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SEPTEMBER 5-11, 2012
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Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
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Editorials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
INSIDE THIS ISSUE
Fun with fiddles
Howell Living History Farm
hosts contest. PAGE 2
School welcomes new theater teacher
BY HEATHER FIORE
The Hopewell Sun
When John Zisa was engulfed
in show business, performing at
Radio City Music Hall, directing
various plays and musicals, and
auditioning for American Idol in
front of critically acclaimed
judge Simon Cowell, he probably
never thought the next step in his
journey would be as Hopewell
Valley Central High Schools
(HVCHS) new Theater Arts
teacher.
Zisa, a 33 year-old Hackensack
native, has been performing on
prestigious stages since he was 8
years old.
His pretty impressive rsum,
which could certainly title him as
a seasoned veteran of the indus-
try, details his ventures with
Radio City Music Halls Christ-
mas Spectacular, along with nu-
merous performances in New
York City and the surrounding
areas, commercial appearances,
singing ventures, and his audi-
tion for American Idol, where he
sang his way into the top 20 male
singers before exiting the show.
I auditioned on a whim, and
did so much better than I thought
I would, Zisa said. It was sort of
like an out-of-body experience for
me, seeing these people in the
flesh that you see on TV all the
time.
Since Zisa has been acting, di-
Special to The Sun
John Zisa, Hopewell Valley Central High Schools new theater arts teacher, directed a variety of plays at other venues throughout his career,
including this performance of Aida at Hackensack High School in 2009.
please see ZISA, page 6
2 THE HOPEWELL SUN SEPTEMBER 5-11, 2012
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Fiddling front and center at contest
By HEATHER FIORE
The Hopewell Sun
On Saturday, Aug. 25, nearly
1,000 people gathered at Howell
Farm in Hopewell Township to
celebrate the deep-rooted tradi-
tion of fiddling at the 28th annual
Fiddle Contest.
The contest, which is organ-
ized by The Hunterdon Folk Ex-
change in collaboration with the
Friends of Howell Living History
Farm, is the largest and longest
running fiddle contest in New
Jersey and attracts some of the
best fiddlers from throughout the
tri-state area, according to co-or-
ganizer and member of the Hun-
terdon Folk Exchange Greg
Myers.
The contest started back in
early 1980s by Bill Huber, who
was a fiddler and whos now
passed away, and it was very
small at first, he said. Back
then, New Jersey didnt have
much of a fiddle contest, so Bill
decided to start one and it grew
over the years. Now, theres a few
contests in New Jersey, but this
one is the oldest.
Myers, who has been helping
organize the contest for about 15
years, lends most of the credit to
Carol Behrens, co-organizer and
member of the Hunterdon Folk
Exchange, who has been involved
with the contest since its begin-
ning.
She should get a lot of credit
for keeping it going after Bills
death, Myers said.
Myers also explained some of
the history behind the contest
and how it came to initiation
nearly 30 years ago.
Fiddle contests are an old tra-
dition that date back to the early
1800s, he said. Its a chance for
fiddlers to get together and share
information, learn new tunes,
and have a chance to play because
a lot of fiddlers work really hard
on their fiddling, and they dont
get to play much in front of audi-
ences. So, this gives them a
chance and encourages them to
keep playing the fiddle and get-
ting better at it.
Howell Farm Director Pete
please see HOWELL, page 7
SEPTEMBER 5-11, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 3
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Celebrating 40 Years of Realizing the
Gifts and Great Promise of
Children who Learn Differently
Lewis Middle School Students
Samantha, Jamie, and Jennifer
Open House:
Saturday, September 22 at 10:00 a.m.
53 Bayard Lane 609-924-8120 lewisschool.org
This information was provided
to The Sun by the Hopewell Town-
ship Police Department:
On Aug. 18 at 4:37 p.m., a 27-
year-old male was operating a
2001 Volkswagen GTI and travel-
ing with a 27-year-old female
northbound on Route 29 in the
area of Valley Road. A 31-year-old
male was operating a 1999
Chevrolet Malibu southbound on
route 29 at the same time. Witness
accounts report the Chevrolet
crossed over into the lane of the
Volkswagen and the two vehicles
struck head on. The 31-year-old
male was not able to provide a
statement at the time of the colli-
sion.
Both 27-year-olds were taken to
Capital Health Systems Helene
Fuld Campus by ambulance. The
31-year-old man was extricated
from the Chevrolet Malibu by
Union Fire and EMS of Titusville
and then flown to Capital Health
Systems Helene Fuld Campus by
North Star helicopter. Para-
medics from Capital Health Sys-
tems and the New Hope Lam-
bertville Rescue Squad assisted
with the care of the involved per-
sons. All injuries are reported to
be non-life threatening at this
time.
