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The Truth About Retirement
Investing for retirement doesn't
have to be complicated.
From
daveramsey.com
Myth:
When saving for
retirement, the
more complex
strategies earn
you more money.
Truth:
Saving for retirement must be
consistent—not complicated. In-
vest only when you’re ready fi-
nancially, and never invest in
something you don’t understand.
We’ve been led to believe that
the more complex an investment
is, the more likely it is to make
money. Nothing could be further
from the truth. You can retire
with dignity using just a few
tools and some good advice.
Begin With a Firm Foundation
Dave Ramsey has taught more
than one million families how to
get out of debt and build wealth.
He recommends you begin invest-
ing for retirement after you’ve
done two things: you’re debt-free,
and you have saved an emer-
gency fund of three to six months
of expenses. Three-fourths of the
people on Forbes list of the 400
wealthiest people in America say
getting and staying debt-free is
the most important thing you can
do when it comes to handling
your money. The full emergency
fund insures you have a cushion
in case of an illness or job loss
and that your retirement funds
stay where they are and keep
growing.
A Simple Plan That Works
Your income is your most pow-
erful wealth-building tool, so
once you’re debt-free; invest 15%
of your income in Roth IRAs and
pre-tax retirement accounts. If
you receive a 401(k), 403(b) or
TSP match from your employer,
invest up to the match. Then,
fully fund a Roth IRA for you
(and your spouse, if married). If
that doesn’t add up to 15% of
your household income, invest
more with your employer plan
until you reach 15%.
Here’s an example:
Household take-home income:
$70,000
Husband: $38,000
Wife: $32,000
15% of $70,000 $10,500
Husband’s 401(k) matches 3%*
-$1,140 (3% of $38,000)
Wife’s 401(k) matches 4%* -
$1,280 (4% of $32,000)
Remainder into Roth IRA
$8,080
(Couples under age 50 can con-
tribute up to $10,000 per year to a
Roth IRA. There are income re-
strictions on Roths. Consult a
professional to be sure you qual-
ify.)
*The employer match does not
count toward your 15%. However,
it automatically doubles your in-
vestment in your 401(k)!
Put your retirement money in
growth stock mutual funds with
a track record of at least five
years of consistent returns (12%
average). Divide your portfolio
equally among growth, growth
and income, international and
aggressive growth funds.
This Is Long-Term Investing
The money you invest for re-
tirement is not to be used for any-
thing other than retirement
income, for two really good rea-
sons:
The longer your money stays
invested, the more it can grow.
Over the last 30 years, the S&P
500, a standard measurement of
stock market performance, has
averaged a 12% growth rate.
You’ll be hit with high penal-
ties and taxes if you take money
out of these investments before
age 59 1/2. Never borrow from
your 401(k), and always roll your
401(k) balance into a traditional
IRA or your Roth if you change
jobs.
After investing for 25 years av-
eraging 12% per year, the couple
in our example above will have
nearly $1.6 million saved for
Page 2
S e N i o r L i V i N g
ChoiCe PubliCations • Fall/Winter 2012
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Fall/Winter 2012 • ChoiCe PubliCations
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Page 4
S e N i o r L i V i N g
ChoiCe PubliCations • Fall/Winter 2012
Eating Well as We Age
By Amanda Knoles
Our mothers always
warned us that if we
wanted to grow up big
and strong we should eat
our vegetables. And in-
creasingly, scientific evi-
dence is demonstrating
that eating healthy foods
and being physically ac-
tive can help us remain
healthy throughout our
lives. Eating a well-bal-
anced diet that includes
plenty of fresh fruits
and vegetables is one of
the smartest things you
can do to improve your
health.
Foods can be powerful
medicines that control
how we look, feel and
perform. By choosing
healthier foods, we can
lose fat, grow muscle,
gain energy and literally
turn back the clock.
Controlling blood sugar
is one of the best
“tricks” available to force
your body to shed fat. In-
stead of eating foods
with lots of refined
flours and sugar, switch
to whole grains, beans,
fruits and vegetables for
a steady stream of en-
ergy. Researchers on
aging have found that
those who consume mas-
sive amounts of
processed foods hasten
the aging process.
Slow-burning carbohy-
drates keep blood sugar
in a healthy range and
maintain a constant level
of mental and physical
energy. Slow-burning car-
bohydrates include oat-
meal, baked beans,
lentils, barley, wheat bul-
gur, broccoli, tomatoes,
asparagus, lima beans,
peas and artichokes.
Fast burning sugar prod-
ucts to avoid include
white bread, pancakes,
bagels, soft drinks,
desserts, muffins, dough-
nuts and candy. Fiber is
also an important part of
a healthy diet. The more
fiber you eat from whole
grains, vegetables and
fruits, the slower sugar is
absorbed into the blood
from the intestine. Fiber
also slows the absorption
of carbohydrates from
the intestine into the
bloodstream. The best
fibers for keeping blood
sugar levels down are sol-
uble and include high
quality breakfast cereals,
whole grains and beans.
Although all vegetables
and fruits have a place in
a healthy diet, some are
better than others. A
sweet potato contains
half the USRDA for Vita-
min C and 3.4 grams of
fiber. Carrots are rated a
close second with more
than four times the
USRDA for beta-carotene.
Spinach, collard greens,
kale, dandelion greens,
mustard greens and
Swiss chard are stars of
the vegetable stage when
it comes to nutrients. Pa-
paya and cantaloupe top
the list of best fruits with
each providing almost a
complete daily dose of
Vitamins A and C along
with healthy doses of
potassium. Strawberries,
kiwis and apricots are ac-
tually rated higher than
apples as healthful fruits.
Beans top the list of the
world’s healthiest diets.
They are a rich source of
carbohydrates, protein,
fiber, minerals and vita-
mins. Soybeans head the
list followed by pinto
beans, chickpeas, lentils,
and black-eyed peas.
Many nutritionists con-
sider whole grains
among the most valuable
of all foods. Top whole
grains include quinoa,
whole-wheat macaroni
and spaghetti, amaranth,
buckwheat bulger, barley
and wild rice. Not all
dairy products are bad
for you. Great sources of
protein, the following
choices have high cal-
cium content and low fat.
Try adding plain nonfat
yogurt, skim milk, low-
fat plain yogurt, one per-
cent milk, nonfat vanilla
yogurt and nonfat cot-
tage cheese to your diet.
The American Cancer
Society has developed a
set of guidelines for diet
and nutrition to help re-
duce the risk of cancer.
1. Choose most of the foods
you eat from plant sources.
Eat five or more serv-
ings of fruits and vegeta-
bles each day. Eat other
foods from plant sources
such as breads, cereals,
grain products, rice,
pasta or beans several
times each day. Fruits
and vegetables contain
important vitamins, min-
erals and fiber. In addi-
tion to being a healthy
snack, they can reduce
your risk for many can-
cers.
Eating five or more
servings may seem diffi-
cult but if you study how
much a serving really is,
it’s fairly easy to incorpo-
rate more into your daily
diet. The following are
examples of a serving:
1/2 cup fruit
3/4 cup 100% juice
1/2 cup cooked veg-
etable
1 cup leafy vegetable
1 medium sized piece of
fruit
1 slice of bread
1 ounce of dry cereal
1/2 cup cooked cereal,
rice or pasta
2. Limit your intake of high-
fat foods, especially from an-
imal sources.
It’s pretty easy to make
low-fat foods a part of
your daily routine. Use
cooking spray instead of
oil; try tuna packed in
water instead of oil. Se-
lect nonfat or low-fat
dairy products. Choose
baked, broiled and
roasted foods instead of
fried.
CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE
The American Heart Associations reccommends turning to fresh fruits and vegetables as snacks and desserts instead of
other high calorie options.
S e N i o r L i V i N g
Page 5
Fall/Winter 2012 • ChoiCe PubliCations
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and the ability to enjoy the familiar daily routines and special
events that enrich all our lives. It means the reassurance of
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Foods made with whole
grains rather than
processed (refined) flour
products are higher in
fiber, vitamins and min-
erals. Beans are great
sources of vitamins, min-
erals and fiber and can be
useful as low-fat, high
protein alternatives to
meat. When you do eat
meat, choose cuts that are
lean, not marbled with
fat. Eat smaller portions
of cooked meat, fish and
poultry. Stir-fries and
casseroles are a good way
to mix smaller portions of
meat with larger portions
of vegetables.
When eating out in
restaurants, check the
menu for low-fat choices.
Most restaurants now
offer low-fat and healthy
choices or will prepare
your meal to order. Keep
in mind that fat-free and
low-fat foods don’t neces-
sarily translate into low
calorie. Read labels care-
fully for fat, sugar,
sodium and calorie con-
tent.
3. Limit your consumption of
alcoholic beverages.
For men, limit alcohol
to two drinks a day; for
women, one drink a day.
A drink is 12 ounces of
regular beer, 5 ounces of
wine or 1.5 ounces of 80-
proof distilled spirits.
4. Combine your healthy diet
with at least 30 minutes of
moderate exercise each day.
You can be active for 30
minutes each day by
walking briskly, swim-
ming, gardening, doing
housework or even danc-
ing. Thirty minutes of
activity doesn’t have to be
continuous. Try taking
the stairs instead of the
elevator, park farther
away from the mall to get
in some extra walking or
do some type of exercise
while you watch TV.
The American Heart
Association stresses that
it’s important to choose
foods low in saturated
fatty acids, cholesterol
and sodium. Total fat in-
take should be no more
than 30 percent of calo-
ries daily. Saturated fatty
acids and trans-fatty
acids should be less than
10 percent of those calo-
ries, polyunsaturated
fatty acid intake should
be 8-10 percent of calo-
ries, and mono-saturated
fatty acids should make
up no more than 10-15
percent to total calories.
Cholesterol intake should
be less than 300 mil-
ligrams per day. Sodium
intake should be no more
than 2.4 grams per day.
The AHA offers the fol-
lowing tips for a heart
healthy diet:
n Buy lean cuts of beef and
pork.
USDA Select beef con-
tains the least fat. The
second leanest grade is
choice.
n Try adding other greens
like endive, escarole, spinach
and cabbage to salads.
n Limit your intake of pick-
les, relishes, olives, etc. They
are very high in sodium.
n Buy fruit juices instead of
fruit drinks and choose juices
high in Vitamin C like orange,
grapefruit and tomato juice.
n Turn to fresh fruits and
vegetables as snacks and
desserts instead of high calo-
rie cakes, cookies and pies.
n Eat fsh at least one or
two times a week.
It is low in saturated fat
and can be prepared in
many ways. Buy fish
filets and bread and bake
them yourself. The coat-
ings on prepared fish add
to their fat content,
weight and cost.
n Extend meat favor by
serving small portions of
meat with vegetables, pasta
and rice.
n Buy fat-free and one per-
cent fat milk rather than 2
percent fat or whole milk.
Skim milk in half gal-
lons costs less than
quarts.
n Buy bread that’s whole
grain and enriched with B vi-
tamins and iron.
n Try no-fat baked goods
and naturally sweetened
products.
n Purchase fat-free, low
fat, low sodium and baked
varieties of crackers and
snack chips but remember
low fat doesn’t mean there
are no calories. Substitute
favorful salsa and hummus
for fat-laden sour cream and
cheese dips.
nSubstitute low fat or non-
fat buttermilk yogurt, ice
cream, sour cream and frozen
yogurt for the regular items.
Low fat cottage cheese
can replace ricotta cheese
in most recipes.
Copyright © publishers-edge
Page 6
S e N i o r L i V i N g
ChoiCe PubliCations • Fall/Winter 2012

