FREE

112 E. Sixth St., PO Box 382, Gaylord, MI 49734 • www.WeeklyChoice.com • (989) 732-8160
Weekly Choice
A Choice Choice Publication
Lifestyles of
Gaylord, located on
US 27 South in Gaylord,
offers a full line of alternative
heating products as well as
pool tables and hot tub/spas to
make the most of leisure living
in northern Lower Michigan.
PHOTO BY JIM AKANS
HIDDEN TREASURES
With approximately
4,000 square feet of
fully stocked resale
space, and new inventory arriv-
ing daily, customers can shop
for just about anything starting
with any letter in the alphabet
at A-2-Z Resale in Gaylord.
PHOTO BY JIM AKANS
Positive News,
Sports and
Events
Thursday, September 6, 2012
A to Z
Resale
By Jim Akans
The relentless drought across North
America this summer has had a devas-
tating effect on crop production across
the country. While consumers may find
prices at the supermarket higher than
normal during the winter ahead, the
STORY
PAGE 14
By Jim Akans
In Petoskey, million-dollar
scenic experiences are not
reserved for sunset alone, and
on Saturday, Sept. 8, you can
find out why. Mary Stewart
Adams, Program Director for
Emmet County's
International Dark Sky Park
at the Headlands, is working
in cooperation with the City
SEE LIGHTS OUT PAGE 5A
STORY
PAGE 5
GAYLORD
1390 Main St. West
989-732-8200
Lifestyles of
Gaylord
By Jim Akans
The 32nd Annual Gaylord
CROP Hunger Walk will take
place this coming Sunday,
September 9th, leaving St.
Andrew Episcopal Church
in Gaylord at 2 pm with
walkers having the option
of following one or five mile
routes. The walk is held
each year to raise awareness
of and provide food and
monetary donations to the
SEE CROP WALK PAGE 4A
¤
I-75, EXIT 290, VANDERBILT
West to Alexander Rd.
www.golfblackbear.net
TEE-TIME
HOTLINE
5 55 55 55 5 4 Star Golf Digest Rating
$
30
$
39
$
250
AUGUST SPECIALS
10 PLAY PASS
MONDAY -
THURSDAY
FRIDAY -
SUNDAY
$
39
$
100
$
49
MONDAY -
THURSDAY
FRIDAY -
SUNDAY
INCLUDING CART • Hot Dogs/chips
VALID THROUGH 8/31/12
VALID THROUGH 8/31/12
VALID THROUGH 8/31/12
Monday -
Thursday
Including Cart & Range Balls
Includes Range
& Large Pizza
Good Any Day -2012
Including Cart
HURRY
ONLY 20
AVAILABLE
PLAY ALL DAY!
4 - SOME SPECIAL
Inside...
& More!
Emmet County's International Dark Sky Park at the Headlands,
in cooperation with the City of Petoskey's Department of Parks
and Recreation will host an evening of stargazing at Petoskey's
Bayfront Park this Saturday evening, September 8th.
h08Th£8h N|0h|6Ah'S S£8V|0£ L£A0£8 S|h0£ 1976 º V|S|T 0S 0hL|h£ AT www.8Ah0h8V.00N
5ALF5 º 5FRV¡CF
RFNTAL º PART5
231.548.5443
6825 M-68
ALANSCN
V
PAYMENT
ASLOWAS

2012 Hornet Platinum Bunkhouse Travel Trailer
* 144 months with $2009
Down @ 4.99% APR
Model 28BHS
Stk #6509
FEATUPE$ |N0LU0E: Fror| 0ueer 8ed ard 0ueer
S|ze l|de·a·8ed, Fu|| S|ze loWer 8ur| W/F||p up TW|r
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Frar|rç, lea| lo|d|rç Tar|º ard Vuc|, Vuc| Vore.
per month
20/20 PROJECT
Paul and Beth Weise operate Northern Michigan Horse Rescue &
Rehab just outside of Gaylord. The devastating drought across the
country this summer has resulted in severe shortages of hay, leaving
the organization far short of the amount of hay their horses will need
this coming winter.
SEE HORSE RESCUE PAGE 4A
8£LL ¥008 I¡£M8 F08 F8££ A¡ www.MI0ßI6AßM0ߣ¥8A¥£8.00M
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MithiguaMeaey$uver.tem
*Coupon only on regular price menu items. Not with any other specials. Must present coupon at time of purchase.






El Rancho
El Ranchero
Drink Specials
Sunday Only • Domestic Beer - 1.99
Imported Beer - 2.50 • Margaritas - 20% off
1241 W. Main St.,
Gaylord
989.732.0307
2160 Anderson Rd.
Petoskey
231.487.1022
2 Combinations
#1 to #30
Any Purchase of $30 or more*
any 2 Lunches*
$
12.99
*
$
5.00 OFF
$
2.00 OFF
The Annual CROP Hunger Walk is a community-oriented event sponsored by the Church World Service. It’s
about neighbors, families and friends walking together to take a stand against world hunger. Sallie Anderson
and Helen Crandall are the co-coordinators of the 2012 Annual Gaylord Crop Hunger Walk, which takes place
this Sunday, September 9th at 2 pm.
PHOTO BY JIM AKANS
Covering 40 Towns in Northern Michigan including Gaylord, Petoskey,
Cheboygan, Grayling, Lewiston, Mancelona, Mio, Indian River and surrounding area.
PHOTO BY JIM AKANS
Northern Michigan
Horse Rescue & Rehab
faces difficult winter ahead
2012 GAYLORD
CROP HUNGER WALK
for franchise info www.biggby.com for franchise info www.biggby.com
Good at these locations only. Not good with any other offer.
No copies of this ad will be accepted. Discount is only
available with this coupon. Expires 10/31/12. CODE 102685
Good at these locations only. Not good with any other offer.
No copies of this ad will be accepted. Discount is only
available with this coupon. Expires 10/31/12. CODE 102685
+90=,
;/9<
Inside the Petoskey Meijer &
1004 W Main Street • Gaylord
Inside the Petoskey Meijer &
1004 W Main Street • Gaylord
BOGO FREE
(BOGO = Buy One Get One)
any grande/super
specialty beverage
(hot, iced or frozen)
$1.00 OFF
any grande/super
specialty beverage
(hot, iced or frozen)
cider &
s’more
de er & de id c


$1 00 OF


FF


BOGO FREE




e r &
s’ m o ee r r re re s
d


for franchise info www
. Not good with any other offer Good at these locations only
No copies of this ad will be accepted. Discount is only
available with this coupon. e Expir
Inside the Petoskey Meijer &
eet • G 1004 W Main Str
$1.00 OF
any grande/sup
specialty bevera
(hot, iced or frozen)


Go
.com .biggby ww
. t good with any other offer
ccepted. Discount is only
es 10/31/12. CODE 102685 av
I eijer &
d Gaylor
FF
10
per
age


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No copies of this ad will be accepted. Discount is only
vailable with this coupon. es 10/31/12. CODE 102685 Expirres 10/31/12. CODE 102685
Inside the Petoskey Meijer &
d eet • Gaylor 004 W Main Str reet • Gaylor
BOGO FREE
(BOGO = Buy One Get One)
any grande/super
specialty beverage
(hot, iced or frozen)


.com by
. ith any other offer
Discount is only
/12. CODE 102685
d
Takes
place
Sunday,
September
9th
LOOKING FOR
HIDDEN TREASURE?
See the directory
on page 5A
for Antique,
Consignment,
Resale &
Thrift Shops.
Locations from all
around Northern Michigan
“Lights Out
Across the Bay”
skywatching event takes
place in
Petoskey
this
Saturday
evening
COURTESY PHOTO
Page 2 • Choice Publications ... The Best Choice! September 6, 2012
By Jim Akans
Connoisseurs of locally made micro brews and delicious Michigan wines take note; the
16th annual “Hopps of Fun” – a festival of celebrating fine quality local and regional beer and
wine, will be taking place this coming weekend at Mackinaw Crossings in Mackinaw City.
This unique “end of the summer season” event features great food, a sampling of over 50
award winning Michigan micro brewed beers, over 40 wines from Michigan’s four interna-
tionally recognized wine regions, and lots of local live music entertainment as well.
The festival grounds are located at Mackinaw Crossings in Downtown Mackinaw City. On
Friday, the tent will be open from 5 to 10 pm, and music will be provided by the Cheboygan
Brewhouse Band and Billy Jewel and his Bad Habits. Saturday, the tent be open from 1 to 10
pm, with music by Billy Jewel and his Bad Habits, Whitmore 5 and Uncle Ugly. After the tent
closes there will be live music by Toast and Jam inside the Depot Restaurant starting at 10:30
pm.
Admission to the tent each day is $10 per person, and a keepsake “Hopps of Fun” beer and
wine tasting glass is provided with each entry fee. Foods will include hot dogs and brats, plus
the acclaimed “Best Pig Roast” on Saturday.
For additional information, visit www.mackinawcity.com and click on the events tab.
CALL (989) 732-8160 FAX (888) 854-7441
EMAIL DAVE1@WEEKLYCHOICE.COM
LOCAL NEWS FROM NORTHERN MICHIGAN
Local News
Thursday, September 6, 2012 Local News Line (989) 732-8160
M A C K I N A W C I T Y
in Mackinaw City
We buy unwanted, broken or scrap gold
and all collector coins.
We pay the public more than any other
dealer in Northern Michigan.
Check with the rest and then come to the best.
NO Games, NO Gimmicks, NO Altered Scales
Just honest cash value.
Give us a call at 989-448-2400
or stop in and see us at our new store in Gaylord.
1363 West Main St. You will be glad you did.
We are located next to Mancino`s and across the street from Ponderosa.
Remember, WE PAY MORE
than anyone in Northern Michigan.
Alpine Gold &
Silver Exchange
(Your hometown coin shop)
NOW OPEN… NOW OPEN NOW OPEN… NOW OPEN
NOW OPEN… NOW OPEN NOW OPEN… NOW OPEN NOW OPEN… NOW OPEN
NOW OPEN… NOW OPEN NOW OPEN… NOW OPEN
Website: dowkermech.com
Home: 989.732.6122
Cell: 989.390.1404
Free Estimates
State Licensed and Fully
Insured for your Protection
Residential and Lt. Commercial
Heating and Cooling
Installation and Service
Forced Air Furnaces, AC, Heat Pumps, Boilers,
Geothermal Heat Pumps, Air Treatment,
Water Heaters and Softeners
We service all makes and models of equipment
Enjoy “Hopps of Fun” this weekend
Just Arrived a truck full of Low
Mileage, 30+ MPG’s …Roomy Im-
palas – Lots of Colors! ll with Re-
maining. Factory warranty!

