Bureau of Labor Market Information Division of Research and Statistics

Andrew M. Cuomo, Governor Colleen C. Gardner, Commissioner

Significant Industries
A Report to the Workforce Development System

New York City | 2011

www.labor.state.ny.us
(1/2011)
The New York State Department of Labor is an Equal Opportunity Employer/Program. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to individuals with disabilities.

Preface One of the major objectives of the workforce development system is to encourage local workforce investment boards (LWIBs) to plan strategically and focus their resources in priority industries (and eventually on priority occupations within those industries). To assist in these efforts, the New York State Department of Labor’s Division of Research and Statistics decided to concentrate this report on industries identified as “significant industries.” Industries presented here are classified according to their North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code. This report lists significant industries based on various criteria. We hope the Workforce Investment Board, as well as others involved in the workforce system, may find it helpful in allocating their limited resources. Significant industries were identified on the basis of job counts, wage levels, job growth (both net and percent) over the 2006-2009 period, and expected job growth based on industry employment projections through 2016. Priority industries that may have been designated as such by economic development or workforce development officials were also considered. New York City Industries Twelve industries are designated as significant in this report. Ten of these industries managed to increase their employment levels between 2006 and 2009, despite the onset of a severe recession. In addition, 11 of these 12 industries are expected to grow faster than the overall economy through 2016. Collectively, these 12 industries account for about half the jobs in New York City. All significant industries shared one or more of the following characteristics: rapid growth (percentage basis); large growth (absolute basis); high wages (average weekly wage above the City average of $1,421 in 2009); or strong expected growth through 2016. The specific reason(s) why each industry was designated as significant are presented in the last column of the first table. A broad-based set of industries were identified for this report. They cover eight major industry groups: construction; trade; transportation and utilities; financial activities; professional and business services; educational services; health care and social assistance; leisure and hospitality; and other services. Industry Analysis In the following analysis, industries are presented in ascending NAICS industry code order. For additional information regarding the NAICS industry classification system, visit http://www.census.gov/epcd/naics07/.

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Construction Skilled trades occupations comprise much of the employment within the construction of buildings (NAICS Industry 236) industry. Although construction is a highly cyclical industry, the long-term outlook is strong. Recently, a variety of factors lowered demand for construction work, including heavy layoffs in the industries that use the most office space, tight credit markets and the completion of a large number of projects started during better economic times. While the weakness should last into next year, there are some hopeful signs: both the job and credit markets are improving and several large universities have major expansion plans. Trade, Transportation and Utilities Food and beverages stores (NAICS Industry 445) is the second largest retail industry and has enjoyed strong growth in recent years. Expansion by national chains -- Costco, Whole Foods, BJ’s Wholesale, etc. -- played a key role in the recent job gains. Unlike many industries in this sector, food and beverage stores generally perform well during economic downturns. Financial Activities The securities, commodity contracts, and other financial investments industry (NAICS Industry 523) is a part of the broader financial activities supersector. Jobs in this industry are heavily concentrated geographically – 90 percent of jobs in securities, commodity contracts, and other financial investments are in New York City and most of the rest are located in the Long Island and Hudson Valley regions. Although this industry is highly cyclical -- going through repeated boom and bust cycles -- it has grown over time. Currently, employment appears to be stabilizing after severe losses in 20082009. However, the real importance of this industry to the New York City economy is in its high wages. The weekly wage ($5,986) paid in the securities and commodity contracts industry is more than four times the all-industry average ($1,421) for 2009. Professional and Business Services Two industries from the professional and business services sector are on the significant industries list. They are: professional, scientific, and technical services (NAICS Industry 541) and administrative and support services (NAICS Industry 561). Although there are marked differences among these industries, they share one common trait: they tend to sell to other businesses rather than consumers. As a result, employment in these industries reacts very quickly to changing economic trends and often leads shifts in the overall job market. The outlook for this sector has improved greatly in recent months, as a stronger than expected bounce-back in corporate profits led to increased purchases of professional and support services. Professional, scientific, and technical services is the only significant industry that qualified based on all four measures – it added jobs at a faster rate than the total for all industries between 2006 and 2009, it is the City’s second largest industry, it is expected to grow faster than average through 2016, and its average weekly wage is above the New York City average.