E-Mail: Office@CharlevoixCountyNews.com
friendly
& positive
news and sports
covering all of
Charlevoix County
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0a||: 231-230-8062
Fax: 888-854-7441
www.CharlevoixCountyNews.com
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Thursday - August 12, 2010
P0 ßox 205, ßoyne 0|ty, H| 49712 · WWW.0har|evo|x0ountyNeWs.com · [989} 732·81ê0 · 0ff|ceQ0har|evo|x0ountyNeWs.com
Weather ....................3
News Briefs ...........4,6
Obituaries .................7
Local Sports .............9
Health & Wellness.....8
Classifieds.........12-13
Movie Guide ..........14
Real Estate .............15
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Located in a nice neighborhood, close to the schools. The double lot allows for you to have room to roam, but enjoy your privacy at the same time. This home looks small from the curb, but offers the starter or growing family a lot of room on the sprawling 1500` of living space!
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See 0oo at
8y 8. J. 0oo|ey
Sitting across from the 27-
year-old soldier at the
Charlevoix library on a sum-
mer day, observing his quick
smile and steady calmness, it is
surprising to nd out that he
was nearly killed in
Afghanistan when the truck in
which he was riding hit an Im-
provised Explosive Device and
blew up.
Platoon Sgt. Troy Drebenst-
edt said he was thrown into the
side of the vehicle, hitting his
head and suering other in-
juries. e next thing he knew
he was on his feet heading
down the road, intent on nd-
ing whomever planted the IED.
“I was extremely angry,” Troy
said. A medic who had noticed
signs of a concussion came to
get him and his superior ocer
ordered him back to the truck.
e other four men riding with
him also sustained injuries, but
no one was killed. e explo-
sive device was made with the
intention to kill everyone in a
large radius anywhere near it.
“It was 300 pounds of explo-
Yo0og So|d|er home Ior how,
but Plans Iuture Return to AIghanistan
Ph0T0 8Y 8. J. 00hL£Y
P|atooo Sgt. Troy 0rebeostedt served |o |rag aod AIghao|stao. he |s home oo |eave aod receot|y sat dowo aod ta|ked abo0t h|s exper|eoces aod how
the exper|eoces |ed h|m to apprec|ate the 0o|ted States more thao ever.
sives. Forty to 100 pounds is
the usual size,” Troy said. “It
cut a hole six feet deep across
the road.”
He is blessed, he says, and
he credits his character to his
Christian faith and his up-
bringing. His anger dissi-
pated and he separates the
Afghan people from the ter-
rorists.
“Being angry with a whole
race is buying into their big-
otry,” he said.
Troy’s job in Afghanistan
was one of the most danger-
ous. He was part of the Com-
bat Engineering Unit, known
as SAPPERS. He performed
“route clearance,” that is, his
job was to nd IEDs planted
by the terrorists and clear the
area of them for safer travel
by the military.
“It’s one of the toughest
jobs, but the number one
threat to our troops are the
IEDs,” Troy said.
Troy served in
Afghanistan for 10 months
and prior to that he served in
Iraq for 14 months. He is
now home in Marquette, un-
dergoing treatment for his
injuries and attending
Northern Michigan Univer-
sity. But he sees himself back
in Afghanistan within the
next two years.
Troy is the son of Marlys
and Bob Drebenstedt of
Charlevoix. Troy’s father is a
county commissioner who
retired from the military and
Troy grew up knowing that a
career in the military was a
Young 5o|d|er kefurns,
Anf|que Aufo 5how,
Publisher’s note: As this story
appears in publication, Troy
Drebenstedt is riding his bicycle
from Sault Ste. Marie to the
Gulf of Mexico with his father
Bob Drebenstedt and his
younger brother, Regan Dreben-
stedt. e adventure is to raise
awareness of the plight of dis-
abled veterans.
8y J|m Akaos
Boyne City is certain to
be a destination location
this coming weekend as the
37th Annual Antique Auto
Show and Flea Market takes
place in Veterans Memorial
Park from 9 am to 4 pm Sat-
urday and Sunday. is is a
free event for attendees, of-
fering a once a year oppor-
ßßll@00 ß0l0 $00N 8 fl08 N8fk0l 37th Annual Bovne Citv Event Takes Place This Weekend
The 37th Aoo0a|Aot|g0eA0to Showaod F|ea Narket takes p|ace |o Veteraos
Nemor|a| Park Irom 9 am to 4 pm Sat0rday aod S0oday. 0008T£SY Ph0T0
8y 8. J. 0oo|ey
BOYNE CITY — What a
summer for boating and
Boyne City’s F. Grant Moore
public marina has drawn the
boating crowd and recogni-
tion for its “Clean Marina”
and, more recently, for “Best
of the North West.”
ßoyne 0|ty pub||c mar|na deck hand, Amber Kota||k ass|sts Kay and ßob Eva Who
are repeat customers from PentWater and docked at the ßoyne 0|ty mar|na.
Ph0T0 8Y 8. J. 00hL£Y
tunity to peruse some awe-
some vintage vehicles and
shop fascinating and unique
wares on the shores of beau-
tiful Lake Charlevoix.
“is is a very popular
event that has been going for
many years,” states Jim Bau-
man, Boyne City Chamber
executive director. “We usu-
ally get about seventy vehi-
cles for the show, all vintage
and in original condition.”
Among the exciting fea-
tures of the show is a spec-
tacular 1911 Ford Touring
Car that was used in the clas-
sic 1979 movie; “Somewhere
in Time” (lmed on Mack-
inac Island). e vehicle is
owned by Arnie Hudson, a
Walloon Lake Resident who
is the immediate past presi-
The 8oyoe 0|ty p0b||c mar|oa koowo as the F. 6raot Noore N0o|c|pa| Na- r|oa |s the rec|p|eot oI severa| recogo|t|oos. 0|ty maoager N|chae| 0a|o (|eIt} aod deck haod Amber ko- ta||k (ceoter} jo|o harbormaster 8arb 8rooks at the mar|oa oo Nooday.
Boyne City Public Marina
Ranks Higb
Ph0T0 8Y 8. J. 00hL£Y
Fub||c Mor|no,
£ast Jordao
Ameods
0og Law
8y 8. J. 0oo|ey
EAST JORDAN —
When grabbing the leash
to take Fido for a walk in
the city of East Jordan, dog
walkers are advised to grab
a disposable bag, as well.
An ordinance was intro-
duced at the city commis-
sion meeting on Aug. 3, to
amend Section 6-36 of the
Code of Ordinances. Sec-
tion 6-36 addresses re-
moval of dog feces if a dog
happens to decide a neigh-
bor’s lawn is the perfect
place to nd relief. But the
new ordinance adds the
language that states:
Anyone walking their dog
on property other than
their own shall be required
to have a disposable bag …
.
Also at the meeting, the
city administrator updated
the commission on the
construction of the Emer-
gency Services Facility. e
main part of the building
and the EMS wing were
under a roof, allowing the
electrical and plumbing
contractors to begin their
portion of the work. ere
is still some ooring to be
poured in the Fire Wing,
the concrete walls are in
place and the roof tresses
on this portion of the
building will be up soon.
e completion target date
is early fall.
Mary Faculak, president
of the East Jordan Cham-
ber of Commerce, gave a
presentation to commis-
sioners that informed
them of what the Chamber
does for the city, and up-
dated them on events the
Chamber has sponsored.
She said she is excited
about the Main Street Pro-
gram.
"| Iee| b|essed
to be |o the 0.S.
where | doo't
have to worry
abo0t someooe
tak|og a Iam||y
member away."
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!ic·¦¦q |ukcd |ujjir·, Cookic·,
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Jic· urd noic.
105 MAlN STREET º EAST JORDAN ·
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·
S e N i o r L i V i N g
Page 7
Fall/Winter 2012 • ChoiCe PubliCations
1250 00Kh|0K ÁVIh0I, 0ÁYI0KP + 888-ÎJ1-J515
WWW.008|0KI8|IIX.00M
· The OUTDOOR TRACK is 1/4 mile in the
Energy Outlet adjacent to the building. Enjoy the
beautiIul gardens courtesy oI the Edelweiss
Garden Club
· The INDOOR TRACK is 1/8 mile and
surrounds the ice rink.
· Walking indoors keeps you active year round!
· Walking is available seven days a week outside
until dusk and inside when building is open.
Hours are subfect to change
depending on team competitions
and special events.
_cu:c.| c: ¿g.:g _cu:c.| c: ¿g.:g _cu:c.| c: ¿g.:g _cu:c.| c: ¿g.:g
231.347.3211 or 888.347.03óº
1322 /ncer:cn Fc., FeIc:key www.emmeIccc.crg
Connect with us on Iacebook
5erv|ng sen|ors s|nce 1ºó7
In-Home kesp|te Fersono| Core Homemoker Serv|ces
F|tness Frogroms Home-De||vered Meo|s k.N. V|s|ts
Ironsportot|on ket|red Sen|or Vo|unteer Frogrom [kSVF}
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Comc und join us /or u hcuIth) brcuk/ust, Iunch or brcuk!!!
Submitted by Dona J. Wishart
exeCutive direCtor, oCCoA
In front of me again at
this moment is a blank
document. The topic of
“elder abuse” is in the
forefront of my thoughts.
In part, because elder
abuse is real; in part, be-
cause it has been an
issue we had to witness
and respond to in our
workday today.
Do I dare write about
elder abuse? If I do, will
you dare read about it?
I remind myself, a col-
umn is to be informative,
perhaps entertaining,
and sometimes carry an
opinion. Trust me, but
please read on, even
though this won’t be en-
tertaining.
Elder abuse is the term
used to describe the mis-
treatment and/or abuse
of an elderly person. It is
estimated that 2 million
older Americans, includ-
ing some 73,000 in Michi-
gan, suffer from elder
abuse. They are the vic-
tims of abuse, neglect
and exploitation. It is the
worst kind of “sad.”
It is “sad” to know and
understand that there are
older adults in our com-
munity suffering from
hunger. Yet, it is possible
to respond to that need.
It is “sadder” to know, as
reported by the Centers
for Disease Control and
Prevention in 2005, that
almost one out of every
two older adults suffer
from a chronic long-term
illness. Yet, there are
ways to help and care for
people suffering from dis-
eases, and ways to help
them self-manage their
conditions. It is “sad-
dest” to know that one in
eight Americans aged 65
and older has
Alzheimer’s disease.
Yet, we have learned to
provide specialized care
for those suffering from
dementia.
Then there is elder
abuse – the worst kind of
“sad.” Elder abuse can-
not be fixed with a good
meal, or controlled
through medicine or self-
management, nor can
victims of elder abuse
forget its impact through
specialized care. To date,
we have not been able to
prevent it. Trying to de-
scribe elder abuse brings
words like physical
abuse, sexual abuse, emo-
tional abuse, and finan-
cial exploitation to this
page. Trying to catego-
rize it might be summed
up in one word: “Evil.”
On June 19, 2012 ten
elder abuse prevention
bills were signed into law
in Michigan to combat
elder abuse.
The Otsego County
Commission on Aging is
available “to help and to
care” for older adults.
Please call 732-1122 or
visit www.OtsegoCounty-
COA.org for information
on programs and serv-
ices.
ELdEr
ABuSE
the
worst kind
of “sad.”
Page 8
S e N i o r L i V i N g
ChoiCe PubliCations • Fall/Winter 2012
www.edwardjones.com