1861 US 31 N.
Petoskey
231-347-2585
we A8£ Feteskey's 0sed 0ar 0eaIer
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RED TAG
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On September 7th & 8th, Mackinaw Crossings will host “Hopps of Fun" at the
Historic Depot restaurant. This unique event will feature as extensive sam-
pling of over 50 award winning Michigan micro brewed beers and over 40
wines from Michigan’s four internationally recognized wine regions.
The Cheboygan Brewhouse Band will be among
the many local musical group providing live music
during the Hopps of Fun festival.
COURTESY PHOTO
COURTESY PHOTO
NEW LOCATION!
Inside of Caribbean Tan, 200 Fairview St,
(Across from the Fairgrounds entrance).
OrigiNAILS by Shelly
Inside of Caribbean Tan, 200 Fairview St., Gaylord
-Same great service
-Same easy phone number
-Same awesome Shelly
making your nails
look beautiful
CALL989-732-7100
Give us a call today to
make an appointment
for fabulous nails!
LEADER ELECTRIC
MICHAEL LEADER
MASTER ELECTRICIAN
25 YEARS EXPERIENCE
Residential - Commercial
Senior and Veterans Discount
Free Estimate
Serving Northern Lower Michigan
Mancelona, MI 49659
Message Center 231-587-0431
CeII Phone 231-313-3413
September 6, 2012 Choice Publications ... The Best Choice! • Page 3
WEATHER:
Thursday
High 75
Low 54
Friday
High 68
Low 51
Saturday
High 69
Low 50
Sunday
High 70
Low 51
Monday
High 73
Low 53
Tuesday
High 72
Low 52
RECORD TEMPERATURES
Avg. Avg. Record Record
Sept. Sunrise Sunset High Low Mean High Low
6 7:06 AM 8:07 PM 72°F 50°F 61°F 89°F (1960) 30°F (1984)
7 7:08 AM 8:05 PM 71°F 49°F 60°F 91°F (1960) 34°F (1955)
8 7:09 AM 8:03 PM 71°F 49°F 60°F 92°F (1959) 31°F (1956)
9 7:10 AM 8:01 PM 71°F 49°F 60°F 89°F (1952) 29°F (1956)
10 7:11 AM 8:00 PM 70°F 48°F 59°F 90°F (1983) 32°F (1995)
11 7:12 AM 7:58 PM 70°F 48°F 59°F 88°F (1952) 30°F (1977)
12 7:14 AM 7:56 PM 70°F 48°F 59°F 96°F (1952) 29°F (1964)
13 7:15 AM 7:54 PM 69°F 48°F 58°F 94°F (1952) 33°F (1975)
14 7:16 AM 7:52 PM 69°F 47°F 58°F 94°F (1952) 30°F (1953)
15 7:17 AM 7:50 PM 68°F 47°F 58°F 82°F (1994) 29°F (1983)
16 7:18 AM 7:48 PM 68°F 47°F 57°F 88°F (1955) 30°F (1984)
LOCAL NEWS
On-line at www.weeklychoice.com
By Jim Akans
The Northland Sportsmen’s Club, located on
Old Alba Road near the corner of West Otsego
Lake Drive in Gaylord, will be offering a free
Hunter Education & Safety program this coming
weekend, September 8th and 9th. Ideal for aspir-
ing young hunters, the two-day program will
cover all the requirements for obtaining a hunting
license for firearms and bow, and will offer care-
fully supervised training for how to safely use a
shotgun, 22-rifle, black powder and a bow. Live
fire training is available, as is tree stand demon-
strations and orienteering.
10 certified instructors will teach the class, and
the focus will be on providing a “hands on” learn-
ing experience. Class size is limited to 60 partici-
pants. Parent signature is required for those par-
ticipants under the age of 18, and parent must be
present for all class attendees under ages 9 and
under.
Registration is mandatory, and will be held on
Friday, September 7th, from 6 pm to 8 pm at the
Northland Sportsmen’s Club.
The Hunter Education & Safety program will
take place from 8 am until 5 pm on Saturday and
Sunday, September 8th and 9th at the Northland
Sportsmen’s Club. While there is no fee for this
class, donations may be made to the Club.
Attendees are asked to bring their own beverage
and lunch each day of the class.
For further information contact Jim Montforton
at (989) 732-9164.
The four winners in the annual
election of Great Lakes Energy
directors are incumbents Paul Byl
of Shelby, Mark Carson of Boyne
City, Robert Kran of Free Soil and
newcomer Paul Schemanski of
Petoskey.
Seven candidates vied for four
open board positions. All are
three-year terms. Incumbent Dale
Farrier of Kalkaska was defeated in
his bid for re-election. Other candi-
dates were Triston Cole of
Mancelona and Benjamin Harris of
Bitely.
Byl is a farmer who has served as
director for 28 years. Carson, who
has been a director six years, is
store manager for Gordon Food
Service in Petoskey and an adjunct
business instructor for Spring
Arbor University. Kran is a dairy
farmer with 10 years of director
experience. Schemanski is an ana-
lyst at McLaren Northern Michigan Hospital.
Winners were announced today at the cooperative’s annual business meeting in Boyne City.
Great Lakes Energy is an electric cooperative governed by a board of directors who are elected by the cooperative’s mem-
bership. Great Lakes Energy customers are members and
owners of the consumer-owned business, which provides
electric service to more than 125,000 members in 26 counties
in western and northern Michigan.
Election was held by mail-in ballot contained in the July
issue of Michigan Country Lines.
Director Election Results
Mark Carson* 2,167 Paul Schemanski* 1,905
Robert Kran* 1,877 Paul Byl* 1,810
Dale Farrier 1,726 Triston Cole 1,431
Benjamin Harris 1,179
*Winners
Free Hunter Education & Safety
program offered at Northland
Sportsmen’s Club this weekend
Four Elected To
Great Lakes Energy Board
G A Y L O R D
Photo by Jim AkAns
Classified Ads
As Low As
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2
00
weeklychoice
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Or call: 989-732-8160
Published Weekly on Thursday.
Afton, Alanson, Alba, Black Lake, Brutus, Burt Lake, Carp Lake, Cheboygan,
Conway, Elmira, Fairview, Frederic, Gaylord, Grayling, Harbor Point, Harbor
Springs, Indian River, Johannesburg, Lakes of the North, Levering, Lewiston,
Lovells, Luzerne, Mackinaw City, Mancelona, Mio, Oden, Onaway, Pellston,
Petoskey, Topinabee, Tower, Vanderbilt, Vienna Corners, Waters, Wolverine
Deadline Monday Noon.
Place Classified ads on-line at
www.WeeklyChoice.com
20 cents/word, $2 minimum.
Notice to Readers: Typically, most advertising is honest and clear about special offers, howev-
er, please be sure to read the contents thoroughly to avoid misrepresentation. Choice
Publications does not warranty the accuracy or reliability of content and does not accept any
liability for injuries or damages caused to the reader or advertiser that may result from content
contained in this publication. Errors in advertising should be reported immediately. Damage
from errors will not exceed the cost of the advertise-
ment for one issue. Choice Publication employees and
family members and listed advertisers’ employees
and family members are not eligible to win. Choice
Publications reserves the right to publish or refuse ads
at their discretion.
IFPA AWARD
WINNING PAPER!
Association
of Free Community
Papers
Published by:
Choice Publications, Inc.
112 East Sixth Street, PO Box 382, Gaylord, MI 49734-0382
Phone: 989-732-8160 Fax: 888-854-7441
Publisher:
Dave Baragrey 1
Dave1@WeeklyChoice.com
Dave Baragrey 2
Dave2@WeeklyChoice.com
Website Administrator:
Chad Baragrey
Chad@WeeklyChoice.com
News Editor:
Jim Akans
Jim@WeeklyChoice.com
Sports Editor:
Mike Dunn
Mike@WeeklyChoice.com
989-370-0605
Sports:
Jeff Baragrey
Jeff@WeeklyChoice.com
Ryan Bokas
Ryan@WeeklyChoice.com
SALES:
Phone: 989-732-8160
Terry Becks
Office@WeeklyChoice.com
Charles Jarman
Charles@WeeklyChoice.com
989-370-5361
Joan Swan
Swan@WeeklyChoice.com
989-732-2271
Sharon Gardulski
Sharon@WeeklyChoice.com
989-826-1053
Local.
Service-
Minded.
Call today for a FREE
Estimate.
Arrow Sanitation
(989) 732-4243
The Northland Sportsmen’s Club, located on Old Alba Road in Gaylord, will be offering
a free Hunter Education & Safety program this coming weekend, September 8th and
9th. Ideal for aspiring young hunters, the two-day program will cover all the require-
ments for obtaining a hunting license for firearms and bow, and will offer carefully
supervised training for how to safely use a shotgun, 22-rifle, black powder and a bow.
The four winners in the annual election of Great Lakes Energy directors
are (L to R) Paul Byl, Mark Carson, Paul Schemanski and Robert Kran.
FULL STEAM AHEAD
POWER WASHING
Chris (989) 350-0536
Jodi (989) 350-9040
Fully Insured
• Houses • Store Fronts • Gas Stations
• Concrete Driveways, Sidewalks & Parking Lots
• Steaming For Oil & Gas Companies
• And Any Thing Else You Can Think To Wash
Hot & Cold Water Up To 4500 psi
We can heat the water up to 250 degrees
Keep Your Garage Door Working
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Call the Garage Door Guy
Call today to schedule
an appointment.
Includes lube, balance, check for any problems
989-619-1086
$
29.95
to service the door
$
9.95
to service the chain, opener
Page 4 • Choice Publications ... The Best Choice! September 6, 2012
LOCAL NEWS
On-line at www.weeklychoice.com
CROP walk Continued...
Church World Service and the Otsego County
Food Pantry; non-profit local organization
that has provided food to over 3,000 individ-
uals so far this year, with another 3,000 pro-
jected by the end of the year.
The Annual CROP Hunger Walk is a com-
munity-oriented event sponsored by the
Church World Service, a ministry comprised
of 36 Christian denominations and com-
munions joined to do their part in eradicat-
ing hunger and poverty. It’s about neigh-
bors, families and friends walking together
to take a stand against world hunger.
Some interesting facts;
- $150 can provide three farm families with
everything they need to make succulent,
nutritious and marketable honey, including
training, hives and equipment.
- $500 can provide 4,000 pounds of food
for a local food bank or provide up to 400
meals in a soup kitchen.
- $1,000 can provide more than a dozen
displaced families with emergency food
packages; each containing enough to feed a
family of five for a month.
- $5,000 can provide a well that reaches
deep into the aquifer, allowing a village
access to clean, safe water. When periods of
drought hit, communities with deep-water
wells can continue to grow gardens, lessen-
ing the drought’s impact on local food sup-
plies.
At the Gaylord CROP Hunger Walk, each
walker has the opportunity to raise money
through individual donations. Area church-
es also hold events such as bake sales and
donate those proceeds to the Walk.
Individuals and businesses also make dona-
tions, and online giving is a donation seg-
ment that is rapidly growing as well.
Last year, 185 walkers took part in the
CROP Hunger Walk, The goal of raising
$12,500 was exceeded by small margin, and
contributions helped to purchase approxi-
mately 25,000 pounds of food for the pantry.
This year’s goal is to have 200 walkers partic-
ipate and raise $13,500. New this year is
“Walking Partners,” allowing the option of
walk participants to match their walk with a
photo and story of an individual who has
benefited from Church World Service dona-
tions in the past.
Registration for the walk will take place at
1:30 pm on Sunday at St. Andrew Episcopal
Church in Gaylord, located at East Main and
Hayes. Walkers are asked to bring their
donations to St Andrews Episcopal the day of
the walk where a “gathering place” will be set
up. The CROP Hunger Walk will begin at 2
pm.
For further information, please contact the
co-coordinators of this year’s event; Helen
Crandall at (989) 732-5479 or Sallie Anderson
at (989) 732-9001 or visit www.cropwalkon-
line/gaylordmi
Horse Rescue Continued...
effect on the price and availability of feed
and hay for horses and livestock may well be
a much more serious crises in the coming
months.
Paul Weise, who runs Northern Michigan
Horse Rescue & Rehab just outside of
Gaylord with his wife Beth and their two
daughters, Stephanie and Amber, relates,
“The drought across lower Michigan this
summer has resulted in a hay supply that is
virtually unavailable. We need approximate-
ly 3,000 bales of hay to get through the win-
ter ahead, and we are far short of achieving
that supply. We have been finding that some
hay is available from farmers in the Upper
Peninsula, but we need to raise money in
order to purchase enough hay to make it
through the winter.”
He explains that the effects of the drought
are actually increasing the amount of hay
NMHRR may require this winter. “We cur-
rently have 25 horses, 17 of which are res-
cues. With other horse farms in northern
Michigan experiencing the same challenges
we are in securing a winter hay supply, some
of those farmers will end up surrendering
their horses to our facility. We expect that
will increase the amount of hay we will need
to make it through the winter.”
The Weise’s established NMHRR three
years ago, creating a non-profit organization
where horses that have been neglected or
abandoned can be rehabilitated and adopt-
ed by caring new owners. Approximately 10
volunteers help out on the 40-acre farm,
which has seen one to two rehabilitated
horses adopted each month since being
founded. Some of those who adopt are first
time horse owners, and NMHRR also offers
rental space for those horses while the own-
ers become familiar with how to care for
them and establish their own place to keep
them.
“We are not a training facility,” Paul Weise
points out. “We are here to help these neg-
lected or abandoned horses learn that they
are now safe, that people are not their
enemy, and to re-build their trust level. That
process can take anywhere from several
weeks to several years. Patience is the key.”
While the need for NMHRR in northern
Michigan is actually increasing, the devastat-
ing drought conditions throughout the
country this summer may threaten the con-
tinued existence of the facili-
ty. Horses need to be fed,
and dwindling hay supplies
and rising costs of available
hay make the financial
prospects of the organiza-
tions survival this winter a
matter of deep concern for
the Weises.
Paul observes, “Even the
Michigan Horse Coalition,
which has a hay bank for
donated hay, is running
short this year. We are going through our
resources to try and find hay, and utilizing
hay extenders…but we are far short of what
we will need for the winter.”
He continues, “We are hoping to raise
funds through our sponsorship program,
which for a donation of $500 will feed a
horse for a year, and we are also looking for
donations of any kind and at any level. We
also want to get the word out that we have
several horses that are ready for adoption as
having some of our horses go to a good
home will also help reduce the demand for
hay we will experience this winter.”
For information about adopting a horse
from NMHRR, becoming a horse sponsor, or
making a donation at any level, please con-
tact Paul Weise at (989) 370-2924 or visit
NMHRR’s website at www.nmhrr.org.
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Register Now!
Comfort Systems
Family Family
Kevin Westcott
989.732.8099
CompIctc D] & Mcdia Scrviccs for
Your Most lmportant fvcnts
www.schccrcntcrtainmcnt.com
Chris Schccr
(989) 217-8090
info"schccrcntcrtainmcnt.com
º Wcddìng/Rcccµlìons
º Bìrlhday Parlìcs
º VHS lo DVD Convcrsìon
º Danccs
º Slìdcshows
º and morc
Stephanie,
Beth and Paul
Weise stand
beside “Cookie”
and “Ehwah,”
two horses
NMHRR res-
cued about
eight months
ago and
brought back
from the edge
of starvation.
PHOTO BY JIM AKANS
LOCAL NEWS
On-line at www.weeklychoice.com
September 6, 2012 Choice Publications ... The Best Choice! • Page 5
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BOYNE ClTY
0ha||eoge No0ota|o 8esa|e
1158 S. M-75, Boyne City
231-582-5711
www.challengemtn.org
CHARLEvOlX
0oos|go 0es|go
100 Van Pelt Pl., Charlevoix
231-237-9773
www.consigndesign.net
CHARLEvOlX
8ergmaoo 0eoter 8esa|e Shop
8888 Ance Road, Charlevoix
231-547-9624
www.bergmanncenter.org
ke||y's Aot|g0es &
F0ro|t0re 8aro
06176 Old US 31 S., Charlevoix
231-547-0133
www.dkellyantiques.com
EAST JORDAN
0rossroads 8esa|e Shop
205 Water Street
East Jordan
231-536-7606
Open Tuesday thru Saturday
ELLSWORTH
6ood Samar|tao
F0ro|t0re & Nore Store
6517 Center St.
Downtown Ellsworth
231-588-2208
thegoodsam.org
ELLSWORTH
6ood Samar|tao
8esa|e shop
9746 Main Street
Ellsworth
231-588-2208
thegoodsam.org
FREDERlC
P|oev|ew N|||tary S0rp|0s
7328 Old 27 North,
Frederic
989-348-8300
GAYLORD
A-2-I 8esa|e
1829 Old 27 South,
Gaylord
989-732-9500
6oodw||| 8eta|| aod
0ooat|oo 0eoter
1361 Pineview Dr.
(near Lowes)
Gaylord
989-705-1747
www.goodwillnmi.org
GAYLORD
6reat 8ooms
00a||ty Pre-0woed F0ro|t0re
148 W. Main St., Gaylord
989-745-5184
www.greatroomsgaylord.com
Aoge|s at work 8esa|e
1523 S Otsego Ave.
Gaylord
989.448.8615
Veo0s & 8|0e Jeaos
340 West Main St..,Gaylord
989-731-2600
www.venusandbluejeans.com
Fo0r Seasoos
8esa|e oI the horth
111 E. Main Street
Gaylord, MI 49735
989.306.1482
HARBOR SPRlNGS
hew 8eg|oo|ogs
Thr|It Shop
650 W Conway Rd.,
Harbor Springs
231-348-2980
HARBOR SPRlNGS
hab|tat Ior h0mao|ty 8estore
8460 M-119.,
Harbor Springs
231-347-8440
MACKlNAW ClTY
Nack|oaw Nercaot||e
Quality Consignments with Integrity
702 South Nicolet, Mackinaw City
Just north of the visitors center
231 436 6005 or 69 599 4945
www.mackinawmercantile.com
MANCELONA
Naoce|ooa Food Paotry
& 8esa|e Shop
201 N. Maple St.,
Mancelona
231-587-9606
MlO
Strawberry Patch
Downtown Mio
989-826-1503
PETOSKEY
Nk8 0oos|gomeots
C|ot||ng, Home F0|n|s||ngs, Deco|
2010 Harbor-Petoskey Road
Petoskey · 231-881-6130
www.MKRConsignments.com
PETOSKEY
0ha||eoge No0ota|o
8esa|e Shop
2429 US31 North, Petoskey
231-348-3195
www.challengemtn.org
6oodw||| 8eta|| aod
0ooat|oo 0eoter
1600 Anderson Rd.,Petoskey
231-348-6947
www.goodwillnmi.org
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By Jim Akans
With approximately 4,000
square feet of fully stocked resale
space, and new inventory arriv-
ing daily, customers can shop for
just about anything starting with
any letter in the alphabet at A-2-
Z Resale in Gaylord.
Founded by Bill and Carol
Brown in May of 2008, A-2-Z
Resale has grown to encompass
just about any resale item shop-
pers could be looking for, includ-
ing appliances, furniture, racks
and racks of clothing, shoes,
tools, home accessories, jewelry,
toys and more…even a special
area devoted to wedding dresses.
“We have just about everything here but
food,” observes Bill Brown. “We locate items
for our inventory from garage and estate
sales, abandoned storage units, donations
and more. We never know what we will have
next, it changes every day.”
One thing is certain, on any given day
there are plenty of items representing every
letter in the alphabet at A-2-Z Resale.
Convenient parking in front of the store
makes it easy for shoppers to stop in on a
regular basis to check out the latest invento-
ry.
A-2-Z Resale is located at 1829 Old 27
South (S. Otsego Avenue) in Gaylord. The
store is open from 9 am to 6 pm, seven days
a week all year long with the exception of
holidays. For additional information call
(989) 732-9500.
PHOTO BY JIM AKANS
A-2-Z Resale is located at 1829 Old 27 South (S. Otsego Avenue) in Gaylord. The
store is open from 9 am to 6 pm, seven days a week all year long with the exception
of holidays.
With approximately 4,000 square feet of fully
stocked resale space, and new inventory arriving
daily, customers can shop for just about anything
starting with any letter in the alphabet at A-2-Z
Resale in Gaylord.
of Petoskey's Department of Parks and Recreation to host an
evening of stargazing at Petoskey's Bayfront Park, in the
"land of the million dollar sunsets."
To highlight the beauty of the dark sky, the lights will be
turned off to allow participants to get a better view of what's
overhead but oftentimes out of sight due to light trespass.
This free program takes place from 8 to 10 p.m. at the Ed
White softball field near the clock tower at the Petoskey
waterfront.
"This is your chance to learn basic constellation identifica-
tion, as well as to enjoy the stellar highlights of the season,
which include the Summer Triangle, the richest part of the
Milky Way stars, the planets Saturn and Mars and more,"
said Adams.
Adams said the program will also introduce a community-
wide dark sky challenge in the planning stages for next year.
"In 2013 we will host a 'Lights Out Across the Bay' challenge
between Harbor Springs and Petoskey, so this Saturday's
event gives us an opportunity to raise awareness about what
we're missing when the outdoor lights are spilling up into
the night sky. It's also just a really good time to get outside
under the stars for awhile," she said.
Participants are to gather at the softball ball field at the
waterfront and are invited to bring a picnic and picnic blan-
ket and beach chairs for comfortable viewing overhead.
Binoculars and telescopes are welcome, though not required.
(Please note that in the event of rain, the event will be
rescheduled for October.)
The Emmet County-owned Headlands became the 6th
National Dark Sky Park in the U.S. and the 9th in the world in
May 2011, and each month free programs are held for the
public. Visit www.emmetcounty.org for 2012 programs and
more information, email darksky@emmetcounty.org, or call
(231) 348-1704. The county sends regular email blasts as well
with information about night-sky observation opportunities
and celestial events; to register, use the contact information
above. The park is located about 2 miles west of downtown
Mackinaw City. For more information about the Headlands,
visit www.emmetcounty.org/darkskypark/ The next event at
the park is Sept. 22, 2012.
Lights Out Continued...
Northern Michigan’s Only
Mattress Wholesaler!
Our new mattresses have great value and comfort
QUEENS
$
199 FULLS
$
189
TWINS
$
99 SOFAS
$
399
RECLINERS
$
199
BEDFRAMESstarting at
$
40
¦urn|lurc : lallrc--c-
www.greatroomsgaylord.com • facebook.com/greatrooms
148 W. Main St., Downtown Gaylord
989-748-4849
Y
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itu
re

