NE W Y OR K · L ONDON · PA R I S · COP E NHAGE N · V I E NNA · B E R L I N · S OF I A

2 0 0 7 / 0 8
C O L L E C T I O N
2007/ 08
C ON T E N T S 2007/08
Moy · Tweed for men 4 - 7
Kelso · Tweed for men 8 - 10
Bruar · Tweed for men 11 - 13
Dalmore · Tweed for men 14 - 16
When only the best is good enough!
Portrait of Boss & Co. − builders of best London guns
18 - 24
Laksen Tweed · Introduction 25
Conaglen · Tweed for women 26 - 29
Skibo · Tweed for women 30 - 31
Travel · Suitcases, bags, and gun cases 32 - 34
Bror Blixen − white hunter and adventurer
Portrait of the husband of Karen Blixen, by bestselling
author Anastassia Arnold
35 - 44
Gore-Tex
®
· Introduction 45
Moose · All-round hunting clothes with
Gore-Tex
®
membrane
46 - 48
CTX™ membrane · Introduction 49
Buffalo · Robust, all-round hunting clothes
with CTX™ membrane
50 - 51
Yack · Functional lightweight hunting clothes with
CTX™ membrane
52 - 53
Sika · Super functional lightweight hunting clothes
with CTX™ membrane
54 - 55
Lady Yack · Functional lightweight hunting clothes
with CTX™ membrane for women
56 - 58
Marmot · Fleece shooting jacket for women 58 - 59
Serengetti & Katavi · Clothes for summer hunting
and safari
60 - 61
Letvægt og zip-off · Lightweight clothes for summer
hunting and safari
62 - 63
Africa is changing − but still wild...
Photo story
64 - 69
Boots · Leather and neoprene boots, gaiters, socks etc. 70 - 73
Mossy Oak · Camouflage clothing with CTX™
membrane
74 - 75
Realtree · Camouflage clothing with CTX™ membrane 76 - 77
Blaze Orange · Hunting clothes with orange safety
colour
78 - 79
Oilskin 81
Moleskin 82 - 83
Leather · Hunting clothes made from leather and skin 84 - 85
Fleece 86 - 87
Knitwear 88 - 91
Shirts 92
Underwear · Special underwear for hunting 93
Accessories · Hats, gloves, belts, etc. 94 - 95
Credits 96
Dear hunter!
This is the third edition of the Laksen catalogue in the
form of a book. Once again, we have filled 100 pages
with exciting stories, beautiful pictures − and, not least,
200 well designed Laksen products.
Hunting and shooting is all about adventure. This time
the author, Anastassia Arnold, one of the world’s leadin g
Blixen experts, takes you along on a tour through the
life and adventures of the famous white hunter and
womaniser , Bror Blixen – with and without
Karen Blixen.
We have visited the gun maker company, Boss & Co.,
in London, and we tell you the whole story about the
company to whom only the best is good enough.
Together with nature photographer, Michael Sand, we
take you on a photo safari to Africa. An Africa that is
changing, but also an Africa that still is wild − a place
full of adventures.
The Laksen range of products is now almost complete.
New this year is a range of footwear, specially designed
and made for the discerning hunter. The Laksen range
now also comprises quality accessories made from fine
leather and canvas: travel bags, gun cases, cartridge bags,
gun slips, etc.
All in all some 80 new products this year. There
are many new items among the functional hunting
garments as well as many new styles in the usual high-
quality and hardwearing Scottish tweed.
As always, comfort, function, and quality are the main
elements behind our range of products, and as always,
many expert users have contributed to the development
and testing of our products. They are all dedicated
shooters and hunters with only one objective in mind:
To develop the very best clothing for all kinds of
shooting and hunting adventures.
Happy reading!
Lars Thomsen
Managing Director
8110 Moy tweed cap
3110 Moy tweed jacket
2110 Moy tweed breeks
7616 Valley shirt
42 Mallard tie
7830 Astor pullover
MOY
3110 “Moy” tweed jacket
100% pure wool from Thrie Estaits. Gore-Tex
®
membrane:
windproof, waterproof and breathable. Water repellent,
Teflon
®
coating. Amaretta™ reinforced yoke. Lining: 100%
polyester . Large cartridge pockets with Amaretta™ reinforcement.
Hand-warmer pockets with fleece lining. Adjustable waist.
5110 “Moy” tweed
shooting vest
100% pure new wool
from Thrie Estaits. Water
repellent, Teflon
®
coating. Amaretta™ reinforcements at shoulder
and pockets. Hand warmer pockets and large cartridge pockets.
2110 “Moy” tweed breeks
Same shell fabric as jacket. Gore-Tex
®

membrane: windproof, waterproof
and breathable. Amaretta™ rein-
forcement at pockets. Waistband
and cuffs with anti-slip tape.
Adjustable cuffs.
9300 “Woodman” gloves
70% wool, 30% acrylic. Fingerless!
8110 “Moy” tweed cap
100% pure new wool from Thrie Estaits.
Water repellent, Teflon
®
coating.
7
MOY
3111 “Moy” sports jacket
Sports jacket in classic Norfolk design. Sporting back for added
comfort. 100% pure new wool from Thrie Estaits. Water repellent,
Teflon
®
coating. Large cartridge pockets. Chest pockets inside and
outside. Many details.
7616 “Valley” shirt
100% brushed cotton. Button-down collar,
tone in tone embroidered logo.
42 “Mallard” tie
100% silk. Also available in green, article No. 32.
7830 “Astor” pullover, orange
Light pullover of 65% merino wool, 27% nylon, 5% cashmere and
3% Spandex. V-shaped neck. Available in four colours: celestial blue
(item No. 7828), cherry (item No. 7829), olive green (item No. 7831).
8
8110 Moy tweed cap
3111 Moy sports jacket
2125 Moleskin breeks
7616 Valley shirt
42 Mallard tie
7830 Astor pullover
8150 Bruar tweed cap
3150 Bruar tweed jacket
2150 Bruar tweed breeks
8123 Stockings
7615 Partridge shirt
41 Grouse tie
8155 Kelso tweed cap
3155 Kelso tweed jacket
2155 Kelso tweed breeks
8123 Stockings
7616 Valley shirt
43 Pheasant tie
KELSO
2155 “Kelso” tweed breeks
Same materials as jacket. Gore-Tex
®
membrane. Teflon
®
coated.
Slant pockets with Amaretta ™ reinforcement. Rear pocket.
Waistband and cuffs with anti-slip tape. Adjustable cuffs.
3155 “Kelso” tweed jacket
100% Scottish new wool from Thrie
Estaits. Water repellent , Teflon
®
coating. Amaretta™ reinforcements .
Lining: 100% polyester. Windproof and waterproof Gore-Tex
®

membrane. High breathability. Ammunition pockets with Amaretta™
trim. Inside rib cuffs. Handwarmer pockets with fleece lining .
5155 “Kelso” tweed shooting vest
100% Scottish new wool from Thrie Estaits,
Teflon
®
coated. Amaretta™ reinforcement. Lining: polyester.
Ammunition pockets, adjustable waist, leather-like buttons.
32 “Mallard” tie
100% silk. Also available in orange, article No. 42.
8155 “Kelso” tweed cap
100% Scottish new wool from Thrie Estaits,
water repellent. Teflon
®
coated.
12
BRUAR
43 “Pheasant” tie
100% silk. Also available in
purple, article No. 33.
2150 “Bruar” tweed breeks
Same shell fabric as jacket. Gore-Tex
®
membrane: windproof,
waterproof and breathable. Amaretta™ reinforcement at pockets.
Back pocket with flap. Waistband and cuffs with anti-slip tape.
Adjustable cuffs.
3150 “Bruar” tweed jacket
100% pure new wool from Thrie Estaits. Water repellent, Teflon
®

coating. Slim model. Amaretta™ reinforcement at pockets and
inside collar. Lining: 100% polyester. Gore-Tex
®
membrane: wind-
proof, waterproof and breathable. Large cartridge pockets with
reinforcements . Hand warmer pockets with fleece lining.
8150 “Bruar” tweed cap
100% pure new wool from Thrie Estaits.
Water repellent, Teflon
®
coating.
5150 “Bruar” tweed shooting vest
100% pure new wool from Thrie Estaits. Water repellent, Teflon
®

coating. Amaretta™ reinforcements at shoulder and pockets. Large
cartridge pockets.
13
BRUAR
3151 “Bruar” sports jacket
Sports jacket with sporting back for freedom of movement. 100%
pure new wool from Thrie Estaits. Water repellent, Teflon
®
coating.
Large cartridge pockets and inside and outside chest pockets.
7617 “Partridge” shirt
100% brushed cotton. Button-down collar,
tone in tone embroidered logo.
7828 “Astor” pullover, celestial blue
Light pullover of 65% merino wool, 27% nylon, 5% cashmere and
3% Spandex. V-shaped neck. Available in four colours: cherry (item
No. 7829), orange (item No. 7830), olive green (item No. 7831).
41 “Grouse” tie
100% silk. Also available in cherry, article No. 31.
14
3151 Bruar tweed sports jacket
2150 Bruar tweed breeks
8123 Stockings
7617 Partridge shirt
41 Grouse tie
7828 Astor pullover
8144 Dalmore tweed cap
3144 Dalmore tweed jacket
31 Grouse tie
7615 Muflon shirt
9570 Burton gloves
DALMORE
3144 “Dalmore” tweed jacket
100% pure new wool from Thrie Estaits. Gore-Tex
®

membrane : windproof, waterproof and breathable.
Water repellent, Teflon
®
coating. Lining: 100% polyester.
Large cartridge pockets with Amaretta™ reinforcement.
Hand-warmer pockets with fleece lining. Adjustable waist.
5144 “Dalmore”
tweed shooting vest
100% pure new wool from
Thrie Estaits, Teflon
®
coated. Amaretta ™
reinforcement. Lining: polyester. Large ammunition
pockets, adjustable waist, leather-like buttons.
2144 “Dalmore” tweed breeks
Same material as jacket. Gore-Tex
®
membrane.
Teflon
®
coated. Slant pockets with Amaretta ™ reinforcement . Rear
pocket. Waistband and cuffs with anti-slip tape. Adjustable cuffs.
New tailor-made design with extra length at the back.
8144 “Dalmore” tweed cap
100% pure new wool from Thrie
Estaits, Teflon
®
coated/water
repellent.
9570 “Burton” shooting gloves
Soft PU leather. Protection with maximum
sensitivity. Colour: Forest green.
17
DALMORE
3145 “Dalmore” sports jacket
100% pure new wool from Thrie Estaits. Sport-
ing back for added comfort. Water repellent,
Teflon
®
coating. Amaretta™ reinforced elbows.
Large cartridge pockets. Chest pockets inside and
outside . Many details.
7615 “Muflon” shirt
100% brushed cotton. Button-down collar,
tone in tone embroidered logo.
31 “Grouse” tie
100% silk. Also available
in blue, article No. 41.
18
All Tweed.
Text and photos: Torsten Wegener
When
only the best
is good enough
At the top of this hierarchy, there are three names that
stand out. Three London-based companies whose inter-
national reputation leaves no doubt about the extra-
ordinary quality and prestige of their products: James
Purdey & Sons; Holland & Holland and Boss & Co.
One of these companies differs slightly from the others,
partly by always having produced much fewer guns, but
primarily by − through the entire history of the company
− having produced “best guns” only: Boss & Co.
The philosophy of “only the best is good enough”
coincides very well with the product strategy of Laksen.
The same goes for the policy to produce fewer products
while maintaining maximum focus on quality in every
detail, rather than aiming for volume with the inherent
risk of poorer quality.
That is why we have chosen to make a presentation of
Boss & Co. in this book.
The first Boss
The first known gunmaker in the Boss family, William
Boss, was born in Leicestershire in 1758. He learned the
gunmaking trade in Birmingham and became a journey-
man in 1780. One could argue that this marks the start
of Boss & Co. as gun makers; however, it was actually
William’s son, Thomas, who formally established the
company many years later.
ritish gunmaking industry has had an enormous
influence on the development of gun technol-
ogy and gun design in all gunmaking countries
throughout the world. Modern shotguns and hunting
rifles still look much the same as they did a century ago.
Also, the manufacturing methods and technical solutions
employed remain largely unchanged from when they
were developed by visionary artisans in the heyday of
British gunmaking industry.

