Master of Technology (Automobile Engineering) Programme Code: MTT Duration – 2 Years Full Time

Programme Structure and Curriculum & Scheme of Examination 2011

AMITY UNIVERSITY UTTAR PRADESH
GAUTAM BUDDHA NAGAR

PREAMBLE

Amity University aims to achieve academic excellence by providing multi-faceted education
to students and encourage them to reach the pinnacle of success. The University has designed a system that would provide rigorous academic programme with necessary skills to enable them to excel in their careers. This booklet contains the Programme Structure, the Detailed Curriculum and the Scheme of Examination. The Programme Structure includes the courses (Core and Elective), arranged semester wise. The importance of each course is defined in terms of credits attached to it. The credit units attached to each course has been further defined in terms of contact hours i.e. Lecture Hours (L), Tutorial Hours (T), Practical Hours (P). Towards earning credits in terms of contact hours, 1 Lecture and 1 Tutorial per week are rated as 1 credit each and 2 Practical hours per week are rated as 1 credit. Thus, for example, an L-T-P structure of 3-0-0 will have 3 credits, 3-1-0 will have 4 credits, and 3-1-2 will have 5 credits. The Curriculum and Scheme of Examination of each course includes the course objectives, course contents, scheme of examination and the list of text and references. The scheme of examination defines the various components of evaluation and the weightage attached to each component. The different codes used for the components of evaluation and the weightage attached to them are: Components Case Discussion/ Presentation/ Analysis Home Assignment Project Seminar Viva Quiz Class Test Attendance End Semester Examination Codes C H P S V Q CT A EE Weightage (%) 05 - 10 05 - 10 05 - 10 05 - 10 05 - 10 05 - 10 10 - 15 05 70

It is hoped that it will help the students study in a planned and a structured manner and promote effective learning. Wishing you an intellectually stimulating stay at Amity University. July, 2011

PREAMBLE
1. Amity University Uttar Pradesh (AUUP) aims to achieve academic excellence by providing multi-faceted education to students and encourage them to reach the pinnacle of success. The University has designed a system that would provide rigorous academic program with necessary skills to enable them to excel in their careers. The mission of the AUUP is

“To develop overall personality of the students by making them not only” excellent professionals”, but also good individuals, with understanding regards for “human values”, pride in their heritage and culture, a sense of right and wrong, and yearning for perfection “

2. Vision of the Institution: The Vision of Amity School of Engineering and Technology (ASET) is to

“Provide best engineering learning experiences in the various fields of Engineering by providing total integrated and quality education and always remaining as the front runner in provision of value education by nurturing Indian traditions and ethos”.

3. Mission of the Institution: The mission of the ASET is to

“Advance learning and knowledge by linking theory and practice in all disciplines, and to prepare students for lifelong learning, leadership and productive and rewarding careers in a changing multicultural world in the various fields of engineering and related fields.”

The mission of the ASET is congruent with the mission of AUUP and prepares students for productive and rewarding career in engineering or related profession. The curriculum instills the techniques and skills of engineering design through the study of basic and advanced engineering science. The foundation is integrated with practice oriented engineering design experience which addresses both technical and non-technical aspects of engineering. Students earning a degree from AUUP are prepared to enter the world of professional practice as good engineer and human being and to continue their studies through the pursuit of higher education.

The strong foundation coupled with thorough preparation in an engineering discipline along with teaching of human values and communication skills, permits each student life long access rapidly developing new technologies and prepares each to be a citizen, a leader and an engineer to cater the needs of the 21st century. The Objectives of Amity School of Engineering and Technology are tabulated below:

(AE) Program M. Post Graduates will design Automobile Engineering devices and systems by applying underlying mathematical principles. professional and social responsibility. (AE) Program: Goal and Objectives Goal The aim of the Program is to provide practice oriented Mechanical and Automation engineering education that fosters personal.TECH. given in Table below: M. ASET Objective A 2 A A A B 3 4 5 . technical excellence and creativity. including a keen cognizance of ethical choices. and implementation of technology.TECH. Post Graduates will be proficient in the systematic explorations of alternatives for Automobile Engineering systems design. Goal of the Programme: The M.TECH. (AE) Objective 1 Post Graduates will understand the evolving Automobile Engineering devices and systems from their underlying physical principles and properties. to follow. software principles and engineering models.TECH. Post Graduates will be effective in team-based Automobile Engineering practice. together with the confidence and skills to lead. Develop the hallmarks of professional conduct. Become excellent professionals by developing strong human values and pride in their heritage and culture 4. teamwork and leadership so that the students are ready to meet the challenges of evolving society Detailed Objectives of M. and to transmit ideas effectively. development. and effective communication. (AE) program has established a broad goal and a set of specific objectives.Amity School of Engineering and Technology: Objectives The Post Graduates of Amity School of Engineering and Technology shall: Demonstrate technical competence in engineering design and analysis consistent with the practice of a specialist and with the broad perspective of the generalist. Post Graduates will demonstrate compliance with professional ethics. Inculcate learning as a lifelong activity and as a means to the creative discovery.