Member SIPC


Bill Forreider
Financial Advisor
.
1365 West Main Street
Gaylord, MI 49735
989-731-1251

needs analysis.
Ask about an insurance

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County Commission on Aging to
become educated about hearing
loss? Where can you learn about
the importance of getting
screened for hearing loss? Who
can answer your questions and
explain your options in address-
ing hearing loss?
Washington, D.C. –
Jacqueline Holton and her hus-
band, Lynn, of Hudsonville, MI,
were always active and social,
and even taught line dancing at
their local community center.
But when Jacqueline started
noticing more than just “selec-
tive hearing” issues with her
husband, she urged him to get a
hearing test. Jacqueline decided
to get tested, too. As it turned
out, her hearing was worse than
her husband’s.
Stories like this are common
among older adults, as hearing
loss affects 9 million seniors in
the United States today. It’s one
of the most common health
problems in the country – but
also one of the most under-diag-
nosed and undertreated. (1)
“One out of every four older
Americans has undetected or
untreated hearing loss, and
NCOA’s research has shown that
most older adults with hearing
loss do not realize how much the
quality of their lives has been af-
fected,” said Jim Firman, presi-
dent and CEO of NCOA. “As
someone with significant hear-
ing loss, I can personally attest
to how the right hearing aids
have dramatically improved my
ability to work and play, my rela-
tionships with family and
friends, and my self-esteem. We
encourage all older adults and
their families to take a hearing
test and find out what they’ve
been missing.”
A 1999 NCOA survey on hearing
loss and older adults found that
when people began to use hear-
ing aids, many saw improve-
ments in their lives, including
their family relationships (66%),
mental health (36%), sense of in-
dependence (34%), social life
(34%), and even sex life (8%). 
“The National Council on
Aging has a terrific track record
of working to improve the lives
of seniors in the United States,
and this initiative is no differ-
ent,” said Kate Rubin, president,
United Health Foundation.
“With hearing loss affecting a
quarter of all seniors, this out-
reach campaign has the poten-
tial to improve the health, and
the lives, of millions of older
Americans.”
“In recent years, hearing aids
have improved significantly be-
cause of digital technologies,”
said Firman. “Therefore, we
think people who use hearing
aids today will see even more
significant improvements in
their lives.”
Thanks to their fitted hearing
aids, Jacqueline and Lynn con-
tinue to lead an active and social
life. Watch a video of their story
online, read through the re-
search, and find more informa-
tion about hearing loss at
www.ncoa.org/HearingLoss.
An invitation to take personal
action to improve hearing!
In addition to visiting
www.ncos.org/HearingLoss,
please consider making an ap-
pointment at the OCCOA at the
Free Hearing Clinic. The clinic
is held every month on the first
Monday at the OCCOA business
office location – 120 Grandview
Boulevard, Gaylord.
Services offered through a
partnership with Ryan T. Hamil-
ton AU. Audiologist & Director
of Advantage Audiology & Hear-
ing Center include otoscopic in-
spection and cerumen removal,
middle ear function analysis,
pure tone hearing screenings,
hearing aid cleaning, program-
ming, and electroacoustic hear-
ing aid analysis.
For more information on serv-
ices, support, and resources
available through your Otsego
County Commission on Aging,
call 732-1122 or visit our web site
at www.OtsegoCountyCOA.org.
(1) 1999 Study “The Consequences of
Hearing Loss in Older Adults” conducted
by the Seniors Research Group, an al-
liance between the National Council on
Aging and Market Strategies, Inc.
###
Submitted by Dona J. Wishart
exeCutive direCtor – otsego County Com-
mission on Aging
Introduction
This column is linked to na-
tional information from the Na-
tional Council on Aging. It is
like a column, in that it is in-
formative, perhaps entertain-
ing, and carries some opinion.
As you read this information
presented by the NCOA some
questions may come to mind.
These may include: What can
you do right here in Otsego
County through your Otsego
New Campaign, in Partnership with united Health
Foundation, Stresses that Hearing Loss is a Family Affair
Page 9
S e N i o r L i V i N g
Fall/Winter 2012 • ChoiCe PubliCations
You have
a choice.
It’s okay to ask for help.
You don’t have to go it alone when
someone you love is seriously ill.
When you partner with Hospice of
Michigan, we help the person you love.
You make the decisions. We bring the
medicine, the equipment, and a caring
team that will make you glad you called.
HOSPICE OF MICHIGAN | 888-247-5701 |
WWW.HOM.ORG
Serving Northeastern Michigan
since1981
u ha
choic
It’s okay to ask for help.
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p.
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of
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aring
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8





It’s okay to ask for help.
You don’t have to go it alone when
someone you love is seriously ill.
When you partner with Hospice of
Michigan, we help the person you love.
You make the decisions. We bring the
medicine, the equipment, and a caring
team that will make you glad you called.
HOSPICE OF MICHIGAN | 888-247-5701 |
WWW.HOM.ORG
Serving Northeastern Michigan
since1981
It’s okay to ask for help.
You don’t have to go it alone when someone
you love is seriously ill. When you partner
with Hospice of Michigan, you’ve signed on
with the most experienced hospice in the
state. A hospice that will answer your call
any time of day, any day of the week.
Whether at home, a facility or hospital
room, you make the decisions. We bring the
medicine, the equipment, and a caring team
that will make you glad you called.
888 247-5701 | WWW.HOM.ORG
Serving NE Michigan since 1981