The reason for this is not only the extraordinary con-
servatism that prevails among the shooting fraternity; it
has a lot to do also with the fact, that many of the tech-
nical solutions were quite innovative and often decades
ahead of their time.
The heyday of British gunmaking was from around
1870 to 1920. During this period, there was a veritable
boom in the number of gunmaking firms, primarily in
England and Scotland. The boom was fuelled by the
circumstance that the British middle class was experiencing
a substantial growth in their economy based, among other
things, on the massive growth in the trade in commodi-
ties from the British colonies. Shooting sports became a
popular pastime and this, naturally, required guns.
The boom suffered a drastic setback in the early 1920s
when a new and very strict gun law was introduced.
Because of the traumas experienced under “the great war”,
it now became much more difficult for private people to
possess guns.
Most of the gun makers that sprung up during the
golden years have long ago ceased to exist. Most of those
that are gone were forced to close down as the customers
simply disappeared. Others were bought up or merged
with businesses that were more fortunate. As a result of
this process, a sort of hierarchy developed, based upon
how the market conceived the difference in quality of
the different makers’ products and upon how successful
in business the companies were.
thro
rifles
Also
emp
were
Briti
The
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has a
nica
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The
1870
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E l
After his apprenticeship, William Boss decided to move
to London. At this time, the gunmaking industry was
concentrated in England’s two largest cities, London and
Birmingham. The industry in Birmingham focussed more
on military weapons while the London trade primarily
catered for the shooting sports.
In London, William Boss was employed by Joseph
Manton, one of the fathers of modern British gunmaking
tradition. Only the very best journeymen were employed
by Manton, and William Boss was known as one of the
best. Unfortunately, he did not live to become an old
man. He died in 1809, only fifty years old. Before he
died, he managed to pass on his skills to his three oldest
sons who all were apprenticed under him at Manton’s.
The oldest son, William junior, established his own gun-
making business in 1814. Unfortunately, the business
only existed for three years before, for reasons unknown,
it closed down again. Nothing is known of William’s
younger brother, Fisher’s gunmaking career. Differently
with the youngest of the three brothers, Thomas. When
his father died, Thomas still had three years left of his
apprenticeship but Joseph Manton must have seen the
potential in the young man because he kept him on in
the firm, and in 1812, young Thomas Boss could call
himself gunmaker journeyman.
Old Boss gun case labels state 1812 as the year of
establishment of Boss & Co. but after his apprentice-
ship, Thomas continued to work for Joseph Manton
– incidentally together with a certain James Purdey. For
how long Thomas continued to work for Manton is not
known but, incredibly, a ledger book from the early years
has survived in the Boss & Co. archives. It indicates that
the first transactions took place in April 1816. This,
therefore, is probably the year that the company Thomas
Boss Gunmaker, the later Boss & Co., was established.
In the following years, as business grew, the company
regularly moved to new and better premises located at
ever-finer addresses. In 1837, the business moved to the
prestigious St. James Street, and it is at this address that
Boss & Co. truly asserts itself in the minds of the public
as builders of high-quality sporting guns.
Around the same time as the move to St. James Street,
Thomas Boss, at the ripe age of 47 marries the five year
younger Amy Fields. The late marriage meant that the
couple did not have children. Therefore, when Thomas
died in 1857 there were no immediate heirs to the com-
pany. In the meantime, the company had become some-
thing of a family business; among the twelve employees
in 1850, there were two nephews, the husband of a
niece, and a cousin.
When only the best is good enough!
In Boss & Co’s archives, order
books and account ledgers are
kept right back from the start
of the company in 1816.
Engravings with Celtic patterns have become
increasingly popular in recent years. Here the
engraving of one of a pair of over and under
guns has just been completed.
James Paddison. However, in spite of his comparatively
young age, James was a seriously ill man at the time, and
when he died in 1873, Edward Paddison became sole
proprietor and manager of the company.
Edward was an eccentric personality who liked to call
himself “Mr. Boss”. He also altered the name of the
company to include his own initials: E. F. P. Boss & Co.
Edward Paddison's time as head of the company coincided
with the period during which the development of sport-
ing guns was at its peak. However, Edward was a very
conservative person when it came to guns. For instance,
he insisted on using the side lever in favour of the more
modern and popular top lever. He also stuck to 30" barrels
even though the fashion at the time − and the develop-
ment of smokeless powder − favoured shorter barrels.
As a result, the sales of Boss guns diminished markedly
from around 1880 and until Edward's death in 1891.
With the death of “Mr. Boss” − Edward Paddison −
ended the direct engagement of the original Boss family
in the company. A new era could begin.
The Robertson era
John Robertson was born in a small Scottish town,
Haddington, where his father was a well-known gunmaker.
Young John had higher ambitions than to take over his
father’s business, so he moved south to seek his fortune
on the much larger English gun market. In Manches-
ter, he was employed by the famous rifle maker, Joseph
Whitworth. After having been with Whitworth for
four years and having learned all about steel and barrel
making from the master himself, he moved to Birming-
ham where he was employed by another of the famous
names, Westley Richards.

After two years with Westley Richards, John Robertson
applied for a position at James Purdey in London. This
was to become the most important period in Robertson’s
time as a journeyman. He worked for Purdey for nine
At Thomas Boss’ death, it was obvious that the two
nephews (on Amy’s side of the family) would take over
the running of the business. The oldest of the two,
Edward Paddison, at that time was 32 years old while
his younger brother, James, was only 15 and still in his
apprenticeship. Amy obviously found that the nephews
were not yet ready for the task, and in stead, she took in
Stephen Grant as partner and manager of the company.
Stephen Grant had been employed by another well-known
gunmaker, Charles Lancaster, before being employed
by Thomas Boss in 1850. He represented the trade
expertise and business experience that Amy thought the
nephews lacked. When Stephen Grant was made partner
the company name was altered to Thomas Boss & Co.
After nine successful years as partner and manager of
Thomas Boss & Co., Stephen Grant decided that it was
time for him to establish himself in business under his
own name. This turned out to be a successful move and
guns bearing his name are still rated as being among the
very best. During the following years, there was a certain
amount of rivalry between Boss & Co. (as the company
was now known) and Stephen Grant – a rivalry that
appeared to do both companies good.
When Stephen Grant left Boss, an aging Amy Boss
handed over the leadership to the nephews, Edward and
The ingenious single-trigger
mechanism of a Boss gun is
difficult to make but extremely
reliable in use.
Factory Manager Matt Ward
heads a team of ten of Britain’s
very best gun makers.
23
years, rising in position to become Purdey’s right hand
man. The next natural step on the career latter would be
to go into business on his own, which Robertson did in
1873. He chose to set his business up to work exclusively
for the trade, and the company soon flourished as
supplier to famous makers such as Holland & Holland,
Stephen Grant, Joseph Lang, Henry Atkin, John Rigby
– and Boss & Co.
During this period of John Robertson’s working career,
his three sons, John, Samuel (Sam) and Robert (Bob) all
apprenticed as gun makers under their father. At the same
time as running a successful business with up to fifteen
gun makers employed, John Robertson also found time
to develop a number of important inventions, which
were all patented, and most of which are still in use by
gun makers today.
Shortly before his death in 1891, Edward Paddison realised
that he needed to find someone to take over Boss & Co.
if the business was to survive. He knew John Robertson
quite well as Robertson had been a busy sub-supplier to
Boss for years. As a result, Boss & Co. owed John Rob-
ertson quite a lot of money, a debt that conveniently
was converted to share capital in connection with a sale.
Seen from John Robertson's perspective, Boss & Co. was
a very strong brand, and a partnership − and ulti-mately
full ownership − would immediately provide the position
in the gunmaking trade, which his professional skills
and reputation warranted. Consequently, he accepted
the proposal for partnership, and one year later, when
Edward Paddison died, he took over full ownership of
the business.
John Robertson chose to keep his trade business running
alongside with Boss & Co. The trade business had an
excellent reputation among its customers and there was
always plenty of business. At the busiest time, John
Robertson employed 45 gun makers between the two
businesses. This made him one of the largest employers
in the flourishing British gunmaking industry at the time.
When only the best is good enough!
With the acquisition of Boss & Co., John Robertson’s
innovative mind was really brought into play. First and
foremost, it was Robertson who developed the unique
Boss single trigger system with the ingenious revolving
turret, a system that over time was to become synonymous
with Boss guns. Under various owners, Boss & Co. had
consistently been marketing the business as “builders of
best guns only”. Different from most other gunmaking
firms, the owners of Boss & Co. refused to make anything
other than best quality guns. With the development of
the single trigger system, Boss & Co. obtained another
unique sales argument for their products.
Boss & Co’s new factory is located in one of London’s westerly
suburbs, near Heathrow airport.
Graham Halsey is Managing
Director of Boss & Co. He owns
the company together with his
brother Keith.Under their leader-
ship, Boss & Co. has risen like
a phoenix from the ashes to very
near former strength and glory.
Actioner John Varney has
worked 32 consecutive years
for Boss & Co. He is responsi-
ble for the “heart”of the gun,
the action, where it all comes
together.
24
trade. Only this way could he be certain to live up to the
motto of the company ever since the days of Thomas
Boss: only the best is good enough.
After John Robertson's death, his three sons, John, Sam,
and Bob, took over the running of the many and varied
activities of the company, which now also included a
shooting school in the western outskirts of London. The
three brothers were all skilled gun makers, but like their
father, they also managed to become successful business-
persons. When the last of the three brothers, Bob, died
in 1951, Sam’s son, Alec, took over. His time as head of
Boss & Co. was short, however, only three years later he
died unexpectedly from a heart attack.
New challenges
In order to maintain a member of the Robertson family
in the management of the company, Alec’s nephew, John
Gilbert Robertson, was appointed director. He was not
directly involved in the daily work of the company and
had no prior knowledge of the gunmaking trade. In 1990
John Gilbert’s son, Timothy Robertson, took over the
position as director, and three years later he was appointed
managing director.
These were changing times for the makers of fine – and
expensive – hand-built guns. Towards the end of the
1990s, Timothy Robertson felt that the business needed
some cash injection and he invited a group of Boss
enthusiast to invest in the company. A chance meeting
in 2001 between the investor group and two brothers,
Keith and Graham Halsey, and a tentative enquiry if
they would sell Boss, resulted in the Halsey brothers tak-
ing over the entire business. Under their leadership, Boss
& Co. has risen like a phoenix from the ashes to very
near former strength and glory with the order books
filled several years ahead.
(Cont.)
Later on, John Robertson also patented a particularly
efficient ejector system as well as a construction, which
many regard as the very essence of Boss ingenuity: the
elegant Boss over-and-under gun.
John Robertson managed to place Boss & Co. among
the very elite of British gunmaking industry − a position
still held by this famous company. He remained at the
helm of Boss & Co. until his death, caused by a relatively
banal appendicitis, in 1917 at the age of 77.
John Robertson's time with Boss & Co. is without a
doubt the most important period in the history of the
company. It was during this period that Boss guns really
established an extraordinary reputation in the market.
John Robertson employed only the best people of the
Stocker Doug Lake is working
on a stock for a new Boss over
and under gun.
The file remains the most
important tool in the process
of building a Boss gun. Almost
all work is still done by hand.
25
When only the best is good enough!
The making of the beautiful Boss guns now takes place
at a new factory, conveniently located next to the
famous Kew Royal Botanic Garden near Heathrow
Airport. Here ten of Britain’s most skilled gun makers
are busy making Boss guns in much the same way and
to the same high standards as in old John Robertson’s
time. Most of the work is still done by hand and that
takes time. Customers must therefore arm themselves
with patience as the delivery time of a new Boss gun
typically is two years.
Even though there no longer are any members of the
Robinson family active in the company, the Robertson
name lives on more vividly than ever under the
frame-work of Boss. Recently Boss & Co. introduced
a whole new series of side-by-side and over-and-under
guns, which bear the Robertson name. The Robertson
guns are made by modern CNC-controlled precision
machines at a Birmingham factory. They are subse-
quently being engraved and finished by hand to a very
high standard.
Boss guns are the best of the best. However, nobody claims
that they are inexpensive. For customers who want a gun
that offers nearly the same qualities as a “real” Boss gun
but who is not prepared to pay the price of a handmade
Boss gun, the Robertson range is a very good alternative.
The Boss & Co. shop was located in Dover Street in
central London for decades. Recently, however, the shop
moved to new premises in Mount Street − roughly midway
between J. Purdey & Sons’ and Holland & Holland’s
shops in the fashionable Mayfair district in west London.
Thus, it is fair to say, Boss & Co. is positioned exactly
where this honourable and history-rich company ought
to be: in between the most famous British gunmaker
names of all times.
From this position, the new owners of Boss & Co. can
look forward towards a bright future. Fortunately the
international market for uncompromising quality goods
is as healthy as ever. A market where only the best is
good enough! N
26
The stories behind the origin of the name Tweed are
plentiful. Many people believe that the name is related
to the Scottish river Tweed, as many of the best-known
weavers of Tweed were located near the river.
LAKSEN TWEED
Quite another version of the story is that a certain
William Watson from the town of Hawick in southern
Scotland in 1826 delivered an order of Scottish ”Tweel”
to Jason Locke & Co., a well-known wool merchant in
London at the time. The shop manager was evidently
a much better wool salesman than office clerk, and the
next time he placed an order, he accidentally substituted
the “l” in Tweel with a “d” = Tweed. William Watson
evidently liked the name Tweed and he subsequently −
very successfully − adopted this as the trade name for his
wool cloth!
To day, Tweed is made in many countries throughout
the world. The Tweed that is made in Italy and Spain
is primarily used for light blazers, sports jackets, and
trousers. It has nothing to do with the real Scottish
”Sporting Tweed”, which is only made in Scotland, and
which −through generations − has proven itself as an
extremely hardwearing material.
Even to day, where modern technology and chemical
treatments enable us to manufacture textiles that are
capable of almost anything, the real Scottish Tweed,
as it was made back in 1826, remains the most robust,
most comfortable, and most handsome cloth that money
can buy.
Laksen was the first manufacturer to combine Scottish
Tweed with modern technology ten years ago when we
combined the high-tech Gore-Tex
®
membrane with
Tweed. To day, we only use the genuine Scottish Sporting
Tweed from Thrie Estaits, woven in Hawick. Exactly like
the Tweed, that WilliamWatson wove in Hawick in 1826.
5192 Skibo vest
2192 Skibo breeks
7849 Kelly pullover
3192 Skibo jacket
27
3160 Conaglen tweed jacket
4160 Conaglen tweed skirt culottes
7848 Kelly pullover
CONAGLEN
7857 “ Quail” sweater,
celestial blue
95% lambswool, 5%
cashmere. Also available
in chestnut (item No.
7856).
8160 “Conaglen” tweed hat
100% pure new wool from Thrie
Estaits. Water repellent, Teflon
®