Outcome 4: (Technical design) the technical ability to design a prescribed engineering sub-system Outcome 5: (Design assessment) the ability to develop and assess alternative system designs based on technical and non-technical criteria 5A: to define overall needs and constraints. Outcome 6: (Professionalism) the ability to recognize and achieve high levels of professionalism in their work. Outcome 9: (Communication) the ability to communicate effectively and persuasively. 5B: to assess the social and environmental requirements of the system and its impact on the global society. Post Graduates will play leadership roles in their professions. Outcome 12: (Lifelong learning) a recognition of the need for and an ability to engage in lifelong learning and development. the Detailed Curriculum and the Scheme of Examination. and analyze experimental data. Outcome 3: (Tools) an ability to use the relevant tools necessary for engineering practice. Outcome 10: (Ethics and morals) a critical understanding of ethical and moral systems and respect for human values in a social context. Post Graduates will be prepared for the continuing learning and self-improvement necessary for a productive career in Automobile Engineering. Outcome 11: (Diversity) an understanding and appreciation of diversity and pluralism. Students Outcomes : The broad student outcomes are based on the students ability to demonstrate: Outcome 1: (Scientific foundation) When faced with a technical problem the student should be able to use applied scientific knowledge 1A: to identify and implement relevant principles of mathematics and computer science. Outcome 8: (Teamwork) the ability to function on teams. arranged . D 5. 1 B: to identify and implement relevant principles of physics and chemistry 1 C: to identify and implement relevant principles of engineering science Outcome 2: (Experimentation) the ability to design experiments. conduct experiments. 6. The Program Structure includes the courses (Core & Elective). respect human values and have pride in their culture and heritage. This booklet contains the Program Structure. Outcome 7: (Leadership) ability to assume leadership roles and respect human values.6 Post Graduates will be proficient in the use of communications (oral presentations and written reports) to articulate their ideas effectively. B 7 C 8 B.

Practical Hours (P).e. lecture Hours (L).10 5 .10 5 . Tutorial Hours (T). and 3-1-2 will have 5 credits. for example. Wishing an intellectually stimulating stay at Amity University.10 5 . The Curriculum & Scheme of Examination of each course includes the course objectives. scheme of examination and the list of text & references. an L-T-P structure of 3-0-0 will have 3 credits. March 2011 .15 70 8. The credit units attached to each course has been further defined in terms of contact hours i. The importance of each course is defined in terms of credits attached to it. 3-1-0 will have 4 credits. The different codes used for the components of evaluation and the weightage attached to them are: Components Case Discussion/ Presentation/ Analysis Home Assignment Project Seminar Viva Quiz Attendance Class Test Term Paper End Semester Examination Codes C HA P S V Q A CT TP EE Weightage (%) 5 . The scheme of examination defines the various components of evaluation and the weightage attached to each component. Thus. It is hoped that it will help the students study in a planned and a structured manner and promote effective learning.10 5 . 7. Towards earning credits in terms of contact hours.10 5 10-15 10 .10 5 .semester wise. course contents. 1 Lecture and 1 Tutorial per week are rated as 1 credit each and 2 Practical hours per week are rated as 1 credit.

I Behavioural Sciences .I Foreign Language .I (Chassis Components Lab) CAD/CAM/CAE Lab Communication Skills . Vibration.II Behavioral Science .II French German Spanish Japanese Chinese Seminar TOTAL 3 3 3 3 3 1 1 1 1 4 4 4 4 3 1 1 2 - 4 4 - 2 2 1 1 2 - - - 2 29 SUMMER PROJECT THIRD SEMESTER MTT301 MTT302 MTT303 MTT304 MTT305 Vehicle Body Engineering Automotive Maintenance & Management Elective I: (Choose any one) • Automotive Aerodynamics • Special type of Vehicles • Automotive Air Conditioning 3 3 3 1 1 1 4 4 4 . 30 SECOND SEMESTER MTT201 MTT202 MTT203 MTT204 MTT205 MTT206 MTT207 MTT220 MTT221 MTT241 MTT243 MTT244 MTT245 MTT246 MTT247 MTT248 MTT255 Vehicle Design Automotive Noise. Thermodynamics & Heat Transfer Automotive Transmission Engine Components Lab Automobile Engineering Lab .PROGRAMME STRUCTURE FIRST SEMESTER Course Code MTT101 MTT102 MTT103 MTT104 MTT105 MTT120 MTT121 MTT122 MTT141 MTT143 MTT144 MTT145 MTT146 MTT147 MTT148 Course Title Internal Combustion Engine Automotive Chassis Vehicle Dynamics Combustion. Harshness Alternative Fuels & Engine Pollution Automobile Electrical Systems & Electronics Elective I: (Choose any one) • Composite Materials • Simulation of IC Engines • Engine Management System Automotive Electrical Systems & Electronics Lab Engine Testing & Pollution Measurements Lab Communication Skills .I French German Spanish Japanese Chinese TOTAL Lecture (L) Hours Per Week 3 3 3 3 3 1 1 2 Tutorial (T) Hours Per Week 1 1 1 1 1 Practical (P) Hours Per Week 4 4 4 Total Credits 4 4 4 4 4 2 2 2 1 1 2 Page No.II Foreign Language .