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HO


























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|

















By Shirley Talent
Recent studies have shown
that a startling number of peo-
ple are living paycheck to pay-
check with little or no savings
to fall back on for emergen-
cies, much less retirement. If
you are one of the millions
over 40 who don’t have a re-
tirement savings plan in place,
it’s not to late to start.
First, analyze how much
money you think you will need
for retirement. If you aren’t
sure if you will be relocating
to another residence or more
affordable state, base your
plan on remaining where you
are now. Make a list of antici-
pated expenses including
mortgage payments, utilities,
home maintenance, living ex-
penses, and add extra for
health care, prescriptions, etc.
Even if you are in perfect
health now, chances are you
will have more health ex-
penses after you retire.
Make a list of all sources of
income that will be available
to you including your expected
Social Security benefit, pen-
sions from previous or current
employers and the expected
value of any 401(k) plans at re-
tirement age.
If your current employer
has a 401(k) or other retire-
ment plan and you have not
been participating, sign up as
soon as possible and make an
effort to contribute the maxi-
mum allowed each year. Most
employers contribute 50 per-
cent or match employee con-
tributions, so you are missing
out on an important benefit if
you aren’t participating. If
you are over 50, you are al-
lowed to contribute a larger
amount each year.
Consider that if you are 50
years old now and contribute
$1000 per month for the next 15
years, and your employer
matches 50 cents for every dol-
lar your savings would be
$270,000 even without calculat-
ing your pre-tax savings and
any interest. Keep in mind
that every dollar you put into
your 401(K) is also reducing
your tax bill each year.
Think about contributing to
a Roth IRA in addition to your
401(k) if you are eligible. Your
contributions to a Roth IRA
won’t be tax deductible but the
earnings will be tax-free when
you retire.
Find ways you can scale
back and reduce your ex-
penses. For example if you are
living in a large home and
your children have left home,
you may want to move to a
smaller, more affordable resi-
dence. Not only will you save
on your mortgage payment,
utility bills, insurance and
property taxes should de-
crease as well. Those who live
in areas with a high cost of
living should consider moving
to a less expensive area and in-
vest the savings in a retire-
ment fund.
Do everything you can to re-
duce credit card debt. Paying
only the minimum each
month means you are continu-
ally paying high interest rates
on money that could be going
into your retirement account.
Pay down high interest credit
cards, transfer balances to
lower interest cards, and after
you pay each card off, put the
amount you were paying for
the card into your retirement
savings instead.
Take a hard look at your
spending habits. Seeing how
much you spend and where
your money goes in black and
white can help you zero in on
areas where you can cut back.
For example, if you have cof-
fee and a bowl of cereal at
home and skip the designer
coffee and muffin you pick up
on the way to work, you could
save $30 a week and $120 or
more per month. Clipping gro-
cery coupons and shopping at
a store that doubles the
amount could save you $15-$20
on every grocery bill.
Scrutinize your bank state-
ment. If your bank is charging
you fees of $15 a month,
switch to a bank that offers
free checking and save $180
per year. Also study your cable
TV and phone charges. If you
shop around you may be able
to reduce your bills and put
that money into savings.
Even if you can’t afford to
put away a large sum of
money every month, there are
simple things you can do to
save more. Stock up on staple
items and clothing during
sales. Take advantage of two
for one discounts at restau-
rants and attend movie mati-
nees instead of paying full
price. Conduct an inventory of
items in your garage and clos-
ets and sell things you don’t
need at a lawn sale or on an
auction site.
Remember that even if you
are in the 45-50 year old age
range you still have several
decades for your earnings to
grow, so invest in mutual
funds, stocks and other care-
fully researched investments
that may give you a better rate
of return.
Most people underestimate
the amount of money they
will need to save for retire-
ment. Taking steps now to
save more and spend less can
provide you with peace of
mind knowing that you have
funds to fall back on.
Copyright © publishers-edge
Tips to Boost Your Retirement Savings
When You’ve Started Late
S e N i o r L i V i N g
Page 10
ChoiCe PubliCations • Fall/Winter 2012
OTSEGO
MEMORIAL
O G E S T O
S C I D E P O H T R O ' N
L A I R O M E M
O G E S T O
Accred||ed o] ||e Corrur||] lea||| Accred||a||or Proçrar
Cer||l|ed o] u.S. Cer|erº lor Ved|ca|d & Ved|care ard 8|ue Croºº 8|ue S||e|d ol V|c||çar
HOME CARE
& HOSPICE
Serving Antrim, Charlevoix, Emmet, and Otsego counties
800-551-4140 · 231-547-6092
www.nwhealth.org
When you need it...where you are
Submitted by Dale Gehman
direCtor, oCCoA
My old watch was fairly
simple, plain, and inex-
pensive. But when I had to
replace it recently, I
wanted another one just
like it. I know there are
watches that do more,
look better, and so on, but
I wanted what I knew and
liked.
The downside to my
shopping method is that I
refused to try other op-
tions. Maybe, just maybe,
there is another watch out
there I would like even
better. But that would
mean changing some-
thing, and like many peo-
ple, I resist change. I like
what I am comfortable
with, and change means,
well, something unknown
and a little unsettling.
We are not immune
from change at the
OCCOA. Our agency has
changed itself as the
world has changed, with
technology driving some
of that as we search for
ways to be more accessi-
ble, easier to work with,
and always fiscally re-
sponsible. In the past two
years, the OCCOA has
adopted three new tech-
nologies that have helped
with those goals: Web
Timesheet Software, My-
SeniorCenter, and a new
telephone system. First
we installed the timesheet
software, which works
like a computer-based
time clock, allowing staff
to enter their timesheets
on a computer, and au-
tomating some of the pay-
roll and reporting
functions. It has saved
time, money, and frustra-
tion.
The second, MySenior-
Center, is a unified client
and volunteer database
which uses bar-coded key
tags to help us track what
programs folks have at-
tended. The system re-
places the drudgery of
sign-in sheets (and read-
ing those signatures!), and
it makes reporting on that
information a snap. Ironi-
cally, our initial concerns
about how well clients
would adopt the new sys-
Buddy, Can You Spare Some Change?
Volunteer Myrna Jasinski shows ameal client how to use his new OCCOA key card while Volunteer
MaxineFinkbeiner looks on
CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE
Page 11
S e N i o r L i V i N g
Fall/Winter 2012 • ChoiCe PubliCations
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800.342.7711 · vitalcare.org
tem were quickly forgotten when
we realized many clients already
had three or four tags from area
businesses on their key chains.
So much for us being the leaders!
The most recent change is our
conversion to a new telephone
system. The old system had seen
several U.S. presidents come and
go. But it was not just the wear
and tear; we needed something
that allows our staff to be as effi-
cient as possible, while allowing
you to get to the person you need
directly and easily.
The good news is that the parts
of the old system that you are
most familiar with have not
changed. Our main number is
still 732-1122, and Customer Serv-
ice Coordinator Tracy Burley an-
swers that line. So many of you
know it by heart that it just can-
not change. What we have
changed is 1) assign direct num-
bers to both staff and depart-
ments, as well as 2) tie our two
offices together so that we can
actually talk to each other.
Previously, callers wanting to
discuss their In-Home Services
or change their Home Delivered
Meals had to call the main num-
ber and get transferred. And,
honestly, with some of those
calls, we did not know who would
be answering the call. It was
frustrating and awkward. Now,
though, you can easily connect to
the person or leave him/her a
message by calling the depart-
ment numbers below.
In-Home Services (Homemak-
ing, Personal Care, Respite)
989-705-2574
Kitchen (Home Delivered
Meals, meal site information)
989-732-1746
Advocacy Department
(Medicare, Social Security, etc)
989-732-9977
Otsego Haus (Adult Day Services)
989-732-4121
Volunteer Programs (Volun-
teering, Scheduling)
989-705-2572
Special Events Information
989-732-4702
Weather Closing Information
989-731-5652
It is now far easier for you to
reach the correct person by just
dialing that specific number. Pre-
viously, to change your home-
making schedule, you called the
main number (which is really
busy!), and got transferred to the
In-Home Services office, and if
you were lucky, you reached
Scheduler Sheila Markle, on the
first try. Now, you can dial that
number directly. Likewise,
callers who wanted to make
changes to their Home Delivered
Meals schedule needed to go
through a two-step process to
reach the Meal Program staff in
the kitchen. Now, if you dial the
Kitchen number, 732-1746, you
will be able to talk with the Meal
Program staff, or leave them a
message directly. Easy.
The new numbers allow us to
add some features that will help
in other ways, too. We now have a
Special Events line that allows
you to listen to a list of upcom-
ing events, as well as a direct
number for volunteers. And, the
Weather Closing line gives us a
way to alert you when bad
weather forces us to close.
Finally, many staff members
now have their own direct num-
bers as well, so if you want to
talk to me directly, for example,
call me at 989-748-4061. My phone
tells me who is calling, how
many calls I have had, what their
numbers are, and how many