The collision is under investi-
gation by Officer Francis Tulko of
the Hopewell Township Police De-
partment. Route 29 was closed for
approximately two hours.
West Amwell and Lambertville
Police assisted with the traffic de-
tours.
Accident injures three,
closes Route 29
Please recycle this newspaper.
4 THE HOPEWELL SUN SEPTEMBER 5-11, 2012
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Order Sheds Now
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Alexa Maher, a resident of
Hopewell, received a Bachelor of
Science from Roger Williams Uni-
versity.
Noah Hamdan, a resident of
Hopewell, received a BFA degree
in Visual Effects from the Savan-
nah College of Art and Design.
on campus
PROFESSIONAL WEBSITES.
PEASANT PRICES.
Addiction Hotline
of New Jersey
(800) 238-2333
PSA
Poison Control Center
(800) 222-1222
PSA
SEPTEMBER 5-11, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 5
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Cooperating Agencies: Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and
County Boards of Chosen Freeholders. Rutgers Cooperative Extension a unit of the New Jersey Agricul-
tural Experimental Station, is an equal opportunity program provider and employer. Contact your local
Extension Office for information regarding special needs or accommodations. Contact the State Exten-
sion Director's Office if you have concerns related to discrimination, 732-932-5000, ext. 584.
Save MARCH 16, 2013 for our Garden Symposium
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2012
1:00 PM 4:00 PM
Bees, Butterflies, Bugs Galore, Bats and Birds too!
Puppet Show Games in the Gardens
Insect Hunt Q&A with Barbara J. Bromley
Back this year: Bugs in Water
And Hayrides on the Lawrence Hopewell Trail!
Mercer Educational Gardens
431A Federal City Road, Pennington, NJ
On-site parking
FREE!
A talk about enamel buttons
will be presented by the New Jer-
sey State Button Society (NJSBS)
at its Fall Show and Competition
on Saturday, Sept. 8, at the Union
Fire Company fire hall located at
1396 River Road (Route 29) in Ti-
tusville, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Karen L. Cohen, a studio-but-
ton artist, will give a talk entitled
Enamel Identification: Perspec-
tives from a Modern Enamellist
at 1:30 p.m., when she will discuss
the differences between enamel
work, which is fired in hot-tem-
perature kilns versus cold enamel
applications.
According to the Big Book of
Buttons, true enameling is an an-
cient technique, whereby a
glassy powder is fused by heat
onto a metal surface, usually gold,
silver, brass or copper.
There are four principal meth-
ods of enameling, each differing
in the way the metal is prepared
to receive the glaze: Cloisonne,
Champleve, Basse-Taille and
Plique-a-Jour. With painted enam-
els, none of the metal surface is
separated by metal partitions.
The NJSBS show is held twice
a year for New Jersey and tri-
state button enthusiasts who
enjoy the artwork and history of
buttons, including their manufac-
ture and design. Throughout the
day there will be a variety of ac-
tivities, including the judging of
button trays entered into compe-
tition, and a button raffle.
The event is open to the gener-
al public, although there is a $2
door fee for all attendees. Coffee
and luncheon items can be pur-
chased on site. The Union Fire
Company & Rescue Squad build-
ing is located at the intersection
of Route 29 and Park Lake Av-
enue in Titusville, opposite the
Delaware River and D&R Canal
State Park (within easy access to
the canal park), a half mile north
of Washington Crossing State
Park in Hopewell Township, and
some five miles south of Lam-
bertville and New Hope, Pa.
For more information, contact
Lillian Buirkle, at (732) 691-1776 or
buttonlady@optonline.net.
Button business: Talk, fall show
and competition planned on Sept. 8
6 THE HOPEWELL SUN SEPTEMBER 5-11, 2012
20 Nassau Street, Suite 26A
Princeton, NJ 08542
609-751-0245
The Sun is published weekly by Elauwit
Media LLC, 20 Nassau Street, Suite 26A,
Princeton, NJ 08542. It is mailed weekly to
select addresses in the 08560, 08525 and
08534 ZIP codes. If you are not on the mail-
ing list, six-month subscriptions are avail-
able for $39.99. PDFs of the publication are
online, free of charge. For information,
please call 609-751-0245.
To submit a news release, please email
news@hopewellsun.com. For advertising
information, call 609-751-0245 or email
advertising@hopewellsun.com. The Sun
welcomes suggestions and comments from
readers including any information about
errors that may call for a correction to be
printed.
SPEAK UP
The Sun welcomes letters from readers. Brief
and to the point is best, so we look for letters
that are 300 words or fewer. Include your
name, address and phone number. We do not
print anonymous letters. Send letters to
news@hopewellsun.com, via fax at 609-751-
0245, or via the mail. Of course, you can drop
them off at our office, too. The Hopewell Sun
reserves the right to reprint your letter in any
medium including electronically.
