Weekly Reader: Boost Your Background Knowledge!

Each week, you will read, take notes on, and reflect on an article or program using the AR-C in order to build your knowledge about the world and practice those writing skills. Each article or program should be cited using MLA format (use CitationMachine.net) . Use a tool to help you cite correctly: citationmachine.net or easybib.com Weeks 1 and 2 Due 9/12 Due 9/19 Weeks 3 and 4 Due 9/26 Due 10/3 Weeks 5 and 6 Due 10/10 Due 10/17 Weeks 7 and 8 Due 10/24 Due 10/31 Weeks 9 and 10 Due 11/7 Due 11/14 Weeks 11 and 12 Due 11/28 Due 12/5 Listen to a program on National Public Radio (either on the radio at 90.7 FM or online at http://www.npr.org/
Take notes in your composition book. Use the AR-C to write a question, and then write a paragraph response to the question.

Watch a 60 Minutes program—either on channel 6 on Sunday evening at 7pm, or from the online archives at http://www.cbsnews.com/sections/60minutes/main3415.shtml
Take notes in your composition book. Use the AR-C to write a question, and then write a paragraph response to the question.

Read an article from Time magazine- actual or online at http://www.time.com/time/
Take notes in your composition book. Use the AR-C to write a question, and then write a paragraph response to the question.

Read an article from The New York Times- actual or online at http://www.nytimes.com/
Take notes in your composition book. Use the AR-C to write a question, and then write a paragraph response to the question.

Read an article from a non-Florida based news outlet at the Newseum at http://www.newseum.org/news/index.html
Take notes in your composition book. Use the AR-C to write a question, and then write a paragraph response to the question.

Read an article from The Onion- an online magazine at http://www.theonion.com/
Take notes in your composition book. Use the AR-C to write a question, and then write a paragraph response to the question.

Weekly Reader: Step-by-Step
1. 2. 3. 4. Choose a text from the topics or sites noted. Read and annotate the text. Use Diigo or an annotation app for online reading. Generate a critical question about the reading using the AR-C (do this in your journal). TYPE a one page response to the question you created. Your response should: a. be double spaced, in 12-point serif font and 1 inch margins. b. establish a clear focus (claim/thesis) in your opening paragraph. c. be organized in paragraphs that relate to and support your claim. d. include a variety of examples and details from the text; examples from the text should be quoted, embed and cited. e. have a unique title that helps clarity or extends your focus or claim. f. demonstrate your understanding of grammar, usage and mechanics topics covered in class (formatting titles, punctuating quotations, etc.). g. be proofread and revised if needed. 5. SHARE and discuss responses in the read around circle on Wednesdays. FOCUS Ideas 4 Insightful Writing is clear, insightful and focused; captures reader’s attention. Order compels, enhances and moves ideas. Purposeful structure with powerful beginning and end. Writing flows with rhythm and cadence. Sentences has purposeful structure. Elegant. Words are precise, interesting and engaging (but not over done). The writer demonstrates a distinct voice that compels and engages an audience. Observes and uses standard conventions; few errors. Correctly uses structures reviewed in class. Meets all requirements. 3 Proficient Writing ideas are focused but ideas are general or obvious. Order moves reader through ideas in a basic way with a beginning, middle, end. 2 Limited Writing lacks clear purpose or ideas. Order seems missing or random. No identifiable structure.

Organization

Sentence Fluency

Writing moves along but Writing lacks flow; it is feels more business-like. difficult to follow. Sentences lack passion. Words are too common, obvious or lack energy. Writing seems sincere, but not engaged; it’s plain, aloof or removed. Reasonable control of conventions demonstrated. Meets most requirements. Words are simple, vague or limited in scope. Writer is indifferent, distance from topic/audience. Errors distract the reader and get in the way of meaning. Meets few, if any, requirements.

Word Choice Voice

Conventions

Formatting/Presentation

From Burke, Jim. “The Weekly Reader.” English Companion. http://englishcompanion.com/classroom/weeklyReader.shtml#tocMain

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