II (Maintenance Lab) Communication Skills – III Behavioural Science – III Foreign Language .III French German Spanish Japanese Chinese Minor Project Summer Project (Evaluation) TOTAL 3 1 - 4 1 1 2 - 4 4 - 2 2 1 1 2 - - - 2 9 35 FOURTH SEMESTER MTT455 Dissertation TOTAL 30 30 .MTT306 MTT307 MTT308 MTT320 MTT321 MTT341 MTT343 MTT344 MTT345 MTT346 MTT347 MTT348 MTT360 MTT361 Elective II: (Choose any one) • Pneumatic& Hydraulic Control • Automotive Safety • Tribology Automobile Components Modeling Lab Automobile Engineering Lab .

‘Internal combustion engines and air pollution’ Harber and Row Publishers. Module II: Fuel Supply Fuel supply in SI Engines: Carburetion and mixture requirements. ‘Internal combustion engine Fundamentals’. Sterling Engine. Multipoint fuel injection system. Friction estimates and Lubrication requirements. Stratified charge engine. Mascow. adiabatic engines.H. Flame travel. Multifuel engines.Heywood. HA: Home Assignment. Combustion chambers for SI engines.1985 . different type of turbochargers. Scavenging processes and efficiencies in 2 stroke engines. Module IV: Cooling System. valves. EE: End Semester Examination. Transfer pump. Springer and A. 2005. flywheel. Mcombustion chamber. Module V: Developments in Engines Lean combustion engines.Construction and Performance aspects.B. cams. • G. Power Plant for Automotive Vehicles Details of engine construction: Reciprocating and Rotary Combustion engines. Patterson. S/V/Q: Seminar/Viva/Quiz.Obert. Mir Publishers.piston assembly. Plenum Press. Review of detonation and Diesel knock–effect of various factors. • M. 1976 • W. NewYork. Module III: Combustion Chamber Ignition and combustion in SI engine. crankshaft. ‘Internal combustion Engines’. Jerk and Distributor pumps. Anglin. camshaft drives. Combustion chamber for CI engines . Mixture distribution and inlet manifold. connecting rod. Att: Attendance Text & References: Text: • J. Combustion in CI engine. Antifreeze solutions. 1989. The course also provides an overview of the development in the field of engines MTT 101 Credit Units: 04 Course Contents: Module I: Engine Cycles and Engine Components Analysis of fuel-air cycle and actual cycles. Excess air supply and air motion. Crouse and A. Air Cooling system. ’Engine emissions and pollutant formation’. Material. free piston engines. 1995.Ganesan. Carburetors-types. McGraw Hill Book Co. ‘Automotive Emission Control’. Dual fuel engines. different parts in it and various operations associated with these engines. valve actuating mechanism. • V.INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES Course Code: Course Objective: This course is to provide fundamental knowledge of IC engines. Ignition delay and diesel knock. McGraw Hill Book Co.S. Tata McGraw Hill Book Co. water. valve ports. Khovakh. ’Motor Vehicle Engines’. 1973.J. cylinder head. Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) A 5 CT 10 S/V/Q 8 HA 7 EE 70 CT: Class Test. Eighth Reprint. Injectors and spray characteristics. construction and design aspects of engine components . Water Cooling Systems construction of radiator. Mechanical and Pneumatic governors. Fuel Supply in CI Engines: Injection system components.pump thermostat and cooling fan. constructional and design aspects.L. vibration damper. Maximum and minimum speed governors. Friction and Lubrication Necessity. Engine heat release and cooling system design. Supercharging-power required and effect on engine performance. cylinder block. References: • Edward F.

