Cairns Post (Qld.

: 1909 - 1954), Monday 10 August 1931, page 2
in
a It approached terrifying fashion. them, throwing out extraordinary rays it of heat as and the hapless came, youths, rooted to the spot, could only shriek for help. Just as it reached them ¡be watch, hearing their cries, broke the door down, and entered, and the apparition vanished. It was believed to have been the "ghost" of a large stove which was afterwards found in the garden bethis hind the house; and when was broken the manifestations abruptly up ceased.

CHINESE. GHOSTS.
!

SOME
[

WEIRD

STORIES.

Although China
!

cognifcd
cccclt
.¿cern

as

superstition,

has long-teen, re-; cite of the citadels oLandehtj its' of trustworthy accounts

j

\

are comparatively rare, and have been compiled* chiefly by ¡.eopíc scarcely regarded them, as who worth chronicling. But those who-have thc time and taste for research of this kind will find themselves amply repaid

beliefs

to

:

i

!

exploration, by regarding thc unseen

I

Chinese. beliefs world and, the speer »re.» people it (writes who and demons Levis Spence in the "Weekly Scots
into
\

PHANTOM BARREL CANDLESTICK.
i

AND

;

I

iman").
I

was are

Although the Chinecc
tl«;

by

no

means
; j I

patrolman in the Ho Tung district going his rounds one brilliant moonlight night when, passing a monastery,

A

.

innately superstitious among at! ¡the nations and profess to laugh just as many supernormal occurrences Europeans do. they are still extremely to ideas so bizarre and even prone grue that it is little wonder that even ?one these best acquainted with them believe to them be the most demon-haunted^ the peoples of the East. among The catalogue of Chinese demons and spirits, good and bad is an almost endless one, bnt in this article 1 shall deal specifically with the Chinese idea more of the ghost proper, the haunting specCelestial a tre, superstition phase of which lias been unaccountably neglected ' writers. by Western
mest
i

j

!

j

I

j

I

i

I

GHOST

OF

A

«-STOVE."

I

I

Like many peoples in a much lower of civilisation, the Chinese regard a the Otherworld as shadowy replica of the earth-life, and even far as to go as attribute an after existence to inaniobjects. We mate not be surprised, must therefore, if we hear of the "ghosts" of chairs and tables, of the spooks of mats carpets-particularly and nasty spooks, from too, which are liable to leap cn* one the shadows of a deserted staircase and unpleasant for him. make matters These, indeed, are usually bf a most disposition. malevolent A story is told of two students who begged to be allowed to put up in an unoccupied house Pekin while sitting for their examnear inations in the capital. The house was believed to bc haunted. But they scoffed at the rumor. One night they heard if someone the sound of footsteps as were mounting the stairs. Taking a a lighted candle, they made search, and in dismay beheld on the steps" a being feetattired in black, about two high, Its and without eyes, nose, or mouth.long hair stood on end and it whistled in a terrifying fashion. It approached
state

figure, squatting on a he saw huddled It was the ground. black all over, and strangely stilL of curiosity be Out it wih touched it dis his staff, when exclosed a long lean face with an pression so ghastly that he immediately collapsed with fright. The creature rose, and, after hovering over him, disaprethc monastery peared ; later when quired a new there was gate, dug up from the ground, at thc site selected, a barrel, varnished on covered the top It was with white clay. the "ghost'' of this seemingly harmless object which the patrolman had seen. A military officer, Shih one Tsung Wu, had a large family, all of whom suffered from a peculiarly painful and malignant disease. Each night the figure of a man, from whose body sparks of fire emitted, entered the house and were passed through the principal apartments. As it did so the patients felt their sufferings increase. Tsung took his bow laid in wait and for the arrows, and it appeared he loosed his spectre. When shaft and the arrow went home, knocking a shower of sparks from the incandescent image. Calling for lights, he found that he had hit a very old and curious candlestick made of cámphor wood, which had been in thc family foi generations. at' once The object was broken and the ashef burnt and up thrown into the river, so that the malevolent spirit which had dwelt within il might be "laid." After this the familj were cured of their malady, and th< hauntings ceased. But tlie ghosts of people are believec

I

I

¡

1

\y

tlie

Chínese
as

to

revisit

cisely

and elsewhere, communicate with them
as

thc earth, pret( attempts quite a are

common
ese

have

a

made like a resembling bone" of a

The Chin country. kind of planchetti large V-shaped wooden, fork in its outlines the "wish fowl, with a pencil attachée
special,

in. this

National Library of Australia

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article48718439

of a fowl, with a pencil attachée to tlie apex. The point of the pencil i: a placed over box of sand, each arni o: the instrument bcing,held by one or tw« Characters in operators. the clums;

bone"

if he. atteUtpts

to

escape

their

presence,

he quietly continued with his drawing; imitating his every movethe corpse in the ittóst unnerving manner. ment
.