coating.
3160 “Conaglen” tweed jacket
100% pure new wool from Thrie Estaits. Water repellent, Teflon
®

coating. Long, slim model. Amaretta™ reinforcement at pockets.
Lining : 100% polyester. Gore-Tex
®
membrane: windproof, water-
proof and breathable. Large cartridge pockets. Hand warmer pockets
with fleece lining.
5160 “Conaglen”
shooting vest
100% pure new wool from Thrie Estaits. Water repellent, Teflon
®

coating. Amaretta™ reinforcements at chest, edges and pockets.
Large cartridge pockets.
7848 “Kelly”
pullover, cherry
50% lambswool, 21%
nylon, 11% angora,
10% cashmere. Turtleneck
pullover in a light and soft
quality. Also available in
leaf green (item No. 7849).
4160 “Conaglen”
tweed skirt culottes
Same materials as
“Conaglen ” tweed trousers.
2160 “Conaglen” tweed trousers
3⁄4 length trousers. Shell: 100%
new wool from Thrie Estaits. Water
repellent, Teflon
®
finish. Slim model.
Slant pockets and two back pockets
with flap. Lining: 100% polyester.
Gore-Tex
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membrane: windproof,
waterproof and breathable.
8162 “Conaglen” tweed cap
100% pure new wool from Thrie
Estaits. Water repellent, Teflon
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coating.
30
3160 Conaglen tweed jacket
8160 Conaglen tweed hat
2160 Conaglen tweed trousers
7857 Quail sweater
3192 Skibo tweed jacket
2192 Skibo tweed breeks
7856 Quail sweater
SKIBO
2610 “Skibo” breeks
Moleskin breeks in a
feminine cut. Two front
pockets with wide
waistband . Legs with
adjustable cuffs with
Velcro.
5192 “Skibo” shooting vest
100% pure new wool from Thrie Estaits. Water repellent, Teflon
®

coating. Amaretta™ reinforcements at chest, edges and pockets.
Large cartridge pockets.
2192 “Skibo” tweed breeks
100% pure new wool from Thrie
Estaits. CTM™ membrane: wind-
proof, waterproof and breathable.
Water repellent, Teflon
®
coating.
Amaretta™ reinforcement at
pockets. Anti-slip tape at cuffs.
Adjustable width at cuffs.
7849 “Kelly” pullover, leaf green
50% lambswool, 21% nylon, 11% angora, 10%
cashmere. Turtleneck pullover in a light and soft
quality. Also available in cherry (item No. 7848).
8193 “Skibo” tweed cap
100% pure new wool from Thrie
Estaits. Water repellent, Teflon
®

coating.
3192 “Skibo” ladies tweed jacket
100% Scottish new wool from Thrie
Estaits. Water repellent, Teflon
®
coating.
Lining: 100% polyester . CTX™ membrane: windproof,
waterproof and breathable. Ammunition pockets . High collar with
Amaretta ™ trim. Handwarmer pockets with fleece lining.
8192 “Skibo” tweed hat
100% pure new wool from Thrie
Estaits. Water repellent, Teflon
®