• G.K. transmission system and provides in-depth knowledge about their operations.M. pneumatic. 1975. Module III: Steering System Condition for true rolling motion of road wheels during steering. Differential . References: • W. • P. S. Construction details of steering linkages. Shock absorbers. double reduction final drive. Exhaust brakes. Design of final drive gears. Steering geometry. Butterworth Heinemann. New York. Narang. transverse radius rods. Static and rolling properties of pneumatic tyres. the springs being separate members. springs act also as torque and Thrust members. Delhi. Rear axle construction-full floating. MTT 102 Credit Units: 04 Course Contents: Module I: Front Axles Back axle: Live back axle. HA: Home Assignment. • R. single torque-thrust member.. Disc brake. Construction of wheel assembly. Ackermann and Davis steering.. drum brake theory. “Advanced Vehicle Technology”. Over-steer and under-steer. “The Automobile”. Module II: Rear Axle and Final Drive Two speed rear axle. New York. 2000. Distributors. “Mechanics of Road Vehicles”. New Delhi. Standard publishers. Newton. Types of tyres and constructional details. wheel wobble and shimmy. power and power assisted brakes. Design of axle housing and axle shaft for these three types of axle arrangements.Giles. “Automobile Engineering”.B.. the Hotchkiss Drive plus torque member. Illiffe Books Ltd. • Kirpal Singh. 2000.P. Testing of brakes. non-slip type. Factors affecting brake performance. 2002 . 2005. “Automobile Engineering”.S. “Steering Suspension and Tyres”. three-quarter floating and semi floating arrangements. “Automobile Engineering”.Steed. torque reaction. tubeless tyres and aspect ratio of tubed tyres Type of brakes. 1999. Rubber. W. front independent & rear independent suspensions.Steeds and T. instantaneous centre. Differential locks. Axle construction introduction. second edition.M. Axle casing constructions. London.Conventional type. Chand & Co. Att: Attendance Text & References: Text: • K. Sharma. use of three radius. New Delhi. Ltd. Different types of steering gear box. Power and power assisted steering Module IV: Suspension and Braking System Types of suspension. S/V/Q: Seminar/Viva/Quiz.J. Examination Scheme: Components A CT S/V/Q HA EE Weightage (%) 5 10 8 7 70 CT: Class Test.AUTOMOTIVE CHASIS Course Code: Course Objective: This course gives a detailed description of the different parts associated with automobile chassis. Problems on final drive. final drive. 13th Edition. “Automotive Chassis”. Types of suspension springs.independent suspensionfront and rear. Chilton Co.Garret. 1992 • Heinz Heisler. Bevel-pinion shaft and worn shaft mountings. • Heldt P. Torque Converters. Khanna Publishers. Final drive: Different type. London. Factors influencing ride comfort. Turning radius.. “The Motor Vehicle”. Constructional details – materials. braking torque developed by leading and trailing shoes. Illiffe Books Ltd. 2004.elastic suspension. constructional details. Chilton Book Co.Heldt. advantages. Steering linkages layout for conventional and independent suspensions. Butterworth – Heinemann. single reduction live axle. 1982. Dhanpat Rai & Sons. 1992 • Harban Singh Rayat. hydro. Principles of shoe brakes. torque and thrust member arrangements. EE: End Semester Examination. Brake actuating systems. Twelfth reprint New Delhi. Wheel bearings. driving thrust. • G. Types of wheels. India.

Khanna Publishers. Delhi. 2005 . K. Seventh reprint. N. “Automobile Mechanics”.• Dr. Giri.

Wiley Eastern Ltd. Types of motion. Helical. Moment of Inertia. “Mechanical Vibration”.Steeds. MTT 103 Credit Units: 04 Course Contents: Module I: Rigid Body Dynamics. Design of suspension system. Module IV: Tyres Types. slip angle. Roorkee. Newyork. Chasel’s Theorem.M. Behaviour while cornering. ‘Automotive chassis’. NewYork. Nem Chand &Bros.S and Gupta. Work-Energy. Introduction to Rigid Body. John Wiley and Sons Inc. kinetics of rigid body. Business Books. Suspension tyres’. ‘Vehicle Dynamics’. 1978 • Dr. Kinematics and Kinetics Newton’s Laws of motion. Chassis spring. Stability on a curved track and on a slope.. Relative merits and demerits. Att: Attendance Text & References: Text: • Rao J.Y. Effect of driving. 7th Edition. Giri. 2003. Module II: Suspension Functioning of suspension system. • J.Giles. Cross wind handling. Illife Books Lid London 1975 • P. Chilton Co .Wong. braking torque. Ellis. ‘Steering. India. EE: End Semester Examination. Torque. Examination Scheme: Components A CT S/V/Q HA EE Weightage (%) 5 10 8 7 70 CT: Class Test. London 1992 • JG. S/V/Q: Seminar/Viva/Quiz. 2002. Khanna Publishers. Delhi. Angular momentum & Impulse. Fluid and Air suspension. K. Different types of suspension systems. London.. Ride characteristics. Module III: Stability of Vehicles Load distribution. “Automobile Mechanics”. R.Leaf. • W. Gyroscopic effects.VEHICLE DYNAMICS Course Code: Course Objective: The objective of this course is to provide information about various aspects of kinematics and dynamics of an automobile. Also the course includes aspects of automobile suspension system and stability of vehicle.. camber thrust. ‘Mechanics of road vehicle’ Illiffe Books Ltd. Rigid vehicle .Heldt. Seventh reprint.’ Theory of ground vehicle’.stability and equations of motion. 2005 References: • Groover. cornering force. Effective spring rate. Gough’s tyre characteristics. Kinematics of rigid body. 1969. K “Theory and Practice of Mechanical Vibrations”. Fundamentals of strength of materials. N. weight transfer during acceleration and braking over turning and sliding. power consumed by a tyre. Effect of camber. HA: Home Assignment. Torsion. 1982 • J. . mechanics of suspension system. Instantaneous centre. Vehicle dynamics affected due to suspension.