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e
stin
a
tio
n
In the Rough, Professionally Painted
or Completely Restored
Over 7,000 sq. ft. of Furniture, Antiques & Goodies
06176 Old U.S. 31 South, Charlevoix, MI 49720
E-Mail: donkellyantiques@yahoo.com
FURNITURE BARN
(231) 547-0133 • Cell (231) 881-0353
Web: dkellyantiques.com
CUSTOM & ANTIQUE
FURNITURE
H I D D E N T R E A S U R E S
Everything and
more at A-2-Z
Resale in Gaylord
FamIIy Per
CremarIon Cenrer
2835 Dickerson Rd., Gaylord, MI 49¯35
989-732-9501
Toll Free 877-407-4446
Where your pet is treated with respect and dignity.
5:«. 5+, Þ+.-:.-, 5:«. 5+, Þ+.-:.-,
-RePaints
-Remodels
-New Construction
-Drywall
-Drywall Repair
-Power Washing
• 18 Years
Experience
• Free Quotes
Danny Galloway
Mobile
989-619-6720
PHOTO BY JIM AKANS
Chamber of Commerce holds Ribbon Cutting Ceremony
for Gaylord Funeral & Cremation Service
On Monday, August 27th, Ambassadors from the Gaylord Area
Chamber of Commerce held a ribbon cutting ceremony for the
recently opened Gaylord Funeral & Cremation Service located at
850 N. Center Avenue in Gaylord. Owners Joe & Vicky Messenger
bring over 30 years of funeral service experience to this new Gaylord
area businesses and offer a comfortable, warm and inviting place to
help families honor their loved ones. Pictured here are Chamber
Ambassadors Kathy Bradley, Mary Brickely and Elaine Bunker,
Gaylord Funeral & Cremation Service owners Joe & Vicky
Messenger, Chamber Ambassador Laura Nash, and guests George
and Linda Judd. Courtesy photo
Page 6 • Choice Publications ... The Best Choice! September 6, 2012
LOCAL NEWS
New stories updated daily on-line at www.weeklychoice.com
GAYLORD
boomers & senior
EXPo
Plan to attend the Boomers &
Senior EXPO, September 5,
2pm-7pm at the Otsego
County Sportsplex. Learn
about various services and
products in Northern
Michigan to help you plan
your future. Special training
sessions on Elder Law,
Financial Planning,
Recreation, Medical Products
& Services, Health in Aging,
In-Home Services, Housing
Options and more.
GAYLORD
United Way Campaign
kick-off
Hear about the good work
United Way is involved with
in the community and see
the Day of Caring teams take
off for their volunteer assign-
ments, Sept. 6, 7:30am
Behind Independent Bank
on M-32.
GAYLORD
Day of Caring
Starting behind Independent
Bank on M-32,Various
Locations on Sept. 6, 8:30 -
11:30am. Teams of
Volunteers will be out and
about lending their muscle to
projects supporting a num-
ber of area non-profits.
GAYLORD
Fundraiser
Come and eat out at Culver's
on September 6th. The New
Life Pregnancy Resource
Center receives a portion of
the proceeds from the sales
during the 4-8:00pm time
period. You get good food
and it will be served by the
New Life staff.
GRAYLING
Financial seminar
The Friends of Crawford
County Library are sponsor-
ing: Dave Ramsey’s financial
coach, Lisa Cornell, in a sem-
inar, How to Budget & Reach
Your Financial Goals, at the
Devereaux Memorial
Crawford County Library, on
September 6th,at 6:30 pm.
Budget worksheets will be
supplied and there will be a
question and answer period.
This program is offered to
you by the FOL at no charge.
CROSS VILLAGE
Food Preservation
Thursday, September 6 learn
about Food Preservation:
Tomato Canning, Freezing,
and Dehydrating from Noon
to 5pm at Bliss Gardens Farm
and Community Kitchen,
5322 Hill Road. Come learn
how to can, freeze, and dry
tomatoes; or if you know
how, come join in the fun of
preserving food in a group
setting. Produce, canning
jars and lids will be provided.
Each participant will prepare
and can tomatoes hands-on,
and take home a share of the
jars at the end of the work-
shop. Sauce, salsa, freezing,
and dehydrating will also be
covered. There will be take-
home info and resources
available. Class size is limit-
ed. Event tentative and date
subject to change based on
season. Cost is $45. Pre-regis-
tration is required. A partner-
ship of ISLAND, Bliss
Gardens Farm, NMSFC,
USDA NRCS. For more infor-
mation please call (231)622-
5252 or email mary@art-
meetsearth.org
GRAYLING
baby closet
Crawford County Baby to
Toddler Closet meets the first
and third Thursday of the
month. The next distribution
day will be September 6.
Please we are very short on
diapers Sizes 5 & 6, pull-ups
4, 5 & 6 ,crib sheets and
receiving blankets, boys and
girls clothes, to include
underwear, shoes and socks.
We do have a drop off for
donations used or new at
United Michelson Church,
Michigan Avenue, between 8
a.m. and 2 p.m. We do also
except monetary donations.
Thank you. For more infor-
mation contact Rose Mary
Nelson at 989-348-2985
OTSEGO COUNTY
Projects and
Volunteer teams need-
ed for Day of Caring
A Day of Caring is scheduled
for this fall and United Way is
looking for projects that will
take about four (4) hours to
complete. If you have a proj-
ect or idea in mind please
give us a call to discuss it fur-
ther. The other half of this
equation includes the busi-
ness community. We are
actively seeking businesses
who are interested in giving
back to the community by
allowing a team of employees
(management team, associ-
ates, etc.) to use 4 hours of
their day on Sept. 6th to help
with the projects. For more
information on how to get
involved contact Carol in the
Volunteer Center at:
Carol@otsegounitedway.org
or 989-705-8584.
HARBOR SPRINGS
Golf Fore manna
September 6th, 1pm at the
Moor Course, Boyne
Highlands. Registration, din-
ner and awards at the
Country Club of Boyne. 18
holes of championship golf,
box lunch, dinner, auction
and prizes. For reservations,
please contact the Manna
Food Project at 231.347.8852
or e-mail at manna@man-
nafoodproject.org. Marquee
Sponsor: Dave Kring
Chevrolet-Cadillac of
Petoskey
CHARLEVOIX/EMMET COUNTIES
Parent Advisory
Committee
The Health Department of
Northwest Michigan is look-
ing for parents of children
with behavioral health issues
to join the Parent Advisory
Committee of the Early
Childhood Behavioral Health
Initiative. Our aim is to
enhance the availability of
and the access to behavioral
health services for children
0-5 and their families. For
their participation, parents
are given a $50 honorarium
for travel and child care per
meeting. Please contact
Natalie Kasiborski at n.kasi-
borski@nwhealth.org or
(231) 347-5144 for more
information. Parents must
reside in Char-Em ISD area.
GRAYLING
senior Project Fresh
Coupons
MSU Extension and the
Crawford County
Commission on Aging &
Senior Center will be hosting
the 2012 Senior Project Fresh
Farmers Market Nutrition
Program. This year’s program
is funded by the Crawford
County United Way and the
Crawford County
Commission on Aging &
Senior Center.You may be eli-
gible to receive $20 worth of
coupons to be used on fresh
Michigan produce at partici-
pating Project Fresh markets
which include the City of
Grayling Farmers Market, the
Grayling Greenhouse and
Jim’s Farm Market. To qualify,
you must be 60 years old or
older, be a Crawford County
resident and meet maximum
income guidelines. For a
household of 1(one), income
must be below
$1,723/month. For a house-
hold of 2(two), income must
be below $2,333/month.
Nutrition class/coupon dis-
tribution will take place on a
first-come, first-served basis.
If you feel you qualify and
would like to participate in
the program, please contact
the Crawford County
Commission on Aging &
Senior Center (COA) at 348-
7123 to register for a date and
time in August to attend the
nutrition class and pick up
your coupons after your eli-
gibility has been determined.
You must contact the COA at
348-7123 to register for a
class ahead of time. Classes
will be held at the Senior
Center at 308 Lawndale
Street in Grayling.
CHARLEVOIX & EMMET COUNTY
Playgroups
Playgroups are offered free
through the Women’s
Resource Center of Northern
Michigan, are for children
aged 0-60 months and pre-
school-aged siblings. The
summer schedule is: 9:30-
11am Tuesdays at Christ
Lutheran Church, Boyne
City; 9:30-11am Wednesdays
at United Methodist Church,
Alanson. Playgroups in
Petoskey and East Jordan will
resume in September. Call
(231)347-0067 for more
information.
GRAYLING
Farmer’s market
Saturdays from 9am – 1pm in
Uptown Grayling (open
through Harvest Festival in
October)
LEWISTON
bazaar spaces
available
There are spaces available to
crafters for the annual
Christmas in October Bazaar,
Saturday, October 20, 9:30-
3:30 at Lewiston Elementary
School. Crafters may call
Montmorency County
Habitat for Humanity, 989-
786-3385, for further infor-
mation and a registration
form.
INDIAN RIVER
Farm market
The Farm Market is back with
the wonderful fresh produce,
flowers, jams, breads and
other homemade items! Stop
in and support your local
farmers and vendors, and
enjoy home grown items. The
Farm Market will be every
Wednesday 2pm - 6pm and
every Saturday 9am – 1pm at
the Citizens National Bank
parking lot on the corner of S.
Straits Hwy and M-68. The
Farm Market will run
through October 31st.
PETOSKEY
Farmers market
Join us each Friday morning
from 8:30 am - 12:30 pm for
fresh fruits and vegetables, as
well as other farm fresh prod-
ucts. 8:30 am to 12:30 pm,
400 block of Howard St.
between Mitchell St. and
Michigan St.
GAYLORD
Farmers market
Michigan farm producers sell
fresh fruits and vegetables,
baked goods, herbs, and
much more under the
Pavilion On Court in
Downtown Gaylord. Open
every Saturday, 8am to 1pm,
through November 17 (possi-
bly through December) and
every Wednesday, 8am to
1pm, July through October.
GAYLORD
making change
Participants of all ages are
invited to join in the third
annual “Making Change
Run/Walk” on Saturday
morning Oct 6 in Gaylord
Michigan to benefit
Guardian Gals, Inc, a non-
profit organization. Men,
women and children can
choose to run or walk a more
adventuresome 1 mile or 5k
path this year and more
experienced runners will
have the option of running a
10k trail run through the
Aspen trails. Each 5k or 10k
runner/walker pledges a
minimum $100 donation. To
register for this annual Fall
event, visit
www.GuardianGalsInc.org
PETOSKEY
homebuyer workshop
Northwest Michigan
Community Action Agency
(NMCAA), a certified HUD
housing counseling agency,
will be presenting a three day
workshop on Homebuyer
Education. This 8 hour work-
shop will be held September
4 and 6 from 6pm to 9pm;
and September 11 from 6pm
to 8pm. This course will
teach you the basics of the
home buying process includ-
ing options for low income
and moderate income fami-
lies. The workshops are
offered free to the public at
2202 Mitchell Park, Suite 4.
Attend all three workshops to
get your certificate of com-
pletion! To register or to find
out about future workshops,
please call 231-347-9070 or
800-443-5518 or visit
www.nmcaa.net.
GRAYLING
AARP Driver safety
Program
The Crawford County
Commission on Aging &
Senior Center is sponsoring
the AARP Driver Safety
Program, a classroom driver
refresher course for drivers
aged 50 and older. AARP
developed this course to help
drivers improve their skills
and prevent crashes. This
course covers the age-related
physical changes in percep-
tion and reaction time, local
driving problems and rules of
the road. The certified AARP
volunteer instructors will be
presenting this course
through a combination of
group discussion and video-
tapes. There are no tests, and
all participants who com-
plete the course will receive a
certificate of completion that
may be eligible for an auto-
mobile insurance discount.
The class will be held in
Grayling on Thursday,
September 6th from 8:30 am
until 4:30pm at the Crawford
County Commission on
Aging & Senior Center at 308
Lawndale St. The fee for this
course is $12 for members
and $14 for non-members
with checks made payable to
AARP. For more information
or to register please call 989-
348-7123.
GRAYLING
Canoe/kayak Club
Runs through November 1st
at 5:30pm at McIntyre’s
Landing on Lake Margrethe.
Hanson Hills Recreation Area
is offering a new
program/club that will intro-
duce the fun of canoeing and
kayaking, although it will be
geared to different skill levels.
There is no cost to partici-
pate, and it is open to ages 10
and up. For more informa-
tion & to register, email
graprograms@hotmail.com
or call 989-348-9266.
GAYLORD
United Way kickoff
September 6 Otsego County
United Way’s Campaign
Kick-Off from 7:30-8:30am
behind Independent Bank on
Main St. See the Day of
Caring volunteer teams take
off for their volunteer assign-
ments while you are there.
GRAYLING
Cholesterol/heart
health Presentation
Thursday, September 6th at
6pm at the Grayling Senior
Center -Learn more about
how to keep your cholesterol
levels in a healthy range and
reduce your risk for heart dis-
ease, the public is invited to
attend a presentation by Dr.
Charles Todoroff, sponsored
by the Crawford County
Commission on Aging &
Senior Center and Mercy
Hospital Grayling. Dr.
Todoroff from Mercy
Physician Network will share
information to help you take
responsibility for managing
your cholesterol levels with
healthy lifestyle choices. The
presentation is free of charge.
The public is invited to a
Stuffed Pepper Dinner at
5pm prior to the presenta-
tion for a small fee.
GRAYLING
budget & Reach your
Financial Goals
Thursday, September 6th at
6:30pm at Devereaux Library
– Adults & teens are invited to
a seminar that will help you
learn to manage your house-
hold budget, savings, credit &
banking. With financial rep-
resentative Lisa Cornell from
Dave Ramsey’s Financial
Peace University. Call 989-
348-9214 to sign up!
LEWISTON
blood drive
Red Cross blood drive Sept. 6
at Garland Resort, 4700 N.
Red Oak Rd. Noon - 5:45pm.
Schedule an appt by calling
800-RED CROSS
GAYLORD
safety threats
OCCOA presents an educa-
tional breakfast Sept. 6, 9am.
Topic is Safety threats and
risks. Sheriff-elect, Matt
Nowicki, EMY Mike Czykoski
and Mike Thompson from
911 are guest speakers. RSVP
to Michelle, 989-748-4068.
Now on Old 27 South
Alpine Transmission
and Service
We moved from our location on M-32 West to Old 27 South
Same Great Service • Same Great People
Stop in and see Len, Derak or Karen for a Free Transmission Inspection
2240 South Otsego Avenue (across from Jim Wernig Chevy), Gaylord
989-732-8308
Be sure to have a good Time!
Firemen’s Memorial Festival Committee
P.O. Box 672 • Roscommon, MI 48653
Phone & Fax (989) 275-5880
Web site www.firemensmemorial.org
*Events & Schedule Subject to Change.
Thursday, September 13
Get Acquainted Night
Family Night
Bring the entire family for free food
and lots of family fun.
-Free Hot Dogs and pop at 5:00 PM
-Craft Projects For the Kids
-Kids Fire Safety Trailer
-Project Identification For Children
-Magic Show at 7:00 PM
Friday, September 14
First Full Day of Festival
Bar Opens at 2 p.m. you must be
21 years of age with picture ID
-Registration for Waterball Until 6 p.m.
-Live Music Begins at 9 p.m.
-Bright Light Vehicle Showdown Begins
at 7 p.m.
-Bright Light Parade follows Showdown
All Day Friday Area Events
-Many vendors will be here full day
-Free pony rides
-Children's activities
-Fire and Rescue Equipment
-Displays & Demonstrations
Saturday, September 15
-Saturday at 9:00 am, we invite you to join
with the Michigan State Firemen's
Association at the Memorial site to pay
tribute to all Fire Fighters. They will
conduct the Annual Memorial Service and
placing of memorial wreaths by Fire
Fighter organizations, service clubs and
others.
-Parade through downtown Roscommon
Begins at 11 a.m.
-Michigan Vehicle Extrication Competition
Begins at 12 Noon
(Pre-registration required)
-Bar Opens 12 noon until 1 a.m. You must
be 21 years of age with picture ID
Saturday, continued...
-Lion's Club Chicken Barbecue 12 Noon
until gone
-Badge Drawing for prizes 12 p.m. until
6 p.m.
-Waterball contest Begins at 12:30p.m
(registration ends at noon on the
waterball court)
-Annual Search and Rescue Competition
Begins at 1p.m
-High Pressure Gas Demo Begins at
1:30 p.m.
-Annual Memorial Festival Dance Begins
at 9 p.m.
-Flashover Trailer Demo
-U of M Survival Flight
All Day Saturday Area Events
-Antique Fire Truck Displays
-Fire and Rescue Equipment Displays
-Gray's Air Cushion and Semi-Truck Up
righting
-Arts & Crafts Booth
-Free Activities for the Children
-Forest Fire Demo, DNR & U.S. Forest
Service
-Adopt-A-Pet
-Petting Zoo
-Horse & Wagon Rides
-Class "A" Foam Demonstration
-911 Children's Firehouse
-Sawdust Pile Penny Hunt
Sunday, September 16
-Pancake Breakfast at the Higgins Twp.
Fire Dept.
-High Pressure Gas Demo
-Class "A" Foam Demonstrations
-No Bar on Sunday
All Sunday Afternoon
-Sawdust Pile Penny Hunt
-Fire and Rescue Equipment Displays.
-Arts and Crafts Booths
-Wall Climbing
-Free Activities for the Children
-Petting Zoo
FESTIVAL EVENTS WITH ACTIVITIES FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY
Located at the Fire Training Grounds (formerly known as the Roscommon Fairgrounds)
SCHEDULE OF EVENTS
33RD ANNUAL MICHIGAN
FIREMEN'S MEMORIAL FESTIVAL
Thursday, Friday, Saturday & Sunday,
September 13 - 16, 2012
4104 S. Straits Hwy Indian River, Mi 49749
(231)-238-4151
www.northstargardens.com
North Star Gardens, Inc.
GARDEN CENTER...
•High quality trees and shrubs •Annuals, perennials, herbs, and vegetables
•Grass seed, mulch, soil,& fertilizer •Pond supplies, fish & pond plants
•Patio furniture •Bird feeders & birdbaths •Garden decor •Giftshop
LANDSCAPING...
•Full landscape design & construction •Ponds
•Quality plant material •Patios & walkways
•New lawns •Bulk mulch •Trees up to 30' tall
•Outdoor Living rooms & Firepits
Serving Northern
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September 6, 2012 Choice Publications ... The Best Choice! • Page 7
LOCAL NEWS
New stories updated daily on-line at www.weeklychoice.com
GRAYLING
yard sale
Hospice of Helping Hands
14th Annual Yard Sale Friday,
September 7th (9am-7pm),
Saturday, September 8th
(9am-6pm) and Sunday,
September 9th (10am-3pm) –
BAG SALE -$1 Bag at the old
West Branch Industries
Building – call 800-992-6592
for further details.
BOYNE CITY
stroll the streets
Extends schedule
The sound of music on
Friday evenings in downtown
Boyne City will be heard a
few weeks longer this sum-
mer. Due to popular
demand, Stroll the Streets
will not be ending the Friday
of Labor Day weekend.
Instead, two additional
Fridays have been added and
Stroll the Streets will contin-
ue through Sept. 14. "Stroll
the Streets was scheduled to
end Friday, Aug. 31, but there
have been so many requests,
we have decided to extend
the season," said Main Street
manager Hugh Conklin. "The
one comment we have been
hearing more than any other
is the sadness people have
that Stroll the Streets is end-
ing. We decided 'Why not
give it a try and see if extend-
ing the season two more
weeks is successful?' If it is,
great; if it's not that's okay,
but we won't know until we
try. For Sept. 7 and the 14 the
number of musical enter-
tainers will be scaled back
from the 6 to 8 groups fea-
tured each week in the sum-
mer. There will be four
groups, one each on the 100
and 200 blocks of Water and
Lake streets.
GRAYLING
Golf tourney
Hansen Hills open Northern
Waters Series Disc Golf
Tournament Saturday,
September 8th at Hanson
Hills Recreation Area -Visit
www.northernwatersseries.c
om or call 989-348-9266 for
more information.
GRAYLING
Ramble to the Pines
Saturday, September 8th,
Mercy Hospice of Grayling
will host its 4th Annual
Ramble to the Pines, a hybrid
memorial event and
fundraiser for the hospice.
Taking place along the 6 mile
bike path between the
Grayling City Hall and the
entrance of Hartwick Pines
State Park, participants can
walk, run, or bike their way
along the trail, between 4 rest
stations and amongst others
who have had loved ones on
hospice services or friends of
the hospice program.
Participants who register for
$25 or higher will receive a
free t-shirt for the event.
Personalized handmade
ceramic leaves will be wait-
ing for pick up at designated
spots along the route, free of
cost, for families or friends of
patients who have died while
in the care of Mercy Hospice
within the past year. This
year, the hospice is also giv-
ing away prizes for the high-
est dollar amount raised by
an individual participant and
the highest dollar amount
raised by a team or group.
The event will also feature a
“mobile silent auction” –
items will be displayed and
available to bid on at both
the beginning of the walk
and at the end. To register or
donate to the event, contact
the hospice at 989-348-4383.
~ See attached Registration &
Pledge Sheet
GRAYLING
benefit dinner
Benefit dinner for Arron &
Kelly Millikin Saturday,
September 8th from 4-8pm
at Hanson Hills Recreation
Area -$5 per person or $20
per family Pulled Pork
Dinner / Silent Auction and
Live Auction will begin at
7pm. Kelly was diagnosed
with Adrenal Cancer in
September 2010 and in
January 2012 her husband
Arron was diagnosed with
Brain Cancer. They both have
undergone radiation,
chemotherapy, and Kelly is
started her 2nd round of
chemotherapy in July 2012.
The family is trying to live life
and continue to parent their
two children, Bailey and
David, and provide as normal
of a life for them as possible.
Please help us support the
Millikin’s fight against this
terrible disease.
GAYLORD
Juried Fine Art
Exhibition
Come see the beautiful work
of local artists at the
Community Arts Center Sept.
8 - Oct. 27. Artist reception
and exhibit opening 5-7pm
GAYLORD
murder mystery
September 8 The Gaylord
Community Productions
invites you to a Murder
Mystery at the Otsego
County Sportsplex from 6-
8pm.
CHEBOYGAN
sturgeon for
tomorrow Annual
banquet
Join Sturgeon for Tomorrow
for their 14th Annual
Banquet at the K of C Hall
Sept. 8, 5-9pm. Doors open
at 5pm and dinner will be
served at 6pm. Dinner
Tickets are $25 for adults and
$15 for youth 14 and under.
Sponsor and Big Spender
packages are available. For
additional information call
(231) 625-2776.
GAYLORD
Antiques &
Collectibles
September 8 The Gaylord
DDA invites you to see all of
the Antiques & Collectibles
that will be for sale from
9am-4pm under the Pavilion
PETOSKEY
nehemiah Project
open house
The Nehemiah Project in
Petoskey is holding an Open
House Sunday, September
9th from 11:30am to 3:30pm.
The Nehemiah Project pro-
vides shelter and food for the
homeless people, men,
women, and children, in our
community. This Open
House is to thank those
churches and people who
have helped in the past and
show them what has been
accomplished. It also gives
other interested and caring
people a chance to visit and
tour the facility. The
Nehemiah Project has been
serving the homeless since
1988 at 36 Bridge St. in
Petoskey. Come visit. Light
refreshments will be served.
GAYLORD
new service times at
E-Free
Beginning on September 9
(one week from this Sunday)
we will be adding an addi-
tional Contemporary Service
to our Sunday mornings here
at E-Free. Our first
Contemporary Service will
begin at 9:00am and our sec-
ond service will begin at
10:30am. Nursery ministry
through age 3 will be provid-
ed during both services.
During the 9:00 service we
will have our Children's
Sunday School taking place
while during the 10:30 serv-
ice we will have our Kidz
Church happening.
GRAYLING
on the Job training
Michigan Works! On the Job
Training Program can reim-
burse you for some of the
costs associated with train-
ing a new employee through
the On the Job Training
Program. Reimbursement
rate is at least 50% of the
wages paid during the con-
tract period. For more infor-
mation, contact Frances
Whitney, Business Liaison, at
989-348-8709 or email whit-
neyf@nemcworks.org.
PETOSKEY
youthbuild
Petoskey YouthBuild is now
recruiting for our next ses-
sion which starts September
10. We are seeking young
people between the ages of
18-24 to participate. This is a
great opportunity for some-
one to complete their GED or
better their basic skills, get
some job training, and earn a
little money. YouthBuild
helps young people earn
their GED or improve their
basic skills in reading and
math, trains participants in
the construction trades, and
teaches work readiness and
leadership skills. If you or
someone you know is inter-
ested in getting more infor-
mation about YouthBuild,
you can pick up an applica-
tion at any Michigan Works
Service Center, call (231) 622-
8920 or visit our website,
www.nwm.org/youthbuild.
GAYLORD
back to school bbQ
September 11 Back to School
BBQ at the University Center
/ M-TEC from 4-6pm hosted
by University Center,
Kirtland M-TEC, North
Central Michigan College,
Spring Arbor University,
Northwood University &
Lake Superior State
University.
GRAYLING
medicare
presentations
Commission on Aging &
Senior Center MMAP volun-
teers also put on presenta-
tions for people who are
turning 65 and entering the
Medicare system as well as
ones about Medicare fraud,
abuse and waste. In addition,
volunteers are actively seek-
ing Medicare beneficiaries
who need assistance in pay-
ing the Part B premium of
$99.90 and/or their prescrip-
tion drug costs. It is impor-
tant that people with
Medicare Part D Prescription
Drug Plans review their cov-
erage every year. The drugs
covered by a particular plan
may change. Drugs with no
co-pays may now have them
for the next plan year. The
premium cost can also
change. In September, the
Commission on Aging &
Senior Center is putting on 3
Medicare presentations. On
Tuesday, September 11th at
6pm, people who will be New
to the Medicare System in the
rest fall of 2012 and in during
2013 are encouraged to
attend. MMAP volunteers
will explain the various parts
of Medicare and the options
you will have. On Tuesday,
September 18th at 6pm,
Medicare Fraud and Abuse
will be addressed. On
Tuesday, September 25th at
6pm, discussion will center
on the Open Enrollment
period for Medicare Part D
Prescription Drug Plans,
which starts on October 15th
and runs through December
7th, and any known changes
to Medicare and Prescription
Drug Plans for 2013. All pre-
sentations will be held at the
Commission on Aging &
Senior Center, located at 308
Lawndale Street in Grayling
and are free of charge.
MACKINAW CITY
Potluck
Celebrate the Equinox Sept.
12 with a shared meal,
stargazing and stories of local
lore about agriculturally
practices that are rooted in
the stars. 6:30 to 8:30p.m. The
events take place rain or
shine. In the event of
inclement weather, pro-
grams take place inside the
Beach House. The Headlands
is located at 7725 East
Wilderness Park Dr. For more
information visit
www.emmetcounty.org
CHARLEVOIX
Women’s club meeting
The Sept. 12 luncheon meet-
ing of the Women’s Club will
feature a guided tour of
Castle Farms in Charlevoix,
including the gardens,
Garden Railroad and a view
of the museum collections,
followed by luncheon. The
tour begins at 10:30am and
will last about 1½ hours. Cost
of the tour and luncheon is
$25. Be sure to wear comfort-
able shoes (and wheelchairs
are available for those who
need them). Please make
your reservation with Sally
Hunt at 231-348-8183 by
noon on Sept. 5. Everyone is
welcome to attend.
GAYLORD
business after hours
You’re invited to join us for
Business After Hours on
Wednesday, September 12th
from 5-7pm. Our sponsor
and host for this evening net-
working event is the Gaylord
Country Club. The cost is $5
for Chamber Members and
$15 for non-members.
CHEBOYGAN
Alzheimer’s
Discussion &
information Group
This group is free and confi-
dential! Come and meet with
others who are walking the
same journey. Together we
can help each other under-
stand, cope, find resources
and build friendships.
Whether you are just begin-
ning this walk with
Alzheimer’s Disease or if
you’ve been a caregiver for
years, there is a place for you
in our group. Contact Jean
Lang at 231-238-5135 for
more information. Monthly
on 2nd Wednesday, Sand
Road Senior Center, 1531
Sand Rd.
GAYLORD
Financial Peace
University
Dave Ramsey's Financial
Peace University class begins
Sept. 12 for 9 weeks. 6:30-
8pm at Evangelical Free
Church, M-32 East. To regis-
ter call 989-732-2647
BELLAIRE
Elders Project
Terry Wooten will workshop
and discuss The Elders
Project, a program he devel-
oped to connect area stu-
dents with elders in the com-
munity Sept. 12 6:30 pm to
8:30 pm at Bellaire
Community Hall, 202 North
Bridge St. Students conduct
interviews, and turn the tran-
scribed rough prose into free
verse poetry using the elders'
own words--their stories pre-
served in a unique form for
generations to come.
Donations appreciated. A
partnership of ISLAND and
Parkside Arts Council, with
support from Applesauce Inn
Bed & Breakfast, and Fischer
Insurance. For more infor-
mation please call (231)622-
5252 or email mary@art-
meetsearth.org
CENTRAL LAKE
Food Preservation
Thursday, September 13
learn about food
Preservation: Can and Freeze
Applesauce. From 6pm to
9pm at Brown-Bromelmeier
Residence, 890 North
Buhland Road. Come learn
how to can and freeze apple-
sauce from organic apples; or
if you know how, come join
in the fun of a community
canning party. Organic pro-
duce, organic sugar, canning
jars and lids will be provided.
Each participant will prepare
and can applesauce hands-
on, and take home a share of
the jars at the end of the
class. There will also be take-
home info and resources
available. Class size is limit-
ed. Cost is $15-25, sliding
scale. Pre-registration is
required. A partnership of
ISLAND, the Bromelmeier-
Brown family, NMSFC, and
USDA NRCS. For more infor-
mation please call (231)622-
5252 or email mary@art-
meetsearth.org
GRAYLING
Grandparents Day
Dinner
The Community is invited to
attend a Grandparents Day
Dinner at the Commission
on Aging & Senior Center on
Thursday, September 13th
from 4-6pm. Menu includes
Roast Beef, Mashed Potatoes
with gravy, Peas & Pearl
Onion Blend, Fresh Fruit
Salad, and Peanut Butter
Brownie with Ice Cream. The
meal is only $4.75 per person
for those under 60 and a sug-
gested donation of $2.50 for
people 60 and over. The din-
ner is open to the public. The
Senior Center is located at
308 Lawndale St. For more
information contact Helen at
the Commission on Aging &
Senior Center at (989) 348-
7123.
GRAYLING
Country music show
Sept 15 & Oct 6. Doors open
at 6:30 / Show starts at
7:30pm at Wellington Farm
Park. If you enjoy old fash-
ioned country music and old
fashioned corny country
comedy, then this is a show
you will not want to miss.
Admission is just $12.50 per
show or $50 for the entire
season. Tickets are available
at the Visitor Center during
business hours.
NORTHERN MICHIGAN
Advertising funds the
Weekly Choice
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announcements and news
releases about all the things
happening in Northern
Michigan in the Weekly
Choice. We help publicize
hundreds of events and
activities all across our area.
Readers love the fact that the
Weekly Choice is distributed
free to hundreds of locations.
However, it is expensive to
publish this newspaper each
week filled with positive
news and sports. Our only
source of revenue comes
from advertising. If your
business or organization has
an advertising budget, be
sure to include the Weekly
Choice in your plans. Our
advertising rates are far less
than most other papers and
P.O. Box 1064 · Gaylord, MI 49734
David
Cell (989) 217-1712
Dan
(989) 448-1942
(989) 732-8050
DIPZINSKI
PAINTING & WALLPAPERING
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1262 S. Otsego Ave. • Gaylord 989-732-5952
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your message will reach
readers all across Northern
Michigan. The Weekly Choice
is distributed free of charge
on news stands to 40 towns
including Gaylord, Petoskey,
Cheboygan, Grayling, Indian
River, Onaway, Mio,
Lewiston, Mancelona and all
surrounding towns. Contact
us at
Office@WeeklyChoice.com
or call 989-732-8160.
GRAYLING
matter of balance
Classes
The Crawford County
Commission on Aging &
Senior Center will be pre-
senting a free series of 8
classes on the subject of pre-
venting falls called A Matter
of Balance, taught by
Catherine & Leonard Wyatt.
Many older adults experi-
ence concerns about falling
and restrict their activities as
a result. This Award-Winning
Program emphasizes practi-
cal strategies to manage falls
and is designed to help older
adults manage their con-
cerns about falling and
increase their activity levels.
Who should attend? Anyone
interested in improving bal-
ance, flexibility and strength;
anyone who has fallen in the
past or anyone who has
restricted activities because
of falling concerns. The class-
es will be held weekly from 9-
11am on Mondays or
Wednesdays during
September and October,
starting Wednesday,
September 5th and ending
Wednesday, October 3rd. For
more information and to sign
up for the series, contact the
Crawford County
Commission on Aging &
Senior Center at 989-348-
7123.
GRAYLING
Creating Confident
Caregivers Workshop
Free Class Series runs Sept.
11, 18 & 25 from 1-3pm at
Grayling City Hall – Certified
Master Train, Robin Petruska,
will teach about dementia
and its effects on the brain,
caregiver resources, manag-
ing behaviors, improving
caregiver skills, how to han-
dle everyday activities more
easily, and taking care of
yourself to better care for
your loved one. Call Jill at
Mercy Hospice at 989-348-
4383.
GAYLORD
Woman to Woman
Conference
Gaylord E-Free Church
Women's conference,
September 14-15. On the
14th, the doors open at
5:30pm-9:00pm. On the 15th,
the doors open at 8:00am-
4:00pm. To register, phone
(888) 930-2060...or for more
information email:
info@gaylordefree.org
VANDERBILT
Auto show & swap
meet
Rascal Jakk's is proud to be a
sponsor and participant of
the 1st Annual Vanderbilt
Auto Show & Swap Meet
which will run Friday,
September 14th from 4pm-
9pm and Saturday,
September 15th from 9am-
close (rain or shine). All cars
and trucks are welcome.
Camping is available, power
is not provided. There will be
live music a Rascal Jakk's on
the 15th at 7pm; 50/50 Raffle
to be drawn at 9pm and a
Poker Run starting at Mill
Street Pizza and Ending at
Rascal Jakk's on Friday the
14th.
INDIAN RIVER
business after hours
The Indian River Chamber of
Commerce Ambassadors
invite you to attend Business
After Hours hosted at Tri-
Rivers Collision on Friday,
September 14th.
Chillermania, Northern
Michigan Animal Rescue
Network and Wolverine
Cabinet Company are
cosponsoring with Tri-Rivers
Collision. Enjoy hors d’oeu-
vres, door prizes and 50/50
drawings while networking
with area business owners
and employees at Tri-Rivers
Collision, 1750 South Straits
Hwy, in Indian River. The
event will begin at 5:30pm
and continue to grow until
7:30pm. Admission at the
door is $5 for members and
$10 for not yet members.
RSVP to the Indian River
Chamber of Commerce at
238-9325 or email
crystal@irchamber.com.
PELLSTON
Dog vaccination
Get your dog(s) vaccinated
for rabies, licensed with
Emmet County for one year
and micro-chipped on
Saturday, September 15. The
rabies, Emmet County
license and micro-chip clinic
will take place from 8 a.m. to
noon at the Pellston Animal
Clinic. Ten appointments will
be available per hour and will
be scheduled on a first-come,
first-served basis. The cost to
participate is $30.
Registration and payment
are required prior to the clin-
ic and must be completed at
Little Traverse Bay Humane
Society, located at 1300 West
Conway Road in Harbor
Springs. Only cash and credit
cards will be accepted. This
clinic is only offered to resi-
dents of Emmet County. This
event is sponsored by Little
Traverse Bay Humane
Society, Pellston Animal
Clinic and the Emmet
County Sheriff’s Department
of Animal Control. For more
information, please call
231.347.2396 or visit
www.ltbhs.com.
BAY HARBOR
home tour
Annual Bay Harbor Home
Tour Sept. 15. Join us for two-
hour guided tours of four
classic Bay Harbor homes
presented by the Bay Harbor
Foundation in cooperation
with Harbor Sotheby's
International Realty. Tours
are scheduled to begin at
9am, 11am and 1pm.
Reservations are required for
this event. Tickets are $35 per
person or $40 per person
after September 1st. Please
call the Bay Harbor
Foundation office to make
your reservations or for more
information. Candace
Fitzsimons, 231.439.2700
CHEBOYGAN
northern Rods’n
Rides
7th Annual Car Show at
Fraternal Order of Eagle
#4046 September 15, 9am -
3:30pm For more informa-
tion contact Norm 231-238-
5135 or 231-420-2460
GAYLORD
Fly & remember
Remember the fond memo-
ries you shared with a loved
one by personalizing and fly-
ing a kite in their honor at
Aspen Ridge Retirement
Village, 1261 Village Parkway.
Hospice of Michigan will
provide the materials. All
families that have experi-
enced the loss of a loved one
are welcome. Sat. Sept. 15,
11am-2pm. To register con-
tact Briana Thorold, 989-705-
2603, bthorold@hom.org.
Cookout and music provid-
ed.
CHARLEVOIX
Car & motorcycle
show
Support Charlevoix Veterans
Soldiers Relief Fund SATUR-
DAY, SEPTEMBER 15TH |
11am - 2pm at Fox
Charlevoix, 06684 US-31 S.
DOOR PRIZES, 50/50 DRAW-
ING, & FOOD VENDORS ON
SITE.
PETOSKEY
nCmC Cookout
The public is invited to North
Central Michigan College's
15th annual cookout on
Sunday, September 16 from
noon to 3pm on the Petoskey
campus. The cookout is a
fundraising event for the
North Central Michigan
College Foundation
Scholarship Fund.
Participants will have a pic-
nic-style lunch, be enter-
tained by the Jelly Roll Blues
Band and have a chance to
participate in a silent auction
and bake sale. Games, a
bounce house and other
entertainment will be avail-
able for children of all ages.
Tickets are available on the
Petoskey campus in the busi-
ness office or fitness center,
the Petoskey Regional
Chamber of Commerce,
Oleson's Market and Glen's
Market South. Ticket prices
are $8 per person. Children
under five eat free. For more
information, visit
www.ncmich.edu and click
on Cookout.
CHEBOYGAN
Festival square Grand
opening
Join the fun at the grand
opening of Festival Square
Sept. 16, 2-4pm.
GRAYLING
Chronic pain class
The Crawford County
Commission on Aging &
Senior Center (COA) is part-
nering with the Michigan
State University Extension
Office to provide a six-week
PATH Workshop on Chronic
Pain Management. PATH
stands for Personal Action
Toward Health and was
developed and tested by
Stanford University. The
workshop will be held on
Tuesdays from 1-3:30pm
each week, starting
September 18th at the Senior
Center at the Devereaux
Memorial Library at 201
Plum St. The registration fee
is only $10, payable to the
Commission on Aging (COA).
Snacks and beverages will be
served. Come and find out
about improving the quality
of your life as you manage
chronic pain. For more infor-
mation and to sign up for the
series, contact the COA at
(989) 348-7123.
GRAYLING
Petoskey shopping
trip
On Tuesday, September 18th,
the Commission on Aging &
Senior Center will take a trip
to Petoskey. The trip will
include shopping in down-
town Petoskey and lunch at
Twisted Olive Café. The cost
of the trip is $15 per person
which includes transporta-
tion only. Lunch is on your
own. The bus is scheduled to
leave from the Senior Center
located at 308 Lawndale
Street in Grayling at 10am
and return by 5pm.
Reservations are required by
calling (989) 348-7123.
INDIAN RIVER
Cruiser’s night
September 19, 5-8pm, Eagles
FOE # 4046, 5743 S Straits
Hwy. Hosted by Northern
Rods’n Rides Car Club
PETOSKEY
Lunch & Learn at
nCmC
To celebrate Back-to-School
days, North Central's
Corporate & Community
Education Department is
offering a FREE Lunch &
Learn Professional
Development Series. Learn
new ideas to help you profes-
sionally and personally while
enjoying lunch with other
business leaders. We'll put on
the coffee. You bring lunch.
All workshops will be held in
Room 70 in the Main
Classroom Building on the
Petoskey campus. Dates and
topics are: Free Online
Resources for your Business
Needs, September 19 at
Noon. Social Media for
Newbies, September 26 at
Noon. The Apple iPad -
What's It All About, October
10 at Noon. Creating a Brand
for your Business,
Wednesday, October 24 at
Noon
GRAYLING
maintenance Fund
Raffle
The Camp Grayling Officers
Club will hold their 21st
Annual Maintenance Fund
Raffle on Thursday,
September 20th at 7:30pm at
the Officer’s Club (immedi-
ately following Business After
Hours – see further details
below). One in 15 is a winner
with a grand prize of
$10,000!! Tickets are $100 and
up to 5 people can go in on a
ticket. If you are interested in
a ticket, please call Merry
Meredith at the Camp
Grayling Officers Club, 989-
348-9033. Deadline for ticket
sales is Sept. 17th .
PETOSKEY
budgeting workshop
Northwest Michigan
Community Action Agency
(NMCAA) will be hosting a
workshop on Budgeting on
September 18 from 6pm to
9pm, as part of a series of six
workshops on financial fit-
ness. This workshop is
offered free to the public at
NMCAA’s Petoskey office
located at 2202 Mitchell Park,
Ste.4. To register or to find
out about future workshops,
please call 231-347-9070 or
800-443-5518 or visit
www.nmcaa.net.
INDIAN RIVER
Fundamentals of
starting A business
This 2 hour orientation ses-
sion is facilitated by a
NLEA/SBTDC Business
Consultant. You will be
acquainted with the process
and the tools needed to help
you begin developing your
business. Wednesday,
September 19, 6 - 8pm at
Indian River Area Library.
Cost is $20 per business.
Registration is required.
Please contact NLEA, 231-
582-6282
CHARLEVOIX & EMMET COUNTIES
Day of Caring and
Campaign kickoff
Wednesday, September 19,
7:30am to 8pm. County wide
day of community service
with non-profits and senior
citizens in Charlevoix and
Emmet Counties. The day
will begin with our 12/13
Campaign Kickoff at 7:30am.
Light breakfast will be served
at Fletch’s in Petoskey and
Harbor Industries in
Charlevoix. Community
services projects will contin-
ue all day. Volunteers are still
needed! Visit website to reg-
ister www.charemunited-
way.org
GRAYLING
Emergency
Preparedness
Emergency situations can
occur at any time. How can
you be prepared if a severe
storm knocks out the power
and all emergency personnel
are busy? You should be
ready to handle situations for
up to 72 hours without out-
side help. The Crawford
County Commission on
Aging & Senior Center will
present an Emergency
Preparedness seminar on
Thursday, September 20th at
6pm at the Center, 308
Lawndale St. Gary Rapelje,
RRT, MBA, from the Region 7
Medical Disaster
Preparedness Network will
present information on how
to prepare for emergencies
and tailoring your disaster
plan to meet the needs of
specific circumstances such
as power outages, or fires. He
will look at plans for neigh-
bors helping each other, uti-
lizing evacuation routes and
much more. Gar is a Certified
Haz-Mat Technician, and is a
Member and Trainer for the
Crawford County Cert Team.
The presentation is free,
open to the public, and no
reservations are required.
Attendees will have a chance
to win one of two emergency
first aid kits, offered as door
prizes. Join us at 5pm for a
great Pork Chop Dinner prior
to the presentation. People
60 and older eat for a sug-
gested donation of $2.50.
Those under 60 eat for a cost
of $4.75.
Page 8 • Choice Publications ... The Best Choice! September 6, 2012
LOCAL NEWS
New stories updated daily on-line at www.weeklychoice.com
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September 6, 2012 Choice Publications ... The Best Choice! • Page 9
LOCAL NEWS
New stories updated daily on-line at www.weeklychoice.com
FOCUS ON THE FAMILY
GRANDPARENTS NEED TO
RESPECT PARENTS'
BOUNDARIES WITH KIDS
with Jim Daly and Dr. Juli Slattery
QUESTION: I don't like the
way my son and his wife are
raising their kids. I don't want
to interfere, but shouldn't I
have a say in what's good for
my own grandchildren?
Juli: There is an excellent chance that
your son and daughter-in-law know that
you have some concerns about how
they're raising your grandkids. Young
parents harbor a lot of doubts of their
own and quickly pick up the vibe when
a close friend or relative disapproves of
their parenting. Your son and his wife
are likely to be more defensive and with-
drawn from you the more they pick up
on your concerns.
Whether or not you realize it, you
potentially have a fair amount of influ-
ence in their parenting. They may even
welcome your perspective and opinion -
- but only if they first feel safe with you.
Influence is a tricky thing. When you
overreach with it, you lose it. A lot of
parents and in-laws are too forceful with
their opinions and unsolicited advice.
This causes a young couple to distance
themselves in order to ward off poten-
tial criticism.
Your greatest influence is your pres-
ence with your son, his wife and chil-
dren. Even if you never mention your
concerns or offer advice, the way you
carry yourself, show unconditional love,
and the character you model will leave a
tremendous impression.
My encouragement to you is to build
a trusting relationship, particularly with
your daughter-in-law. Find ways that
you can genuinely compliment her as a
wife and mother, remembering that
motherhood can, at times, be an
exhausting marathon. Show her that
you care about her as a person, and as
difficult as it may be, let go of your con-
cerns for now. The day will come when
she is desperate for a word of advice or
wisdom. She's far more likely to seek
you out if you have built a trusting rela-
tionship than if she feels threatened by
your disapproval.
** ** **
QUESTION: My family recently
joined a church. My elderly
father has no use for religion,
and he's trying to convince my
kids that they're wasting their
time. Should I prevent them
from seeing their grandpa?
Jim: We'd advise that you set firm
boundaries with your father and make it
clear that it's your right and responsibil-
ity to oversee your children's spiritual
growth. He doesn't have to like the fact
that they're attending church with you,
but he needs to respect your decision.
At the same time, I can empathize
with your desire to maintain a good
relationship with him, especially for the
sake of your kids. Growing up, I didn't
have any grandparents. There's evi-
dence my mom and dad may have been
part of the witness protection program
(no joke!), and so extended family was
nonexistent. I would have loved nothing
more than to have someone to call
"Grandma" and "Grandpa." With that in
mind, it would be tragic if you and your
kids were to become estranged from
your dad over this issue.
The challenge, then, is to arrive at a
point of compromise. Make it clear to
your dad that you love and respect him,
and that you want your kids to be able to
spend quality time with their grandpa.
But also make it clear that you need to
make your own choices as a parent, and
that if he has concerns about your fami-
ly's spiritual path, he should take them
up with you, not the kids. It won't be
easy, but with honesty, open communi-
cation and respect from both parties,
there's no reason your kids
can't continue to have a fun
and healthy relationship with
their grandpa.
** ** **
Jim Daly is president of Focus on
the Family, host of the Focus on the
Family radio program, and a hus-
band and father of two.
Dr. Juli Slattery is a licensed psy-
chologist, co-host of Focus on the
Family, author of several books,
and a wife and mother of three.
Submit your questions to:
ask@FocusOnTheFamily.com
Copyright 2012
Focus on the Family,
Colorado Springs, CO 80995
International Copyright Secured.
All Rights reserved.
Distributed by Universal Uclick
1130 Walnut St.
Kansas City, MO 64106;
(816) 581-7500
This feature may not by repro-
duced or distributed electronically,
in print or otherwise without writ-
ten permission of Focus on the
Family.
This good news for Your family brought to
you by Family Comfort Systems
For more good news about Your family's health contact us.
Kevin Westcott
989-732-8099