PUBLISHER Steve Miller
GENERAL MANAGER & EDITOR Alan Bauer
VICE PRESIDENT OF SALES Joe Eisele
NEWS
MANAGING EDITOR Mary L. Serkalow
PRODUCTION EDITOR Kristen Dowd
HOPEWELL EDITOR Heather Fiore
OPERATIONS
DIGITAL MEDIA DIRECTOR Tim Ronaldson
ART DIRECTOR Tom Engle
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD Russell Cann
CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Barry Rubens
VICE CHAIRMAN Michael LaCount, Ph.D.
ELAUWIT MEDIA GROUP
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD Dan McDonough, Jr.
VICE CHAIRMAN Alan Bauer
W
ere pretty sure that Repub-
lican Party leaders took a
close look at speeches before
they were delivered at the recent con-
vention. Which makes us wonder how
Chris Christies remarks actually saw
the light of day.
Make no mistake, the governor de-
livered a bang-up speech. He spoke of
values, sacrifice and the future of the
nation and his party. He had people
cheering. If theres one thing Christie
does well, its deliver a speech.
But, in his remarks, that Romney
guy seemed to be an afterthought. It
took a long time for the governor to
even mention the GOP nominee. There
was a lot of stuff about Christie, his
views and his vision, but not a lot
about trying to get Mitt Romney elect-
ed president in November.
Christie took some heat for his re-
marks the day after he delivered them.
Were guessing the heat didnt bother
him one bit.
Christies blunt, tell-it-like-he-sees-it
approach is one of the things people
like about the guy. In an era when al-
most every other politician tailors his
or her speech to whomever they are
speaking to, Christie never leaves a
doubt in anyones mind about what he
thinks. Its not always what people
want to hear. But theres something to
be said for a politician not worrying so
much about being popular and just
speaking his mind.
The governors speech certainly was
an accurate introduction to the rest of
the nation. And it set him up well for a
future presidential run perhaps as
early as 2016 should President Obama
win re-election.
Love him or hate him, Christie defi-
nitely would be an interesting presi-
dential candidate. No one will accuse
him of pandering to special interests.
No one will wonder where he stands on
issues or what he would do if elected.
In these days, where politicians
promise one thing and deliver another,
Christies openness and bluntness set
him apart.
in our opinion
Hi, my name is Chris
Governors convention address sets him up for a future presidential bid
Christie in 2016?
The governors speech at the
Republican National Convention last
week was long on vision and short on
politicking. That might not be great for
Mitt Romney, but it could serve Christie
well in four years.
recting, and singing his entire life, he did-
nt acquire the teaching bug until about
seven years ago when he ran into his high
school English teacher, who then offered
him a job at the school.
I kind of laughed at first because teach-
ing wasnt something that I thought about,
although people have always told me that
Id be a good teacher, he said. And, it
wound up being something that I really
loved. I tell people it was by accident, but
Im also one to think that there are no acci-
dents in life, so I think it was meant to be.
With his new position and wealth of ex-
perience, Zisa hopes to help Hopewell stu-
dents find their own amazing experiences
in the world of performing arts. Hell teach
Theater Arts and direct HVCHS yearly
program of two plays and one musical.
What Im really excited about is that
Hopewell already had support and atten-
tion on the arts, so its a really great oppor-
tunity to come somewhere that has a pro-
gram thats so successful, and instead of de-
veloping something or changing some-
thing, I feel like Ill just be able to take it
and continue it in my own aesthetic, he
said. Its a great place to continue the work
thats been done and move forward and
hopefully bring the students a sense of ma-
terial that they havent been exposed to.
Zisa further detailed his mild anxiety,
which many new teachers experience, but
more so how hes anxious to begin teach-
ing and molding the students at HVCHS.
Its tough being the new guy sometimes
with students who dont know you and the
way you work, but I think its easier in a sit-
uation where they already have a good pro-
gram, he said. Its different when there is
no program at all, and you have to use
everything youve got to get them even in-
terested at all. Because theyre already in-
terested in it, I think its a good marriage.
Zisa will begin his term this year, and
was chosen from a pool of 74 applicants, ac-
cording to District Supervisor of Visual
and Performing Arts Peter Griffin, who is
excited to see what Zisa has to offer for
HVCHS students.
He brings a wide range of experience
that will enhance our program and bring it
to the next level, Griffin said. Im confi-
dent hell bring our high school theater
students to new levels of performance that
they never thought possible.
For his part, Zisa detailed how he enjoys
playing a part in kids lives, and some-
times, their futures.