Ramos. B. Single zone. ‘Internal combustion Engines’. and C. H. • J. McGraw hill book company NewYork 1990 • John.I.Complete combustion in C/H/N/O systems. Heywood. NewYork.I.COMBUSTION THERMODYNAMICS AND HEAT TRANSFER Course Code: Course Objective: This course describes the combustion thermodynamics associated with S. Engines and Gas Turbines. Wiley eastern India ltd. and Taylor. .B. I.N. Heat transfer analysis and FEM application in heat transfer in I. Description of the combustion process in C. Heat transfer In I.C.C. • Lewis. Princeton. Constant pressure. engines . 1996. Att: Attendance Text & References: Text: • Spalding.I.. Adiabatic flame temperature general case and alternate methods. R.E. and C. 2005. engines find due importance in this course. Butterworth Science Publications.C. Engines S. Examination Scheme: Components A CT S/V/Q HA EE Weightage (%) 5 10 8 7 70 CT: Class Test. "Some fundamental of Combustion". and C. “Modeling of Internal Combustion Engine”. 1982. 1979. 1976. • Ashley Campbel. Module IV: Heat Transfer in Engines Basic principles. 1985. References: • Taylor. P. MTT 104 Credit Units: 04 Course Contents: Module I: Combustion Process Combustion in premixed and diffusion flames. constant volume adiabatic combustion. Hot wire and Laser Doppler Anemometers.Ganesan. B. • Ganesan. Heat of reaction measurement. Eighth Reprint. New Jersey.S.I. Combustion process in I. Numerical solution for the flame temperature.I.C. Pease.. EE: End Semester Examination. 1988.l. Tata McGraw Hill Co. Constant volume combustion heat of reaction. constant pressure adiabatic combustion. Combustion calculations. International Text Book Co. Module II: Heat of Reaction and Adiabatic Flame Temperature Importance of heat of reaction.O diagrams in S. London. "Computer Simulation of Spark Ignition Engine Process "... Module III: Combustion in S.D. I.F.I.V. Princeton University Press. "Combustion Process High Speed Gas Dynamics and Jet Propulsion Series". “Thermodynamic analysis of combustion engine”.’ Internal Combustion Engines’". “The Internal Combustion Engines".FEM application in heat transfer studies in I. Tata McGraw Hill Book Co. Engine combustion and chemical thermodynamic models for normal combustion. engines. turbulent flow production models. S/V/Q: Seminar/Viva/Quiz. Pennsylvania.I. John book company. engines.. • V. HA: Home Assignment. Engines. Multi zone models for C. Module V: Experimental Investigation of Combustion in Engines Photographic studies of combustion processes. Engines. Radiation from clouds of solid particles such as soot. Convective heat transfer. NewYork.

Converter coupling Module III: Automatic Transmission Applications Need for automatic transmission. tractive effort. A: Attendance Text & References: Text: • Newton and Steeds. Chapman and Hall Ltd. Automotive Transmission and Power Trains construction. 1981-88. Illiffe Publishers.such as resistance to motion. 1992 . Anglin.Principle of operation of Early and Modified Ward Leonard Control system. Hydrodynamic Torque converter . I Mech E Conference. Requirement of transmission system. 1990. Examination Scheme: Components A CT S/V/Q HA EE Weightage (%) 5 10 8 7 70 CT: Class Test.Various types of hydrostatic systems.. Chilton Book Co. Construction and torque capacity. Constructional details and Performance characteristics..Principle of operation. engine speed. MTT 105 Credit Units: 04 Course Contents: Module I: Clutch and Gear Box Problems on performance of automobile .M. 1992. Principles of Hydrostatic drive system. principle. Principle of operation. HA: Home Assignment. Advantages & limitations. Different types of clutches. D. Performance characteristics and Reduction of drag torque. Continuously Variable Transmission (CVT) – Types – Operations. Hydraulic control system for automatic transmission. S/V/Q: Seminar/Viva/Quiz. Construction and Working of typical Janny hydrostatic drive. References: • Heldt... hydrostatic devisees and automatic transmission system will be taught to the students. Electric drive .Principle of operation. P. Different types of gearboxes such as Sliding mesh gearbox. Wilson Gear box and Cotal electromagnetic transmission Module II: Hydrodynamic Drive Fluid coupling . Torque capacity. construction and principle of operation of various types of mechanical transmission components. engine power and acceleration. Constructional details. hydrodynamic devices. Comparison of hydrostatic drive with hydrodynamic drive. • SAE Transactions 900550 & 930910. 2000. Multistage torque converters... Motor vehicles. EE: End Semester Examination. Chevrolet “Turboglide” Transmission. Polyphase torque converters. W. Modern Transmission systems. Module IV: Hydrostatic and Electric Drive Hydrostatic drive . Constant mesh gearbox and Synchromesh gearbox. The detailed concept. Determination of gear ratios for vehicles.L.W.H. • Hydrostatic transmissions for vehicle applications.AUTOMOTIVE TRANSMISSION Course Code: Course Objective: The main objective of this course is to impart knowledge in automotive transmission. Construction and operation of Ford – T-model gearbox. Advantages and limitations. • Crouse. A. McGraw Hill. Torque converters. • Judge.