messages I have. I guess it is all a
good change, and as soon as I fig-
ure out what all the blinking
lights mean, I will be right with
you.
Where does one f¡nd a
donaI¡on-onIy resIauranI,
whose m¡ss¡on ¡s Io feed
hungry peopIe regardIess
of Ihe¡r ab¡I¡Iy Io pay7
CurrenIIy Ihere are onIy
e¡ghIeen of Ihese resIau-
ranIs ¡n Ihe Un¡Ied 8IaIes
and one of Ihem ¡s r¡ghI
here ¡n your reg¡on.
The IronI !orch ¡s a
non-prof¡I 5O1(c)8. Our
doors opened, ¡n 8epIem-
ber of 2OO8, w¡Ih onIy
$8,2OO.OO ¡n donaI¡ons. !n
2O11, w¡Ih Ihe hard work of
a ded¡caIed commun¡Iy
and Ihe donaI¡ons of gen-
erous conIr¡buIors, our
morIgage was pa¡d off.
Our board members are
currenIIy charI¡ng a paIh
for Ihe IronI !orch`s fu-
Iure. Th¡s ¡ncIudes ex-
pand¡ng Ihe k¡Ichen and
resIrooms, bu¡Id¡ng a
greenhouse, ¡mpIemenI¡ng
a menIor¡ng program for
garden¡ng, and consIrucI-
¡ng a fac¡I¡Iy IhaI wouId
encourage and supporI
cIasses ¡n food preparaI¡on
and preserv¡ng.
OnIy w¡Ih donaI¡ons
w¡II our v¡s¡on be made a
reaI¡Iy. The IronI !orch
M¡n¡sIr¡es ¡s aIways Iook-
¡ng for voIunIeers for Ihe
Cafe and our M¡n¡sIr¡es'
comm¡IIees. !f you wouId
I¡ke Io be parI of IhaI v¡-
s¡on, pIease feeI free Io
conIacI John HasI¡ngs, for
comm¡IIee ¡nIeresI, aI 281-
G45-1878 or ¡f you wouId
I¡ke Io voIunIeer aI Ihe
Cafe', Jan Kassmussen aI
281-588-2OOO.
The Front Porch - On a mission to feed the hungry
Page 12
S e N i o r L i V i N g
ChoiCe PubliCations • Fall/Winter 2012
12G1 \¡IIage !arkway, CayIord M! 4D785
PH: (989) ?05-2500 fax: (D8D) 7O5-25O5
aspenr¡dge_rImgmI.com - www.rImgmI.com
A KeI¡remenI L¡v¡ng Commun¡Iy
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Submitted by Dale Gehman
direCtor, oCCoA
What happens when we
stop thinking about
“what we do,” and we
think about “what can we
do?” It really is human
nature to tell ourselves “I
don’t do that” or “It’s not
something I can do” be-
fore we have even tried to
do whatever “it” is. When
we started asking our-
selves that question at
the Otsego County Com-
mission on Aging regard-
ing our fee-for-services
offering, you could say
the light bulb went on,
and we started seeing our
capabilities rather than
our traditional offerings.
And, those capabilities
meant opportunities to
serve clients in new and
better ways than we have
in the past. I want to tell
you about a few of those
clients, and what we have
been able to do for them
with our new services
format.
One of the corner-
stones of our agency is
our meal program. As di-
rected by the federal
Older American Act, we
have provided tasty and
nutritious meals for thou-
sands of our area’s older
adults through both our
Congregate and Home
Delivered Meals pro-
grams. But, if a person
had a special dietary
need, we did not offer
customized meals to meet
that need. It was a great
system for the majority of
people, but there were
others for whom it fell
short.
Several months ago, we
learned that Lee Magsig,
a regular at our Congre-
gate Meals, was having
trouble with sodium in
his diet, which had
landed him in the hospi-
tal for some weeks. What
Magsig needed was a
comprehensive plan to
limit his sodium. After
discussing it with him,
the agency proposed a
meal plan that met his di-
etary restriction. Since
then, Magsig has paid for
12 especially-prepared
meals each week, but,
more importantly, he has
stayed out of the hospi-
tal. “All my readings went
down to normal,” Magsig
says after he began eat-
ing the meals prepared
for him.
As required by Older
American Act meal-pro-
gram standards, the Con-
gregate and Home
Delivered meals we offer
are already low in
sodium, but for those,
like Magsig, who have
even further restrictions,
our staff can accommo-
date those needs. “Basi-
cally, I’m still using the
same food,” says Meal
Program Coordinator
Suzanne Bannister, “but
the key to making it low
in sodium is the prepara-
tion, as well as balance
It’s All In How You Look At Things
Client Lee Magsig and OCCOAMeal Program Coordinator Suzanne Bannister
CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE
Page 13
S e N i o r L i V i N g
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with fresh fruit and vegeta-
bles.” Magsig says, for him,
“It’s a lot easier. This way, it’s
nice.”
To make the menu as pleas-
ing as possible, Magsig and
Bannister occasionally dis-
cuss the meals and options.
“I tell her the stuff I don’t
like, and she lays off that,”
laughed Magsig. That feed-
back helps Bannister keep
the meals interesting and
satisfying, even while she is
limiting the sodium. So, in
the end, the meals help
Magsig stay healthy, but
maybe the best part is that
he doesn’t have to cook. “I
hate being in the kitchen,”
he admits.
Another mainstay of the
OCCOA is our In-Home Serv-
ices, which includes personal
care, homemaking, and
respite. Like many of the
services we offer, this sup-
port, in many cases, allows
clients to stay in their homes
or with family longer than
they might have been able to
otherwise. Local resident
Donna Vinecki and her
mother, Katherine White, are
one such example. White,
who lives with Vinecki and
her husband Ed, has been a
client receiving In-Home
Services through the
OCCOA. Recently, though, Vi-
necki has used additional
respite services from the
OCCOA, which the Michigan
Department of Human Serv-
ices (DHS) has paid for. The
respite time was over and
above what was typically
available from the OCCOA,
but we now offer it and more
on a fee-for-service basis.
On some occasions, when
Vinecki needed to go out of
town for doctors appoint-
ments, she has used the
OCCOA respite care on a fee-
for-service basis to insure
that White was not left home
alone. “It works great,” she
says. In the past, Vinecki
adds, her brother would have
had to come up from down-
state to stay with their
mother for the day so that
she could go to her appoint-
ments.
But, for caregivers like the
Vineckis who are tied to the
role 24/7, it is more than just
getting away for appoint-
ments. Vinecki says the
added respite care also pro-
vides some needed down time.
“We need a break once in a while,
Mom from us, and us from Mom,”
she quips.
And, again, as with so much of
what the OCCOA does, the main
goal is allowing our area older
adults to live as they choose,
where they choose. Sometimes, it
does not take a lot of help for the
clients and their caregivers, but it
makes a big difference nonethe-
less. “I’d like to have her around
for as long as I can,” Vinecki adds.
Had either of the examples
above been brought to our agency
in past years, the answer we prob-
ably would have given would have
been “I’m sorry, but we don’t offer
that.” Now, though, you might say
we have a different perspective.
We prefer to look at opportunities
and think “how can we help?”
After all, if we are in the business
of providing meals, or providing
respite care, how can we help
even more people through those
services? It’s out-of-the-box think-
ing, and we are enjoying the chal-
lenges and opportunities it
brings. If you have questions
about how we might be able to
help you with fee-for-service offer-
ings, please contact us at 989-732-
1122.
Page 14
S e N i o r L i V i N g
ChoiCe PubliCations • Fall/Winter 2012
Eileen Godek
volunteer CoordinAtor, oCCoA
In a community where
family values are still im-
portant and folks watch
out for each other, espe-
cially those who are most
vulnerable, caring for
older adults has long
been a priority for Otsego
County residents. The
idea of serving the
county’s elderly began
back in the 1970s when a
group of folks volun-
teered their time to pre-
pare potluck-style meals
for them in what most
county residents know,
today, as the Community
Center.
However, the budget
was small, and thus lim-
ited the numbers of older
adults who could benefit
from this volunteer meal
program. It didn’t take
long before community
leaders recognized and
promoted the need for a
formal organization that
would enable even more
older adults to benefit
from a formally-struc-
tured meal program and
other much-needed serv-
ices – services that could
be applied for and funded
from Older American Act
dollars and state grants.
The OCCOA was for-
merly established in July
1979!
Thanks to the persist-
ence and urgings of these
dedicated leaders, the Ot-
sego County Board of
Commissioners estab-
lished the Otsego County
Commission on Aging in
July 1979 to operate as a
business unit of the
county. The new agency
was charged with being
primarily concerned with
the county’s services and
responsibilities to its
older adults. This in-
cluded coordinating, pro-
viding, and initiating
public and private pro-
grams, and promoting
their independence and
well-being.
Once the agency was es-
tablished, a board of di-
rectors was recruited,
federal and state grants
were applied for and
awarded, and the first
part-time employees were
hired. Ten years later, a
local millage was passed
to provide even more
services to an even
broader base of older
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LocuI Scrcicc /or
LocuI Customcrs
Call Ne Today With Your
Life, Health & Medicare Insurance Questions
Timothy Bruce CLU
Certified Senior Advisor
tim@foxinsuranceagency.com
66S4 US 31 South
Charlevoix
231.547.3423
www.foxinsuranceagency.com
Proudly Serving Our Local Community for 20 Yearsl
OCCOA Board of Directors – Serving Otsego County since 1979!
OCCOA Board of Directors: (Front l-r) Mary Sanders, Jack Thompson, and Richard Beach-
nau.  (Back: l-r) Lee Olsen, Joe Duff, James Camiller, Jim Mathis, and Pat Slominski.
CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE
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Page 15
S e N i o r L i V i N g
Fall/Winter 2012 • ChoiCe PubliCations


































































































































































































































































































































































































































