-,
i

The
saw

so.it"at-last

returned,

and

Chinese
I I

script

are

written

and
until

are

transcribed is the message

the sand by a third persoi complete.
on

he

the.body, of his father

when sitting

THE

"UNDEAD."

Mediums and the entire ¿apparatus o as ^piritnaliím are encount commonly ered in China as among ourselves, am thc laying or exorcising of ghosts i accomplished by following specific di rcctions given in the Confucian classic: Particular!;.- eerie are those Chinese tale ut the "undead," vampires, or huma: beings who refuse to rest in their grave; and who desire to wreck o: vengeance tile living. Such ghosts usually hav fjiaring long sharp claws, ani eyes, arc covered with white or greenish-whit hair, and will pursue for miles thos are who unlucky enough to cross thei paths. .V dreadful tale is told of a travelle who was accommodated by an innkeepe in a room where the uncofñned body o i dead man lay behind a curtain. Jus failing as he was asleep he heard rustling behind the th and, screen, It crossed the root corpse emerged. to v:herc he lay, breathed upon him aw it hal rctrrncd to the conch on which bi-en hid Each time he movo out. abo stirred. At last, nerving himsel he rushed from the house, followed b; ibe vengeful dead. In desperation h concealed himself tree,' 01 behind a which the r:sir~e rushed with such fur * ". firmly-in the trunk %'.? *; it '« \: was found that its fin h::;i bored into the tree'so deep! it they had ofi to remove -.ut to be cut
; .

up cn the. bed; fainted in sheer terror. Liu pluckily continued with his portrait. At last he heard, thé' undertaker's-men carrying the coffin, and called to tficni to brooms. bring some Grasping .what was .wrong, they seized a couple^ of brooms and with répeated blows beat the vampire back upon thc bed, .and then battened it down securely in the coffin.
,

I

ATTACKED
?
?

BY
more

A
*

"VAMPIRE."

terrifying story of a citifrom Canton. Two of Nanking, Chank zens and Li, went business. Li prolonged his to Canton on virit to that city, giving Chang a letter duly delivered. to hjs family, which was But as he was executing .this friendly errand Chang was told that Li's father had died on the previous day and that the body was lying in state in thc principa! apartment of the house. After the qf the' Chinese he made pious custom the "usual ritual offerings, and he as invited to stay overnight occupied was a chamber on thc other side ot the courtyard to that- in which the dead man

A

still

vampire

comes

lay.

CORPSE

THAT

YAWNED.

There lived at Hang G101Î a giftei ^uist named Liu I Hsien. Hard b; a welt father and his son, and cn th -kath -of the former the son asked Liu t< a rax.t memorial portrait of him whi! :he funeral were bein r.rrangemcuts made. Tlie artist arrived at. the hous 'n the son's absence, and. went upstair ;n search of the body, which he founj stretched out on a couch'. Arranging hi drawing materials he set to work copy '"n£ tlie pale lineaments, when sudden! sat the rorree up, yawned, and stretche its limbs.

that Horrified, Liu at cnce concluded and was a v. yampire, knowing wei that the "undead'' invariably~attack one' if he. atteUtpts their to escape presence,
it

night he was awakened by a noise, rustling and peering through, a crack in tlie paper window he beheld a strange right;: The widow of che deceased^ was praying beside the body bf her husband, a lighted incense stick in her hand. Then, approaching Chang's room, she slipped off her girdle and tied the handles of tlie folding doors tightly together,. after which Chang, inspired by a sense of coming evil, continued to sit up, watching through the crack in the window. He saw the coffin rise. His face open and the dead man black as a demon's, his eyes glared xis incandescently in his head, and his whole fierce and terrible. expression was The its coffin; awful thing leapt from and with -whistling breath came straight for It snapped the Chang's door. girdle which held the doors like straw and bounded into the room. Chang, horrified, had only time to push a large wardrobe upon the vampire when he collapsed and fainted. The widow, hearing the noise, and accompanied by her servants, rushed to Chang's assistance. When she had revived him with a cordial she explained that her husband had' led a most evil life and since his death had appeared to her and told her that Chang would visit The house. "He will-have a large sum of Late
at slight

a

sum

of
"'I

creature
more .40

dressed

in

with him," said the vampire. money will steal it, kill him, and share it you." The
poor woman, tried frustrate her to design by prayer, and now her guest had escaped a ful.