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Administrative and support services lost jobs while the New York City total grew between 2006 and 2009. Nonetheless, this category is expected to grow much more rapidly as the economy expands in the coming years. Temporary help agencies are a large part of administrative and support services, which brings down the industry’s overall average wage level, and also contributes to its volatility. Because of their sensitivity to economic trends these two significant industries will offer some of the best opportunities coming out of the recession. Educational Services With more than 325,000 jobs between the public and private sectors, educational services (NAICS Industry 611) is the largest of any significant industry. This sector added jobs (+4.1%) between 2006 and 2009, but is not expected to grow much faster than the City’s economy going forward. Long-term growth in educational services is driven more by demographics than by economic conditions. Trends such as a growing school-age population and an increasing portion of the population attending college drive employment demand. Health Care and Social Assistance Growth in health care industry employment is, like educational services, also driven more by demographics than by overall economic conditions. Many health care occupations are expected to see strong demand over the next decade as the population continues to expand and age. Growth in health care also benefits from continued technological innovation which both creates more demand for health care services and requires new types of technical skills. Laser eye surgery and joint replacement surgery are good examples of this trend. Two health care industries -- ambulatory health care services (NAICS Industry 621) and nursing and residential care facilities (NAICS Industry 623) -- are on the significant industries list. Ambulatory health care services was the fastest-growing significant industry between 2006 and 2009 and is also projected to be the fastest growing through 2016. Nursing and residential care facilities grew at a much slower rate but still outperformed the overall job market and is expected to do so in the future. More than most industries, health care industries offer a wide range of occupational opportunities. There are health care occupations with large numbers of jobs, or occupations that are rapidly growing and require few skills, but offer low wages (home health aides). There are also technical jobs that require some training and offer average pay (dental assistants) and high wage jobs that require considerable training and educational credentials (registered nurses). These industries are also major employers of clerical and administrative workers. Social assistance (NAICS Industry 624) is a large industry that has enjoyed steady growth for many years and is expected to continue to perform well in the future. It is similar to jobs in health care and education in that many of the services this industry provides are not directly tied to the economic cycle, but tend be required even during downturns. For the same reason, it should be expected to perform relatively well during a recovery. However, because a large 3

portion of this industry’s jobs are supported by government spending, it often performs relatively poorly in the early phases of a recovery because government revenues have not recovered yet. Leisure & Hospitality Two industries from this sector -- accommodation (NAICS Industry 721) and food services and drinking places (NAICS Industry 722) – are on the significant industries list. Accommodation is on the significant industries list because it experienced above-average job growth. The outlook is also positive, as jobs are expected to grow faster than the overall economy through 2016. Food services and drinking places added the most jobs of any significant industry, and is expected to grow somewhat faster than the overall economy going forward. This industry has the lowest average weekly wage of all 12 significant industries. Many of its largest occupations require only short-term training and offer wages well below the median wage for all occupations. However, food services and drinking places also offers considerable opportunity for advancement to a higher-paying supervisory position. Leisure and hospitality, which is usually hurt by national recessions, has performed well during this downturn. Job gains in this sector were helped by New York City’s growing popularity as a tourist destination, aggressive price cuts by hotels and restaurants, and a steady stream of new hotel openings. Going forward, rising corporate profits should lead to a recovery in business travel. Other Services Other services is a mix of personal and laundry services, auto repair, religious and charitable organizations, and business and civic associations. The largest industry in this sector, religious, grantmaking, civic, professional and similar organizations (NAICS 813), is on the significant industries list. In recent years, this sector has been a slow but steady source of new jobs. It is also expected to grow at a moderately above-average rate through 2016. While this industry employs a wide variety of occupations – everything from clergy to public relations specialists – it is also a large employer of clerical and administrative workers.