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adults.
In 1993, new management was
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management techniques, princi-
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agency (still in place today),
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that since I plan to live here my
entire life. I also want to con-
tribute to Gaylord’s senior pop-
ulation to make it everything it
can be.” He adds, “As a person
with a business background, I
see a vibrant full-service Com-
mission on Aging as being an
important component to our
county’s economic develop-
ment.”
Thompson reflects on his in-
volvement with the OCCOA
board, “I greatly appreciate
the management team [Execu-
tive Director Dona Wishart
and Director Dale Gehman], as
well as the strategic emphasis
of the board.”
Mary Sanders, the assessor
and supervisor for Hayes
Township, has been a member
of the OCCOA board since the
late 1980s and currently
serves in the capacity of its
vice president. She recalls, “I
first became involved with
the agency when I assisted
seniors with their tax credits.
I appreciated the beginnings
of the agency and how it was
growing and improving.
When I was asked to be a part
of that growth, I was thrilled!”
She reflects, “Through the
years, I have worked with sev-
eral directors and have been
impressed with the profes-
sional and knowledgeable di-
rection that they have
provided for the agency.” She
adds, “The staff, at all levels,
makes a huge difference in the
lives of our seniors. All the
services we provide are special.
OCCOA truly makes lives eas-
ier for so many of our citi-
zens.” She concludes, “The
OCCOA is well known through-
out the state. We are the lead-
ers!”
Pat Slominski is a county re-
tiree who, until recently, was a
mediator with Community Me-
diation Services for 12 years.
She serves as the OCCOA board
secretary. She shares, “I joined
the OCCOA Board of Directors
to assist them in the important
job they do in taking care of the
needs of the elderly in our com-
munity and in Otsego County.”
She reflects, “I appreciate being
an OCCOA board member be-
cause I want to assist the agency
in the meaningful work they do.”
James Camiller, CPA, is the
owner of James Camiller, CPA, in
Lewiston. A resident of Otsego
County, he currently serves the
OCCOA Board of Directors as its
treasurer. He notes, “I joined the
board because I wanted to become
more involved with the commu-
nity.” He adds, “I also wanted to
be a contributor to the success of
the agency.”
Also serving on the OCCOA
Board of Directors are Richard
Beachnau, attorney Alan Couture,
Gaylord City Manager Joe Duff,
Rudi Edel, and Pastor Jim Mathis.
Lee Olsen is the Otsego County
Commissioner’s Board liaison.
Sadly, Bob Harden, who served for
many years as the NEMCSA liai-
son, passed away nine months ago.
His contribution to the OCCOA
Board of Directors, as well as our
community, will always be remem-
bered and appreciated.
To learn more about the OCCOA
Board of Directors, dates and times
of board meetings, or the OCCOA’s
services, please visit our website,
OtsegoCountyCOA.org.
Page 16
S e N i o r L i V i N g
ChoiCe PubliCations • Fall/Winter 2012
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By Amanda Knoles
According to the U. S.
Census Bureau, almost 40
percent of Americans who
are 45 and older are single.
High divorce rates, longer
life spans, the loss of a
spouse, and the decision
by some simply not to
marry have swelled the
ranks of older singles to
36.2 million.
Older singles seeking to
expand their social lives
are discovering the dating
world has changed signifi-
cantly thanks to personal
ads, dating services, and
the Internet. Where plac-
ing a personal ad was once
seen as an act of despera-
tion, today it’s one of the
easiest ways of putting
yourself back in the dat-
ing game.
Online dating services
seem to work well for
older singles because it
gives them a chance to get
to know a great deal about
potential matches before
meeting in person. Even
regular participation in
other non-dating sites can
lead to a connection.
Classmates.com and col-
lege alumni sites have
helped many former
sweethearts reconnect
after years apart.
While many Baby
Boomers still prefer meet-
ing people through
friends, neighbors or rela-
tives, some like the
anonymity of looking for
prospects online. Some
sites are geared toward
the over 50 crowd, while
others are designed for
people with specialized in-
terests. Most participants
agree searching for con-
nections online is prefer-
able to hanging out at
bars.
If the idea of meeting
people online doesn’t ap-
peal to you it’s still possi-
ble to meet people the
old-fashioned way. Let
your friends know you’re
getting back into the dat-
ing scene and ask if they
know someone you might
like. Yes, you will have to
suffer through several
awkward dates, but
there’s always the chance
you’ll click with someone.
Most people over 50 aren’t
as idealistic as 20 and 30
year olds. They tend to be
more flexible and open-
minded about the types of
people they will date, and
they have fewer hang-ups
about long-term commit-
ments.
First dates can be awk-
ward and somewhat
stressful no matter what
your age. When you’ve
been out of the dating
scene for a while, make
the location of your first
date a place where you
both can feel comfortable.
Instead of going to a ro-
mantic restaurant, attend
a wine-tasting event or
grab a quick bite at a cof-
fee shop and play a round
of miniature golf. If you
can plan the date to coin-
cide with a common inter-
est such as attending a
concert, all the better.
Dating experts often ad-
vise against attending a
movie on a first date, but
it’s fine as long as you
share a meal or coffee af-
terward. While discussing
the film you’ve just seen
you may discover you are
both movie buffs with a
deep love of a certain
movie genre. Or, you may
find that your tastes or to-
tally different. Either way,
discussing movies before
or after the film can be an-
other way of getting to
know someone.
Avoid talking too much
about your divorce, past
relationships, or your chil-
dren. Your mission on a
first date is to get to know
the other person without
revealing too much emo-
tional baggage. Don’t tell
everything about yourself.
Leave some mystery so
the other person will want
to get to know you better.
Get involved in more ac-
tivities, whether it’s at-
tending singles night at
your church or joining a
divorced parents group.
Sign up for a hiking trip
or enroll in a photography
or cooking class. Even if
you don’t meet the love of
your life, you may find a
couple of new friends.
Recent studies have
shown that how many
friends you have is an im-
portant factor in how
happy you’ll be after you
retire. It turns out that
along with socking money
away for your retirement,
you should work on build-
ing a social network. Hav-
ing a group of people that
you can turn to for emo-
tional support and simply
spend time with helps re-
duce stress and build a
sense of security.
You don’t have to be as
choosy in picking your
friends as you are with
dating partners. After all,
you probably won’t be liv-
ing together, so if one of
you is messy and the other
a neat freak when it comes
to personal habits, it won’t
matter as long as you
enjoy each other’s com-
pany while playing golf or
going fishing.
To increase your circle
of friends you’ll have to
get out of the house more
often. Spend time at a
local park, talk to people
you meet while walking
your dog, visit an art
gallery regularly, or sim-
ply be friendly to others
when you frequent the
local coffee shop.
Spend a few hours a
week volunteering at a
hospital or join a group
like Habitat for Humanity.
Chances are within a few
weeks you will have a
larger circle of friends
and the satisfaction of
contributing to a good
cause.
Copyright © publishers-edge
Making New Friends and Dating After 50
Page 17
S e N i o r L i V i N g
Fall/Winter 2012 • ChoiCe PubliCations
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g. inityhomehealth.or