coating. Quilted lining.
8610 “Skibo” hat
Moleskin hat with reversible
Skibo tweed hat band.
33
10008 Game bag
Canvas with cow leather trim. Water
repellent, Teflon
®
coating. Hand tied net.
Cotton lining and brass buckles.
10003 Duffle bag
Canvas travel bag. Water repellent
PU and Teflon
®
coating. Leather trim at zipper and pockets. Brass
buckles and zippers. Detachable and adjustable shoulder strap with
protection pad. Inside cotton bag for laundry etc.
10004 Briefcase
Canvas with cow leather trim.
Water repellent PU and Teflon
®
coating. Several inside and outside
pockets. Detachable and adjustable shoulder strap with protection
pad. Strong leather carry handle. Brass buckles and zipper.
10009 Cartridge bag
Canvas with leather trim.
Water repellent, Teflon
®
coating.
Cotton lining and brass buckles.
TRAVEL
36
10000 Gun case
Cow hide on wooden frame.
Fully felt lined. Brass locks and brass
reinforced corners. Leather handle.
10002 Leather gun slip
Soft, “roll-up” leather slip. Soft, thick pile
lining for added protection. Adjustable and
detachable leather sling. Brass buckles.
10001 Cartridge case
High quality oak and leather. Fully felt lined. Brass lock
and brass reinforced corners. 5 cartridge compartments
with felt lined dividers.
10005 Cartridge pouch
Soft cow leather with elastic cartridge
straps. Magnetic lock.
10006 Rifle bag
Canvas with cow leather
trim. Water repellent PU and
Teflon
®
coating. Utility pocket.
Soft, thick pile lining for extra
protection. Small utility pocket
with zipper. Detachable and
adjustable webbing shoulder
strap with protection pad and
brass buckles.
10007 Canvas gun slip
Soft, “roll-up” canvas slip
with cow leather trim. Water
repellent PU and Teflon
®
coating.
Soft, thick pile lining for extra
protection . Detachable and adjustable
webbing shoulder strap with protection
pad and brass buckles.
6106 Leather belt
Heavy leather belt, quilted. Brass buckle.
6105 Canvas belt
Heavy canvas belt with leather reinforcements. Brass buckle.
37
From Sweden to Kenya
Text: Anastassia Arnold
The American writer Ernest Hemingway wrote about
Bror Blixen: “The Baron was not a man that you forget.”
Baron Bror von Blixen-Finecke was born in 1886. His
family background was two old noble families. His mother,
Clara, was countess Krag-Juel-Vind-Frijs who grew up
on the Denmark’s largest estate, Frijsenborg. His father
was baron Frederik von Blixen-Finecke, heir to the
Dallund estate in Denmark and the Näsbyholm estate
in southern Sweden. The von Blixen-Finecke family is
able to trace its origins as far back as 1239. (Some two
hundred and fifty years prior to Columbus’ discovery
of America in 1492.) As the third son of a noble family,
Bror had no family obligations. It was his older brother,
Carl’s duty to carry on the family estate. As long as Bror
found himself a way to make a living, the family was
happy. As a start, Bror finished an education as farmer
and he subsequently became the manager of Stjärneholm,
the home farm of the Näsbyholm estate.
Bror was an accomplished cattleman, but life on Stjärne-
holm soon became too boring for him. As soon as Bror
was old enough to handle a gun, he eagerly pursued the
Blixen-Finecke family’s hunting and shooting traditions.
Näsbyholm was famous for offering the best shooting in
all of Scandinavia, and members of the royal families in
both Denmark and Sweden often came shooting on the
estate. The young Bror knew of nothing better than
Bror Blixen…
– adventurer and
white hunter
38
“the freedom of the fields and woods, the joy in wander-
ing about at will, without compulsion, and observing
the wild things and scenery, causes a strange singing in
the blood – it’s a tune one never forgets, which no school
discipline can drive out of one’s mind.” Bror recalls in
his book African Hunter.
Bror’s twin brother, Hans, was his regular hunting com-
panion. Their first prey was hares, which they sold to
the local butcher. The proceeds were quickly spent.
Later Bror stated that he thought he would probably have
remained manager of Stjärneholm if he had not become
engaged to his half cousin, Karen Dinesen. “Between us
we built up in our imagination a future in which every-
thing but the impossible had a place”, Bror recalls.
Their plans included all kinds of wild ideas about emi-
gration to Malacca or Russia, until one time when they
visited Bror’s uncle, count Mogens Krag-Juel-Vind-Frijs
at Frijsenborg. He had just come home from a safari to
Kenya. The more count Mogens told them about Kenya,
the more they become determined to go there. According
to what people told them, it was easy to make a fortune
on farming in Kenya.
The night before Christmas Eve 1912, the engagement
between baron Bror von Blixen-Finecke and Karen
Dinesen was declared. In the spring of 1913 Bror sailed
from Italy bound for Mombassa. From there he rode the
train to Nairobi. The African landscape was beautiful,
but it was the abundance of game that made Bror feel
the free
ing abou
the wild
the bloo
disciplin
his book
Bror’s tw
panion.
the local
Later Bro
remained
engaged
we built
thing bu
Anastassia Arnold
has a Master of Arts in Nordic literature. She is the
author of five books. The biography “Bror Blixen
− an adventurer” received much acclaim when it
was first published. Epoch-making new evidence
revolutionised previous Blixen research work.
Later she authored “The ballad of Marie”, a bio-
graphy about the Danish woman painter, Marie
Krøyer. The book became a bestseller in the Nordic
countries with more than 160.000 copies sold.
The biography covers Marie Krøyer’s life from
her youthful ambitions as an artist, through the
marriage with artist celebrity P. S. Krøyer, to the
fatal love affair with Swedish composer Hugo
Alfvén. Anastassia Arnold is the co-author of the
book “Portraits from a marriage. Marie and
P.S. Krøyer”.
In connection with the research for her fourth
book, “The art in Marie Krøyer’s life”, Anastassia
Arnold discovered 40 paintings by Marie Krøyer,
which subsequently completely changed to conception
of Marie Krøyer’s role in Danish art history into
one of the leading figures among woman painters.
39
Bror Blixen – adventurer and white hunter
like he had come to the Garden of Eden. “One simply
cannot believe ones eyes. The train plows its way forward
across the plain between whole regiments of giraffes, gnu,
antelopes, graceful gazelles (Grant’s and Thompson’s),
ostriches, and zebras… − Only a few hundred yards
to the southward a big heard of elephants is galloping
along, and among them a rhinoceros.”
In the highland outside Nairobi, Bror purchased the
Mbagathi coffee farm and then sent for Karen. On the 14th
January 1914, the day after Karen had arrived Mombassa
by boat, she and Bror got married at a simple ceremony
with the Swedish prince Wilhelm as a prominent witness.
Honeymoon safari
Without a map, Bror and Karen Blixen started out from
the Kijabe station on their first safari. Along they brought
two heavily laden wagons, a light mule-drawn cart with
a sunroof for themselves, Bror’s servant Farah, a saise,
whose job is was to look after their horses and mules, a
young masai moran as a guide, the gun bearer Ismail, and
the old cook Ismail who made up the rear, riding a mule.
The recent rains had cut deep furrows in the dirt road,
but when they reached the plains of the Kedong valley,
the unrestricted views and the swarms of game after they
had been driving through endless bush was breathtaking.
The first camp was set up at the foot of Mount Souswa.
The next day they passed through one of the most beautiful
landscapes in Kenya. The heart of Masai country. The
Kedong valley is surrounded by blue mountains: Mount
Souswa with its long flat crater top, to the north Longenot
with its two camel humps and furrowed slopes. And to
the west, the Mau mountains rose from the plains with
their primeval forests of cedar and olive trees.
After having shot all the ordinary species of antelopes,
zebras and gnu, they focussed their attention on lions.
In the cool darkness before sunrise they left camp together
with their masai tracker heading for the direction where
they heard lions roar during the night.
40
The days went by without any success on the lions.
Later on in life, Bror became famous for his ability to
get lions for his clients. He was able to track lions where
nobody else could find the slightest trace of them in
the bush. But in his early safari days, he did not know
enough about the habits of lions. Many years later, he
stated that everything he knew about lions he learned
from fostering the orphaned lion cub, Kom.
One day when they were out shooting meat for the camp,
their saise came running for them. A male lion was taking
a snooze on a riverbank near their camp. They hurried
back, even though they were sure that the lion had dis-
appeared by then. But it was still there. It lay completely
still, watching them with its massive head resting on its
forepaws. Bror quickly changed his gun. For a short
moment the lion lifted its head and Bror immediately
fired. The bullet struck the lion in the centre of the chest
and it fell without uttering a sound.
In the evening the natives celebrated the demise of the
lion with a Ngoma. Hesitantly a few of the young men
started to dance. “Little by little the circle of dancers
widened. Rhythmic marching on the spot, interrupted
by regular bounces either straight up or to the left or right.
The warm bodies shining like bronze in the flickering
light of the fire. The night was amazingly bright, and
the stars were sparkling like never before”, Bror writes.

In Denmark Karen had taken part in hunting activities
but she did not quite understand the hunters’ enthusiasm
for the hunt itself. But after four weeks on safari with
Bror, she wrote an ecstatic letter to her brother, Thomas
Dinesen, explaining about the intoxication of the hunt
and about getting the big cats on one’s brain.
On this, their honeymoon safari, Bror and Karen were
full of happiness. Their life together was never to become
so uncomplicated again. On a photograph taken on the
safari, Bror and Karen stand closely together behind their
trophies. They look like each other. Slim and suntanned,
they are beaming with harmony.
Thirty years later, when a friend asked Karen Blixen what
she wanted most in life, she replied without hesitation:
“Once again to go on safari with Bror”.
White hunter
Bror hated the trivialities of repetition. Whether in love
or work. He was not cut out for the quiet life at home,
nor to stick to only one woman. His immense vitality
and energy required constant challenges for his mind
and courage. The marriage with Karen did not last.
After the break-up from Karen in 1922, Bror was stripped
of everything except his guns. His creditors’ hunt for him
was so intense that he was forced to hide himself in the
bush near Isoli. But then his close friend, the governor,
Sir Robert Coryndon intervened and referred some friends
of his who wanted to go on safari to Bror.
In the middle of the night, Sir Robert drove his friends
into the camp and woke up Bror. “I want you to take
41
my wife and me on a safari from the East coast to the
West coast. By compass, you understand, the straight way.
Imagine a ruler on a map…” Quietly Bror explained to
the hothead, there are no straight roads in Africa. ”Then
we will cut our way through”, the man replied. In spite
of his crazy idea, he appeared to Bror as a man of reason.
Was he aware that it would be an extremely time con-
suming project? “I have got two years, that ought to do”,
replied Sir Charles Markham. Salary for two years! It was
like a heavenly gift for Bror. Together with the Markham
couple, Bror travelled to Uganda and Congo, he hiked
along Lake Victoria, north to Lake Rudolph, and
through Ethiopia.
This safari was the start of Bror’s professional career as a
white hunter and of a life-long friendship with Charles
Markham. The two friends made several expeditions
together. Including a five-month long expedition where
they collected and registered fish and plants from the
Congo and Chari rivers for the British Museum of
Natural History. The trip from Bangui to N’djamena in
Chad had been a fatiguing affair, full of hardships. They
were both set on getting to Europe as quickly as possible.
They then got the idea that they could save a lot of time
by going due north through the Sahara desert – the direct
route to Algiers − by motorcar! They bought a truck
without having even seen it. The governor of Chad did
all he could to talk them out of the project. The vehicle,
an International Delivery Truck, was a standard model
built for the roads of USA − not for desert driving. In
order to be suitable for ploughing through the sand
dunes of the Sahara, the truck should have been specially
built with extra large coolers, wide tires, six-wheel trac-
tion, and a reduction gear. Additionally, it was the wrong
time of year with frequent sandstorms and dried out water
holes. The more the governor spoke against the venture,
the more intriguing the two gentlemen found the Sahara.
It took the two daredevils 16 days to complete the 4,535
kilometres from Kano to Algiers, straight across the Sahara
where daytime temperatures hovered around 50° C in
the shade. They lost their way and they nearly died of
thirst, but after having traversed the Atlas mountains,
they safely reached Algiers.
Beryl Markham and Bror
A close friend and partner was Beryl Markham. She
became famous when was the first person ever (man or
woman) to fly single-handed across the Atlantic from
London to the USA. It was a worldwide sensation in
1936 when she landed on the easterly shores of Cape
Breton of Nova Scotia.
Beryl grew up on her father’s farm at Njoro in Kenya.
She learned hunting techniques from her African
playmates . In the course of her life she changed her
career several times. From breeding racehorses to pilot,
author, and then back to breeding racehorses in Kenya.
As one of the first white hunters in Africa, Bror would
use an airplane, piloted by Beryl, to locate game for
clients.
Bror Blixen – adventurer and white hunter
42
Beryl found Bror’s endurance almost scary. He could
walk for weeks, even months, non-stop from dawn to
dusk on the trail of an elephant. The only people who
were able to keep up with him were the natives. The
years in Africa left their mark on Bror. He suffered from
several tropical deceases. From time to time he would
fall in his tracks somewhere in the bush, shivering with
malaria fever, only to be up and walking the next morning
as if nothing had happened. “With an appearance like
the half brother of Death, but still capable of shooting
as dead straight as always and doing his job with the
usual professional competence”, Beryl Markham recalls.
Bror had acute senses and instincts. One glance at the
sun, even when it was covered by clouds, and Bror knew
exactly what time of day it was. Once, when Beryl flew
Bror from Kenya to England in her small sports plane,
he awoke from a slumber and exclaimed: “I can smell
Sudd!”, when they passed the Sudd papyrus swamps at
high altitude. His sense of smell had awoken him. Even
at an altitude of several hundred metres, he knew in his
sleep exactly where they were!
The profession as white hunter was made for Bror.
Here the skilled hunter, the pleasant party person, the
eminent organiser, the ever restless, adventurous and
fleeting womaniser all come together in one and the
same person. Bror’s aristocratic background gave him an
extra advantage as most of his clients were either British
upper class or wealthy Americans. The British felt that
they were in the company of one of their equals, and the
newly-rich Americans loved to be close to a member of
the coveted aristocracy.
His looks, however, in no way lived up to the Hollywood
image of the great white hunter. Bror was neither hand-
some with clear-cut features, nor silent and short-tem-
pered. Nor did he adorn himself with the traditional
white hunter’s attributes, such as big knives, revolvers
or binoculars. Bror was round-cheeked, talkative and
pleasant to everybody. He never carried anything around
unless he was actually in the process of hunting a prey
– then he would always carry his own gun and am-
munition. One thing, though, he did have in common
with the white hunter hero of the movies: the almost
magnetic attractiveness for women.
During the twenties and thirties, Bror became almost
a living legend. His visits to European and American
cities was always prominently publicised in the gossip
columns of the local newspapers. The years that Bror
− or Blix as his friends and clients called him – was active
as a white hunter and safari guide were to become his
best. The culmination of his life.
The Africans gave Bror the nickname “Wahoga”. This
means wild duck, and it was in reference partly to his
slightly waddling gait, partly to his restlessness and
unquenchable thirst for freedom and wandering. The
natives immediately recognised that he was one of the
great wanderers.
Bror gained a great deal of respect from his natives
friends, they regarded his legendary endurance and
abilities as a hunter as almost mythical. When he left
Africa after 24 years, they regarded him as a ‘raki sana’:
a great friend. Such respect, however, is not easily gained.
You get it neither as a result of wealth or generosity, nor
by acting as the defender of the natives’. Such respect
is granted only to someone who has a greatness in his
personality and who displays a large amount of courage
in his actions.
The are plenty of examples of Bror’s courage. One example
is from a photo safari with a Swedish film photographer.
In the 1920’s the photo equipment was rather crude. It
was necessary to bring the photographer up quite close
to the game in order for it to look like something on the
film. It was Bror’s task to locate crocodiles, hippos, buf-
faloes and rhinoceroses and get them in as close to the
camera as possible.
43
In order to give the photographer a shot of an attacking
rhino, Bror crept up to it covered by a bush. He then
slapped the drowsy rhino bull across its snout before
jumping in to its field of vision, sprinting towards the
film camera. One of the two accompanying hunters
were then supposed to shoot the animal when it got too
close to Bror. The plan obviously worked out!
On safari with the Prince of Wales
After the divorce from Karen Blixen, Bror married English
Cockie Birkbeck. Cockie had lived her life among the
upper class but was basically without means of her own.
Just like Bror, she was a lively and carefree soul.
Many of Bror’s safari clients became his close friends.
Several of them lent him money and never got it back.
But somehow it never seemed to have any influence on
their friendships. Like one client friend once said: “In
the company of Bror, I felt more alive than ever before.
Everything was possible according to him. He turned
one’s wildest dreams into reality. So what matters a little
money in relation to this!”
One client, major Edward Cooper, insisted that he
wanted to hunt lions with a bow an arrow. It was more
sporting and fair to the lion than using a rifle, the newly
arrived client lectured Bror. Bror’s scepticism was abruptly
dismissed by Cooper. It was bow and arrow, period!
After wounding a lion, it attacked Cooper when it was
stopped by a well-placed bullet from Bror’s rifle. Cooper
subsequently forgot all about hunting with bow and
arrow − but never his gratitude towards Bror for saving
his life.
On Bror’s recommendation, Cooper later bought a farm,
Singu Estate, in Tanzania. Singu Estate was situated ten
miles outside Babathi village in the Pinaars Heights,
3000 feet above sea level. The nearest town, Arusha, was
more than one hundred miles away. Cooper appointed
Bror Blixen – adventurer and white hunter
44
Bror as manager of the farm where he and Cockie moved
into a mud-built hut, their temporary home. Later Bror
built a wooden house with three rooms for them. There
was no water or toilet in the house, and when they had
guests (which they often did), they camped outside the
house. In the following years, Bror divided his time
between ploughing up new land, running the farm, and
being away on months-long safaris in order to make
extra money.
In November of 1928, the Prince of Wales − who later,
for a short period of time, was to become King Edward
VIII before he abdicated in favour of life together with
Mrs. Wallis Simpson – came on an official visit to
Kenya together with his brother, Prince Henry. After the
official visit, the two princes came to Arusha in order to
go hunting. Prince Edward himself contacted Bror and
asked him for his assistance in bagging a lion. The leader
of Prince Edward’s safari, Denys Finch Hatton, had
told the prince that Bror was the best lion man in all of
Africa. Would Bror care to join the safari? Bror accepted
the proposal on the spot.