For Further Information It is hoped that the members of the workforce system find the information in this report useful. The New York State Department of Labor’s New York City labor market analyst, James Brown, is available for consultation. He can be reached via email at James.Brown@labor.ny.gov or by phone at (212) 775-3330. The statewide report entitled “Significant Industries in New York: A Report to the Workforce Development System” may be found at http://www.labor.ny.gov/stats/index.shtm.

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Significant Industries, New York City, 2010
Average Weekly Wage: 2009 Projected % Change in Jobs: 2006-2016 Why Industry is Significant*

Job Count NAICS Industry Name 2006 2009

Net Change in Jobs: 2006 - 2009

% Change in Jobs: 2006 - 2009

236 445 523 541 561 611 621 623 624 721 722 813

Total, all industries Construction of Buildings Food and Beverage Stores Securities and Commodities Contracts Professional and Technical Services Administrative and Support Services Educational Services Ambulatory Health Care Services Nursing and Residential Care Facilities Social Assistance Accommodation Food Services and Drinking Places Religious, Grantmaking, Civic, Professional, and Similar Organizations

3,552,999 30,386 59,489 175,977 309,276 177,553 312,795 150,533 83,079 156,191 38,895 178,504 65,586

3,564,126 32,728 64,180 165,029 314,578 170,427 325,550 168,713 85,670 161,489 40,500 197,466 68,737

11,127 2,342 4,691 -10,948 5,302 -7,126 12,755 18,180 2,591 5,298 1,605 18,962 3,151

0.3% 7.7% 7.9% -6.2% 1.7% -4.0% 4.1% 12.1% 3.1% 3.4% 4.1% 10.6% 4.8%

$1,421 $1,325 $471 $5,986 $2,017 $896 $933 $921 $784 $533 $946 $454 $1,075

7.4% 14.4% -2.2% 22.4% 24.2% 11.1% 9.7% 34.4% 14.4% 21.0% 10.0% 9.2% 11.0%

NA G,P G J, P, W G, J, P, W J G, J G, J, P G, P G, J, P G G, J G

*Key: G: Industry experienced above-average job growth; can be net or percentage growth. J: Industry employs a significant number of jobs (>100,000). P: Growth projected for 2006-2016 is at least twice the all industries rate. W: Industry pays above-average wages.

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Construction of Buildings
(NAICS Industry 236)
Industry Description: The work performed by establishments in this industry may include new work, additions, alterations, or maintenance and repairs. The on-site assembly of precut, panelized, and prefabricated buildings and construction of temporary buildings are included in this subsector. Part or all of the production work for which the establishments in this subsector have responsibility may be subcontracted to other construction establishments — usually specialty trade contractors. Ten Most Common Occupations for Construction of Buildings (NAICS Industry 236)
Occupation’s Median Annual Wage in this Industry $47,992 $55,843 Projected Employment Change (%), 2006-2016 8.5% 9.0%

Rank 1 2

SOC Code 47-2031 47-2061

Occupational Title Carpenters Construction Laborers First-Line Supervisors-Managers of Construction Trades and Extraction Workers Construction Managers Helpers—Carpenters Secretaries, Except Legal, Medical, and Executive Bookkeeping, Accounting, and Auditing Clerks Executive Secretaries and Administrative Assistants Cost Estimators Painters, Construction and Maintenance

% of Workers 30.5% 15.5%

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

47-1011 11-9021 47-3012 43-6014 43-3031 43-6011 13-1051 47-2141

7.5% 5.7% 4.6% 3.7% 2.7% 2.4% 2.3% 2.3%

$76,222 $129,238 $25,174 $25,985 $45,318 $60,624 $73,900 $22,318

9.4% 9.1% 12.9% -1.4% 8.0% 10.9% 17.8% 7.3%

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Food and Beverage Stores
(NAICS Industry 445)
Industry Description: Firms in this industry usually retail food and beverages merchandise from fixed point-of-sale locations. Establishments have special equipment (e.g., freezers, refrigerated display cases, refrigerators) for displaying food and beverage goods. Staff are trained in the processing of food products to guarantee the proper storage and sanitary conditions. Ten Most Common Occupations for Food and Beverage Stores (NAICS Industry 445)
Occupation’s Median Annual Wage in this Industry $17,226 $18,300 $18,112 $29,418 $31,285 $22,709 $19,286 $21,279 $67,577 $27,550 Projected Employment Change (%), 2006-2016 -2.9% -12.2% 10.2% 3.7% -3.7% 15.1% 0.5% -19.0% -1.9% -3.5%