I like being an instrumental part of
young peoples lives at that time when they
are choosing to go down one path or anoth-
er, he said. I enjoy knowing a student is
going on to study theater because I intro-
duced him or her to it, that I actually affect-
ed their path.
I like being in a community that clearly
values the performing arts, he said.
With the kind of support that exists here,
the possibilities really are endless.
Zisa likes being an instrumental part of kids lives
ZISA
Continued from page 1
SEPTEMBER 5-11, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 7
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Watson explained how Howell
Farm has been hosting the con-
test since 1994, and detailed how
the Friends of Howell Living His-
tory Farm became involved.
At Howell Farm, we interpret
the agriculture and lifestyle of a
typical family farm of the area
during the 1890-1910 era by invit-
ing visitors to participate in Liv-
ing History programs that give
them a taste of the early days,
which include the fiddle contest,
he said. The Friends also con-
tribute by offering the childrens
craft, which was a percussion
shaker this year. During the con-
test, the Friends also make and
serve old-fashioned ice cream
using an ice cream freezer pow-
ered by an early gas engine,
which the Friends helped acquire
and restore in the early 1990s.
Howell Farms fiddle contest
drew fiddlers from various states,
including New Jersey, Pennsylva-
nia and New York.
During the contest, the two-
dozen or so fiddlers who compet-
ed were required to play two dif-
ferent tunes of varying tempos.
There were no regional limits to
the type of music the contestants
were able to play, but most fid-
dlers stuck to the traditional fid-
dle music, such as Turkey in the
Straw and other songs that are
generally played at square
dances.
However, some fiddlers also in-
corporated waltz and other kinds
of folk genres like Cajun and
bluegrass tunes.
We try not to be too strict
about it because generally every-
thing falls in the folk category,
Myers said.
Although the contest is loosely
judged based on presentation, im-
itation and performance, Myers
added how the first 20 pre-regis-
tered fiddlers received $50 just for
showing up and playing.
As far as the judging went,
there were three judges who were
responsible for crowning winners
for the adult and junior contests.
The adult contest, which ranked
first through fourth places, gave
fiddlers a chance of winning any-
where from $75 to $175. For the
junior competition, which is basi-
cally to involve the kids and give
them something to participate in,
awarded first through third
places with a grand prize of $30.
Its a lovely afternoon, and its
really fun to see the kids play,
Myers said. People get up there
and play lovely old tunes that
arent heard too much anymore,
and the audience really likes it.
The Foundation of Morris Hall/St. Lawrence Inc. PRESENTS
WITH SPECIAL GUESTS
JODI BENSON SAL VIVIANO
Saturday, September 29, 2012 8:00pm
Patriots Theater at the Trenton War Memorial
Tickets: $35-$85 Visit www.thewarmemorial.com or call 609-791-9451
Patron tickets, including a Champagne Reception with Peter Nero, Ms. Benson and Mr. Viviano
can be purchased by calling 609-896-9500, ext. 2215, or jmiller@slrc.org.
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Howell Farm has hosted
fiddle contest since 1994
HOWELL
Continued from page 2
Send us your
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Drop us an email at
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editor at (609) 751-0245.
WEDNESDAY SEPT. 5
Wednesday Night Out Talk Series:
Joe Pylka will talk about Fall Hik-
ing in Hopewell Valley at 7 p.m.
at the Hopewell Train Station.
Talk will focus on Hopewell Valley
area but will also look at other
key New Jersey trails for the hik-
er or outdoor enthusiast. Pylka is
a Hopewell resident and biologist
with many years experience
teaching outdoor courses in hik-
ing and paddling.
Hopewell Township Zoning Board
meeting: 7:30 p.m. the first
Wednesday of the month in the
Municipal Auditorium. For more
information visit hopewelltwp.
org.
SUNDAY SEPT. 9
Leisurely Guided Hike: All ages. 1
p.m. at the Nayfield Preserve on
Rt. 518, 1.2 miles west of Route 31.
Friends of Hopewell Valley Open
Space leisurely guided hike on
1.5-mile trail through meadow
and forest. For more information
visit www.fohvos.org or call 730-
1560.
Hopewell Presbyterian Church:
Worship service at 10:30 a.m.
Intergenerational Sunday School
from 9 to 10:15 a.m. Coffee fellow-
ship from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
80 West Broad St., Hopewell.
Hopewell United Methodist
Church: Worship service at 10
a.m. Teen/adult education from 9
to 9:45 a.m. Sunday school at 10
a.m. Youth group at 6:30 p.m. 20
Blackwell Ave., Hopewell.
St. Alphonsus Roman Catholic
Church: Mass at 7:30, 9 and 11:15
a.m. 54 East Prospect St.,
Hopewell.