324 Meado






MI ayling, Gr e, iv ws Dr 324 Meado






MI
People who keep their teeth and
gums healthy with regular brush-
ing may have a lower risk of de-
veloping dementia later in life,
according to a new study.
Researchers who followed close
to 5,500 elderly people over an 18-
year period, found those who re-
ported brushing their teeth less
than once a day were up to 65 per-
cent more likely to develop de-
mentia than those who brushed
daily.
Inflammation stoked by gum
disease-related bacteria is impli-
cated in a host of conditions in-
cluding heart disease, stroke and
diabetes.
And some studies have found
that people with Alzheimer’s dis-
ease, the most common form of
dementia, have more gum dis-
ease-related bacteria in their
brains than a person without
Alzheimer’s, said Paganini-Hill.
“It’s thought that gum disease
bacteria might get into the brain
causing inflammation and brain
damage.”
She and her team wanted to
look at whether good dental
health practices over the long
term would predict better cogni-
tive function in later life. The re-
searchers followed 5,468 residents
of a Californian retirement com-
munity from 1992 to 2010. Most
people in the study were white,
well-educated, and relatively af-
fluent. When the study began,
participants ranged in age from
52 to 105, with an average age of
81.
All were free of dementia at the
outset, when they answered ques-
tions about their dental health
habits, the condition of their
teeth and whether they wore den-
tures.
When the researchers followed-
up 18 years later, they used inter-
views, medical records and in
some cases death certificates to
determine that 1,145 of the origi-
nal group had been diagnosed
with dementia.
Of 78 women who said they
brushed their teeth less than
once a day in 1992, 21 had demen-
tia by 2010, or about one case per
3.7 women. In comparison,
among those who brushed their
teeth at least once a day, closer to
one in every 4.5 women developed
dementia. That translates to a 65-
percent greater likelihood of de-
mentia among those who
brushed less than daily.
Among the men, the effect was less
pronounced, with about one in six ir-
regular brushers developing the dis-
ease - making them 22 percent more
likely to have dementia than those
who did brush daily. Statistically,
however, the effect was so small it
could have been due to chance, the re-
searchers said.
There was a significant difference
seen between men who had all, or at
least most, of their teeth, or who
wore dentures, and those who didn’t -
the latter group were almost twice as
likely to develop dementia.
That effect was not seen in women,
though. Paganini-Hill could only
speculate on the reasons for the dif-
ferent outcomes among men and
women. Perhaps women wear their
dentures more often than men, and
they visit the dentist more frequently,
she suggested.
The new findings, published in the
Journal of the American Geriatrics
Society, cannot prove that poor dental
health can cause dementia. Neglect-
ing one’s teeth might be an early sign
of vulnerability to dementia, for in-
stance, or some other factor could be
influencing both conditions.
Still, this report “is really the first
to look at the effect of actions like
brushing and flossing your teeth,”
said Dr. Amber Watts, who studies
the causes of dementia at the Univer-
sity of Kansas and was not involved
in the research.
The new study does have some lim-
itations. Paganini-Hill and her team
looked at behavior and tooth count as
a kind of proxy for oral health and
gum disease. They didn’t carry out
any dental exams so they couldn’t de-
termine if people had gum disease or
not.
And tooth loss isn’t always related
to gum disease, Watts noted. Head in-
jury and malnutrition are also im-
portant causes of tooth loss in adults,
and any of those might increase risk
for dementia, she said.
“I would be reluctant to draw the
conclusion that brushing your teeth
would definitely prevent you from
getting Alzheimer’s disease,” Watts
said. Yet despite the limitations,
Watts said the study is an important
step toward understanding how be-
havior might be linked to dementia.
“It’s nice if this relationship holds
true as there’s something people can
do (to reduce their chances of devel-
oping dementia),” said Paganini-Hill.
“First, practice good oral health
habits to prevent tooth loss and oral
diseases. And second, if you do lose
your teeth, wear dentures.”
sourCe – JournAl of the AmeriCAn
geriAtriCs soCiety
Dental Health Linked to Dementia Risk
Page 18
S e N i o r L i V i N g
ChoiCe PubliCations • Fall/Winter 2012
By Amy Kennedy
You become eligible for
Medicare health insurance in
the United States when you turn
65. (Some younger people with
disabilities also qualify for the
federally sponsored program.) If
you are approaching age 65,
there is a seven-month period
during which you can apply for
Medicare. You may apply three
months before your 65th birth-
day, the month of your birthday,
or three months after your birth-
day by visiting the Social Secu-
rity Administration office near
you.
Part A Medicare helps pay for
hospital bills, and Part B helps
pay for doctor bills. (Part D is
the prescription drug insurance
program and it requires a sepa-
rate application process.) Most
people do not have to pay a
monthly premium for Part A,
which covers hospital bills. The
Medicare taxes you or your
spouse paid while working cover
the cost.
Whether you sign up for Part
B, which covers doctor bills, is
your choice. You will have to pay
a deductible and monthly pre-
mium for Part B coverage. You
may sign up when you first go
on Medicare, decline the cover-
age, or sign up in the future. If
you are still working or have
group health insurance from
your employer or your spouse’s
employer, you might not have an
immediate need for Part B. How-
ever, if you postpone signing up,
the premium could go up by 10
percent each year.
If you are 65 or older when you
sign up for Part B, you have six
months to buy any Medicare
Supplemental (Medigap) policy
you choose no matter what your
state of health. (This open en-
rollment period occurs only
once.) If you are 65 or older and
working and you have group
health insurance from your em-
ployer or a spouseís employer,
you can postpone your open en-
rollment period.
The Original Medicare Plan is
available throughout the United
States while Medicare Advan-
tage Plans (HMO, PPO, PFFS
plans) are available only in cer-
tain parts of the country. If you
have other plans besides the
Original Medicare Plan avail-
able to you, compare the costs
and benefits, then choose the
plan that suits your needs best.
The amount you pay for
Medicare depends on which plan
you choose and whether you
have other insurance. If you
choose a Medicare HMO or PPO,
you won’t need to purchase a
Medicare Supplemental (Medi-
gap) policy. (Medigap is insur-
ance that helps pay some of your
uncovered costs in the Original
Medicare Plan.)
In the Original Medicare Plan
you can go to any doctor or hos-
pital in the United States that ac-
cepts Medicare. In a Medicare
HMO or PPO you will pay more
if you go to doctors outside the
plan network, and with a PFFS
plan you can choose any doctor
or hospital that accepts the
Medicare plan. (If you need
emergency care, you can go any
doctor or hospital no matter
which Medicare plan you have.)
If you are on a limited budget,
costs in a Medicare HMO or PPO
are typically lower. You may be
able to get help from your state
to pay some of your health care
costs if you qualify.
All Medicare plans pay for
your health care costs away
from home if you have an emer-
gency or need urgent care. If
you travel outside the country
frequently you should choose a
plan that covers health care out-
side the United States.
As we get older many of us
have medical concerns that re-
quire the services of a special-
ist. With the Original Medicare
Plan, PFFS plans, and PPOís you
can go directly to any specialist.
With a Medicare HMO you can
only see a specialist after your
primary care doctor makes a re-
ferral.
Medicare expanded coverage
to include a one-time compre-
hensive physical exam after en-
rolling in Medicare Part B, plus
screening tests for heart disease
and diabetes. The exam must
take place within the first six
months that you have coverage.
It includes an overall evaluation
of your health, information
about preventive care, and refer-
rals for additional care if
needed. The exam includes a re-
view of your medical history,
blood pressure check, vision
test, and evaluation of drugs
you take.
Copyright © publishers-edge
Facts everyone should know about Medicare
Top Three
Things To
Remember
1. You have seven
months to sign up
for Medicare (three
months before your
65
th
birthday, the
month of your birth-
day, and three
months after your
birthday.)
2. Part B Medicare
covers doctor bills
and it’s optional. If
you choose to enroll,
you will pay a de-
ductible and monthly
premium.
3. The “Welcome To
Medicare” physical
exam (during the
first six months of
enrollment in Part B)
includes screening
tests for heart dis-
ease and diabetes.
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Page 19
S e N i o r L i V i N g
Fall/Winter 2012 • ChoiCe PubliCations
AdVErTISEMENT
By Jim Akans
Having a properly functioning and effi-
ciently operating heating and cooling sys-
tem is essential for every homeowner. But
as we age, ensuring reliable year round
comfort and safety in the home becomes
even more important. Thankfully, the ex-
perts at Family Comfort Systems make it
easy, and affordable; to keep your home’s
heating and cooling system in top shape.
With experience in the heating and cool-
ing industry since 1979, Kevin Westcott has
led the team at Family Comfort Systems
since establishing his locally-owned Gay-
lord business back in 1995. The company’s
longstanding tradition of expertise and ex-
cellence in customer service has estab-
lished a loyal customer base throughout
northern Michigan.
The company recently re-located to 519 W.
Second Street in Gaylord, and offer a wide
range of services and products designed to
maintain the safety and energy efficiency
of the heating and cooling system in any
home or business.
“We are currently running a special pro-
gram for homeowners and businesses to
have their heating system tuned-up and in-
spected for safe operation before winter
hits,” states Kevin Westcott. “Having an in-
spection will ensure the system runs more
efficiently, thereby using less fuel to oper-
ate, will make it less likely that the home-
owner or business will experience a
breakdown this winter, and we will inspect
the system for any safety concerns.”
The service is actually a multi-point in-
spection that includes a safety check, a
thorough cleaning and filter replacement,
an inspection of the heat exchanger and
venting system, adjustments to the burn-
ers, and lubrication of any applicable com-
ponents. Westcott notes that while tuning
up the system will result in fuel bill sav-
ings, the safety inspection is critical.
“If the heat exchanger has a crack in it or
if the chimney is plugged,” he relates, “the
system will leak deadly carbon monoxide
gas into the interior of the home. That will
result in the occupants becoming sick, or in
cases of a severe leak, it can be fatal.”
The heat exchanger on a furnace is the
primary component for transferring heat
from the burning fuel (natural gas, propane
or fuel oil) to the air circulated by the sys-
tems blower. A series of hollow metal
tubes, the heat exchanger undergoes in-
credible stress over time as it cycles from
room temperature to extremely high de-
grees during operation. Eventually this
stress can lead to cracks in the metal that
allows carbon monoxide, which is normally
channeled to the exhaust system, to filter
into the home.
If a system needs to be updated, ongoing
innovations in technology offer today’s
home and business owners heating and
cooling solutions that are more efficient,
economical, and comfortable than ever be-
fore. Among the many equipment options
offered at Family Comfort Systems is the
air source heat pump; a unique cooling and
heating technology that has evolved over
the past few decades to become a viable,
and economical, approach to creating a vir-
tually year-round indoor comfort in homes
and businesses right here in northern
Michigan.
Kevin Westcott states, “It is a technology
that has been around for a long time,
though 30 years ago an air source heat
pump was not something that would work
well in northern climates. Developments in
technology over the years has made heat
pumps a very viable option in our region,
typically requiring an alternate heating
source only when the outside temperature
dips below 30 degrees.”
Westcott notes that in the case of a home
or business that uses standard propane fed
furnace system, the utility savings
achieved by adding a heat pump can ap-
proach 30-percent. Those using a natural
gas fed furnace can save approximately 15-
percent. An additional benefit is the air
source heat pump will provide indoor air-
cooling during the summer.
“If someone is looking at replacing an ex-
isting furnace or air conditioning system,”
Westcott states, “we will run the numbers
for them and see how the utility savings
will pay back if they utilize an air source
heat pump. There are also many rebates
available that can substantially offset the
initial investment they make for the equip-
ment.”
Whether your heating system is of a re-
cent vintage, or has been lurking in the util-
ity room for a decade or more, an autumn
inspection is a great way to keep winter’s
cold where it belongs; in the gorgeous
northern Michigan outdoors.
Family Comfort Systems can be contacted
at (989) 732-8099 or at www.familycomfort-
systems.com.
Having a properly functioning and efficiently operating heating and cooling system is essential for every
homeowner. Thankfully, the experts at Family Comfort Systems, led by owner Kevin Westcott, make it easy,
and affordable, to keep your home’s heating and cooling system in top shape. PhoTo by Jim AkAns
Page 20
S e N i o r L i V i N g
ChoiCe PubliCations • Fall/Winter 2012
By James Thomas
“When we honestly ask
ourselves which person in
our lives mean the most to
us, we often find that it is
those who, instead of giv-
ing advice, solutions, or
cures, have chosen rather
to share our pain and
touch our wounds with a
warm and tender hand.
The friend who can be
silent with us in a moment
of despair or confusion,
who can stay with us in an
hour of grief and bereave-
ment, who can tolerate
now knowing, not curing,
not healing and face with
us the reality of our pow-
erlessness, that is a friend
who cares.”
Henri Nouwen, Out of
Solitude
Those who have come
through grief often re-