Ask about our
Senior Discount
By Jim Akans
When Michael Leader decided to form his
own electrical contracting company, his goal
was to not only offer the expertise earned
from his over 25 years of experience in the
electrical field, but to also provide those serv-
ices promptly, efficiently and economically.
“We cover electrical service and installation
in every aspect of residential, commercial and
industrial applications,” states Michael
Leader. “We also offer extremely competitive
rates, typically working out to about half of
what bigger contractors may charge.
However, we do not cut corners…the quality
of our work is exceptional. We take great
pride in our work.”
Leader started working in the electrical field
back in 1983, became a journeyman and went
on to become a master electrician. He moved
to the Mancelona/Kalkaska area from Detroit
in 1994, built a new home for his mom, and
raised two sons as a single dad, with each son
graduating from high school with honors.
He relates, “One is now attending Air Traffic
Controller school in Biloxi, Mississippi, and
my other son is an electrical apprentice,
working part time for me, and I hope to
employ him full time when this business takes
off.”
Leader points out that the scope of work his
company will handle ranges from large scale
commercial or residential service or installa-
tions, to helping someone address smaller
electrical issues in the home.
“A person recently called that had been
having trouble figuring out the purpose of
several wall switches in their home,” Leader
recalls. “We were able to stop by and identify
the functions for those switches, and they
were very happy with the service we provid-
ed.”
He affirms, “Whether the job is large or
small, we are here to get the job done
promptly, economically, and completed right
the first time.”
Contact Leader Electric at (231) 587-0431 or
(231) 313-3413.
Participants of all ages are invited to join in the third annu-
al “Making Change Run/Walk” on Saturday morning Oct 6 in
Gaylord Michigan to benefit Guardian Gals, Inc, a non-profit
organization. The mission of Guardian Gals, Inc. is to actively
engage, educate and offer opportunities for young girls and
women in grades 6 through 12 to learn skills, behaviors and
knowledge that enhance positive personal and societal
change. Their mission is carried out in community service
projects, philanthropy, self care lessons and mentoring by
area leaders.
Guardian Gals Founder and Executive Director, Abby
Hamilton, explained that the Making Change event is multi-
purpose. “We will be “Making Change” in a variety of ways.
This event will raise important funding for the Guardian Gals
organization; increase public awareness of our year-round
work in the community; and also offer a healthy outing of
exercise and fun for participants and those cheering them
on.” Hamilton stated that last year’s 2nd Annual ”Making
Change” event generated high levels of enthusiastic support
with 146 participants, and raised over $12,000. A wide variety
of healthy and eco-friendly prizes were donated from over
100 local and large corporate businesses.
The year’s event will begin behind Gaylord Intermediate
School at the Gaylord Environmental Learning Center, and
take a beautiful route through the Environmental Center
field and Aspen Park. Men, women and children can choose
to run or walk a more adventuresome 1 mile or 5k path this
year and more experienced runners will have the option of
running a 10k trail run through the Aspen trails. Event plan-
ners have arranged professional timing as this year’s
improved offerings to participants.
Each 5k or 10k runner/walker pledges a minimum $100
donation, which can be raised through friends and family
supporting their efforts; hosting a garage sale; or through
other creative ways. Those unable to participate in person
can sponsor a walker or runner, provide prizes or other valu-
able assistance. Donations of all amounts are welcome.
Contact Abby Hamilton via phone at 989.390.5749 or via
email at AbbyHamilton@GuardianGalsInc.org for more infor-
mation. To register for this annual Fall event, visit
www.Active.com/guardiangals or www.GuardianGalsInc.org
LEADER ELECtRiC offers experienced, efficient and
economical service and installation
Guardian Gals Are Making Change…Again!
COURTESY PHOTO
When Michael Leader decided to form his own electrical contracting company, his
goal was to not only offer the expertise earned from his over 25 years of experience
in the electrical field, but to also provide those services promptly, efficiently and eco-
nomically.
Upcoming Senior
Programs & Events













