Rank 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

SOC Code 41-2011 43-5081 35-2021 41-1011 51-3021 43-4051 51-3022 53-7064 11-1021 51-3011 Cashiers

Occupational Title

% of Workers 34.1% 18.9% 8.8% 5.0% 3.0% 2.8% 2.4% 2.3% 2.3% 1.6%

Stock Clerks and Order Fillers Food Preparation Workers First-Line Supervisors-Managers of Retail Sales Workers Butchers and Meat Cutters Customer Service Representatives Meat, Poultry, and Fish Cutters and Trimmers Packers and Packagers, Hand General and Operations Managers Bakers

7

Securities and Commodity Contracts, and Other Financial Investments and Related Activities
(NAICS Industry 523)
Industry Description: Firms in this industry are primarily engaged in one of the following activities: (1) underwriting securities issues and/or making markets for securities and commodities; (2) acting as agents (i.e., brokers) between buyers and sellers of securities and commodities; (3) providing securities and commodity exchange services; and (4) providing other services, such as managing portfolios of assets; providing investment advice; and trust, fiduciary, and custody services. Ten Most Common Occupations for Securities and Commodity Contracts (NAICS Industry 523)
Occupation’s Median Annual Wage in this Industry $130,143 $157,155* $107,473 $160,261 $66,376 $42,848 $48,981 $88,006 Projected Employment Change (%), 2006-2016 11.6% 11.3% 17.4% 19.4% 10.9% 15.1% 5.8% 15.8%

Rank 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

SOC Code 41-3031 11-3031 13-2051 13-2052 43-6011 43-4051 43-4011 13-2011

Occupational Title Securities, Commodities, and Financial Services Sales Agents Financial Managers Financial Analysts Personal Financial Advisors Executive Secretaries and Administrative Assistants Customer Service Representatives Brokerage Clerks Accountants and Auditors

% of Workers 12.6% 9.1% 8.9% 8.7% 7.0% 5.0% 4.6% 3.3%

Computer Software Engineers, 9 15-1031 Applications 3.1% $100,087 NA First-Line Supervisors-Managers of Office and Administrative Support 10 43-1011 Workers 2.6% $76,788 1.1% * The wage for the industry is not releasable; the all-industry wage for the region is shown instead. NA - Not Available

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Professional and Technical Services
(NAICS Industry 541)
Industry Description: Establishments in this industry group are engaged in processes where “human capital” is the major input. Firms make available the knowledge and skills of their employees, often on an assignment basis, where an individual or team is responsible for the delivery of services to the client. The distinguishing feature of this industry group is firms within it are almost wholly dependent on worker skills. Thus, firms here are selling expertise. Examples include legal, accounting, architectural, advertising, scientific R&D, and other professional services. Ten Most Common Occupations for Professional and Technical Services (NAICS Industry 541)
Occupation’s Median Annual Wage in this Industry $163,410* $81,646 $51,518 $68,929 $55,085 $41,025 $23,870 $35,689 $56,514 Projected Employment Change (%), 2006-2016 8.6% 15.8% 9.6% 20.5% 10.9% 8.0% 5.8% -1.4% 20.0%

Rank 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

SOC Code 23-1011 13-2011 43-6012 23-2011 43-6011 43-3031 43-9061 43-6014 41-3011 Lawyers

Occupational Title

% of Workers 7.9% 5.9% 4.7% 3.8% 3.2% 3.0% 2.9% 2.8% 2.6%

Accountants and Auditors Legal Secretaries Paralegals and Legal Assistants Executive Secretaries and Administrative Assistants Bookkeeping, Accounting, and Auditing Clerks Office Clerks, General Secretaries, Except Legal, Medical, and Executive Advertising Sales Agents

10 15-1021 Computer Programmers 2.3% $76,041 -6.2% * The wage for the industry is not releasable; the all-industry wage for the region is shown instead.