mark that the loving sup-
port of friends and family
members made all the dif-
ference. But many people
aren’t sure what to say or
do.
One widow said, “My
husband died suddenly.
From that day until this,
my supervisor has not
said one word to me about
his death.” Although an
estimated 25% of employ-
ees in any given workplace
are grieving, co-workers
are often reluctant to
bring up the subject. This
just adds to a person’s
grief.
After the death of her
son, a woman joined her
church’s bereavement sup-
port group. They give
practical aid: “One person
returned dishes to those
who had brought food; an-
other helped address
thank you notes. A young
man offered to mow the
lawn and another offered
to take her friend to
church.”
Grief has been described
as the emotion that heals
itself. During ancient
times, stoic philosophers
encouraged their followers
not to grieve, believing
that self-control was the
appropriate response to
sorrow. Well intentioned,
but uninformed people
still carry on this long-
held tradition. We live in a
society that encourages re-
pressing the emotion of
grief, as opposed to ex-
pressing it. The result is
that many people either
grieve in isolation or at-
tempt to run away from
their grief.
Am I Qualified to Help?
Perhaps you don’t feel
qualified to help. You may
feel uncomfortable and
awkward. Such feelings
are normal, but don’t let
them keep you away. If
you care about your sor-
rowing friend or relative,
you are qualified to help.
In fact, simply communi-
cating that you care is
probably the most impor-
tant thing you can do. The
following suggestions are
offered to help you reach
out to a grieving friend.
Communicate Warmth
Give a hug or touch.
These communicate
warmth, caring and love.
It’s okay to say very little
on an early visit. A press
of the hand or a simple
touch feels good and may
be all that is needed. Ac-
cept silence. Your pres-
ence takes the place of
words.
Be Present
The experiences of
shock, denial, numbness
and disbelief are nature’s
way of temporarily pro-
tecting the mourner from
the reality of death. Feel-
ing dazed, unable to con-
centrate or make decisions
are common occurrences.
Sometimes people drive to
a store and can’t remem-
ber how they got there.
Quiet, caring, supportive
companionship often is
the greatest need. Just be
there! Acknowledge that
you too feel helpless. Do
not offer easy answers or
explanations.
Be Yourself
Bring flowers, bake
cookies, and write a letter.
Taking time to write about
memories of the person
who died will bring ongo-
ing comfort, as it can be
read over and over again.
Offer to prepare a meal,
clean the house or care for
the children. This kind of
help lifts burdens and cre-
ates a bond.
Listen!
Accept whatever feelings
are expressed. Anger, frus-
tration, and guilt are
sometimes difficult to
hear and should not be
taken personally. Anger is
often addressed toward
those who are most
trusted. It is necessary for
those in grief to recognize
and articulate these feel-
ings in order to process
them for healthy healing.
Respond with Empathy
When it is time to speak,
do so simply and quietly.
Helpful statements which
convey acceptance are:
“It must be very hard to
accept.”
“That must be very
painful.”
“I’m sorry.”
“I wish I could take the
pain away.”
“It’s okay to be angry with
God.”
Avoid Clichés
Statements such as those
listed below increase the
pain and anger of grief.
“You can have other chil-
dren.”
“You will marry again.”
“Time heals all things.”
“It’s God’s will.”
“I know how you feel.”
Keep in Touch
You may think you’re
being considerate by leav-
ing the person alone, but
the griever often feels
abandoned. Visits and
phone calls can be very
helpful.
Be Patient
Grieving can take any-
where from a few months
to years. There is no
timetable for grief. There
is nothing wrong with a
family that remembers,
cares and cries, even after
years of loss. Beware of
setting deadlines by state-
ments such as “Don’t you
think you should be over
this by now?”
Use the Deceased Per-
son’s Name
Remembering events
shared together and using
the deceased person’s
name in normal conversa-
tion are indications that
the person’s life was of
value and memories of
good times will last.
Tears are Healing
Crying is nature’s way of
releasing internal tension
in the body and allowing
the mourner to communi-
cate a need to be com-
forted. Sharing tears indi-
cates a willingness to
enter into grief work and
conveys a sense of feeling
understood. Tears may ex-
press acute pain or the joy
of memories. Avoid say-
ing, “Don’t cry,” or push-
ing tissues toward
someone who is crying. Of-
fering a tissue is some-
times seen as a signal that
the person should stop
crying.
Faith and Grief
In the grieving process,
people experience resent-
ment and often look for
someone to blame. They
may blame God for caus-
ing pain or for not pre-
venting it. A crisis of faith
challenges people to ask,
“Is there a God?” or “Why
is God letting this happen
to me?” Prayer can be very
difficult during times of
severe loss because there
is so much in the way: de-
nial, anger, depression or
painful feelings. You
might ask if they have a
source of spiritual sup-
port that might be of help.
You can also offer to re-
member them in your
prayers.
Grief is a Process. Re-
covery is a Choice.
Eventually grievers will
be ready to move on and
make a new life. As
helpers, you can:
Assist, but do not push
the person, in finding new
ways to approach their
life.
Let them know that
changes are okay.
Remind then that their
memories are always with
them.
Invite them to go places
with you.
Be there to listen to their
concerns about their
changing roles.
Encourage them to
reach out and be involved
with other people.
Remember to plant seeds
of realistic hope.
Copyright © publishers-edge
How to Help a Grieving Friend
heRe ARe some ideAs:
Listen. Be there without feeling you must constantly offer advice or good cheer.
Give your friend the freedom to cry.
Share memories of the person who died.
Avoid clichés like, “I know just how you feel.”No one knows another’s grief.
Visit, call and write regularly.
Provide support but let the grieving person make decisions.
Accept changes in your friend. Grief can be an emotional roller coaster.
Pray for your friend.
Page 21
S e N i o r L i V i N g
Fall/Winter 2012 • ChoiCe PubliCations
Senior CenIer Hours: Mon - Thurs 8:8Oam Io Gpm, Ir¡days 8:8Oam Io 5pm
Ior ¡nformaI¡on on acI¡v¡I¡es and evenIs, pIease caII (D8D_ 848-7128
308 LawndaIe SI., GrayIing, MI 49?38
Phone (989) 348-?123 · fax (989) 348-8342
VisiI us on Ihe web! www.crawfordcoa.org
e-ma¡I: d¡recIor_crawfordcoa.org
Progrums & Acticitics 2012-13
Senior CenIer Dining
Monday - Thursday 12pm and 5pm
Ir¡day 12pm onIy
$2.5O donaI¡on for 8en¡or GO-
8oup & 8aIad Ðar
Mon-Thur $2.5O seI cosI.
CommuniIy Dinners
CrandparenIs` Ðay Сnner · 8epI. 18 · 4-Gpm
HarvesI Сnner · OcI. 18 · 4-Gpm
Thanksg¡v¡ng Сnner · Þov. 15 · 4-Gpm
Chr¡sImas Сnner · Ðec. 18 · 4-Gpm
What is one to do in this
age of higher prices and
longer longevity? Many
of you have taken advan-
tage of a reverse mort-
gage and this has been the
answer to help relieve
your financial strains; but
many of you are still on
the fence wondering is
this a good idea? Making
use of your assets is a
smart and prudent ap-
proach to managing the
rising costs of goods and
services. The one asset
that is often overlooked is
your home. Utilizing your
home’s assets and tapping
into that asset is a viable
and intelligent strategy.
Unlike tapping into sav-
ings and stocks, when you
use the assets from your
home, you are ‘keeping’
or retaining that asset.
You still own your home
and you still can watch
that asset grow and grow.
When viewed over time,
your home is perhaps the
most safe and viable in-
vestment most of us have
made.
So what exactly is a Re-
verse Mortgage? A Re-
verse Mortgage is a
special type of loan which
enables you to tap into the
equity in your home and
receive cash, a tax-free
monthly income or a line
of credit. You continue to
retain full ownership of
your home while the re-
maining equity stays with
you or your heirs, and
there are no monthly pay-
ments to make. The loan
does not have to be repaid
until you permanently
leave your home. Reverse
mortgages are backed by
the U.S. Government
therefore protecting you
from ever “outliving the
loan” or owing more than
the value of the home. A
Reverse Mortgage is easy
to obtain provided that
you are at least 62 years of
age or older, your home is
your primary residence
and you have substantial
equity in your home (pro-
ceeds of the Reverse
Mortgage can be used to
pay off existing liens or
mortgages).
As with anything, Re-
verse Mortgages aren’t a
good fit for every situa-
tion, but for some it can
truly be a financial life
saver. A Reverse Mort-
gage could be a good fit if
you or a family member
(62 or over) is struggling
financially. It can provide
a dependable monthly in-
come or pay off debts
such as credit cards or an
existing mortgage to free
up those monies. Unlike a
typical home equity line
of credit there are no
monthly payments to
make, therefore it doesn’t
just consolidate or lower
your monthly payments,
it actually eliminates
them. There are many
misconceptions about Re-
verse Mortgages so educa-
tion is the key. Following
are a few key factors re-
garding Reverse Mort-
gages:
What is the minimum
age to qualify? 62 or older.
There is no maximum
age.
Does the mortgage com-
pany own the home? NO.
You still retain owner-
ship. It’s simply a lien
that is added to the prop-
erty.
Can you outlive the loan
and be kicked out of your
house? NO. As long as
you maintain the prop-
erty taxes, insurance and
general upkeep of the
home you can never be
kicked out regardless of
your age or the remaining
home equity funds.
Will your heirs be liable
for repaying the debt? NO.
Because they are govern-
ment backed loans you
and your heirs are pro-
tected from ever owing
more than the future
value of the home.
Are credit scores and in-
come a factor when being
approved? NO, not cur-
rently.
To find out more information
about Reverse Mortgages call
Lisa Parks with The Reverse
Mortgage Center at (231)218-
0307 for a personalized analysis
to determine if a Reverse Mort-
gage would benefit you.
What is a Reverse Mortgage and is it a good idea?
Page 22
S e N i o r L i V i N g
ChoiCe PubliCations • Fall/Winter 2012
9ß9.732.1122
occoo@occooonline.org
www.OlsegoCounlyCOA.org
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D K O L I / O
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Charlevoix County Seniors ride Free
Charlevoix County Transit
Boyne City
231-582-6900
10% for all seniors on all menu
prices.( excludes all specials and ex-
press pizzas and meal deals). AArP
members included: Need to show
card.
Spicy Bob’s
472 N. Lake St., Boyne City
231-582-9560
“Free senior drink (hot or cold) with
purchase of any sandwich, salad or
pizza.”
Subway
114 Water Street, Boyne City
231-582-7020
$1.00 off the regular price. Matinees
(shows before 6:00 pm are $5.00 for
Seniors
Charlevoix Cinema III
Downtown Charlevoix
231-547-4353
dunmaglas offers 10% off Green Fees
for Seniors 55+. Not available with
other offers
Dunmaglas Golf Course
9031 Boyne City Rd,Charlevoix
231 547-4653
“Senior Citizen Meal deals. Special of-
fers include Pizza for 1, P’Zone® Pizza,
Sandwiches, Tuscani Pasta and
Spaghetti. Senior Citizen Meal deals
are available to guests 60 Years of Age
or Older …
All day / Every day”
Pizza Hut
1303 Bridge Street, Charlevoix
231-547-5321
10% off all purchases( must mention
before sale is rung up)
Billies Fashions
300 N Main St., Cheboygan
231-627-6177
Ask about our Senior discount
Family Plumbing Heating & Air
Conditioning
519 West Second St.. Gaylord
989-732-8099
10% for all seniors on all menu
prices.( excludes all specials and ex-
press pizzas and meal deals). AArP
members included: Need to show
card.
Spicy Bob’s
250 S. Lake St., East Jordan
231-536-3600
“Wednesday is senior discount day at
AK Hair Studio. 10% off all services
and products. Book appt online. Open
7 days, walk ins welcome. Electrolysis
(permanent hair removal), all hair
services, pedicures and manicures”
AK Hair Studio
250 Meijer Drive-
Inside Meijers
Gaylord
989-732-1000
25% off all Service (in-home or repair
center).
Valid September – October 2012
Alpine Computers
249 S. Wisconsin. Gaylord
989-732-5577
10% off labor for seniors
Alpine Electronics
1349 S Otsego Ave. Gaylord
989-732-5004
“10% discount off regular menu
prices.“
Jets Pizza
111 W. Main. Gaylord
989-731-9929
“Buy 2 hours of service,
get 2 hours free.”
Seniors Helping Seniors
221 E. Felshaw St.. Gaylord
989-448-8323
“10% Senior discount on all work
including Service Calls, and Installa-
tions”
Steve’s Heating
Gaylord
989-732-0906
Free Congragate Meal for Seniors
60+ (if it is your frst time)
Crawford County Commission
on Aging and Senior Center
308 Lawndale. Grayling
10% Parts and Labor.  No appoint-
ment nessary.  Free shuttle
service.  We service all makes and
models.. Saturday service 8am-12pm 
Feeny Ford
208 S. James St.. Grayling 989-
348-3242
10% for all seniors on all menu
prices.( excludes all specials and ex-
press pizzas and meal deals). AArP
members included: Need to show
card.
Spicy Bob’s
5604 W. M-72. Grayling
989-348-2828
discounts available to Emmet County
Seniors for Massage Therapy and Foot
Care Clinics
Friendship Centers of Emmet
County
1322 Anderson Road. Petoskey
231-347-3211
10% for all seniors on all menu
prices.( excludes all specials and ex-
press pizzas and meal deals). AArP
members included: Need to show
card.
Spicy Bob’s
1169 N. US 31 (in front of Glens
North), Petoskey
231-347-3015
10% off
Little Traverse Bay Cafe
314 W Mitchell St
Petoskey Mi
231 753 2211
15 % discount on pick up or dine in.
Monday receive the buffet $5.00
B.C. Pizza
910 Spring Street, Petoskey
(231) 347-1212
10% for all seniors on all menu
prices.( excludes all specials and ex-
press pizzas and meal deals). AArP
members included: Need to show
card.
Spicy Bob’s
1006 W. Main. Gaylord
989-732-2422
$$$ $$$
sEnioR
DisCoUnts
Page 23
S e N i o r L i V i N g
Fall/Winter 2012 • ChoiCe PubliCations
!|.¿ |.: .. ..t-·¿ »· .¿ ¡..·
.·: ..t-·¿ ·¿|· ...¿
–Darlene DeNike

231547-8630
Be sure to discuss a physical
therapy plan with your physician
ahead of time. If you’d like more
information, please call one of
our rehab centers.
Fre Hab
Re Hab
Knee Hab
Physical
therapy is
key to a
healthy
outcome
Facing joint
replacement?
Physical therapist
Kyle Nobel helps
Darlene DeNike
with some
knee-strengthening
exercises
231536-1451
An affiliate of
Charlevoix Area Hospital
An affiliate of
Charlevoix Area Hospital
231582-6365
Page 24 ChoiCe PubliCations • Fall/Winter 2012

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