For more information
or to register:
308 Lawndale Ave.,
Grayling
989-348-7123
Matter of Balance Classes
Starting September 5 · 9-11am
The Crawford County Commission on Aging & Senior Center will be present-
ing a free series of 8 classes on the subject of preventing falls called A Matter
of Balance, taught by Catherine & Leonard Wyatt. This Award-Winning Pro-
gram emphasizes practical strategies to manage falls and is designed to help
older adults manage their concerns about falling and increase their activity lev-
els. Who should attend? Anyone interested in improving balance, flexibility
and strength; anyone who has fallen in the past or anyone who has restricted
activities because of falling concerns. The classes will be held weekly on Mon-
days or Wednesdays during September and October, starting Wednesday, Sep-
tember 5th and ending Wednesday, October 3rd. Reservations Required
AARP Driver Safety Program
Thursday, September 6 · 8:30am-4:30pm
A classroom driver refresher course for drivers aged 50 and older. This course
covers the age-related physical changes in perception and reaction time, local
driving problems and rules of the road. The certified AARP volunteer instruc-
tors will be presenting this course through a combination of group discussion
and videotapes. There are no tests, and all participants who complete the
course will receive a certificate of completion that may be eligible for an auto-
mobile insurance discount. The fee for this course is $12 for members and $14
for non-members with checks made payable to AARP.
Cholesterol/Heart Health Presentation
Thursday, September 6 · 6pm
Learn more about how to keep your cholesterol levels in a healthy range and
reduce your risk for heart disease, the public is invited to attend a presentation
by Dr. Charles Todoroff, sponsored by the Crawford County Commission on
Aging & Senior Center and Mercy Hospital Grayling. Dr. Todoroff from
Mercy Physician Network will share information to help you take responsibil-
ity for managing your cholesterol levels with healthy lifestyle choices. The
presentation is free of charge. The public is invited to a Stuffed Pepper Dinner
at 5pm prior to the presentation for a small fee.
Medicare Presentations
Tuesday, September 11, 18, 25 · 6pm
Commission on Aging & Senior Center MMAP volunteers also put on presen-
tations for people who are turning 65 and entering the Medicare system as well
as ones about Medicare fraud, abuse and waste. In addition, volunteers are ac-
tively seeking Medicare beneficiaries who need assistance in paying the Part B
premium of $99.90 and/or their prescription drug costs. In September, the
Commission on Aging & Senior Center is putting on 3 Medicare presentations.
On Tuesday, September 11th at 6pm, people who will be New to the Medicare
system (turning 65) in the fall of 2012 or in 2013 are encouraged to attend. On
Tuesday, September 18th at 6pm, Medicare Fraud and Abuse will be addressed.
On Tuesday, September 25th at 6pm, discussion will center on the Open Enroll-
ment period for Medicare Part D Prescription Drug Plans, which starts on Oc-
tober 15th and runs through December 7th, and any known changes to
Medicare and Prescription Drug Plans for 2013. All presentations will be held
at the Commission on Aging & Senior Center, and are free of charge.
Grandparents Day Dinner
Thursday, September 13 · 4-6pm
The Community is invited to attend a Grandparents Day Dinner. Menu in-
cludes Roast Beef, Mashed Potatoes with gravy, Peas & Pearl Onion Blend,
Fresh Fruit Salad, and Peanut Butter Brownie with Ice Cream. The meal is only
$4.75 per person for those under 60 and a suggested donation of $2.50 for peo-
ple 60 and over. The dinner is open to the public. For more information contact
Helen at the Commission on Aging & Senior Center at (989) 348-7123.
Chronic pain class
Starting September 18 · 1-3:30pm
The Crawford County Commission on Aging & Senior Center (COA) is part-
nering with the Michigan State University Extension Office to provide a six-
week PATH Workshop on Chronic Pain Management. The workshop will be
held on Tuesdays from 1 to 3:30pm each week at the Devereaux Memorial Li-
brary. The registration fee is only $10. An informational session will be held on
Wednesday, Sept 5th at 5:30pm at the Senior Center for more information
about the PATH classes.
Petoskey Shopping Trip
Tuesday, September 18
The Commission on Aging & Senior Center will take a trip to Petoskey. Please
call 348-7123 to reserve a spot by Friday, Sept 7th
Thunder Bay Resort Trip
Thursday, September 27
Reservations required by Friday, Sept 7th.
Emergency Preparedness
Thursday, September 20 · 6pm
The Crawford County Commission on Aging & Senior Center will present an
Emergency Preparedness seminar. The presentation is free, open to the public,
and no reservations are required.
Page 10 • Choice Publications ... The Best Choice! September 6, 2012
SUNDAY SERVICES
WEDNESDAY
10:30 AM
7:00 PM ADULT BIBLE STUDY
Joy Fellowship
Assembly of God
8600 S. Straits Hwy.
Located between Indian River and Wolverine.
Sunday - Coffee Hour 9 AM
Service - 10 AM including services for children
Wednesday - 6 PM
231-525-8510 Pastor Bob Moody
Bible Based Preaching
Traditional Music
Friendly, Casual, Atmosphere
Come Just As You Are
Sunday School 10:00 • Morning Worship 11:00
Evening Service 6:00 • Wednesday 6:00
Alpine Village Baptist Church
158 N. Townline Rd., Gaylord • 989-732-4602
Iß0IAß 8I¥£8 008¡0M L06 ß0M£8
°lf you're not happy...We're NOT Finished!"
00NPL£T£0 0V£8 50 L06 & ST|0k 80|LT h0N£S
º F0|| Log or 1l2 Log S|d|og & 8estorat|oo oo 0|der Log homes.
º 0|eao & Sta|o proveo to |ast Ior years.
6.8. wo|Igram & Soos, |oc.
logs@straitsarea.com
(231} 238-4638
(231} 420-3033
Licensed & Insured
www.indianriverloghomes.com
Friendship Church
415 North Ohio, Gaylord · 989-732-3621
Pastor Steve Datema
A Christian Reformed Ministry
Enjoy the music and message every Sunday morning
at 10:00am. Sunday School at 11:15am
Our Mission: ¨A Spirit filled family of God united in our fear and love of Christ and
committed to the truth of the Bible. A praying church that equips its members to care,
serve and reach out to others with the saving grace of Jesus Christ.'
A0TS 17:11 (h£w |hT£8hAT|0hAL V£8S|0h}
11 how the 8ereao Jews were oI more oob|e character thao those |o Thessa-
|oo|ca, Ior they rece|ved the message w|th great eageroess aod exam|oed the
Scr|pt0res every day to see |I what Pa0| sa|d was tr0e.
Berean Bible Church
Serv|ces
Surda] Sc|oo| lor Adu||º ard Yourçer C|||drer 9:45 ar
Surda] C|urc| Serv|ce 11:00 ar
wedreºda] C|urc| Serv|ce 7:00 pr
17o4 Top|raoee Va|| Rou|e · Top|raoee Vl
Pastor 0ave 6earhart · 231 238 8552
FREEDOM WORSHIP CENTER
Full Gospel • Non Denominational Church
826-8315
Need Prayer or Ride to Church...Give us a call
• Sunday School - Adults/Kids 9:30 am
• Sunday Worship 10:30 am
• Thursday Back to Basics Bible Study 5 pm
611 Mt. Tom Rd. (M-33)
Mio, Michigan
Inspirational Living
Providing a safe environment for you
to browse the web.
Now offering free computer time plus coffee and
popcorn.
Noon Prayer on Wednesdays
Lounge area to watch TV
Christian
Cyber
Cafe
.GOD
Locuted ín the
South \ísconsín St., Cuyíord, Míchígun
Cer|emjerer¡ ¥t:it eri 'jiri| |illei 'errite
Daily Word
THURSDAY: 1 Samuel 4:8-9 New American Standard Bible (NASB) 8 Woe to us! Who shall
deliver us from the hand of these mighty gods? These are the gods who smote
the Egyptians with all kinds of plagues in the wilderness. 9 Take courage and
be men, O Philistines, or you will become slaves to the Hebrews, as they have
been slaves to you; therefore, be men and fight.”
FRIDAY: 2 Chronicles 15:7 New American Standard Bible (NASB) 7 But you, be strong and
do not lose courage, for there is reward for your work.”
SATURDAY: Micah 3:7-8 New American Standard Bible (NASB) 7 The seers will be
ashamed And the diviners will be embarrassed. Indeed, they will all cover
their mouths Because there is no answer from God. 8 On the other hand I am
filled with power—With the Spirit of the Lord—And with justice and courage
To make known to Jacob his rebellious act, Even to Israel his sin.
SUNDAY: Deuteronomy 31:6 New American Standard Bible (NASB) 6 Be strong and coura-
geous, do not be afraid or tremble at them, for the Lord your God is the one
who goes with you. He will not fail you or forsake you.”
MONDAY: Joshua 1:6-8 New American Standard Bible (NASB) 6 Be strong and courageous,
for you shall give this people possession of the land which I swore to their
fathers to give them. 7 Only be strong and very courageous; be careful to do
according to all the law which Moses My servant commanded you; do not turn
from it to the right or to the left, so that you may have success wherever you
go. 8 This book of the law shall not depart from your mouth, but you shall
meditate on it day and night, so that you may be careful to do according to all
that is written in it; for then you will make your way prosperous, and then you
will have success.
TUESDAY: Hebrews 11:6 New American Standard Bible (NASB) 6 And without faith it is
impossible to please Him, for he who comes to God must believe that He is and
that He is a rewarder of those who seek Him.
WEDNESDAY: Micah 7:7-8 New American Standard Bible (NASB) 7 But as for me, I will
watch expectantly for the Lord; I will wait for the God of my salvation. My
God will hear me. 8 Do not rejoice over me, O my enemy. Though I fall I will
rise; Though I dwell in darkness, the Lord is a light for me.s
PASTOR’S PERSPECTIVE
Bob Moody
Joy Fellowship -
Assembly of God
I just graduated from NCMC so I
could teach preschool.
No but I had to work a lot while
going to school.
Lauren Teibisondi, Onaway
To go to college so I can do better i
my life.
No I just graduated from high
school.
Aaron Bertram
To try to do the best inside my
norm and step outside the box
now and then.
There's always obstacles, but as
long as you find another road you
can get around them.
Ashley Grooters,
Gaylord
I'm studying psychology to find out
why people do what they do.
I get told to go into something with
more opportunities.
Drake Miller, Cheboygan
I want to go to school to be a vet-
erinarian technician.
No obstacles.
Bekka Neelis, Cheboygan
Don’t be content to be the chip off the old block—be the old block itself
-Winston Churchill
I love Winston Churchill. One day I want to devote some time to just studying his life. This man had
the ability to coin a short phrase that conveyed a simple truth in very few words. This particular phrase
is a perfect example.
I think Mr. Churchill was challenging his hearers to become someone worth following. Many are con-
tent to simply follow in other’s footsteps. History is made by those willing to go where others have not
been. I believe God has called His people to step out into uncharted areas and do great things. He has
called others to retake ground that has been lost. He has called some to build upon the foundations laid
by those who went before. Others have been called to rebuild and yet others to train disciples who do
these things. One thing I am certain off—He has not called any of His children to be complacent!
Too many never make the mark in this world that God has planned for them simply because they
don’t want to! They are as lazy as a pet coon. They just want to attend church (if they do that even)
and be happy. Let others go, let others work, let others build and yes let others have the honor. They
just want to do nothing. Pew Potatoes! God help us! And He will if we will just step out into the new
place He has called us to. “Well, I don’t have that kind of faith” many say. Hooey! Everybody has
enough faith to take the first step! God has given us all that much. After you take the first step He’ll
give you enough to take the second step. He doesn’t quit giving as long as you keep going.
So, if you have been wanting to be the block instead of the chip why not start now? Winston Churchill
was but one man but he inspired England to persevere against a powerful enemy. He weren’t no chip!
No way!!!! He was a big block. You can be too. God wants you to. You don’t have to do the whole thing
today but launch out into something new today. Not sure what to do? Read your Bible for ten minutes.
You’ll find something.
You’ve got to start today. If you don’t you’ll spend the rest of your life getting ready to start. Talk
to someone who launches out into the unknown. Get advice from them. Don’t talk to the chips. Go find
a rock—and then be one!
Father, I’m not looking for glory for myself but I want to bring glory to your name. Help me!
Copyright 2012 Robert A. Moody
Permission is granted to use this devotion in its entirety with the understanding that it not be edited, altered or sold. If you have questions or
comments please contact Bob at pb@indianriverchurch.com.
Thoughts on...What great thing have you felt inspired to?
Has anything gotten in the way?
September 6, 2012 Choice Publications ... The Best Choice! • Page 11
LOCAL NEWS
New stories updated daily on-line at www.weeklychoice.com
This years parade featured Parade Marshal’s were Sam and Madge
Smith.
Sunday, September 2nd was a gorgeous late summer day, perfect weather for
the annual Thunder Over Waters Festival, as attendees appreciated as they
perused the Arts and Crafts fair which ran from 10 am to 7 pm this year.
This year’s beautiful
Miss Thunder Over
Waters contestants
took a few minutes
after the parade to
pose for a wonderful
photo. From left;
Kassi Richards (who
was crowned 2012
Miss Thunder Over
Waters), Shelby
Crapser and Hailey
Buckler.
At 3 pm, the exciting Waterball competition got underway behind the
Fire Hall, with firefighting teams struggling to force the suspended
ball into their opponents court.
The 2012 Miss Otsego County Fair
Queen Court toured in a classic Camaro
during the parade (from left; Anastasia
Bragg - 1st Runner Up, Kayenne Baur -
2012 Miss Otsego County Fair Queen
and Julie Tippery - the pageant’s 2nd
Runner Up.
National Grandparents Day is cele-
brated on September 9. If you’re a
grandparent yourself, you already know
the pleasures of having grandchildren in
your life. So you may want to take this
occasion to think of ways you can help
those grandchildren get the most out of
their lives.
Perhaps the most valuable thing you
could give to your grandkids is the gift of
education. Consider this: Over a life-
time, college graduates earn, on aver-
age, about $1 million more than those
without a degree according to the
Census Bureau. So, putting money
toward your grandchildren’s college
education is probably a pretty good
investment.
Furthermore, your grandchildren
may well need the help, because college
is expensive and costs continue to rise.
Consequently, you may want to con-
tribute to a 529 plan. You have several
options for how the money can be
invested and contribution limits are
quite high. All withdrawals are free from
federal income taxes, provided the
money is used for qualified college
expenses. (Keep in mind, though, that
non-qualified withdrawals will be tax-
able and possibly subject to penalties.)
Plus, if you invest in your own state’s 529
plan, your contributions may be
deductible on your state income taxes.
If you name one grandchild as a ben-
eficiary of a 529 plan and that grand-
child decides not to go to college, you
can switch the account to another
grandchild — in other words, you main-
tain control of the money for the life of
the account.
Of course, despite its economic ben-
efits, college is not for everyone. So if
you wanted to provide financial help to
a grandchild who seems likely to choose
a different route in life, what could you
do?
One possibility is to set up a custodial
account, often known as an UGMA
(Uniform Gift to Minors Act) or UTMA
(Uniform Transfer to Minors Act). You
can fund a custodial account with many
different types of investments, but the
use of the money is entirely up to your
grandchildren when they reach the age
of termination in whatever state in
which they live. But if your reason for
funding a custodial account is simply to
provide a gift, then you might not be
concerned with how the money is used.
On the other hand, if you want to give
your grandchildren a financial gift with
greater control, you may want to speak
to your attorney about your options.
One possibility is to set up an irrevoca-
ble trust. You can fund this trust with
either cash or securities and specify at
the time the trust is created when the
funds can be used. So For example, you
can provide that
the trust pay your
grandchild a cer-
tain amount of
money at one age,
with another
installment com-
ing several years
later. Keep in
mind, though,
that trusts are
complex instru-
ments and may
have tax consider-
ations, so in addi-
tion to consulting
with an attorney,
you’ll want to dis-
cuss your plans
with your tax advi-
sor.
Whichever option is right for your
family, use Grandparents Day as an
opportunity to consider the ways in
which you can give something to the
grandchildren who give so much to you.
This article was written by Edward
Jones for use by your local Edward Jones
Financial Advisor.
Philip Hofweber is a Financial
Advisor with Edward Jones Investments
located at 100 West Main Street in
Gaylord. He can be reached at (989)731-
1851, or email him at
phil.hofweber@edwardjones.com. Tune
in Friday Mornings 8:30 am to Eagle
101.5 for Phil Hofweber to hear his week-
ly Financial Focus Topic. Edward Jones,
its financial advisors and employees do
not provide tax or legal advice. You
should consult with a qualified tax or
legal professional for advice on your spe-
cific situation.
FINANCIAL FOCUS
CONSIDER THESE FINANCIAL
GIFTS FOR YOUR
GRANDCHILDREN
Philip Hofweber, Financial Advisor with Edward Jones
GAYLORD, (989) 731-1851
1928 S. Otsego Ave.
Gaylord
www.gaylordfordlincoln.com
(989) 732-6737
1-800-732-6710
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A gorgeous late summer day for
2012 Thunder Over Waters festival
Photos by Jim Akans
Bikes, bikes and
even more bikes
were donated by
local individuals
and businesses
again this year, and
presented through-
out at 4 pm in the
afternoon in a
drawing among
youngsters wearing
their lucky wrist
bands that were
handed out during
the festival.
Page 12 • Choice Publications ... The Best Choice! September 6, 2012
LOCAL NEWS
New stories updated daily on-line at www.weeklychoice.com
September is
National
Literacy Month,
and while that’s
an excellent
reason to grab
a book and cel-
ebrate, it is
also an occa-
sion to learn
about literacy
in America.
PHOTO BY JIM AKANS
Gold Mine Resale Shop North Manager Tammy
Hutchinson (left) is pictured near the store’s
newly renovated donation receiving area.
Women’s Resource Center of Northern Michigan
(WRCNM) staff and representatives from organi-
zations that helped fund the building improve-
ments include (from left) Hutchinson; Maureen
Radke, Charlevoix County Community
Foundation, Program Officer; Jan Mancinelli,
WRCNM Executive Director; Deb Smith,
WRCNM Assistant Director; Kathy Hutschke,
Oleson Foundation, Executive Director; and
Terry Newton, Petoskey Rotary Club Charities,
Inc., President.
Automotive
Review
Chevrolet launches the
All-New
2013 Malibu
PHOTO COPYRIGHT GENERAL MOTORS
The exterior design of the all-new Malibu carries DNA from its sister vehicles, the
Camaro and Corvette, to bring a sporty sensibility to the family sedan segment.
The all-new
2013 Malibu is
Chevrolet’s
first global
midsize sedan
designed and
engineered to
provide cus-
tomers from
Shanghai to
New York and
Sydney to Sao
Paulo with
expressive
design,
advanced
technologies,
ride perform-
ance and fuel-
efficient pow-
ertrains. It will eventually be sold in
nearly 100 countries on six continents.
In North America, the Malibu comes
in LS, LT and LTZ trim levels, along
with the Malibu Eco, which uses fuel-
saving eAssist ™ technology to enable
EPA-estimated fuel economy of 25 city
/ 37 highway, for the best fuel econo-
my of any non-hybrid midsize sedan.
The new Malibu Eco is also the first
2013 midsize car to earn double hon-
ors for safety, including a 5-Star
Overall Vehicle Score from the
National Highway Traffic Safety
Administration and a 2012 Top Safety
Pick by the Insurance Institute of
Highway Safety.
The Malibu Eco is a smart choice for
customers who want a midsize car
with excellent fuel economy, but with-
out the higher price of some full
hybrid sedans. Malibu Eco’s eAssist
system uses power stored in an air-
cooled, lithium-ion battery to provide
needed electrical boost in various driv-
ing scenarios, optimizing engine and
transmission operation. An advanced
115V lithium-ion battery and 15-kW
motor-generator unit help increase
fuel economy.
The exterior design of the all-new
Malibu carries DNA from its sister
vehicles, the Camaro and Corvette, to
bring a sporty sensibility to the family
sedan segment. A wider stance, broad
shoulders and an integrated rear spoil-
er bring a new athleticism to Malibu
and give it a more aggressive appear-
ance. Malibu also has electronically
controlled and integrated active aero
shutters to
improve
aerodynam-
ics and
enhance fuel
economy
without sac-
rificing the
exterior
design. They
automatical-
ly close air-
flow through
the lower
grille open-
ing when air
intake is
least needed,
improving
aerodynamic
performance and enhancing fuel effi-
ciency. The shutters are standard on
Eco and LS models, as well as the 3LT
trim.
The new Malibu interior was
designed to bring an element of
sophistication to everyday driving, fea-
turing an all-new, dual-cockpit design
that creates an inviting, roomy and
comfortable environment. The
increased width of the new Malibu
means a more spacious cabin.
Compared to the previous model, it
has nearly four cubic feet (113 L) of
additional interior volume, along with
more shoulder and hip room.
For customers who enjoy style and
performance, Chevrolet will offer its
first-ever Turbo on a Malibu with an
all-new Ecotec 2.0L turbo engine rated
at 259 horsepower (193 kW) and 260
lb.-ft. of torque (353 Nm) between
1,700 and 5,200 rpm. It is the most
powerful midsize sedan from a domes-
tic automaker, and more powerful
than Malibu’s previous V-6 engines. It
will be available later this fall on LT
and LTZ models.
The 2013 Chevrolet Malibu delivers
precise ride and handling. It has been
engineered to be best-in-class and on
par with more expensive sports
sedans. Benefiting from continuous
refinement of an award-winning glob-
al architecture, engineers have tested,
tuned and calibrated the Malibu on
rural roads, highways, freeways and
GM validation facilities around the
world.
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Mary Welsh, Master Stylist
27 years experience
Hours: Tuesday through Friday 10am-6pm
Saturday by Appointment
5517 Old 27 South, Gaylord
989.619.3029
Come see me at
The View Hair Salon
~ SPECIAL ~
Make an appointment with Mary Welsh and
receive $5.00 Off your haircut or
$10.00 off any chemical service.