Word Christian Fellowship Interna-
tional: Worship service at 10 a.m.
Sunday school at 10:30 a.m. 44
Van Dyke Road, Hopewell.
MONDAY SEPT. 10
Yoga: 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. at Hopewell
Branch of the Mercer County
Library System. Bring yoga mat
or large towel. Registration
required; call (609) 737-2610.
Tai Chi: 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. at
Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. Learn
this ancient art to promote good
health and relaxation. No regis-
tration required.
Story time: 10:30 a.m. at Hopewell
Public Library. For toddlers and
pre-schoolers. Stories, songs and
fingerplays. Registration is not
required.
Hopewell Township Committee
regular meeting: 7 p.m. at the
Hopewell Municipal Building, 201
Washington Crossing-Pennington
Road. Open to the public. Visit
www.hopewelltwp.org to confirm
time, for agenda or for more
information.
TUESDAY SEPT. 11
Tuesday Night Knitters: 7:30 to 9
p.m. at Hopewell Public Library.
Welcomes knitters of all levels. A
cozy evening of stitching and
conversation.
Yoga: 5 to 6 p.m. at Hopewell Branch
of the Mercer County Library Sys-
tem. Bring yoga mat or large tow-
el. Registration required; call
(609) 737-2610.
Hopewell Township Affordable
Housing Committee meeting: 7
p.m. at the Township Municipal
Building, 201 Washington Cross-
ing-Pennington Road. Visit
www.hopewelltwp.org to confirm
time or for more information.
CALENDAR PAGE 8 SEPTEMBER 5-11, 2012
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609-751-0245 | sales@elauwit.com
www.elauwit.com
Hopewell
Lawrence
Montgomery
Princeton
Robbinsville
West Windsor
1 Tree Farm Road
Pennington, NJ 08534
(609) 730-8700
Hours: Tues-Fri: 10-6pm, Sat: 10-5pm
Metal-eyes
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We welcome children ages
3 through 8th grade to join
our "Kairos" church school
program (10am Sundays).
ST. MATTHIW'S IPISCOPAL CHLRCH
Pennington
{Across Irom Toll Gute Grummur School)
We have wonderful, dedicated teachers and terrific kids!
We extend a heartfelt invitation for you to join us! Please contact
our Director at StMattKairos@verizon.net with any questions.
SEPTEMBER 5-11, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 9
Passenger Tires
Performance Tires
Truck & SUV Tires
Always the BEST PRICE!
No coupons needed!
Commercial
Lawn & Garden
Heavy Equipment
Tractor Tires
Bob-Cats
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1735 North Olden Extension

Ewing, NJ
609-895-8811 HOURS: Mon-Fri 7:30am-5pm Sat 8am-Noon
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Wholesale Tires Open to The Public
WHERE HONESTY AND INTEGRITY COMES FIRST!
Tire mounting on premises.
All major and minor brands.
OVERWHELMED
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We can help.
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(609) 792-0606
Skip the hassle. Just get paid.
The Hopewell Branch of the
Mercer County Library is wel-
coming the Artists Choice back
for its third annual art show in
the librarys community room at
245 Pennington-Titusville Rd. in
Pennington.
The show will be on display for
the entire month of September.
There will be a Meet the Artists
reception on Wednesday, Sept. 12
from 4 p.m. until 6 p.m. Refresh-
ments will be sponsored by Com-
Forcare Senior Services.
The Artists Choice Group is
comprised of local residents who
meet weekly at the Hopewell Val-
ley Senior Center to work on their
art and share ideas. Members of
the group use various media, in-
cluding watercolor, oil, and
acrylics.
Artists featured in the show
will include Bob Barish, Sue
Ewart, Norm Fesmire, Dorothy
Friedman, Bee Hilton, and Gloria
Panebianco.
For more information about
the Artists Choice Group or Art
Show, contact Hopewell Valley
Senior Services at (609) 737-0605,
ext. 692 or email
awaugh@hopewelltwp.org.
Artists Choice show
returns to library
10 THE HOPEWELL SUN SEPTEMBER 5-11, 2012
The Master Gardeners of Mer-
cer County organizations 10th
annual Insect Festival will be
held on Saturday, Sept. 8, from 1
p.m. to 4 p.m. at the Mercer Edu-
cational Gardens located at 431A
Federal City Road in Pennington.
Attendees are invited to view
the seven demonstration gardens
Annual, Butterfly, Cottage,
Herb, Native Plant, Perennial and
Weed ID and talk with Master
Gardeners who will be on hand to
offer tips and display guides for
recognizing some of the pesky as
well as beneficial insects. Every
garden will host an activity that
will entertain and teach children
of all ages about the incredible
and often beautiful insects com-
mon to the Northeast. Admission
to the event is free and on-site
parking is available.