9

Administrative and Support Services
(NAICS Industry 561)
Industry Description: Establishments in this industry support the day-to-day operations of other organizations. The processes employed in this sector (e.g., general management, personnel administration, clerical activities, cleaning activities) are often used by businesses found throughout the economy. Many of the activities performed in this group were once done by businesses themselves. Recently, however, many businesses have “outsourced” these activities to third-party contractors. Activities in this sector are typically on a contract or fee basis. Ten Most Common Occupations for Administrative and Support Services (NAICS Industry 561)
Occupation’s Median Annual Wage in this Industry $23,886 $26,556 $32,243 $24,162 $35,961 $49,216 $36,094 $31,084 $23,997 $23,845 Projected Employment Change (%), 2006-2016 9.7% 7.5% 6.3% 5.8% -1.4% 10.9% 10.5% 15.1% -8.6% -12.2%

Rank 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

SOC Code 33-9032 37-2011 37-3011 43-9061 43-6014 43-6011 43-3011 43-4051 53-7062 41-9041

Occupational Title Security Guards Janitors and Cleaners, Except Maids and Housekeeping Cleaners Landscaping and Groundskeeping Workers Office Clerks, General Secretaries, Except Legal, Medical, and Executive Executive Secretaries and Administrative Assistants Bill and Account Collectors Customer Service Representatives Laborers and Freight, Stock, and Material Movers, Hand Telemarketers

% of Workers 14.0% 13.4% 4.9% 3.1% 2.9% 2.3% 2.2% 2.1% 2.0% 1.9%

10

Educational Services
(NAICS Industry 611)
Industry Description: Industries in this group provide instruction and training in a wide variety of subjects. The instruction and training is provided by specialized establishments, such as schools, colleges, universities, and training centers. Ten Most Common Occupations for Educational Services (NAICS Industry 611)
Occupation’s Median Annual Wage in this Industry $63,836** $26,687* $65,188** $85,210 $65,269** $48,106 $29,302 $30,952 $28,139 Projected Employment Change (%), 2006-2016 NA NA NA NA NA 7.1% 9.4% 7.5% 5.8%

Rank 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

SOC Code 25-2021 25-9041 25-2031 25-1199 25-2022 25-3099 39-9011 37-2011 43-9061

Occupational Title Elementary School Teachers, Except Special Education Teacher Assistants Secondary School Teachers, Except Special and Vocational Education Postsecondary Teachers, All Other Middle School Teachers, Except Special and Vocational Education Teachers and Instructors, All Other Child Care Workers Janitors and Cleaners, Except Maids and Housekeeping Cleaners Office Clerks, General

% of Workers 10.1% 10.0% 8.0% 5.9% 4.3% 4.3% 3.2% 3.1% 2.6%

Secretaries, Except Legal, Medical, 10 43-6014 and Executive 2.5% $45,684 -1.4% * The wage for the industry is not releasable; the all-industry wage for the region is shown instead. ** The wage for the industry is not releasable; the statewide wage for the region is shown instead. NA – Not Available

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Ambulatory Health Care Services
(NAICS Industry 621)
Industry Description: Ambulatory Health Care Services establishments provide health care services directly or indirectly to ambulatory patients and do not usually provide inpatient services. Health practitioners in this group provide outpatient services, with the facilities and equipment not usually being the most significant part of the production process. Ten Most Common Occupations for Ambulatory Health Care Services (NAICS Industry 621)
Occupation’s Median Annual Wage in this Industry $19,078 $28,814 $32,322 $81,902 $130,197* $30,148 $33,580 $21,369 Projected Employment Change (%), 2006-2016 40.8% 12.7% -1.4% 13.4% 4.5% 33.7% 28.3% 34.4%