Construction, Inc.
2860 Kassuba Road, Gaylord, MI 49735
Let
Tom Kuch
(formerly from Norandex)
help you find the
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for your home.
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Call Tom at J-N-J Construction to get
your free estimate for professional
installation of quality products for
your home or business.
989-370-5738
FREE
ESTIMATES
PHOTO COPYRIGHT GENERAL MOTORS
The new Malibu interior was designed to bring
an element of sophistication to everyday driving,
featuring an all-new, dual-cockpit design that cre-
ates an inviting, roomy and comfortable environ-
ment.
By Jim Akans
Frederick Douglass observed, “Once you
learn to read, you will be forever free,” Whether
turning the crisp pages of a fresh new book, the
dog-eared yellowing leafs of a treasured
favorite, or cradling an electronic reader while
stretching out on a comfortable chair, there is
nothing quite like the adventure, imagination,
and lessons a good book can relate. It is the
tale, the prose, the emotion, and the vivid birth
of the mental imagery extracted from mere let-
ters arranged on paper (or LCD screen) that
transport the reader from one reality to anoth-
er, and leave life richer for a very modest effort.
September is designated as National Literacy
Month, and while that’s an excellent reason to
grab a book and celebrate, it is also an occasion
to take a look at literacy in America.
According to the National Center for Family
Literacy, over 30 million Americans have read-
ing skills below basic literacy levels…that’s
about 14 percent of our country’s population.
The group, ProLiteracy Worldwide, defines lit-
eracy as the ability to read, write, compute, and
use technology at a level that enables one to
reach his or her full potential. In a society rap-
idly moving toward an information and service
based economy, literacy so defined is becom-
ing more important to the health of the society
with each passing year.
Statistics confirm that literacy can have a
huge impact on a country’s economic stature.
The U.S. Census Bureau found workers 18
years of age and over with a bachelor’s degree
earn an average of $51,206 a year, while those
with a high school diploma earn an average of
$27,915 and those without earn an average
$18,734 per year.
ProLiteracy Worldwide found that annual
health care costs in the U.S. are four times
higher among those with low literacy skills (as
compared to those with high level skills), and
that over 60 percent of inmates in state and
federal corrections facilities can barely read
and write.
The observance of National Literacy Month
is an excellent opportunity to contact your
local library, schools, and non-profit organiza-
tions such as the United Way and ask about
ways you can contribute through financial or
book donations, or volunteer opportunities, to
promote literacy programs in your area. Such
efforts help to ensure these programs continue
to operate and inspire literacy growth in your
home community. Support legislation that
promotes education and literacy, these are the
building blocks for America’s future.
Victor Hugo stated, “To learn to read is to
light a fire; every syllable that is spelled out is a
spark.”
Take the time to read a good book, encour-
age other to do the same; keep the fires of free-
dom of the imagination burning brightly.
Petoskey Rotary Club Charities, Inc.,
Charlevoix County Community Foundation
and the Oleson Foundation provided funds to
help create the new “donation station” drop-off
area at the Gold Mine Resale Shop North build-
ing in Petoskey. The project included excavat-
ing part of the rear area to accommodate water
run-off, building a sidewalk on the rear
perimeter, adding a driveway path to a new
donation receiving door and directional sig-
nage. The receiving door is now covered by a
large canopy providing donors with added con-
venience and protection from the elements.
The canopy also protects the receiving area
from water run-off, unnecessary moisture and
dirt tracking.
“Overall, the building improvements create a
safer, more convenient and accessible area for
donors to drop off goods,” said Jan Mancinelli,
Executive Director. “It is important to continue
attracting donors who provide gently used
items for our Gold Mine stores because the
proceeds from those sales are absolutely criti-
cal in helping fund WRCNM programs and
services which are relied on by thousands of
individuals annually.”
The Gold Mine Resale Shop North is located
just south of Oleson’s Food Store on US 31
North, Petoskey. The original Gold Mine store
is located at 1002 Emmet Street, Petoskey. Both
stores are open 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Monday
through Saturday. Donations drop-offs are
accepted from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. To arrange for
pick up of large donations or larger furniture
items, call the WRCNM Administrative Office at
231-347-0067.
Local funders support Gold Mine Resale
Shop donation station
Sit back with a good book
and celebrate
National Literacy
Month
WRC Promotes Staff Members
Arts Center Announces eddi Award Winners
September 6, 2012 Choice Publications ... The Best Choice! • Page 13
Roscommon - Many new activities have
been added to this year’s Family Night of the
Michigan Firemen’s Memorial Festival in
Roscommon. The fun begins Thursday, Sept.
13th at 4:00 p.m. on the Fire Training Grounds.
Glen’s Market of Roscommon will provide a
free dinner that will consist of hot dogs (grilled
by Big Moe’s Bar B-Q) pop, chips and all the
goodies, served by the Lions Club of
Roscommon. Fire hats along with other items
will be passed out by members of the Michigan
Firemen’s Memorial Festival Committee.
The Association to Rescue Kritters better
known as ARK will have live birds of prey , and
the Crawford-Roscommon Conservation
District will have displays emphasizing envi-
ronmental stewardship. MSU 4-H Extension
District will have numerous Science displays
created by their students.
Ronald McDonald will perform a magic
show at 5:00, and members of the Award win-
ning Roscommon High School Choir will per-
form a variety of musical selections at 6:00. Mr.
& Mrs. Santa Clause will make a early appear-
ance in the Christmas in the Village Santa
House performing magic, listening to early
requests and passing out gifts.
Bring your camera and take pictures with,
DNR-Smokey Bear, Chase Bank-Chase the Dog,
Chemical Bank-Silver Squirrel and North
Central Area Credit Union-Dollar Dog with his
PT Cruiser. Learn fire safety by experiencing
the challenge of the Gerrish Twp. Smoke trailer.
Pillows and Yella Rosea will be clowning
around and passing out prizes .
Interested in flying ? Then visit with Roy
Spangler who will show and explain how he
built his very own air-plane. The Roscommon
Historic Model Train Club will have a working
model train display., that can be enjoyed by the
young and young at heart. By the way they
have their very own permanent display in the
Village of Roscommon and offer rides on a
miniature train located at the Ausable River
Center. You will be amazed to hear Coastie
the Coast Guard Safety Boat answer questions
about boat safety. Kirtland Community College
and the Roscommon Area District Library &
Friends will have displays.
Michigan State Police will help us recognize
a variety of dangers. A free vision check called
Pediavision A basic eye exam for pre school
children will be available from the Roscommon
Lions Club. Chamber of Commerce represen-
tatives from the Higgins Lake Roscommon and
Grayling Chambers will be available to talk
about programs in their communities and lis-
ten to your ideas.
Gahagan Nature Preserve, Edward Jones
Investment, Independent Bank, Civil Air Patrol,
Good Shepherd United Methodist Church, the
Voice and Fish News-papers, and American
Heritage Girls will have a variety of interactive
activities.
The Roscommon Sheriff Department will
have a swat team along with their assault vehi-
cle that will be available for questions and
hands on inspection. Climb aboard a real Fire
Truck manned by the Higgins Twp. Fire Dept.
A coloring contest sponsored by Big Moe’s
Bar B-Q will offer prizes for the top three
entries. There will also be a hand operated
Apple Press, allowing you to make apple cider.
Visit Barnyard Babys Petting Zoo and Roger
& Pam Staven with their performing Cockatoo
and Australian Shepherd. Be on the look out
for Tammy Thompson of
WUPS 98.5 FM who will be
talking with people on a live
remote.
For our race car enthusiasts
we are honored to have NHRA
Top Alcohol Jr. Dragster driv-
ers, 15 year old Keara Dixon
and her 10 year old brother
Brandon Dixon, along with
their race cars. They will talk
about their racing experience’s
and answer your questions.
Try your skill at the
Houghton Lake Sportsman
Club mobile target range.
LOCAL NEWS
New stories updated daily on-line at www.weeklychoice.com
Nicole Wallesverd
Smokey
Bear
spreads
the word
that only
you can
prevent
forest
fires.
Everyone
enjoys the
Firemen’s
Memorial
Festival
Stacey Walsh-Hobbler
Expires 8/31/12
• Guided Trail Rides
• Hand-led Pony Rides
7902 Mullett-Burt Rd., Cheboygan, MI 49721
231.238.9976
Howell's
Riding Stable
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• Garages
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The Women’s Resource Center of Northern Michigan
(WRCNM) recently promoted two staff members, Stacey
Walsh-Hoobler and Nicole Wallesverd, to leadership positions.
Stacey Walsh-Hoobler, who began with the agency as a
therapist in 2001, has been named Clinical Supervisor. She
will be responsible for supporting the WRCNM team of thera-
pists, as well as overseeing clinical services at agency satellite
offices in Cheboygan, Gaylord and Mancelona. As Clinical
Supervisor, she will also serve on the WRCNM Leadership
Team, assisting with the coordination of programs and deci-
sion-making related to agency program policies, service deliv-
ery, budgets and personnel. She will continue in her capacity
as a therapist working with WRCNM clients at the administra-
tive/counseling office in Petoskey.
Walsh-Hoobler received a Bachelor of Science majoring in
Human Services from Lake Superior State University where
she graduated Cum Laude and was awarded Outstanding
Human Service Graduate. She earned a Masters of Social
Work from the University of Michigan with concentrations in
Interpersonal Practice and Mental Health. She has continued
her education by attending workshops and training on topics
crucial to her work.
The Women’s Center also promoted Nicole Wallesverd to
Children’s Program Director, where she will oversee both
Project FREE Preschool and the Children’s Learning Center
(CLC) programs. Wallesverd will also serve on the agency’s
Leadership Team. Project FREE is a state-funded school
readiness program for four year olds taught in half-day ses-
sions by two certified teachers. The CLC is a popular child
care option for area working families which provides an edu-
cational environment for children 2 ½ - 11 years old.
Wallesverd attended North Central Michigan College and
graduated from Alma College with a Bachelor of Arts in
Elementary Education with an Early Childhood Endorsement.
Prior to being hired by the WRCNM as Lead Teacher for the
Children’s Learning Center in 2010, she had taught kinder-
garten in Raleigh, North Carolina and had been the director of
a children’s program at the Bay Harbor Yacht Club for three
summers.
For information on WRCNM programs and services call
their administrative office at (231) 347-0067, or visit their web
site at wrcnm.org.
The Crooked Tree Arts Center is proud to announce the recip-
ients of the 2012 eddi Awards. The ceremony will be held on
Friday, September 21 at Crooked Tree Arts Center, downtown
Petoskey. The eddi Awards began in the fall of 2001 and are now
held in alternate years.
Those who will receive eddi Awards for 2012 are: Visual artist,
Harry Boyer, Harbor Springs; Performing Artist; Peter Sims,
Petoskey; Arts and Cultural Organization, Charlevoix Public
Library, Charlevoix; Arts in Education, Maggie Van Wagoner,
Petoskey; Arts and Cultural Leadership, Jil Brien, Petoskey;
Benefactor, Stafford Smith, Petoskey; and Lifetime Achievement,
Sis Fisher, Harbor Springs.
The eddi recipients are chosen by a nine person jury, lead by
eddi Award co-chairs, Marilyn Davies and Steve Spencer. The
jury for 2012 included Jane Diller, Lynn Dinning, Roy Harvey,
Joyce Herbert, Cheri Leach, Jim Kochensparger, Kirby Snively,
Sue Sheets and Ima Williams. The jury, which includes many
previous eddi Award recipients, reviewed over 30 nominations
for 2012 eddi Awards. “Nominations can be made at anytime
for the 2014 awards and a nomination form is available on our
website” noted Liz Ahrens, Executive Director, CTAC. The mas-
ter of ceremonies for the 2012 event will be Steve Spencer.
The eddi Awards are named on memory of eddi Offield, a
much loved and admired patron of arts and culture in northern
Michigan and a founder of the arts center. “Seating in the the-
ater is limited to 220 guests so we encourage people to reserve
their tickets now” remarked Kurt Wietzke, Crooked Tree Arts
Center Board President. “We are anticipating a full house as
each year we invite the winners from previous eddi Awards to be
part of the evening’s festivities” continued Wietzke. Past award
recipients are encouraged to attend as a group photograph will
be taken at the beginning of the evening. For a full list of previ-
ous winners, go to www.crookedtree.org.
Sponsors of the 2012 awards include Bay View Association,
Blissfest, CMU Public Broadcasting, Granite and Quartz
Countertops of Petoskey, McLaren Northern Michigan, Odawa
Casino Resort, Petoskey Plastics, and PNC Bank. The evening
includes appetizer buffet, awards ceremony followed by dessert.
Tickets are $50 per person and reservations can be made by
calling Crooked Tree at 231-347-4337, on line at
www.crookedtree.org, or in person at the Arts Center in down-
town Petoskey. Tickets are not available at the door.
Trees Down in Your Yard? Call Shawn Thomas Today
Families Enjoy Michigan Firemen Festival in Roscommon
Trucks, Troilers, Cor Houlers
Rentals
Call us for all your moving needs
PRO SERVICES
AUTO & TRUCK REPAIR
Gaylord – 989-731-4447
Atlanta – 989-785-4647
Hitches Installed,
Moving Supplies & Boxes
Each
recipient
receives
an original
bronze
sculpture
created by
area artist
Paul Varga.
LOCAL NEWS
New stories updated daily on-line at www.weeklychoice.com
Page 14 • Choice Publications ... The Best Choice! September 6, 2012
The Michigan Department of Transportation
(MDOT) is once again making game day traffic
information available for Michigan State
University, University of Michigan, and Detroit
Lions football fans on MDOT's Web site at
www.michigan.gov/mdot. You can find
"Getting to the Game" traffic information at
www.michigan.gov/gettingtothegame or you
can click on the "Getting to the Game" icon on
the MDOT Web site home page. Game day trav-
el updates will be posted regularly throughout
the fall season.
Wherever possible, construction on home
game days surrounding events in East Lansing
and Ann Arbor will be suspended and lanes
reopened. However, MDOT urges motorists to
drive with caution in those work zones where
restrictions are still in place.
Don't Barrel Through Work Zones! - Drive
Smart to Stay Alive.
MDOT puts traffic information online
for game day travelers
Home energy &
leisure products at
Lifestyles of Gaylord
By Jim Akans
“We offer home energy and leisure prod-
ucts aimed at the way we live here in
Northern Michigan,” states Mike Westcott,
manager of Lifestyles of Gaylord, formerly
known as Philips Energy. “We carry a full
line of alternative heating equipment by
Hearth N Home, including pellet stoves,
wood stoves and boilers, and wood-burning
and gas fireplaces, both free-standing and
wall units. On the leisure side, we have
Brunswick pool tables and a complete inven-
tory of accessories, plus three brands of hot
tubs and spas.”
The variety of products on display in the
Lifestyles of Gaylord Showroom is astound-
ing. Just inside the front entry, an inviting
presentation of Brunswick pool tables greets
the shopper, creating an immediate urge to
grab a pool cue and chalk up.
Westcott points out, “The University of
Wisconsin performed a test and found that
the Brunswick Gold Label line, which utilizes
a secret rubber materials formula for the
bumpers, is up to forty percent more respon-
sive than any competing brand. Brunswick
tables have always set the standard for play-
ing performance and durability.”
While the pool tables certainly bring
visions of enjoying afternoons and evenings
shooting a few games with friends, the
amazing selection of alternative heating
equipment on display at Lifestyles of
Gaylord provide inspiration for substantial
savings on home energy bills.
“Pellet stoves have been a very popular
item,” notes Westcott. “We carry the number
one and number two brands; Harman and
Quadra-Fire. Pellet stoves are very easy to
operate; with electronic ignition and ther-
mostatic control, it is a very simple way to
switch over from traditional natural gas or
propane heating in the home.”
And the savings can approach a forty to
fifty percent on home heating bills. Even
those who take advantage of the financing
available at Lifestyles of Gaylord may well
find they are paying less each month for the
equipment and pellets that they would be
paying for their traditional monthly budget-
ed heating bill. It’s tempting to apply those
monthly savings to a new pool table or hot
tub!
There’s no better way to soothe those
aches and pains after a hard day at work
than to stretch out in a warm, bubbling hot
tub spa right at home. Lifestyles of Gaylord
offers three leading hot tub brands; Jacuzzi,
which is the original spa manufacturer that
continues setting the standards all others
aspire to, as well as Four Winds and SpaTech,
lines that offer that relaxing home hot
tub/spa retreat experience at a more budget
oriented price point.
Lifestyles of Gaylord have an in-house
crew of qualified, certified technicians that
install and service their products throughout
northern Lower Michigan.
From a full line of alternative heating
equipment to leisure products that reflect
the Northern Michigan experience, Lifestyles
of Gaylord celebrates the way we live, and
the way we relax!
Lifestyles of Gaylord, located on US 27 South in Gaylord, offers a full line of alternative heating products as well as pool tables and hot
tub/spas to make the most of leisure living in northern Lower Michigan.
The variety of products on display in the Lifestyles of Gaylord Showroom is astounding.
Photo by Jim AkAns
Photo by Jim AkAns
Choosing a locally owned store
generates almost four times as
much economic benefit for the
surrounding region as shopping at
a chain, a new study has conclud-
ed. The analysis also found that
eating at a local restaurant pro-
duces more than twice the local
economic impact of dining at a
chain restaurant.
The research firm Civic
Economics analyzed data from fif-
teen independent retailers and
seven independent restaurants, all
located in Salt Lake City, and com-
pared their impact on the local
economy with four chain retail
stores (Barnes & Noble, Home
Depot, Office Max, and Target) and
three national restaurant chains
(Darden, McDonald’s, and P.F.
Chang’s).
The study found that the local
retailers return an average of 52
percent of their revenue to the
local economy, compared with just
14 percent for the chain retailers.
Similarly, the local restaurants re-
circulate an average of 79 percent
of their revenue locally, compared
to 30 percent for the chain eateries.
What accounts for the difference?
Independent businesses spend
much more on local labor. They
also procure more goods for resale
locally and rely much more heavily
on local providers for services like
accounting and printing. This
means that much of the money a
customer spends at a local store or
restaurant is re-spent within the
local economy, supporting other
businesses and jobs.
September 6, 2012 Choice Publications ... The Best Choice! • Page 15
LOCAL NEWS
New stories updated daily on-line at www.weeklychoice.com
4706 W. Otsego Lake Dr.
Gaylord, MI 49735
(989) 732-1785
www.golfthenatural.com Largest Engagement Ring Selection!
311 West Main, Downtown Gaylord
www.hogansjewelers.com
989.732.4444
ALPINE GOLD & SILVER EXCHANGE
1363 West Main, (next to Mancino`s) Gaylord

