DICTIONARY ENTRY

amo, amare, amavi, amatus
FIRST PRINCIPLE PART: This part is the rst person singular of the verb in the present tense “I love”. When looking up an unknown word you should always be looking for this rst part. SECOND PRINCIPLE PART: This part is the in nitive “to love”. This part is useful because after you take o the “re” you add personal endings to make present, imperfect, and future tense verbs. THIRD PRINCIPLE PART: This part is the rst person singular perfect “I have loved”. This part is useful because you use it to make verbs in the perfect, future perfect, or pluperfect. FOURTH PRINCIPAL PART: This part is a verbal adjective. It is called the Perfect Passive Participle. It ends in 'us' and is translated as 'having been...ed'. e.g. amatus having been loved. Reading a Latin dictionary entry is easy once you know what to expect. A good Latin dictionary entry will give you all the information you need to understand and use a Latin word. Use this sheet to help you with how this resource works.

puella, ae f.
NOMINATIVE SINGULAR of the noun “a girl”. When looking up a new word always look for the rst part. First and second nouns have easy nominatives. However nouns in the third may look very di erent. GENITIVE SINGULAR of the noun “of the girl”. This part is important. It is the part the endings are added to. This is very important in the third when the nominative and genitive do not look the same. vox, vocis f voice. GENDER: It is easy to tell the gender of rst and second nouns, but you must check the third. There are three genders masculine, feminine, and neuter. Sometimes you may see a C which means common gender.

bonus, -a, -um
The FIRST PART is the masculine singular nominative form of the adjective. Most adjectives will look like the one above and act like a rst or second noun. However sometimes the adjective may have an “-is” and act like a third. The SECOND PART is the feminine singular nominative. Some adjectives have three endings and some do not. If an adjective only has two endings “fortis, e” the rst ending works for both masculine and feminine. The THIRD PART is the neuter nominative singular of the noun. Remember that the neuter rule also applies to adjectives as well. The endings for the neuter nominative and accusative are the same.

DICTIONARY ENTRY
amo, amare, amavi, amatus
FIRST PRINCIPLE PART: This part is the rst person singular of the verb in the present tense “I love”. When looking up an unknown word you should always be looking for this rst part. SECOND PRINCIPLE PART: This part is the in nitive “to love”. This part is useful because after you take o the “re” you add personal endings to make present, imperfect, and future tense verbs. THIRD PRINCIPLE PART: This part is the rst person singular perfect “I have loved”. This part is useful because you use it to make verbs in the perfect, future perfect, or pluperfect. FOURTH PRINCIPAL PART: This part is a verbal adjective. It is called the Perfect Passive Participle. It ends in 'us' and is translated as 'having been...ed'. e.g. amatus having been loved. Reading a Latin dictionary entry is easy once you know what to expect. A good Latin dictionary entry will give you all the information you need to understand and use a Latin word. Use this sheet to help you with how this resource works.

puella, ae f.
NOMINATIVE SINGULAR of the noun “a girl”. When looking up a new word always look for the rst part. First and second nouns have easy nominatives. However nouns in the third may look very di erent. GENITIVE SINGULAR of the noun “of the girl”. This part is important. It is the part the endings are added to. This is very important in the third when the nominative and genitive do not look the same. vox, vocis f voice. GENDER: It is easy to tell the gender of rst and second nouns, but you must check the third. There are three genders masculine, feminine, and neuter. Sometimes you may see a C which means common gender.

bonus, -a, -um
The FIRST PART is the masculine singular nominative form of the adjective. Most adjectives will look like the one above and act like a rst or second noun. However sometimes the adjective may have an “-is” and act like a third. The SECOND PART is the feminine singular nominative. Some adjectives have three endings and some do not. If an adjective only has two endings “fortis, e” the rst ending works for both masculine and feminine. The THIRD PART is the neuter nominative singular of the noun. Remember that the neuter rule also applies to adjectives as well. The endings for the neuter nominative and accusative are the same.

DICTIONARY ENTRY
amo, amare, amavi, amatus
FIRST PRINCIPLE PART: This part is the rst person singular of the verb in the present tense “I love”. When looking up an unknown word you should always be looking for this rst part. SECOND PRINCIPLE PART: This part is the in nitive “to love”. This part is useful because after you take o the “re” you add personal endings to make present, imperfect, and future tense verbs. THIRD PRINCIPLE PART: This part is the rst person singular perfect “I have loved”. This part is useful because you use it to make verbs in the perfect, future perfect, or pluperfect. FOURTH PRINCIPAL PART: This part is a verbal adjective. It is called the Perfect Passive Participle. It ends in 'us' and is translated as 'having been...ed'. e.g. amatus having been loved. Reading a Latin dictionary entry is easy once you know what to expect. A good Latin dictionary entry will give you all the information you need to understand and use a Latin word. Use this sheet to help you with how this resource works.

puella, ae f.
NOMINATIVE SINGULAR of the noun “a girl”. When looking up a new word always look for the rst part. First and second nouns have easy nominatives. However nouns in the third may look very di erent. GENITIVE SINGULAR of the noun “of the girl”. This part is important. It is the part the endings are added to. This is very important in the third when the nominative and genitive do not look the same. vox, vocis f voice. GENDER: It is easy to tell the gender of rst and second nouns, but you must check the third. There are three genders masculine, feminine, and neuter. Sometimes you may see a C which means common gender.

bonus, -a, -um
The FIRST PART is the masculine singular nominative form of the adjective. Most adjectives will look like the one above and act like a rst or second noun. However sometimes the adjective may have an “-is” and act like a third. The SECOND PART is the feminine singular nominative. Some adjectives have three endings and some do not. If an adjective only has two endings “fortis, e” the rst ending works for both masculine and feminine. The THIRD PART is the neuter nominative singular of the noun. Remember that the neuter rule also applies to adjectives as well. The endings for the neuter nominative and accusative are the same.

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