There will be many exciting ac-
tivities offered this year. Viewing
tiny organisms through micro-
scopes at the Bugs in Water activi-
ty will be back again this year.
Enjoy an insect hunt on the paths
cut through the restored meadow
or visit with native and honeybee
experts who can explain why we
need to be less fearful and more
respectful of the most important
pollinators in our ecosystem.
Learn how insect predators, in-
cluding both bats and birds, can
help control insect pest popula-
tions and reduce the use of chem-
ical pesticides. Children will be
able to help paint a mural of the
newly restored meadow, take a
look at red wriggler worms mak-
ing compost in a simple container
that is easy to set up at home, and
join in a bee waggle dance used
by honeybees to communicate
with one another about the loca-
tion of blooming flowers.
Popular events from previous
years will continue butterfly
births, Monarch butterfly tag-
ging, bugs galore (insect inspec-
tion and handling), the insect
puppet show, tattoos, crafts,
hayrides, and Q & A with Barbara
J. Bromley, Mercer County Horti-
culturist.
Local environmental agencies
will also be present with their ex-
perts and displays Rutgers Uni-
versity Entomology faculty;
Stony Brook-Millstone Watershed
Association; Conserve Wildlife,
NJ; Mercer County Soil Conser-
vation; Mercer County Mosquito
Control; NJ Department of Agri-
culture Beneficial Insect Rearing
Laboratory; Mercer County 4H;
and Mercer County Equestrian
Center. The Naturalist from Mer-
cer County Parks will also be
present to lead insect-related ac-
tivities.
The Master Gardeners of Mer-
cer County is a volunteer educa-
tional outreach program of Rut-
gers Cooperative Extension. For
more information on the organi-
zations educational programs
and events, visit www.mgofmc.
org.
Master Gardeners get ready for annual Insect Festival
Bttgt//eIuw.It/stuyvesmtBumt
Located a short distance from Albany, NY. All packages include a
full hunting excursion, licensed guide, field dressing, as well as all
meals and accommodations at our newly remodeled lodge. Fall and
spring turkey, whitetail deer (archery, rifle, muzzleloader), pheasant
(field and tower), coyote, rabbit, waterfowl.
(888} 690-0041
Alcoholics Anonymous
of South Jersey
(856) 486-4444
PSA
Narcotics Anonymous
of New Jersey
(800) 992-0401
PSA
SEPTEMBER 5-11, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 11
This information was provided
to The Sun by the Hopewell Town-
ship Police Department:
On Aug. 1 at noon, Detective
Kevin Zorn charged a 38-year-old
female with forgery and theft. She
was charged after Detective Zorn
investigated the report of a per-
son altering a check from a local
church and cashing it in her own
name for a loss of over $4,500.
This case will be forwarded to the
Mercer County Prosecutors Of-
fice for review.
On Aug. 10 at 11:15 a.m., Officer
James Rosso responded to a Lam-
bertville Hopewell Road address
for the report of criminal mis-
chief. Sometime overnight, some-
one damaged a brick mailbox at
the end of the driveway. The dam-
age was estimated at $2,500.
On Aug. 14 at 10:30 a.m., Detec-
tive Kevin Zorn charged a 22 year-
old male with burglary, theft,
criminal mischief, and posses-
sion of burglar tools. He was
charged after Detective Zorn in-
vestigated a burglary at the Its
Nutts restaurant along Route 29
on Aug. 3. The man is a former
employee of the restaurant. This
case will be forwarded to the Mer-
cer County Prosecutors Office for
review.
On Aug. 16 at 9:15 p.m., Officer
Mandy Grey observed a Nissan
pickup truck traveling along
Scotch Road at 58 mph in a 45
mph zone. Officer Grey stopped
the truck and spoke with the driv-
er, a 21-year-old male. After fur-
ther investigation, the pickup
truck was impounded and a
search warrant was obtained.
Seven baggies containing mari-
juana were located in the truck
with a total weight of approxi-
mately one half pound. He was
charged with the possession of
marijuana with the intent to dis-
tribute, possession of marijuana
(over 50 grams), speeding, failure
to display credentials, and posses-
sion of CDS in a motor vehicle.
This case will be forwarded to the
Mercer County Prosecutors Of-
fice for review.