3. Credit Units: 02 Examination Scheme: IA EE A PR LR V PR V 5 10 10 5 35 35 Note: IA –Internal Assessment.ENGINE COMPONENTS LAB Course Code: MTT 120 Course Contents: 1. Study of four-stroke compression ignition engine by dismantling and assembling. Study of two stroke spark ignition engine by dismantling and assembling. .Performance. Study of four-stroke spark ignition engine by dismantling and assembling. EE. Study of Comparison of engine components. 5. 2. Study of two-stroke s compression ignition by dismantling and assembling. V – Viva.External Exam. 4. PR. LR – Lab Record.

dismantling and Assembling of Gear box. dismantling and Assembling of Differential mechanism. dismantling and Assembling of Front axle. dismantling and Assembling of Braking system. Study of wheel alignment and wheel balancing. Study. Leyland. dismantling and Assembling of Clutch.Performance. Study and measurement of various makes of Automobile Chassis. . Ambassador etc. Study. Study. Study. dismantling and Assembling of Steering system. 4.AUTOMOBILE ENGINEERING LAB . Examination Scheme: IA EE A PR LR V PR V 5 10 10 5 35 35 Note: IA –Internal Assessment. dismantling and Assembling of Rear axle. 7. V – Viva. EE. 9. Study. PR. 6. Study. 8.External Exam. Credit Units: 02 2. 3. 5. LR – Lab Record. such as Tata. Study.I (CHASSIS COMPONENTS LAB) Course Code: MTT 121 Course Contents: 1.

EE.Performance. Simulation and Machining of automotive/ simple components in CNC Machine. Credit Units: 02 Examination Scheme: IA EE A PR LR V PR V 5 10 10 5 35 35 Note: IA –Internal Assessment.CAD/CAM/CAE LAB Course Code: MTT 122 Course Contents: 1. Analysis of 4 automotive components by using FEM package. V – Viva. 2. Using Pro-E or any other standard solid modeling of 4 different automotive components in 3D. LR – Lab Record.External Exam. . PR. 3.

Cambridge Speaking Effectively. Raman – Prakash. homonyms. Porter-Ladousse. Story telling. antonyms.al. Jones. Oxford Speaking Personally. Extempore & Role Plays Module III: Reading Skills Vocabulary: Synonyms. Cambridge Business Communication. Cambridge . Jermy Comfort. diminutives.COMMUNICATION SKILLS – I Course Code: MTT 141 Course Objective: The Course is designed to give an overview of the four broad categories of English Communication thereby enhance the learners’ communicative competence. et. homophones Idioms & phrases Foreign words in English Module IV: Writing Skills Writing Paragraphs Précis Writing Letter writing Coherence and structure Essay writing Module V: Activities News reading Picture reading Movie magic Announcements Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) CT1 20 CT2 20 CAF 25 V 10 GD 10 GP 10 A 5 CAF – Communication Assessment File GD – Group Discussion GP – Group Presentation Text & References: • • • • Working in English. Credit Units: 01 Course Contents: Module I: Listening Skills Effective Listening: Principles and Barriers Listening Comprehension on International Standards Module II: Speaking Skills Pronunciation and Accent Reading excerpts from news dailies & magazines Narrating Incident.

BEHAVIOURAL SCIENCE . Credit Units: 01 Course Contents: Module I: Understanding Self Formation of self concept Dimension of Self Components of self Self Competency Module II: Self-Esteem: Sense of Worth Meaning and Nature of Self Esteem Characteristics of High and Low Self Esteem Importance & need of Self Esteem Self Esteem at work Steps to enhance Self Esteem Module III: Emotional Intelligence: Brain Power Introduction to EI Difference between IQ. analysis and action plan Module V: Leading Through Positive Attitude Understanding Attitudes Formation of Attitudes Types of Attitudes Effects of Attitude on Behaviour Perception Motivation Stress Adjustment Time Management Effective Performance Building Positive Attitude Module VI: End-of-Semester Appraisal Viva based on personal journal Assessment of Behavioural change as a result of training Exit Level Rating by Self and Observer Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) SAP 20 A 05 Mid Term Test (CT) 20 VIVA 30 Journal for Success (JOS) 25 . EQ and SQ Relevance of EI at workplace Self assessment. analysis and action plan Module IV: Managing Emotions and Building Interpersonal Competence Need and importance of Emotions Healthy and Unhealthy expression of emotions Anger: Conceptualization and Cycle Developing emotional and interpersonal competence Self assessment.I (SELF-DEVELOPMENT AND INTERPERSONAL SKILLS) Course Code: MTT 143 Course Objective: This course aims at imparting an understanding of: Self and the process of self exploration Learning strategies for development of a healthy self esteem Importance of attitudes and their effect on work behaviour Effective management of emotions and building interpersonal competence.