Rank 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

SOC Code 31-1011 43-4171 43-6014 29-1111 29-1069 31-9092 31-9091 39-9021

Occupational Title Home Health Aides Receptionists and Information Clerks Secretaries, Except Legal, Medical, and Executive Registered Nurses Physicians and Surgeons, All Other Medical Assistants Dental Assistants Personal and Home Care Aides First-Line Supervisors-Managers of Office and Administrative Support Workers

% of Workers 14.3% 7.9% 6.9% 6.7% 4.2% 4.2% 3.9% 3.7%

9

43-1011

3.4%

$56,567

1.1%

Licensed Practical and Licensed 10 29-2061 Vocational Nurses 3.1% $47,023 8.9% * The wage for the industry is not releasable; the all-industry wage for the region is shown instead.

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Nursing and Residential Care Facilities
(NAICS Industry 623)
Industry Description: Nursing and Residential Care Facilities provide residential care combined with either nursing, supervisory, or other types of care as required by the residents. Here, the facilities are a significant part of the production process and the care provided is a mix of health and social services with the health services being largely some level of nursing services. Ten Most Common Occupations for Nursing and Residential Care Facilities (NAICS Industry 623)
Occupation’s Median Annual Wage in this Industry $35,168 $24,942 $49,055 $79,735 $33,359 $34,714 $26,971 $31,594 $29,650 $28,269 Projected Employment Change (%), 2006-2016 9.9% 40.8% 8.9% 13.4% 6.8% 10.2% 9.4% NA 7.3% 17.4%

Rank 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

SOC Code 31-1012 31-1011 29-2061 29-1111 37-2012 35-2021 39-9011 21-1015 39-9032

Occupational Title Nursing Aides, Orderlies, and Attendants Home Health Aides Licensed Practical and Licensed Vocational Nurses Registered Nurses Maids and Housekeeping Cleaners Food Preparation Workers Child Care Workers Rehabilitation Counselors Recreation Workers Social and Human Service Assistants

% of Workers 21.1% 15.0% 7.0% 6.1% 3.9% 3.5% 3.4% 3.1% 2.0% 1.6%

10 21-1093 NA – Not Available

13

Social Assistance
(NAICS Industry 624)
Industry Description: Establishments in the Social Assistance industry provide a wide variety of social assistance services directly to their clients. These services do not include residential or accommodation services, except on a short stay basis. Ten Most Common Occupations for Social Assistance (NAICS Industry 624)
Occupation’s Median Annual Wage in this Industry $22,594 $22,202 $23,407 $35,739 $29,315 $20,936 $33,038 $40,168 $23,814 $24,310 Projected Employment Change (%), 2006-2016 34.4% 40.8% NA 7.4% 17.4% 9.4% NA NA 7.3% 7.5%

Rank 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

SOC Code 39-9021 31-1011 25-9041 25-2011 21-1093 39-9011 21-1015 21-1021 39-9032

Occupational Title Personal and Home Care Aides Home Health Aides Teacher Assistants Preschool Teachers, Except Special Education Social and Human Service Assistants Child Care Workers Rehabilitation Counselors Child, Family, and School Social Workers Recreation Workers Janitors and Cleaners, Except Maids and Housekeeping Cleaners

% of Workers 21.0% 8.8% 8.7% 7.3% 4.7% 3.5% 3.2% 3.1% 2.4% 1.9%

10 37-2011 NA – Not Available

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Accommodation
(NAICS Industry 721)
Industry Description: Establishments in the Accommodation industry provide lodging or short-term accommodations for travelers, vacationers, and others. There is a wide range of establishments in the industry. Some provide lodging only; while others provide meals, laundry services, and recreational facilities as well as lodging. Lodging establishments may even generate more revenue from the provision of complementary services. Ten Most Common Occupations for Accommodation (NAICS Industry 721)
Occupation’s Median Annual Wage in this Industry $40,739 $34,936 $37,201 $47,064 $41,627 $48,626 $28,734 $29,182 $40,108 $43,973 Projected Employment Change (%), 2006-2016 6.8% 13.8% 8.7% 6.2% 7.5% 9.5% 1.9% 9.4% 5.9% 8.6%