On Aug. 17 at 3:39 p.m., Officer
Christopher Vaccarino stopped a
car on Columbia Avenue after ob-
serving the driver not wearing a
seatbelt. While speaking with the
driver, a 19-year-old male, Officer
Vaccarino smelled the odor of
raw marijuana coming from the
car. Further investigation found
the man to be in possession of
plastic baggies containing mari-
juana, digital scales, a metal
grinder containing marijuana
residue, and multiple glass pipes
containing marijuana residue. He
was placed under arrest and
transported to police headquar-
ters for processing. He was
charged with the possession of
marijuana with intent to distrib-
ute, possession of marijuana
(over 50 grams), possession of
drug paraphernalia, failure to
wear a seatbelt, and CDS in a
motor vehicle. He was later re-
leased and this case will be for-
warded to the Mercer County
Prosecutors Office for review.
On Aug. 19 at 2:34 a.m., Officer
Joseph McNeil stopped a car
along Route 29 after observing it
traveling at a low rate of speed
and weaving in and out of its
lane. Officer McNeil spoke with
the driver, a 34-year-old male, who
had the odor of alcohol on his
breath. After performing field so-
briety tests, he was placed under
arrest and transported to police
headquarters for processing. He
was charged with DWI, reckless
driving, failure to keep right, and
failure to exhibit credentials,
which will be heard in municipal
court. He was later released to an
acquaintance.
police report
School bells are ringing once
again in Pleasant Valley as the
Howell Living History Farm in-
vites the public to participate in a
unique back to school day on
Saturday, Sept. 8, from 10 a.m.
until 4 p.m. The program features
the educational, social and cultur-
al activities centered around the
one-room school in rural life of
1900.
The Howell Farm
schoolmistress has McGuffy read-
ers, slates and slate pencils ready
for students of all ages to begin
their lessons in the three Rs. Visi-
tors can take a seat in an antique
school desk and try their hand at
orthography using pen and ink,
or attempt to solve farm related
arithmetic problems on the chalk-
board. As in yesteryear, children
can help with farm chores before
attending the one-room school.
The school bell will ring on the
hour at 11 a.m., noon, 1 p.m. and 3
p.m. to begin lessons and half
past the hour at 11:30 a.m., 12:30
p.m., 1:30 p.m. and 3:30 p.m. for re-
cess and a quick tour of the privy.
During recess, children will be in-
troduced to hoops and sticks, tug
of war and other old-fashioned
games and toys.
School lunches served in bas-
kets or pails will be sold in the
kitchen, and a childrens craft
program, Leaf Bookmark, will
be held from 11 a.m. until 3 p.m.;
cost is $2 per craft.
Participants in the school pro-
gram may attend the box social,
which will be held at 2 p.m. Well-
wrapped boxes of homemade pies
or goodies will be auctioned off to
benefit the school. The lucky gen-
tleman who wins the bid on the
teachers pie will also share her
company.
People who have recollections,
stories, and photographs to share
of days in a one-room school-
house are encouraged to visit the
farm on the 8h, or come to the Fri-
day evening talk on the Pleasant
Valley Schoolhouse. The program
begins at 7:30 p.m.; the gates open
at 7 p.m. A $3 donation is suggest-
ed.
Howell Farm is located on Val-
ley Rd., just off Rt. 29, two miles
south of Lambertville. Hours are
10 a.m. until 4 p.m. on Tuesday
through Saturday, and noon until
4 p.m. on Sundays. Parking and
admission are free. Howell Farm
is operated and maintained by
the Mercer County Park Commis-
sion. For information, call (609)
737-3299, or visit websites at
www.howellfarm.org or www.
mercercounty.org.
Howell Living History Farm hosts
back to school program on Sept. 8
Pet Friends Grief
support for pet owners
(800) 404-7387
PSA
Statewide Domestic
Violence Hotline
(800) 572-7233
PSA
NJ Ease Senior
Services Helpline
(877) 222-3737
PSA
Visit us online at
www.hopewellsun.com
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20 Nassau Street
Princeton, NJ 08542
609.751.0245
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classified
T HE HO P E WE L L S U N
SEPTEMBER 4-11, 2012 PAGE 14
W H A T Y O U N E E D T O K N O W
All ads are based on a 5 line ad, 15-18 characters per line. Additional lines: $9, Bold/Reverse Type: $9 Add color to any box ad for $20. Deadline: Wednesday - 5pm for the following week.
All classified ads must be prepaid. Your Classified ad will run in all 10 of The Sun newspapers each week! Be sure to check your ad the first day it appears.
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H O W T O C O N T A C T U S
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Hopewell Sun Lawrence Sun
Montgomery Sun Princeton Sun
Robbinsville Sun West Windsor Sun
HeIp Wanted
BOX
ADS Only
$
25per week List a text-only ad for your yard
sale, job posting or merchandise.
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 9/30/12.
$1,000 OFF
UP TO
Any new
complete roofing
or siding job
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 9/30/12.
10% OFF
UP TO
Any
roofing
or siding job
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 9/30/12.