Burgoyne John. Daniel: Emotional Intelligence. Macmillan Gegax Tom. Dalip. Dr. Viva Books Pvt. Harmony Books Chatterjee Debashish. R. Lucie Press. Losoncy Lewis. Winning in the Game of Life: 1st Edition. Emotional Intelligence at work. 1999. Goleman. McGraw-Hill Book Company. Dinkmeyer Don. • • • • • • • . Covey.. Simon & Schuster Ltd. Sage Publications. First Edition. Marc: Self Esteem.I. Bantam Books Goleman. Khera Shiv: You Can Win. A Manager’s Guide to Self-Development: Second edition.. American Media Pedler Mike. 1st Edition. 1st Edition 1997. Dr. 1995 Edition.Text & References: • • • Towers. Leading Consciously: 1998 1st Edition. The Skills of Encouragement: St. Boydell Tom. 2002. Singh. Ltd. Bantam Books. 1992 Edition. Stephen: Seven habits of Highly Effective People. 1998 Edition. Daniel: Working with E.

de ses activités. singulier et pluriel négation avec « de ». défini. premiers contacts. 01 to 37: Unités 1. contracté nom. présenter quelqu’un. quand. 4. donner/demander des informations sur une personne. qui.pour insister après une préposition 7. faire la connaissance des autres. exprimer ses goûts et ses préférences 2. de son pays. se présenter. non 6. 3.I Course Code: MTT 144 Course Objective: To familiarize the students with the French language • with the phonetic system • with the syntax • with the manners • with the cultural aspects Credit Units: 02 Course Contents: Module A: pp. formules de politesse. 2. comment. de sa ville. quoi. pronom tonique/disjoint. dire la date et l’heure Contenu grammatical: 1. est-ce que. où. Unité 3: Organiser son temps 1. Unité 3 Objectif 1. Nommer les choses Unité 2: Faire connaissance 1. dire/interroger si on comprend 3.2 Only grammar of Unité 3: objectif 3.FRENCH . "moi aussi". si. organisation générale de la grammaire article indéfini. Parler de soi: parler du travail. futur proche Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) CT1 20 CT2 20 C 20 I 20 V 15 A 5 C – Project + Presentation I – Interaction/Conversation Practice Text & References: • le livre à suivre: Campus: Tome 1 . "moi non plus" interrogation: Inversion. qu’est-ce que. masculin. 2. quelle(s) Interro-négatif: réponses: oui. rencontres 2. adjectif. féminin. quel(s). 5. que. 4 and 5 Contenu lexical: Unité 1: Découvrir la langue française: (oral et écrit) 1.

Furniture. kommen. how. dark. what. how many. Vielen Dank!. nationalities and their languages To make the students acquainted with the most widely used country names. (es tut mir Leid!). colorless. modes of Transport Module VI: Professions To acquaint the students with professions in both the genders with the help of the verb “sein”. wie geht’s?: Danke gut!. etc. etc. ausgezeichnet!. political situation and economic opportunities available in Germany Credit Units: 02 Course Contents: Module I: Introduction Self introduction: heissen. Module IX: Numbers and calculations – verb “kosten” The counting. the use of my. read and write in the language with the help of the basic rules of grammar. plural structures and simple calculation like addition. which. Lernziel Deutsch . so la la!. Greetings: Guten Morgen!. Hallo. geography. which will later help them to strengthen their language. “Wie viel kostet das?” Module X: Revision list of Question pronouns W – Questions like who. Eatables. Danke sehr!. light. trinken. multiplication and division to test the knowledge of numbers. subtraction. lernen. All Vegetables. To give the students an insight into the culture. feminine and neuter gender. prima!. Danke!. sehr gut!. arbeiten. wohnwn.GERMAN . All personal pronouns in relation to the verbs taught so far. colorful. miserabel! Module II: Interviewspiel To assimilate the vocabulary learnt so far and to apply the words and phrases in short dialogues in an interview – game for self introduction. where. when. The family members. etc. pale. how much.I Course Code: MTT 145 Course Objective: To enable the students to converse. Module III: Phonetics Sound system of the language with special stress on Dipthongs Module IV: Countries. Guten Tag!. Es geht!. Animals. family Tree with the help of the verb “to have” Module VIII: Colours All the color and color related vocabulary – colored. Gute Nacht!. Fruits. Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) CT1 20 CT2 20 C 20 I 20 V 15 A 5 C – Project + Presentation I – Interaction/Conversation Practice Text & References: • Wolfgang Hieber. nicht so gut!. Guten Abend!. your. etc. Module VII: Pronouns Simple possessive pronouns. Module V: Articles The definite and indefinite articles in masculine. their nationalitie and the language spoken in that country.