The professional hunters stopped at nothing to find a
lion for the prince. In a landscape dominated by tall
grass, they discovered a male lion. Bror knew that it was
now or never so he went into the thicket alone in an
attempt to scare the lion out by means of loud shouts
and clapping of the hands. Prince Edward got his lion,
and the heir to the Throne was suitably impressed by
Bror’s fearlessness. In his diary from the safari, Sport
and Travel in East Africa, the prince writes that Bror’s
“attitude towards lions is that of the prophet Daniel”.
In 1930 Prince Edward returned to Kenya, this time
the main object was elephant. In Jipi near the Paré
mountains, they came upon the tracks of a very large
elephant bull with exceptionally large tusks. For four days,
Bror, Denys Finch Hatton and the prince tracked the
elephant in a fearful heat. “The spoor positively smelt
of him, but we had not seen him”. On the fourth day,
Denys spotted the elephant. When the prince stalked
up close, he accidentally stepped on a dry twig. When
it snapped, “the elephant set off at full speed at a rate of
forty miles an hour and was gone before we could count
three”. Devastated the three hunters fell to the ground.
Bror was fascinated by elephant hunting. Against
elephant the odds are mostly in your disfavour. Partly
because of the physical advantages of the elephant, partly
because of its intelligence and ability to react. “Just like
the buffalo, the elephant reflects on the situation and
draws its conclusions that rarely are wrong”. There
were occasions where Bror seriously doubted who was
hunting whom when, totally exhausted, he was stagger-
ing along on the spoor of an elephant for the third
consecutive month.
After the royal safaris, Bror’s reputation sky rocketed.
Everybody wanted to go on safari with Prince Edward’s
professional hunter. Together with Phillip Percival, also
known as Pop, Bror formed the safari company Tanganyika
Guides. Blix and Pop were in a class of their own. They
charged up to 150 or 200 Pounds per month where
others gladly accepted half that. Tanganyika Guides only
knew two categories of safaris. First class safaris where
the clients had up to three aeroplanes and a huge staff
of people at their disposal. No effort was spared to fulfil
the clients’ wishes. Second class safaris were less lavish.
One of Tanganyika Guides’ clients was Ernest Hem-
ing-way, who went on safari with Phillip Percival as his
guide. On his return journey to Europe, Hemingway
met Bror on the cruise liner “Gripsholm”. The two men
exchanged hunting stories on the ship’s deck and in the
bar. To Hemingway, Bror was the real thing compared
to his own poor imitation of a big game hunter. The
two men kept close contact through the rest of their
lives – even though they rarely met in person. They did
go on a fishing trip together once on Hemingway’s boat,
“Pilar”, off Bimini Island – one of the Bahamas isles. On
board with Bror was the new love of his life, the Swedish
45
adventuress Eva Dickson. Young and attractive, Eva was
the final straw for Cockie. Their marriage ended in yet a
divorce for Bror.
Exit Africa
In 1938, Eva Dickson was tragically killed in a road
accident near Baghdad. She had just set out on a record-
breaking drive, single handed along the ancient Silk Route.
Eva’s death had a terrific impact on Bror. It was like the
music had disappeared from his life. Not even safari life
appealed to him any more. A former client, now a close
friend, Winston Guest, was shocked by Bror’s despond-
ency. Should he buy a farm for Bror in Tanzania, or
perhaps a small estate in Sweden, he asked Bror’s nephew.
Something definitely had to be done to bring Bror out
of his misery. On the other hand, hanging on to property
of any kind, or money, was an impossibility for Bror.
They had to figure out something else.
Winston Guest rented the shooting rights on an estate
on Gardiner’s Island – a small island outside New York
City. Guest offered Bror a position as gamekeeper on
the estate. His main job was to manage the pheasant
rearing and to look after the wild geese that visited the
island. Bror accepted the position. He needed a change
of scenery. What he did not know at the time, was that
he was never again to live in Africa. The most important
period of his life, a period of 25 consecutive years in
Africa, was history. The life as Wahoga lay behind him.
Ernest Hemingway came and stayed at Bror’s place on
Gardiner’s Island. They went shooting together on the
island. New York was only a short flight away. Here
Bror was a frequent guest at parties with people like the
Vanderbilts, Barbara Hutton, Gloria Swanson, president
Roosevelt, and many others.
The circle is completed
When the second world war broke out, Bror Blixen
wanted to go back to Europe to do his part in the war.
He managed to raise enough money in the States to buy
a field hospital, which he brought across to Namsos in
Norway. Here the war raged between the Germans and
the Norwegians. The Germans, however, had the upper
hand, and Bror and the hospital staff were forced to flee
from the Germans across the border to Sweden.
Bror spent the remaining years of his life, from 1940 to
1946, in a small cottage on the Näsbyholm estate. The
circle had been completed. Once again he went shooting
on the family grounds – and he wrote a book about his
years in Africa. About his respect for the natives and their
knowledge of nature and their abilities as hunters, about
the wildlife of Africa, about hunting with the Wambuti
pygmies in the vast Ituri forest, about his wanderings in
Ethiopia, Uganda, and Congo, and about crossing the
mighty lake Chad and the endless Sahara desert.
In Tanzania they named a town after him. Wahoga.
And fifty years later, when I visited Kenya and Tanzania
to walk in his path, the natives still remembered him. His
reputation and the power of his personality were as vivid
as ever. N
Bror Blixen – adventurer and white hunter
46
More than 30 years ago, Gore-Tex
®
presented their
revolutionary waterproof yet breathable membrane
for functional garments. At the time, it was generally
considered impossible to make waterproof clothes,
which were comfortable to wear. However, the unique
combination of waterproofness and breathability soon
made Gore-Tex
®
a favoured material for active wear
and sports wear where the activity level and prospects
of changing weather made waterproof and breathable
clothing a boon.
As one of the first producers of hunting clothes in
Europe, Laksen developed their first line of models with
Gore-Tex
®
back in the beginning of the 1980s. For
more than 25 years now we have been producing quality
clothes incorporating the world-renowned Gore-Tex
®

membrane.
Today, Gore-Tex
®
manufactures a range of different
products, all designed to keep the wearer warm, dry
and comfortable regardless of the prevailing climatic
conditions . The Windstopper followed the Gore-Tex
®

membrane. This material is 100% windproof while
being extremely breathable. Ideal for the active hunter
as the material, in addition to being windproof and
breathable , is lightweight and noiseless.
After more than 30 years on the market, Gore-Tex
®

remains state of the art, and in our ongoing endeavours
to provide hunters around the globe with optimum
comfort, functionality and quality, we are proud to be
partners with the world’s leading manufacturer in
this field.
GORE-TEX
®
47
3251 Moose hunting jacket
1251 Moose hunting trousers
40 Gore-Tex
®
hat
7854 New Foundland sweater
MOOSE
40 Gore-Tex
®
hat
Warm and waterproof.
Colour: Forest green blend.
9608 “Ranger”
Gore-Tex
®
gloves
100% polyester fleece, with
Gore-Tex
®
insert. Polyamid cuff.
Waterproof.
7854 “New Foundland” sweater
Velour sweater of 100% cotton.
Zipper and turtleneck collar.
3251 “Moose” jacket
100% polyester. Water repellent, Teflon
®
coating. Short lightweight
jacket with reinforcements at shoulders and pockets. Gore-Tex
®

membrane: windproof, waterproof and breathable. Hand warmer
pockets. Game pocket. Several inside pockets for license etc. Detach-
able, adjustable hood. Adjustable at sleeves.
1251 “Moose” trousers
Same fabric as Moose jacket. Two slant pockets with zippers under
flap. Back pocket with zipper. Adjustable width at waist and ankles.
CTM™ membrane: waterproof, windproof and breathable.
7650 “Moose” shirt
100% brushed cotton.
Button-down collar, two chest pockets .
Tone in tone embroidered logo.
8142 Backpack
Detachable frame transforms
into a padded seat. Large pocket
with drawstring. Large side
pockets. Detachable thermo-
insulated bag. Waterproof bag
inside for wet items. Pocket at
top for documents.
50
CTX