FREE
ROOF AND
GUTTER
INSPECTION
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 9/30/12.
FREE
GUT TERS
With any new roof
and siding job
Virtual Home
Remodeler
www.tricountyexteriors.com
609-882-S800
BOOF LBAHINO?
WE CAN REPAIR IT!
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Concrete Masonry
POOLS
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Open Close Liners
Paint Removals
Patios Decks
Call: 908-359-3000
Home Improvement
1oo pooped 1o scoop?
We provide weekly scooper service s1or1ing o1
$
I3/week
saving our planet, one pile at a time
856-665-6769
www.alldogspoop.com
GET $10.00 OFF YOUR FIRST SERVICE!
Locally owned and operated.
Pet Care
2 MONTHS FREE
OMEGA
SELF STORAGE
300 Lawrence Station Road
Lawrenceville, NJ 08648
609-584-1133
Services
BIG BOYS INC
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CHECK OUT THE SUN CLASSIFIEDS!
ReaI Estate For Rent
FOR RENT
2 garages with loft &
electricity
Skillman, NJ
840 sq ft - $550/month
640 sq ft - $350/month
Dave - (908) 305-6861
DRIVING LIVE-IN CERTI-
FIED HOME HEALTH
AIDESENOR CARE MAN-
AGEMENT, a private home
care agency is recruiting
CHHAs WTH A DRVER`S
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tions. YOUR OWN VEH-
CLE a PLUS with extra
compensation. References
and experience required.
Competitive pay rate and
benefits (health care, RA,
paid vacation). Please call
(609)882-0322 for applica-
tion and interview
appointment.
Privately owned home care
company, SENOR CARE
MANAGEMENT, serving
Central New Jersey is
recruiting for a PART TIME
RN to assist full time RN.
Senior Care Management
is a home care and care
management agency. The
position is 25 hours per
week, 10am to 6pm - days
flexible. Salary commensu-
rate with experience. Must
have GERATRC and
HOME CARE experience
and be able to travel.
Please fax resume to (609)
882-9400.
Place your
classified today!
856
427-0933
Auto Services
* MD Mobile Windshield Repair *
Nationally Certified
Top Quality Lifetime Warranty
Repairs + Replacement
Contact & Inquiries:
609-462-3692
www.mdglassrepair.com
ACTIVITY AIDES
SENOR CARE MANAGE-
MENT is seeking effective
and energetic individuals to
assist our senior clients in
helping them remain active
and lead more stimulating
lifestyles through activities.
f you are looking for PART
TME work and have
FLEXBLE hours ALONG
WTH activity experience in
a facility setting, please call
(609)882-0322 for applica-
tion and interview
appointment.
Diesel Bus Mechanic
Needed in Freehold, NJ.
Great Pay / Benefits.
APPLY ONLNE.
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HeIp Wanted
CLASSIFIED SEPTEMBER 5-11, 2012 - THE HOPEWELL SUN 15
LET THE
SUNS
WORK
FOR YOU!
Call
856
427-0933
for Advertising
Info.
40 EVERGREEN DRIVE
Meticulous property
on an oversized corner
lot. Amenities feature
vinyl fenced in yard,
two sheds, sprinklers,
upgraded kitchen with
granite tops, porcelain
italian tile, custom
stone backsplash, all
new stainless steel ap-
pliances, new hvac,
new garage door, up-
dated baths, berber
carpeting, 8.5 ft granite bar with recessed lighting, freshly painted interior, sun
room with gas fireplace, located on one of Uppers most desirable streets. This
property has it all and is priced to sell. Don't miss this! $247,500
Ocean City New Jerseys #1 Real Estate Team!
The Team You Can Trust!
Matt Bader
Cell 609-992-4380
Dale Collins
Cell 609-548-1539
Let the Bader-Collins Associates make all of your Ocean City
dreams come true! If you are thinking about BUYING, SELLING or
RENTING, contact us for exceptional service and professionalism.
3160 Asbury Avenue Ocean City, NJ 08226
Office: 609-399-0076 email: bca@bergerrealty.com
Academic Success:
Tutoring
Certified K-12 Honors
Graduate
Over 25 years exp.
Caring,ndividualized
nstruction
SAT Reading, Writing,
Math, Subject Tests
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609-924-2610
Tutoring
Why choose P. Cooper Roofing and Siding?
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Virtual Home
Remodeler
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 9/19/12.
$1,000 OFF
UP TO
Any new
complete roofing
or siding job
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 9/19/12.
10% OFF
UP TO
Any
roofing
or siding job
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 9/19/12.
FREE
ROOF AND
GUTTER
INSPECTION
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 9/19/12.
FREE
GUTTERS
With any new roof
and siding job