Highest Paying Coin &
Scrap Gold Dealer in
Northern Michigan.
NOW
OPEN
Open Mon-Fri 9am – 6pm
Sat. 9am – 2pm
CLOSED SUNDAYS
Buy – Sell
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We Take Trade-Ins
989-748-4849
148 W. Main St.
Downtown Gaylord, MI 49735
www.greatroomsgaylord.com
facebook.com/greatrooms ¦urn|lurc : lallrc--c-
We Pay Cash for Clean Used Furniture
Your New & Used
Furniture Destination
231-838-6207
COST: $40 PER MONTH (FIRST 3 FREE!)
3:30 - 4:15 PM BEGINNER
4:30 - 5:30 ADVANCED CLASS
HAMILL’S CARPET
sponsored by
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CLIFF HASS • (231) 347-8601
FENCING CLASSES

Ask about our
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989-732-8099
219 East Main
Gaylord, MI 49735
989-732-6271 PHONE
WWW.MAINOAK.COM
BRIAN M. HOYNER, DDS
Main
ak
Family Dentistry
PLC
O
UP NORTH ELECTRONICS
658 EDELWEISS VILLAGE PKWY., GAYLORD, MI 49735
Between Walmart and Lowes in the Walmart Plaza
Jeff Morey,
Manager
upnorthelectronics@hotmail.com
PH. 989.732.6731
Dine In, Carry Out or Delivered to your door!
989-705-7332
1361 M-32 West, GayIord
Here`s what you get.....
PETOSKEY & ALPENA
231-348-3700 989-354-7771
1 Large 16¨
3-topping pizza
1/2 Grinder
1 order of
Garlic Cheese Bread
Feed the FAMILY or OFFICE
for only
$
16
95
www.MancinosNorth.com
1 2 3
4815 Old 27 South,
Gaylord
Open for Dinner 7 Nights a Week!!!
Enjoy the Daily Happy Hour, Incredible Dinners,
the best Pizza around and much, much more.....
989-732-5552 • 800-743-7529
Donole Fresh or Oonned Food
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sponsored by
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Call us about oui LowCost Spay Ƭ Neutei Piogiam
View Our Adoptable Pets Online
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ሺʹ͵ͳሻ ʹ͵ͺ-PAWS
Looking for
ways to get
involved?