MEMBRANE
Function and comfort second to none
The letters CTX™ translate to Comfort, Technology,
and eXtreme. The CTX™ membrane was developed
using the most advanced technologies available. The
membrane is completely watertight while still allowing
the body to breathe. This makes the CTX™ membrane
the most comfortable weather protection available
– regardless of climatic conditions and temperature.
As the only membrane on the market, CTX™ was
developed specifically for use in shooting and hunting
clothes. This means, that the membrane offers some
unique qualities, which are particularly relevant for the
hunting sportsman.
In addition to being completely watertight and wind-
proof, the CTX™ membrane is extremely silent, which
is particularly important for instance when stalking.
The technical properties of the membrane match the
highly changing conditions that apply when the hunter
is either physically active or when he sits motionless in
wait for his quarry.
The high degree of breathability is important because it
allows moisture-rich air to escape from the body while
keeping the skin completely dry. This means, that even
when a person is physically very active, the skin remains
dry and comfortable .
The CTX™ membrane is tested to the following
extreme standards:
Watertightness: 20,000 mm water column per m
2
Breathability: 30,000 g per m
2
/24 hours.
51
3257 Buffalo hunting jacket
1257 Buffalo hunting trousers
8620 Eagle hat
BUFFALO
3257 “Buffalo” jacket
Heavy fabric of 70% cotton + 30% nylon. Water and dirt repellent
wax-treated surface. Amaretta™ reinforcements at shoulders,
pockets , and inside collar. CTM™ membrane: windproof, waterproof
and breathable. Hand warmer pockets with fleece lining. Game
pocket. Inside pocket for license etc. Detachable, adjustable hood.
Adjustable at waist and sleeves.
10 “Flex” suspenders
Durable button-on suspenders with
leather trim.
8620 “Eagle” knitted hat
100% pure new wool.
1257 “Buffalo” trousers
Same fabric as Buffalo jacket. Slant pockets
with zippers under flaps. Back pocket with zipper.
Adjustable width at waist and ankles. CTM™ membrane:
windproof, waterproof and breathable.
7951 “Star” fleece sweater
65% acrylic, 35% polyester pile. Short zipper and turtleneck.
Adjustable at hem.
53
YACK
7649 “Forrest” shirt
100% brushed cotton.
Button-down collar, two chest
pockets. Tone in tone embroidered logo.