Rank 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

SOC Code 37-2012 43-4081 35-3031 49-9042 37-2011 35-2014 39-6011 35-9011 35-3041 35-3011

Occupational Title Maids and Housekeeping Cleaners Hotel, Motel, and Resort Desk Clerks Waiters and Waitresses Maintenance and Repair Workers, General Janitors and Cleaners, Except Maids and Housekeeping Cleaners Cooks, Restaurant Baggage Porters and Bellhops Dining Room and Cafeteria Attendants and Bartender Helpers Food Servers, Non-restaurant Bartenders

% of Workers 25.5% 9.4% 7.6% 4.7% 4.0% 3.2% 3.1% 2.3% 2.0% 1.9%

15

Food Services and Drinking Places
(NAICS Industry 722)
Industry Description: Businesses in the Food Services and Drinking Places industry prepare meals, snacks, and beverages to customer order for immediate on-premises and off-premises consumption. There is a wide range of establishments in this industry. Some provide food and drink only; while others provide various combinations of seating space, waiter/waitress services and incidental amenities, such as limited entertainment. The industry includes full-service restaurants; limited-service eating places; special food services, such as food service contractors, caterers, and mobile food services; and drinking places. Ten Most Common Occupations for Food Services and Drinking Places (NAICS Industry 722)
Occupation’s Median Annual Wage in this Industry $24,926 $17,006 $19,127 Projected Employment Change (%), 2006-2016 8.7% 17.0% 10.2%

Rank 1 2 3

SOC Code 35-3031 35-3021 35-2021

Occupational Title Waiters and Waitresses Combined Food Preparation and Serving Workers, Including Fast Food Food Preparation Workers First-Line Supervisors-Managers of Food Preparation and Serving Workers Cooks, Restaurant Counter Attendants, Cafeteria, Food Concession, and Coffee Shop Dishwashers Cooks, Fast Food Bartenders Dining Room and Cafeteria Attendants and Bartender Helpers

% of Workers 22.3% 14.1% 7.6%

4 5 6 7 8 9 10

35-1012 35-2014 35-3022 35-9021 35-2011 35-3011 35-9011

7.4% 6.9% 6.4% 6.2% 5.0% 4.4% 3.5%

$30,818 $26,237 $19,887 $17,952 $18,804 $22,330 $18,342

9.4% 9.5% 7.2% 7.5% 7.1% 8.6% 9.4%

16

Religious, Grantmaking, Civic, Professional, and Similar Organizations
(NAICS Industry 813)
Industry Description: Organizations in the Religious, Grantmaking, Civic, Professional, and Similar Organizations industry includes these that organize and promote religious activities; support various causes through grantmaking; advocate various social and political causes; and promote and defend the interests of their members.
Ten Most Common Occupations for Religious, Grantmaking, Civic, Professional, and Similar Organizations (NAICS Industry 813)

Rank 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

SOC Code 43-6014 13-1079 21-2011 43-6011 37-2011 25-3021 43-9061 39-9011 43-3031 27-3031

Occupational Title Secretaries, Except Legal, Medical, and Executive Human Resources, Training, and Labor Relations Specialists, All Other Clergy Executive Secretaries and Administrative Assistants Janitors and Cleaners, Except Maids and Housekeeping Cleaners Self-Enrichment Education Teachers Office Clerks, General Child Care Workers Bookkeeping, Accounting, and Auditing Clerks Public Relations Specialists

% of Workers 7.1% 5.6% 5.4% 4.9% 4.5% 4.4% 3.6% 3.4% 3.3% 3.10%

Occupation’s Median Annual Wage in this Industry $31,270 $55,667 $36,400 $47,650 $20,792 $34,922 $20,904 $22,389 $39,738 $75,889

Projected Employment Change (%), 2006-2016 -1.4% 6.6% 13.5% 10.9% 7.5% 14.1% 5.8% 9.4% 8.0% 18.7%

17