white had

once

with

distraught, had evil husband's rejoiced that fate1 so dread-

Thé servants raised the wardrobe picked up the vampire's body, and returned it to the coffin, but later, on the advice of Chang, it was burned by Buddhist priests so. that the soul might have
rest.

about years old, with a a short beard, and a tongue more than a foo| long. He had tried to give the alarm, but the apparition seized him by the throat. Just then another Kuei, with a tall and white beard, suddenly 'apcap peared and asked the first. to spare his victim on account of his youth. The demon desisted, and A-Lung became unconscious.

appeared

to him.

It seemed black face,

THE OP

DEMON

EXORCISED.

TYPES

HAUNTING

DEMONS.

The haunting demons of China may be divided into two classes, the Kuei, or spirits capable of good as well as evil, and associated with death and darkness, and the Mo, which are wholly evil.

A-Lung was put to bed. During the night mysterious lights flitted about the room, and so affrighting d'd the manifestations become that"
a was

sent

for.

magi-nan
it

The

sorcerer

Human
ially if

ghosts may become Kuei, especthey happen to be manifestations

of the P'o, or lower soul. There are also the Yao, or apparitions which arise out of the imagination of man and have no existence of themselves. For all of these th© Confucian scholars of the upper classes affect -a disdain in acsupreme cordance with the teachings of the'r
master.
are usually asparticular house, and the Kuei are sometimes believed to perthe spirits of the dead in order to sonate further their wicked designs. These are frequently exercised by means of firecrackers or by the red characters of the Yang, or solar color, which are regarded efficacious against the spirits as specially of darkness or Yin (the opposite of Yang), as. the following story shows: In Su Chow lived a tutor, named Han, who had as a scholar one Su, and a sercalled A-Lung. vant One night when Su was reading in the upper part of the house he sent A-Lung for some tea, but the man returned in great fear, saying that he had met a strange-looking person at the font of the stairs. He was dressed in white, and did not reply when spoken to. A-Lung thus concluded that he was confronted with a Kuei, and made off. Su, as is the mariner of Chinese scholars, scoffed at the tale, and as A-Lung refused to go upstairs again, another servant called Liu was told off

Ghostly appearances
with
a

his cpirion that A-Lung was by a Kuei, and proceeded to trace certain characters on the sick man's body. Over the heart he traced the sign for "righteousness," on his neck the cbar-l for "sword," and arter on each band the symbol for "fire." The moment the last had been written the Kuei who possessed the serving-man screamed otit, "Do not burn me! Let me go!" So freed from his tormentor, A-Luhg was and never again experienced such a visit.

as gave possessed

,

ation.

sociated,

In the gusts ot wind which-so often rain, the Chinese believe accompany they -can hear the wailing of those whose re-.j lef t mains are unburied, it is and thought that the ghosts of such people strongly object to' wandering- about in the wet/ On the whole there is a touch or the prosaic and material in the occult lore of China, and no very sharp line of division separates the terrestrial from thc' supernatural. of the great disabilities under thé collectors of Qiinese ghost stories labor is the reticence of the people, who rather naturally think it unlucky to speak of spirits or superonly, be natural occurrences, and' can to' do" so ceased after much pressure has been brought to bear on them. which
One

,

to

serve

him.

canacity, Paint with Allen áhrf Sons

Berger's Paints.-Greatest covering Berger's.-Samuel

Ltd,

agents.*

'

.

.

night Liu went down to fetch for Su, and stumbled over a body Iring at the foot of the stairs. It was A-Lung, unconscious, but breathsome

That

tea

ings
were

His
full

eyes,

mouth,

nose

and

ears was

covered When

of mud, and his back with black fingermarks;" he recovered
in

he

the creature dressed

told Liu that white had once

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