8131 “Yack” hat
100% polyester. Hat with CTX™ membrane: windproof, waterproof
and breathable . Fold-up orange warning tape.
3231 “Yack” jacket
100% polyester, sanded micro polyester. Lightweight hunting
jacket with reinforcement and CTX™ membrane: windproof,
waterproof and breathable. Handwarmer pockets with fleece
lining , ammunition pocket and game pocket with PU coated lining .
“Napoleon ” pocket under front flap. Pocket on sleeve. Inside
pockets for mobile phone and license. Removable and adjustable
storm hood. Adjustable waist and hem. Reinforcement on pocket
flaps, cuffs and shoulder area.
1231 “Yack” trousers
100% polyester, sanded micro
polyester. Lightweight hunting trousers with CTX™ menbrane:
windproof, waterproof and breathable. Reinforcement at inside
legs and at pockets. Two slant pockets, rear pocket with zipper
and leg pocket.
8560 Balaclava
100% polyester Outlast
microfleece . Trim: 100%
nylon. Colour: Forest green.
60 Facemask
100% acrylic. Lightweight
and soft. Colour: Green blend.
8331 “Yack” cap
100% polyester. Cap with
CTX™ membrane, fold-up
orange warning tape.
9501 “Fox” leather glove
Soft leather glove with fleece
trim, shooting finger and CTX™
membrane and Thinsulate lining.
Windproof and waterproof.
54
3231 Yack jacket
1231 Yack trousers
8131 Yack hat
3296 Sika jacket
1296 Sika trousers
7855 Hardy sweater
8171 Boar hat
SIKA
7855 “Hardy” sweater
60% wool, 40% acrylic. Cable knit
with short zipper and pile lining of collar.
8315 Laksen cap
100% cotton. Lightweight with
ventilation. Laksen logo. Adjustable.
3296 “Sika” jacket
100% micro polyester. CTX™ membrane:
waterproof, windproof and breathable. Lining: 100% quilted
polyester . Detachable waterproof stormhood with adjusters .
Handwarmer pockets. Rear game pocket with waterproof lining.
Tabs inside handwarmer pockets keep lower pockets open for
quick access . Inside adjustable waistband, hem and cuffs. Inside
elasticated cuffs.
1296 “Sika” trousers
100% micro polyester. CTX™ membrane:
waterproof, windproof and breathable. Lining: 100% quilted
polyester. Slant pockets, side pockets, pocket with flap at rear.
58 Fleece gloves
100% microfleece. Breathable.
Shooting finger. Reinforced
palm. Colour: Dark green.
8171 Boar hat
Classic felt hat, 100% wool with leather band.
57
3241 Lady Yack hunting jacket
1241 Lady Yack hunting trousers
8315 Laksen cap
9300 Woodman gloves
6202 Neoprene boots
LADY YACK & MARMOT
3241 “Lady Yack” jacket
90% micro polyester + 10% nylon, brushed surface. Lightweight
jacket with reinforcements at shoulder and pockets. CTM™
membrane : windproof, waterproof and breathable. Hand warmer
pockets with fleece lining. “Napoleon” pockets, game pocket, and
sleeve pocket. Several inside pockets for license etc. Detachable,
adjustable hood. Adjustable at waist.
1241 “Lady Yack” trousers
90% polyester, 10% polyamide. Lining: 100% polyester . CTM™
membrane: windproof, waterproof and breathable. Reinforcements
at pockets and inside of leg. Back pocket with zipper.
3502 “Marmot” shooting jacket
100% polyester. Ladies fleece shooting jacket with CTX-AIR™
membrane , windproof and breathable, tailored fit, slit at rear, adjustable
waist strap for attachment of ear protection. Reinforcement at shoulder ,
large cartridge pockets, two way zipper at front. Feminine cut.
60
3502 Marmot shooting jacket
2610 Skibo moleskin breeks
8315 Laksen cap
5628 Serengetti hunting vest
6627 Serengetti shirt
1627 Serengetti jeans
7682 Katavi ladies shirt
1682 Katavi ladies jeans
SERENGETTI - KATAVI
1627 “Serengetti” jeans
97% cotton, 3% Spandex.
6-pocket jeans in stretch
twill. Knife pocket at rear.
Prewashed.
Colour: Olive.
1628 “Serengetti” jeans
97% cotton, 3% Spandex.
6-pocket jeans in stretch
twill. Knife pocket at rear.
Prewashed.
Colour: Sand.
7682 “Katavi ladies shirt
100% cotton. Safari shirt in
a feminine cut with turn-up
sleeves. Reinforced seams
all over. Two large chest
pockets , and pencil
opening . Prewashed.
Colour: Sand.
1682 “Katavi” ladies jeans
97% cotton, 3% Spandex.
6-pocket jeans in stretch twill
and feminine cut. Knife pocket
at rear. Prewashed.
Colour: Sand.
8171 Boar hat
Classic felt hat, 100% wool with leather band.
7627 “Serengetti” shirt
100% cotton. Safari shirt
with turn-up sleeves.
Reinforced seams all over.
Two large chest pockets, and
pencil opening. Prewashed.
Colour: Olive.
7628 “Serengetti” shirt
100% cotton. Safari shirt
with turn-up sleeves.
Reinforced seams all over.
Two large chest pockets, and
pencil opening. Prewashed.
Colour: Sand.
5628 “Serengetti” hunting vest
100% cotton. Safari vest with two
chest pockets, two large cargo
pockets with access from both
top and side. Pocket with zipper
for licence and map. Large game
pocket at rear and inside pocket.
Prewashed.
Colour: Sand.
63
DRY+UV-CUT
LIGHTWEIGHT ZIP-OFF
6102 - 6103 - 6104 “Pigeon” canvas belt
100% cotton. Traditional webbing belt with logo buckle.
Colour: Olive, Camel, Black.
7629 “Arusha” shirt
100% nylon, polybrush. Lightweight, high wicking,
UV protection. Trekking shirt with mesh insets and ventilation
openings . Large chest pockets.
1620 “Mara”
zip-off trousers
100% polyester with
Nano finish: sweat transporting ,
antistatic, and resistant to UV rays. 5 pockets.
Adjustable waist and zip-off legs. Ideal for safaris
and hot summer days. Colour: bronze.
5602 “Mara” vest
100% polyester with Nano
finish: sweat transporting,
antistatic, and resistant to UV
rays. Reinforced shoulders,
large cartridge pockets,
inside pocket for license etc.
Large pocket on backside.
Ventilation slit with mesh
lining.
1621 “Mara” zip-off trousers
Same as item No. 1620. Colour: olive.
64
7629 Arusha shirt
1620 Mara zip-off trousers
5602 Mara vest
8315 Laksen cap
Afrika is
changing
Photos: Michael Sand. Text: Torsten Wegener.
ɧe Africa that greeted Karen and Bror B|ixen on their
arriva| in 1913 has changed in a great many ways.
Large parts of the continent has been urbanised and
there are not many areas |eft, which - in one way or the
other - are not under some form of human inßuence
today. ɧe massive herds of anima|s, of a|| species,
that once h||ed the savannah are gone.
And yet.!
Africa is sti|| wi|d. It is sti|| possib|e to hnd |arge areas
of unspoi|t nature. It is a|so sti|| possib|e to see great
herds of wi|d anima|s migrating through the |andscape,
and one can sti|| experience the true African safari, which
|eaves an inde|ib|e impression in one's mind. However,
adventures |ike that are not waiting for you at the end
of the ßight |atter. One must be wi||ing to work hard,
have the true-fe|t desire... - and posses the guts for it!
Just as Karen and Bror B|ixen had the wi||, the desire
and the guts for it when they hrst set foot on this
fascinating , formidab|e and ßamboyant continent.
ɧe hrst thing that strikes the hrst-time visitor to Africa
is the sme||. ɧis unique, yet indehnab|e sme|| of
Africa that surrounds one wherever one goes. And the
sounds. Africa a|so has her own very specia| sounds.
ɧe cooing of the red-eyed dove in the thicket from the
hrst g|impse of ear|y morning |ight. ɧe fear-inspiring
roars of the ma|e |ion in the distance whi|e the sun
rises from a huge bonhre on the eastern sky. Or the
friend|y snorting of hippos in the river yonder when
the day is waning.
It is a|| a part of Africa - present-day Africa,
and B|ixen's Africa.
ɧe Africa that greeted Karen and Bror B|ixen on their
i | i 1913 h h d i
Just as Karen and Bror B|ixen had the w
d h f i h h h f
– but still wild...
66
The Guinea fowl is the
pheasant of Africa, a
terrestrial bird that flies
fast and high when
danger is imminent.
A friendly companion
on the dusty red dirt
roads, and a welcome
variety on a monotonous
camp menu.
A watchful eye
monitors your every
move from the
thicket. A massive
Cape buffalo, ready
for escape − or
attack. You never
really know.
Defiant, resilient
and courageous.
A challenge for
every hunter, and
justly one of the
Big Five.
The spiral horns of the greater kudu to many hunters are the
quintessence of an African trophy. This handsome antelope
is common across
southern Africa.
However, in East
Africa, the hunter
must work hard for
a good trophy.
The kudu prefers
thorny bush where it
can make itself invis-
ible in a fraction of a
second.
The wildebeest is half
horse, half bovine,
so the saying goes.
A quaint creature
in many ways but
an important player
in nature's great
African circle of
life and death
− whether as prey
to lions and
crocodiles, or as
keeper of the
savannah. Poor man's buffalo, some people call it, but there is
is nothing poor about a large wildebeest bull. It is both strong
and courageous.
The Latin name of
the roan antelope
is hippotragus
− horse goat − and
the animal does
actually have some
common features
with both horse
and goat. But it
is an antelope,
one of the largest
in Africa and a
much coveted
trophy. It takes
a large calibre
bullet to knock
it down, and a
wounded roan
bull should be
approached with
considerable
care − it can
be lethal.
67
The sable antelope is a
cousin of the roan. Black as
night and with formidable
scimitar-shaped horns. Un-
questionably one of Africa's
most handsome antelopes
but difficult to locate in the
wild. Some very good rea-
sons why it has always been
one of the most sought
after African trophies.
A prominent pair of
curved horns on the head
of a strong male waterbuck
is a magnificent sight as
he slowly makes his way
to his favourite foraging
grounds, while the sun
is sinking in the west.
A master waterbuck
needs not fear the
coming of night.
Zebra are gregarious
animals with a strong
social hierarchy. Disputes
or breach of the social
etiquette are dealt with
through fights with
an aggressiveness that
humans often interpret
as extreme brutality.
The socials bonds that
keep the herd together
provide security for the
individual animal, but
zebra live their lives
in the danger zone
as favourite prey to
lions.
The red-billed ox picker has specialised in removing ticks and
other bloodsucking insects from buffaloes and antelopes. That
makes the bird a welcome visitor, no matter where on the host
animal it seeks its prey. The impala buck willingly lowers its ear
to allow for easy access for the bird. If the number of ticks on an
animal becomes excessive, it may ultimately succumb to anaemia.
The warthog is
numerous across
the African con-
tinent. It can
be a charming
fellow to watch,
but make no
mistake; the
tusks of a large
boar can be
sharp as knives.
If cornered,
the animal
becomes
dangerous to any enemy − even leopards, which
have warthogs on the top of their bill of fare.
Africa is changing – but still wild…
68
“It was so hand-
some; I simply
had to possess
it!” In this way,
Karen Blixen
explains why
she felt com-
pelled to shoot
a large black-
maned lion
that she saw
standing as a perfect silhouette on an ant hill. Since historic
times, lions have always had an almost mythological effect on
hunters, and lions remained the preferred hunting object for
both Karen and Bror Blixen.
It is the
lionesses who
provide food
for the lion
family. Even so,
the patriarch
always has first
serve of the
meat from a
freshly killed
prey.
69
Africa is changing – but still wild…
Gazelles by the
thousands greeted
Bror Blixen from
the savannah on
his very first train
ride from Mom-
basa to Nairobi .
Much of the
savannah has now
been cultivated
or turned into
grazing land for
the natives' herds
of cattle and
goats. Luckily,
the Thompson’s
gazelle is largely
unaffected. Together with its larger cousin, Grant's gazelle, the
gracious Thompson can still be seen in great numbers on the
East African savannah.
The elephant is under pressure in large parts of Central and
Western Africa, but in most of Southern Africa the problem is
the direct opposite. In some places, the
number of elephant is so great that this
in itself is the biggest threat for the
survival of the species. Elephants can
be very destructive in their search for
food, and if the number of animals in
a particular area becomes too great,
the elephants destroy the possibility
for regeneration of their food sources.
This causes the elephants to seek
food on cultivated land, which in
turn leads to conflicts with humans
with only one sure loser. In such
areas, controlled and sustainable
hunting is the animals only hope for
survival in the long term.
The klipspringer is one
of Africa's many small
antelopes. Its name is
highly appropriate as
these little animals live
all their life in rocky
terrain. Its hooves have
soft soles that provide
excellent grip on the
smooth rocky surfaces.
“It looked at me as if I owed
it money!” In this colourful
way, American author Robert
Ruark, described the look
that an old buffalo bull sent
him. There are many good
reasons why an old war-
battered “Dugga Boy” is one
of the most coveted trophies
for any big game hunter.
70
71
With the introduction of the new Laksen boots, our
range of products is now almost complete. The Laksen
boots are developed in co-operation with some of the
world’s leading manufacturers of footwear.
All boots are constructed around the sole. It is all-
important for fit, ergonomics, and comfort, therefore,
that the sole is correctly dimensioned. Vibram
®
is one of
the world’s most recognized manufacturers of soles for
functional footwear. That is why we have selected the
best products from Vibram
®
for our boots. This ensures
optimum comfort, functionality, and wear resistance.
You can choose between suede or nubuck leather,
depending on boot model. In both cases, the leather
is reinforced by hardwearing, water and dirt resistant
nylon applications.
LAKSEN BOOTS
The CTX™ membrane ensures watertight yet breath-
able boots. Read more about the CTX™ membrane on
page 49.
In addition to our range of leather boots, we also offer
different models of neoprene wellies. They are made
from 6 mm thick neoprene reinforced by natural rubber.
In comparison with traditional rubber boots, the weight
of our neoprene boots has been more than halved.
Neoprene provides efficient insulation, which makes the
boots ideal for use in temperatures from −20° to +20° C.
Moreover, our neoprene boots are made with soles that
provide a very different level of comfort than traditional
rubber boots.
These features make Laksen neoprene boots the ideal
alternative to traditional rubber boots.
72
NEOPRENE BOOTS
+
SOCKS
8123 Stockings
65% new wool, 35% nylon.
Designed to match tweed
collection in colour and style.
Green.
8122 Stockings
65% new wool,
35% nylon.
Designe d to match
tweed collection in
colour and style.
Rust.
6201 Neoprene boots camo
Moulded neoprene boots with Realtree Hardwoods Green
®
camo
print. Elastic shaft that adjusts to the contours of the ankle. The
lining transports moisture away from the foot. Heavy-duty, shock
absorbing sole. Oil resistant. Extra reinforcements to heel and toe.
“Kick strap” on the heel enables easy slip in with the use of hands.
100% waterproof, lights and flexible. Ideal for walking as the boots
adjust to the feet like shoes.
6202 Neoprene boots green
Same as item No. 6201. Green.
8127 “Acton” socks
68% wool, 17% Thermolite
®
,
13% polyamide, 2% elastane.
Light socks with Thermolite
soles, absorb moisture and keep
the feet dry.
8128 “Chaney” socks
74% wool, 18% Thermolite
®
,
7% polyamide, 1% elastane.
Heavy, soft socks with Thermo-
lite soles that absorb moisture
and keep the feet dry.
6203 Neoprene boots Vibram
®
soles
Same as item No. 6201, but with extra robust Vibram
®
soles, ideal
for rocky surfaces. Green.
73
6206 Extreme Pro Hunter boot
BOOTS, GAITERS & LEGGINGS
95 “Hull” gaithers
Heavy polyester, PU coated,
nylon lining. Adjustable nylon
strap. Hook for attachment
to shoelace.
96 “Nick” camo gaiters
Heavy polyester, PU coated,
nylon lining. Adjustable nylon
strap. Hook for attachment
to shoelace.
608 Leggins
Polyester, P.U. coated. Durable ,
effective protection for walking
through water or high grass.
Forest green.
609 “Hunter chaps”
Heavy canvas polyester, with PU
coating.

6204 “Hunter” boot
Low cut boot in cow suede. Seam-sealed CTX™
membrane: waterproof and breathable. Padded
Cordura
®
reinforcement at ankle and padded tongue for
additional protection. Heavy metal lacing rings. Rubber
protective toe cap. Shock absorbing heel construction
and anatomically constructed mid sole. Durable and
wear resistant, anti-slip Vibram
®
sole.
6205 “Pro Hunter” boot
Medium cut boot in nubuck leather.
Seam-sealed CTX™ membrane: waterproof
and breathable. Padded Cordura
®
reinforce-
ment at ankle and padded tongue for ad-
ditional protection , inside lined in soft leather.
Heavy metal lacing rings. Rubber protective toe
cap. Shock absorbing heel construction and
anatomically constructed mid sole. Durable and
wear resistant, anti-slip Vibram
®
sole.
6206 “Extreme Pro Hunter” boot
High cut boot in nubuck leather. Seam-sealed CTX™ membrane:
waterproof and breathable. Padded Cordura
®
reinforcement at ankle
and padded tongue for additional protection, inside lined in soft
leather. Heavy metal lacing rings. Rubber protective heel and toe caps.
Shock absorbing heel construction and anatomically constructed mid
sole. Durable and wear resistant, anti-slip Vibram
®
sole. The high shaft
provides maximum protection of ankle on uneven or rocky surfaces.
75
3258 Woodman camo jacket
1258 Woodman camo trousers
8315 Laksen cap
8232 Camo backpack
PU coated. Detachable frame
transforms into a padded seat.
Three large outside pockets.
Large bottom bag with pocket
for wet items.
MOSSY OAK
®
CAMO
1258 “Woodman” camo trousers
100% polyester micro fleece with
Mossy Oak New Break-Up
®