Call our
PAWS line!
Seiving Cheboygan County anu suiiounuing aieas
JEFFERSON STREET
Next to Zion Lutheran Church
PETOSKEY • 231-347-7530
If you or your business are interested in sponsoring your favorite
non-profit organization, call our office at 989-732-8160 or e-mail us at
Office@WeeklyChoice.com.
We have a number of Non-Profit Groups who are waiting for
a sponsor to be a part of the 20/20 Project. Cost to sponsor a Non-Profit
Group is just $25 a month.
The Friendship Shelter, Inc.
We are a homeless shelter serving the Gaylord area.
In addition to providing food and shelter, a major focus of
The Friendship Shelter's program is training and education designed
to ensure continued success for our clients once they transition to
independent living.
Visit: http://www.thefriendshipshelter.org/needs.html
To find out how you can help
Underwritten by: Anonymous Donor
St Mary Cathedral School
321 N. Otsego, Gaylord, MI 49735 • 989-732-5801
Give online at:
http://www.gaylordstmary.org/about-us/fundraising
Underwritten by:
J-N-JConstruction, Inc.
(989) 731-1338 • Jim Jeffers, 2860 Kassuba Rd., Gaylord, MI 49735
Maintain your independence
NMS provides a wide array of services 24 hours a day,
7 days a week, to meet your needs at home
• Transportation
• Errand Services
• Medication Management
• Health Management
• Home Maintenance
• Companionship
• Housekeeping
• Respite Care • Personal Care
• Building solutions for barrier free living
Northern Management
Services/Access Unlimited
nehemiah Project
offering shelter to Petoskey
Area homeless
Underwritten by
b Jeremy Wills D.D.s.
God gave you your teeth...we help you keep them.
33 years in Petoskey at 204 State St., Petoskey
231-347-8980
Gaylord Area Council for the Arts
GACA 2012 CALEnDAR
The Gaylord Area Council for the Arts 2012 Calendar is a major
fundraiser for the Arts Council. The theme for this year’s calendar is
“Black and White with a Little Red”; inspired by our annual exhibit in
February of the same name.
Calendars are available for $10.00 at the Community Arts Center,
125 E.Main St., Gaylord, MI,
Hrs: Tues.-Fri., 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Sat., 11 a.m.-1 p.m.
Phone: 989-732-3242 • www.gaylordarts.org
SALT & SAND ARE
TO yOuR vEHICLE
STOP BY TODAY TO kEEP
CORROSION AT BAY!
989.390.0485
www.jnjalpineautowash.com
1509 W. Main St., Gaylord
HAZARDOUS
J-N-J Construction, Inc.
HOMEBUILDERS PLUS*
“Over 100 Years Combined Experience”
• New Homes • Additions • Remodeling
• Garages • Decks • Siding & Windows
Insured • Licensed • FREE Estimates
(989) 731-1338
Jim Jeffers, 2860 Kassuba Road, Gaylord, MI 49735
sponsored by seniors helping seniors (989) 448-8323
1419 Standish Avenue
Petoskey MI 49770
231-347-2153
culliganpetoskey@yahoo.com
Call today for your Free In
Home Water Analysis.
Locally owned and operated
Carla L Parkes RN, Owner
Seniors Helping Seniors
®
...a way to give and to receive
®
989-448-8323
www. seni orshel pi ngseni ors. com/northernmi chi gan
www.northernmanagement.org
657 Chestnut Ct., Gaylord, MI 49735
989-732-6374 • 866-486-0712
You Are Invited to...
The Alpine Tavern
& Eatery
and Sport
Haus Pub
Michaywé
1535 Opal Lake Road
Gaylord, MI 49735
Phone 989.939.8911
Fax 989.939.8511
fixit@michaywe.com
www.michaywe.com
Whatever it takes!
200 S. Court Avenue, Suite 2
Post Office Box 1154,
Gaylord, Michigan 49734
Phone: 989.448.8828
Fax: 989.448.8829
curtr@ehtc.com
Curt A. Reppuhn
CPA PPLC
6461 Old 27 North,
Vanderbilt, MI 49795
989-966-2600
Weekend Entertainment Karaoke & Live Bands
Full
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Keno
Wifi
Pizza
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Daily Lunch
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This message
sponsored by
1377 w MAlh 37.
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Contact the Otsego County Animal
Shelter to see their pets for adoption.
Otsego County
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200 Eaº| 7|| S|. · 0a]|ord
[989} 705·7ê32
Support Adoption and Rescue. Why go to a
dog breeder, cat breeder or pet store to buy
a dog or buy a cat when you can adopt?
WWW.otsegocountym|.gov|an|ma|·contro|·18|
www.montesautowash.com
220 S. Otsego Ave., Gaylord • (989) 732-5444
otsego County
United Way
116 East 5th St.,Gaylord MI 49735 • 989-732-8929 x14
Lorraine@otsegounitedway.org • www.otsegounitedway.org
The only way to end poverty is to build community
Underneath everything we are, underneath everything we do, we are all people.
Connected, Interdependent, United.
And when we reach out a hand to one, we influence the condition of all.
That's what it means to LIVE UNITED.
Page 16 • Choice Publications ... The Best Choice! September 6, 2012
Harbor Springs - Area art lovers came together to meet the staff of the new Eli and Edythe Broad
Museum at Michigan State University.
Local summer residents Linda and Bill
Demmer of Lansing and Harbor
Springs planned a wonderful Sunday
Event. Michael Rush, Founder and
Executive Director, Marcia Crawley,
Director of Development, Sandra
Szymanski, Development and
Membership Coordinator and Mark Terman, MSU
Development Office were invited to come to this area to
share an update on the new museum that will open at MSU
this fall. Linda and Bill Demmer, Demmer Corporation, host-
ed a dinner at their cottage in Harbor Springs. Guests includ-
ed local friends and supporters of Michigan State University
and the Cultural Arts. The management team from the Broad
Museum presented a film documenting all the exhibit rooms
of the new museum and the many educational and cultural
exhibits that will be possible at the Eli and Edythe Broad
Museum.
Guests were first invited to enjoy the arts. The event start-
ed on Sunday afternoon with a visit to the Peery Art Gallery
in Harbor Springs with a cocktail reception and viewing of an
exhibit of the work of Artist James Peery. This exhibit was the
first stop for guests to meet and greet the visiting members
of the Broad management team. Next on the agenda was a
short walk to Linda and Bill Demmer's Cottage for a specially
prepared "Perch Dinner" served under a tent in the beautiful
gardens at the Demmer Residence.
Michael Rush kept the attention of all guests with charm
and as he eloquently spoke and educated the guests on what
this new museum will add to
the reputation, education
and enjoyment of cultural
arts to all who attend and
visit the MSU Campus. Art
lovers from across the nation
and world will come to visit
this magnificent structure
designed by Pritzker Prize-
Winning architect Zaha
Hadid. The 40 million dollar
museum is scheduled to
open on November 9, 2012.
We urge you to read more on
this magnificent museum
which will bring visitors
from around the world to
visit MSU and the State pf
Michigan. Read and see
more:
broadmuseum.msu.edu.
The Region 19 Minigrant program of the Michigan
Council for Arts and Cultural Affairs announces the
upcoming deadline for mini grant applications for
2013. The Michigan Council for Arts and Cultural Affairs
Region 19 Minigrant program includes Alcona, Crawford,
Iosco, Ogemaw, Oscoda and Roscommon counties. The
deadline for applications is Monday, October 1, 2012 for
projects that fall within a timeline of January 1, 2013
through September 30, 2013.
New this year is a second component to this program.
Through the mini grant program, the Council will also
award Professional Development grants for individuals
working in Arts and Culture. Continuing this year, appli-
cants must participate in the Michigan Cultural Data
Project. Arts and cultural organizations enter financial,
programmatic and operational data into a standardized
online form and can then use the CDP to produce a vari-
ety of reports designed to help increase management
capacity, identify strengths and challenges and inform
decision-making. They can also generate reports to be
included as part of the application processes to partici-
pating grant makers. For more information regarding the
CDP requirement, see application guidelines.
During 2012, the Council, through the Kirtland
Community College Foundation, was able to distribute
$10,200 into three of the six counties covered. The
Minigrant program is a grants-giving partnership funded
by the State of Michigan through the Michigan Council
for Arts and Cultural Affairs (MCACA) and administered
by agencies in each region of the state. Minigrants pro-
vide up to $4,000 for locally developed, high quality arts
and cultural projects, which are special opportunities to
address local arts and cultural needs and increase public
access to arts and culture. Minigrants support a broad
range of artistic expression from all cultures through proj-
ects which preserve, produce, or present traditional or
contemporary arts and culture. Non-profit organizations,
located in the state of Michigan, including (but not limit-
ed to) service organizations, arts organizations, parks and
recreational organizations, churches, professional associ-
ations, public and non-public schools, cities, townships
and villages may apply.
A copy of the application and the guidelines can be
found on the MCACA Minigrant website at: www.kirt-
land.edu/mcaca. If anyone would like a copy mailed to
them, contact Beth Petrik at 989-275-5000 ext. 397 or
email at beth.petrik@kirtland.edu.
READ
Recreation, Entertainment, Arts, Dining
Patrons Enjoy
Exhibit at Peery
Art Gallery
Arts Mini-Grants Available
Deadline to apply October 1, 2012
W W W . F A M O U 5 P O L ¡ 5 H K ¡ T C H F N . C O M
T R A D ¡ T ¡ O N A L P O L ¡ 5 H C U ¡ 5 ¡ N F
At the loíísh lítchen oí Hurbor Spríngs und letoskey, you'íí suvor
the ííuvors oí the oíd country: the rích, eurthy bíends oí meuts und
vegetubíes thut ure the stupíes oí loíísh home cookíng.
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231-838-5377
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231-881-5987
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- Dinc ln, Takc Out or DcIivcry-
Now Two LocaIlons!
Open 7 a.m. Daily · For Reservations Phone (989) 732-5524
Downtown Gaylord
Gaylord`s Landmark Restauant Since 1919
'EARLY
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Any menu selection
including desserts.
Monday thru Thursday
from 4:00 to 7:00 p.m.
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Saturday
September
22
8:30 p.m.
Saturday
September
29
8:30 p.m.
'Michigan Man¨
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Open Daily At 4:30 p.m.
Early Bird Specials 4:30 - 6 p.m. Monday thru Thursday
(989) 786-4600 • Lewiston, Michigan
Located at the corner of County Rd. 489 & 612
www.theredwoodsteakhouse.com
Emmet Historical
Commission
announces History
Contest for Students
The Emmet County Historical Commission and the Bob Schulze
Fund for Creative Writing will once again sponsor a Historical Essay
Contest for area schoolchildren. Any third or fourth-grade students in
Emmet County are eligible for the contest, including home schooled
children.
Prizes are $100 for first place and $50 for second place. Contestants
may write about any topic that involves Emmet County history. The
essay should be two pages or less, typed, double-spaced. Only one
entry per student is allowed. Entries may be submitted individually or
through schools or libraries. The student's name should not be on the
essay, only on the attached entry form. The entry form should be
placed on top of four copies of the essay.
Entries must be postmarked by Feb. 15, 2013, and should be sent
to:
Emmet County History Contest
c/o Melinda Spencley
711 Plains Road, Brutus, MI 49716
or email to: essay@emmetcounty.org. An advisory committee will
choose the winning entry.
Are your middle and high school age chil-
dren ready for school? This is an exciting time
for students as they anticipate the school year
which includes shopping for clothes and sup-
plies, renewing school friendships, seeing new
faces and possibly entering into dating rela-
tionships. As families prepare to send their
children back to school, it is a good time to talk
with children about healthy relationships and
dating violence.
Adults and adolescents are often unaware
how regularly dating violence occurs. It is a
shocking fact that one in three adolescents in
the U.S. is a victim of physical, sexual, emo-
tional or verbal abuse from a dating partner, a
figure that far exceeds rates of other types of
youth violence. A nationwide survey conduct-
ed by the Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention (CDC) reveals one in 10 high school
students reported being hit, slapped or physi-
cally hurt on purpose by their dating partner in
the 12 months prior to the survey. Also, one
quarter of high school girls reported having
been victims of physical or sexual abuse.
Parents and students should know violent
relationships in adolescence can have serious
ramifications by putting the victims at higher
risk for performing poorly in school, substance
abuse, eating disorders, risky sexual behavior
and further relationship violence.
As part of back to school preparations, help
your child understand the nature of dating vio-
lence:
• Physical—occurs when a partner is
pinched, hit, shoved or kicked.
• Emotional—means threatening a partner
or harming their sense of self-worth, for exam-
ple name calling, shaming, bullying, embar-
rassing on purpose or limiting interaction with
friends and family.
• Sexual—forcing a partner to engage in a sex
act when he or she does not or cannot consent.
• Stalking—refers to a pattern of harassing or
threatening tactics used by a perpetrator that is
both unwanted and causes fear in the victim.
Dating violence can take place in person or
electronically, such as repeated texting or post-
ing of sexual pictures of a partner online.
Dating violence may start with teasing and
name calling, often thought to be a “normal”
part of a relationship. However, these behav-
iors can lead to more serious violence like
physical assault and rape.
Studies have shown that people who harm
their dating partners are more depressed and
more aggressive than peers. Other factors that
increase risk for harming a dating partner
include alcohol use, trauma symptoms, having
a friend involved in dating violence, problem
behaviors in other areas, belief that dating vio-
lence is acceptable, exposure to harsh parent-
ing and/or inconsistent discipline and lack of
parental supervision, monitoring and warmth.
During preteen and teen years, young people
are learning skills they need to form positive
relationships with others. This is an ideal time
to openly communicate about dating violence
and promote healthy relationships to help pre-
vent patterns of dating violence that can last
into adulthood.
The Women’s Resource Center of Northern
Michigan provides school-based prevention
programs covering topics like harassment,
manipulation, stalking, dating violence and
healthy relationships. For more information or
support, call (231) 347-0082 or visit wrcnm.org.
Why you should talk with your children
about dating violence:
•Females age 16 to 24 experience the highest
rate of intimate partner violence -- almost
triple the national average.
•Violent behavior typically begins between
the ages of 12 and 18.
•The severity of intimate partner violence is
often greater in cases where the pattern of
abuse was established in adolescence.
•About 72% of eighth and ninth graders are
“dating".
•Only 33% of teens who were in a violent
relationship ever told anyone about the abuse.
September 6, 2012 Choice Publications ... The Best Choice! • Page 17
1447 S. Otsego Ave., Gaylord
989.732.7000
sakswellnesscenter.com
Health & Wellness
Back to school prep should include dating violence discussion
Guest Commentary:
830 S. Otsego Ave. • Gaylord
888-247-501 / www.hom.org
Classes Available!
Visit
www.gaylordsgym.com
(989) 732-0744
GAYLORD FAMILY FITNESS CENTER
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Program Offers
Emotional Support to
Children Who Have a
Loved One Diagnosed
with Cancer
Petoskey – McLaren Northern Michigan is
offering a program to provide emotional sup-
port to children (ages 5-12) who have a parent
or other loved one diagnosed with cancer.
The six-week program is called CLIMB®,
which stands for Children’s Lives Include
Moments of Bravery. Through CLIMB®, art and
play activities help children to understand and
develop coping skills. This free community
service is funded by McLaren Northern
Michigan Foundation.
“The goal is to help children identify and
express the complex feelings they may experi-
ence during this difficult time. If there is a child
who may benefit from support in navigating
their way through a loved one’s cancer diagno-
sis, please know this resource is available,” said
Amy L. Juneau, an oncology social worker at
McLaren-Northern Michigan.
Through CLIMB, children will learn:
•Cancer is “not their fault.”
•They are not alone.
•About cancer and treatment options.
•How to express their feelings.
•How to manage anger.
•How to communicate effectively with loved
ones with cancer.
The program will take place from 5:30 to 7
p.m. on Mondays, September 10, 17, 24, and
October 1, 8 and 15 at the Community Health
Education Center (CHEC) building located
across the parking lot from the main entrance
to McLaren-Northern Michigan.
CLIMB was developed by The Children’s
Treehouse Foundation, a non-profit founda-
tion dedicated to the emotional support of
children who have parents or grandparents
with cancer.
For more information or to enroll a child in
the CLIMB® program, please contact Amy
Juneau, at 231.487.4015.
By Amy Grant
With a few questions, parents can be, as the
TV ads say, “the Anti-Drug.” Asking your child
where they are going and who they are going to
be with and then spot checking to verify that
they are where they say they are and are with
who they say they are going to be with is very
effective in stopping drug use.
One of the most effective deterrent to drugs
is a well-informed parent. While many parents
fear that discussing drugs with their children
may lead to experimentation, the truth is com-
munication and knowledge could save your
child's life. The more your children know about
the legal, medical and social effects of using
drugs, the better prepared they will be to resist
peer pressure and the come-ons of drug deal-
ers.
Drug prevention programs at school, church
and community centers often use lectures and
scare tactics to warn teens of the dangers of
drugs, but concerned and involved parents are
the drug dealer's worst enemy.
Foster a close and communicative relation-
ship with your children. Teens who respect
their parents and want to please them are far
less likely to get involved with drugs. Pay atten-
tion to who your children are spending time
with and make them accountable for their
whereabouts. Allow your children to invite
friends into your home frequently so you can
get to know them and learn more about their
parents.
If you suspect a child is lying, confront him
and seek the truth no matter how painful it
may be. Establish trust with your children but
let them know you may check up on them from
time to time. For example if your daughter is
spending the night at a friend's house, inform
her you will be calling during the evening to
make sure she feels comfortable and has every-
thing she needs. When a child knows you may
check his or her whereabouts, he is less likely
to fabricate a lie in an attempt to sneak off to a
forbidden destination.
Talk to your children frankly about the physi-
cal, mental and legal complications drugs can
cause. Give them booklets, articles from maga-
zines, and help them learn how to resist peer
pressure. Children often cave in to peer pres-
sure because no one has taught them how to
resist it effectively. Practice role playing with
them in different situations and give your kids
an arsenal of reasons for saying "No." Let them
know if verbal responses aren't working, the
best defense is sometimes just to walk away.
Don't make the mistake of thinking drug
experimentation is a rite of
passage that all kids go
through. The drugs that are on
the street today are 10 times
stronger than anything baby
boomers used in the 70s. Talk
to your teens about the dan-
gers of club drugs and what
can happen at rave parties.
Club drugs like Ecstasy, GHB,
Meth and LSD can cause seri-
ous health problems and even
death. Your teen needs to
know that experimenting even
once could have serious con-
sequences.
Set limits for your children
and enforce curfews. Allow
some flexibility for special
events but ask your kids to
check in with you regularly.
Take the extra time to call the parents at a
home where a party will be held and make sure
you feel comfortable with the level of supervi-
sion.
Let your children know you are their safety
net. If they get into a situation where they feel
uncomfortable at a party or after school, they
should know they can call you or another trust-
ed adult to come get them. Warn them of the
dangers of talking to strangers, and go over
safety precautions they can take to protect
themselves if they feel they are being followed
or harassed.
Question sudden changes in behavior and
appearance. Personality changes such as for-
getfulness, irritability, and isolation from
friends and activities are important warning
signs. Pay close attention if your child begins to
feign illness in order to skip school or tries to
find excuses for avoiding homework. The
behavior change may have nothing to do with
drugs but it's important to confront the prob-
lem whatever the cause.
Try to make your home a safe, warm, and
positive environment. When your children feel
happy at home they will be less likely to rebel
and seek escape in forbidden places.
Provide your children with positive alterna-
tives to drugs. Allow them to do things in their
free time that make them feel good such as
participating in sports, attending movies, pur-
suing hobbies, doing volunteer work, and
learning new skills such as playing the piano or
guitar. Reward them for positive accomplish-
ments such as good grades, winning a role in
the school play, etc.
Home environments linked with a high risk
for drug abuse include situations where the
parents are neglectful, abusive, too lenient or
too strict, and where the parents or siblings use
tobacco, alcohol and drugs. If affection is not
expressed, drugs are never discussed, and eco-
nomic pressures are a constant problem, chil-
dren are more likely to turn to drugs.
Copyright © Publishers-Edge
Page 18 • Choice Publications ... The Best Choice! September 6, 2012
ä-:'|ª
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By Jim Akans
The community is invited to attend a benefit dinner
and auction event to be held at the Hanson Hills
Recreation Area this coming Saturday, September 8th,
from 4 to 8 pm. Proceeds from this event will be uti-
lized to help with medical expenses for local residents,
and co-owners of Spikes Rusty Nail in Grayling, Arron
& Kelly Millikin.
Kelly was diagnosed with Adrenal Cancer in
September 2010 and in January 2012 her husband,
Arron, was diagnosed with Brain Cancer. They both
have undergone radiation, chemotherapy, and Kelly
started her 2nd round of chemotherapy in July. The
family is trying to live life and continues to parent their
two children, Bailey and David, and provide as normal
of a life for them as possible. Hospital care expenses
and monthly prescriptions and medical expenses have
become an overwhelming burden upon the family, and
this benefit dinner and auction can greatly help in
their fight against these terrible diseases.
Requested donations for the dinner are $5 per per-
son or $20 per family. Fare will include pulled pork,
sloppy joes and salads. There will also be live and
silent auctions, as well as raffle “grab bags” for folks to
bid on. Some examples of the items up for auction will
include a two-night stay in Vail, Colorado, a boat trip to
Mackinac Island, Golf Packages, Artwork, gift certifi-
cates, a Skeet Shooter, Kayak, Jewelry, Stained Glass
Tables, Carved Duck Decoys, Professional Photographs
and much, much more. The auctions are scheduled to
begin around 7 pm.
Please plan to attend this very important event and
help to support the Millikin’s fight against this terrible
disease.
September 6, 2012 Choice Publications ... The Best Choice! • Page 19
LOCAL NEWS
New stories updated daily on-line at www.weeklychoice.com
Benefit dinner for Arron & Kelly Millikin to be held at
Hanson Hills this Saturday
The
community
is invited to
attend a benefit
dinner and
auction event to be
held at the Hanson Hills
Recreation Area this
coming Saturday,
September 8th, from 4 to 8 pm. Proceeds from this event will be
utilized to help with medical expenses for local residents, and co-
owners of Spikes Rusty Nail in Grayling, Arron & Kelly Millikin.
Page 20 • Choice Publications ... The Best Choice! September 6, 2012
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