camo print. CTM™
membrane: windproof,
waterproof and
breathable. Slant
pockets under flaps, and
pocket on leg. Back waistband
with Elastic. Back zipped pockets.
Adjustable width at ankles.
3258 “Woodman” camo jacket
Short lightweight jacket in 100% polyester with
Mossy Oak New Break-Up
®
camo pattern. CTM™
membrane: windproof, waterproof and breath-
able. Large cartridge pockets and hand warmer
pockets. “Napoleon” pockets and game pocket.
Several inside pockets for license etc.
Detachable, adjustable hood.
77
REALTREE
®
CAMO
3259 “ Elck” camo jacket
Parka coat in 100% polyester. CTM™ membrane:
windproof, waterproof and breathable. Light polyester padding and
polyester lining. Large cartridge pockets, hand warmer pockets,
“Napoleon” pocket and large game pocket. Detachable, adjustable
hood. Adjustable at waist and sleeves.
8359 “Elck” cap
Same fabric as jacket.
Fleece ear warmers that
can be folded away.
1259 “Elck” camo trousers
100% polyester micro fleece with Realtree Hardwoods Green
®
camo
print. CTM™ membrane: windproof, waterproof and breathable.
Slant pockets and pocket on leg. Back waistband with Elastic. Back
zipped pockets. Adjustable width at ankles.
78
3259 Elck camo jacket
1259 Elck camo trousers
8359 Elck cap
6201 Neoprene boots camo
3401 Blaze camo jacket
5210 Gary vest
8316 Blaze orange cap
5210 “Gary” vest
100% polyester. Reversible, blaze orange and green.
Adjustable hem, extended rear and high collar. Zip slant pockets
on both sides. Chest pocket on blaze orange side.
8316 Laksen cap
Blaze orange colour.
100% polyester. Adjustable.
With Laksen logo.
3401 Blaze camouflage jacket
100% polyester. Teflon
®
coated fabric in Mossy Oak Branch
®
pattern.
Water repellent lightweight jacket with large cargo pockets and
gamepocket at rear.
BLAZE ORANGE
61 Safety band
Blaze orange colour. To wear around the
head, hat or sleeve. Velcro closure.
82
310 Oilskin jacket
100% waxed cotton oilskin. Water repellent.
Leather trim. Checkered wool lining. Large
cargo pockets. Handwarmer pockets.
810 Oilskin hat
100% Waxed cotton oilskin.
Polyester lining. Turn-out
orange safety hat band.
OILSKIN
83
5125 Moleskin shooting vest
2125 Moleskin breeks
8144 Dalmore tweed cap
7830 Astor pullover
5126 Moleskin shooting vest
2126 Moleskin breeks
8171 Boar hat
7831 Astor pullover
MOLESKIN
1125 Moleskin trousers
100% cotton, brushed and
Teflon
®
coated. Amaretta™
reinforced. Two slant and
pocket at rear. Anti-slip
waistband . Olive green.
1126 Moleskin trousers
100% cotton, brushed and Teflon
®

coated. Amaretta™ reinforced.
Two slant and pocket at rear. Anti-slip
waistband. Bronze colour.
2125 Moleskin breeks
100% cotton, brushed and
Teflon
®
coated. Amaretta™
reinforced. Two slant and
one pocket at rear. Anti-slip
waistband. Olive green.
2126 Moleskin breeks
100% cotton, brushed and Teflon
®
coated.
Amaretta™ reinforced. Two slant and one
pocket at rear. Anti-slip waistband.
Bronze colour.
5125 Moleskin shooting vest
100% cotton, brushed and Teflon
®
coated. Amaretta™ reinforced.
Large ammunition pocket s. Elastic adjustable waist. Olive green.
5126 Moleskin shooting vest
100% cotton, brushed and Teflon
®
coated. Amaretta™ reinforced.
Large ammunition pockets . Elastic adjustable waist. Bronze colour.
85
566 Buffalo skin
shooting vest
Cotton lining. Two extra -large
cartridge pockets. One rear cartridge
pocket with easy access.
5701 “Clay”
shooting vest
Shell: 100% buffalo leather.
Large cartridge pockets, strap at side
for attachment of ear protection, two-way
zipper , adjustable waist, large pockets at rear.
9801 All Natural Balsam
All Natural Balsam is made exclusively
from natural ingredients: lanolin , beeswax,
and coconut oil. All Natural Balsam adds
natural oils to the product, impregnating and
preserving, to prevent it drying out, cracking
and fading. All Natural Balsam is an effective
substance for surface protection of wood,
vinyl, rubber, oilskin and leather products.
Plastic container with 150 ml. Application
sponge included.
166 Buffalo skin
trousers
Removable cotton
lining . Knife pocket.
Slant pockets. Rear
pocket with flap.
167 Buffalo skin
breeches
Removable cotton
lining. Knife pocket.
Adjustable waist ties
in back. Zipped legs.
LEATHER
86
566 Buffalo skin shooting vest
167 Buffalo skin breeches
8171 Boar hat
7831 Astor pullover
3501 Antler shooting jacket
1231 Yack trousers
8315 Laksen cap
7996 “Ibex” fleece jacket
100% polyester micro-fleece, anti pilling,
Windstopper
®
lining , 100% windproof, breathable.
3501 “Antler” shooting jacket
100% polyester. Fleece shooting jacket w. CTX-AIR™ membrane ,
windproof and breathable, tailored fit, slit at rear, adjustable waist
strap for attachment of ear protection. Reinforcement at shoulder,
large cartridge pockets, two way zipper at front.
FLEECE
89
7828 Astor pullover
8150 Bruar tweed cap
7617 Partridge shirt
41 Grouse tie
7829 Astor pullover
8155 Kelso tweed cap
7615 Muflon shirt
41 Grouse tie
Laksen offers a large and varied selection of Tweed
garments for both ladies and gentlemen. That places
great demands on our range of accessories.
For this year’s collection, we have designed a selection
of knitwear in colours that perfectly matches the various
tweed patterns. The different knitwear items can be put
together with the Tweed patterns at will, according to
individual style and taste.
The Laksen knitwear fully matches the quality of the
genuine Scottish Tweed. In order to ensure this, we use
only the finest cashmere, angora, merino, and lambs
wool materials.
The carefully selected wool materials ensure super soft
knitwear, exquisite in colours as well as design.
For the gentlemen, matching shirts and ties are
available .
LAKSEN KNITWEAR
91
7855 Hardy sweater
7855 “Hardy” sweater
60% wool, 40% acrylic. Cable knit with
short zipper and pile lining of collar.
KNITWEAR
7516 “Glen” windbreaker
50% wool, 50% polyester. Cable knitted sweater, with
front zipper in wool-acrylic mix. Wind-breaking lining.
93
7651 “Bison” shell shirt
100% brushed cotton with 100% cotton mesh lining of the body
part for maximum absorption and ventilation. Two chest pockets.
Tone in tone embroidered logo. Press studs.
7661 “Shelter” shell shirt
100% brushed cotton with 100% cotton mesh lining of the body
part for maximum absorption and ventilation. Two chest pockets.
Tone in tone embroidered logo. Press studs.
SHIRTS
94
UNDERWEAR
7210 “Bear” underwear
100% polyester terry knit. Extra thermal insulation,
high absorbency. Long sleeves. Turtle neck with zipper.
7211 “Bear” long johns
100% polyester terry knitt
with French terry back for
extra thermal insulation.
High absorbency.
When combining Laksen underwear with waterproof
and breathable outerwear you obtain the ideal balance
in your hunting apparel.
Unsuitable underwear may eliminate the advantages of
breathability and insulating ability of your outerwear.
This may result in excessive perspiration, which in turn
may lead to body overheating or hypothermia.

Polyester fibres combined with the special knit structure
of Laksen underwear ensure optimum breathability
and insulation. Your body temperature remains stable,
so that perspiration or cold will not spoil your hunting
experience .

Laksen underwear ensures a constant, pleasant body
temperature.
95
9300 “Woodman” gloves
70% wool, 30% acrylic.
Fingerless !
9701 “Go” leather glove
100% soft nubuck buffalo
leather , shooting finger.
Thinsulate ™ lining.
9608 “Ranger”
Gore-Tex
®
gloves
100% polyester fleece,
with Gore-Tex
®
insert.
Polyamid cuff. Waterproof.
58 Fleece gloves
100% microfleece.
Breathable . Shooting
finger. Reinforced palm.
Colour: Dark green.
9580 “Sandwell” goatskin gloves
Leather shooting gloves. Lining: 100%
silk.Shooting finger on right hand.
9570 “Burton”
shooting gloves
Soft PU leather. Protection
with maximum sensitivity.
Colour: Forest green.
9501 “Fox” leather glove
Soft leather glove with fleece trim, shooting
finger and CTX™ membrane and Thinsulate
lining. Windproof and waterproof.
ACCESSORIES
96
8316 Laksen cap
100% polyester. Adjustable with
logo. Blaze orange colour.
8315 Laksen cap
100% cotton.
Lightweight with ventilation .
Laksen logo. Adjustable.
8131 “Yack” hat
100% polyester. Hat with CTX™
membrane, windproof and water-
proof and breathable. Fold-up orange
warning tape.
8171 Boar hat
Classic felt hat, 100% wool with leather band.
61 Safety band
Blaze orange colour. To wear
around the head, hat or sleeve.
Velcro closure.
6105 Canvas belt
Heavy canvas belt with leather reinforcements. Brass buckle.
6106 Leather belt
Heavy leather belt, quilted. Brass buckle.
6102 - 6103 - 6104
“Pigeon ” canvas belt
100% cotton. Traditional
webbing belt with logo
buckle.
Colour: Olive, Camel, Black.
10 “Flex” suspenders
Durable button-on suspenders
with leather trim.
8331 “Yack” cap
100% polyester. Cap with CTX™
membrane, fold-up orange warning
tape.sikkerhedsbånd.
8620 “Eagle” knitted hat
100% pure new wool.
60 Facemask
100% acrylic.
Lightweight and
soft. Colour:
Green blend.
40 Gore-Tex
®
hat
Warm and waterproof.
Colour: Forest green blend.
97
Artwork and production: VENTURE Communication A/S
Printing: Nørhaven Book A/S
Outdoor photos: Michael Sand and Torsten Wegener
Product photos: Jakob & Weiland
Hunters: Lars Karnøe, Britt Juul Andersen, Maria Louise
Busk, Erik Lundsholt, Bent Kiertzner and Allan Bach a.o.
Thanks to Anastassia Arnold; Marianne W. Asmussen,
Rungstedlund; Graham Halsey, Boss & Co. − and to J.P.
Sauer & Sohn and Teviotex − for their participation.
Thanks to Leica and SMC-Automobiles for providing
equipment, and to Inge & Peter Busck for their kind
hospitality.
LAKSEN 2007/08
Laksen reserves the right of modifications and altera-
tions of the products without notification.
The colour reproduction of the clothes is as close to
reality as the printing process allows.

© Copyright Laksen A/S 2007
98
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Denmark (Head office)
Tel.: +45 87421000
E-mail: mail@laksen.dk
Austria
Tel.: +43 6474 66 55 40
Benelux
Tel.: +31 625047740
Bulgaria
Tel.: +359 2 865 35 28
North England /
Scotland / Ireland
Tel.: +44 7917360855
E-mail tf@laksen.dk
England
South / Midlands
Tel.: +44 7801386264
E-mail saw@laksen.dk
Laksen A/S
Langdyssen 1
DK-8200 Århus N
Denmark
www.laksen.dk
Finland
Tel.: +358 15 555 0402
France
Tel.: +33 0477360340
Germany / Switzerland
Tel.: +49 1717180062
E-mail rn@laksen.dk
Hungary / Romania / Croatia
Tel.: +36 703151314
Italy
Tel.: +39 0543 473729
Kazakhstan
Tel.: +7 3272 430 200
Norway
Tel.: +45 8742 1000
Ask our distributors for your local Laksen dealer:
Poland
Tel.: +48 226176148
Portugal
Tel.: +351 256330800
Russia
Tel.: +7 0952981162
Slovakia
Tel.: +421 424378511
Sweden
Tel.: +46 706111413
The Czech Republic
Tel.: +420 493522802
USA
Tel.: +45 87421000
Eng
OS L O · MOS COW · P R AGUE · L I S B ON · E DI NBURGH · WA R S AW · BUDA P E S T

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