• • • •

Hans-Heinrich Wangler, Sprachkurs Deutsch Schulz Griesbach, Deutsche Sprachlehre für Ausländer P.L Aneja, Deutsch Interessant- 1, 2 & 3 Rosa-Maria Dallapiazza et al, Tangram Aktuell A1/1,2 Braun, Nieder, Schmöe, Deutsch als Fremdsprache 1A, Grundkurs

SPANISH – I
Course Code: MTT 146 Course Objective:
To enable students acquire the relevance of the Spanish language in today’s global context, how to greet each other. How to present / introduce each other using basic verbs and vocabulary

Credit Units: 02

Course Contents:
Module I A brief history of Spain, Latin America, the language, the culture…and the relevance of Spanish language in today’s global context. Introduction to alphabets Module II Introduction to ‘Saludos’ (How to greet each other. How to present / introduce each other). Goodbyes (despedidas) The verb llamarse and practice of it. Module III Concept of Gender and Number Months of the years, days of the week, seasons. Introduction to numbers 1-100, Colors, Revision of numbers and introduction to ordinal numbers. Module IV Introduction to SER and ESTAR (both of which mean To Be).Revision of ‘Saludos’ and ‘Llamarse’. Some adjectives, nationalities, professions, physical/geographical location, the fact that spanish adjectives have to agree with gender and number of their nouns. Exercises highlighting usage of Ser and Estar. Module V Time, demonstrative pronoun (Este/esta, Aquel/aquella etc) Module VI Introduction to some key AR /ER/IR ending regular verbs.

Examination Scheme:
Components Weightage (%) CT1 20 CT2 20 C 20 I 20 V 15 A 5

C – Project + Presentation I – Interaction/Conversation Practice

Text & References:
• • Español, En Directo I A Español Sin Fronteras

JAPANESE - I
Course Code: MTT 147 Course Objective:
To enable the students to learn the basic rules of grammar and Japanese language to be used in daily life that will later help them to strengthen their language.

Credit Units: 02

Course Contents:
Module I: Salutations Self introduction, Asking and answering to small general questions Module II: Cardinal Numbers Numerals, Expression of time and period, Days, months Module III: Tenses Present Tense, Future tense Module IV: Prepositions Particles, possession, Forming questions Module V: Demonstratives Interrogatives, pronoun and adjectives Module VI: Description Common phrases, Adjectives to describe a person Module VII: Schedule Time Table, everyday routine etc. Module VIII: Outings Going to see a movie, party, friend’s house etc.

Learning Outcome
 Students can speak the basic language describing above mentioned topics

Methods of Private study /Self help
 Handouts, audio-aids, and self-do assignments and role-plays will support classroom teaching

Examination Scheme:
Components Weightage (%) CT1 20 CT2 20 C 20 I 20 V 15 A 5

C – Project + Presentation I – Interaction/Conversation Practice

Text & References:
Text: • Teach yourself Japanese References: • Shin Nihongo no kiso 1

Use of verb “zuo” and how to make sentences with it. different languages and Countries. Practicing chart with Initials and Finals. (CHART – The Chinese Phonetic Alphabet Called “Hanyu Pinyin” in Mandarin Chinese. as it is called in Chinese. Min. Use of interrogative particle “shenme”. Cantonese. Worker. “ma” and “nar”.. Credit Units: 02 Course Contents: Module I Show pictures. have tea …………. Module II Greetings Let me Introduce The modal particle “ne”. the language of Mainland China. How to make interrogative sentences ending with “ma”. Getting to know each other. Businessman. Are you busy with your work? May I know your name? Module IV Use of “How many” – People in your family? Use of “zhe” and “na”. Doctor. etc. Gan. Changes in 3rd tone and Neutral Tone. Measure words Days and Weekdays. The course aims at training students in practical skills and nurturing them to interact with a Chinese person. Hakka. The course aims at familiarizing the student with the basic aspects of speaking ability of Mandarin. Use of Please ‘qing” – sit. Structural particle “de”. Use of guixing. Teacher. A brief self introduction – Ni hao ma? Zaijian! Use of “bu” negative. dialogue and retell. Use of “Nin” when and where to use and with whom. or Putonghua.CHINESE – I Course Code: MTT 148 Course Objective: There are many dialects spoken in China.) Practicing of Tones as it is a tonal language. Module V Family structure and Relations. “shui”. The most widely spoken forms of Chinese are Mandarin. Module III Attributives showing possession How is your Health? Thank you Where are you from? A few Professions like – Engineer. Use of “you” – “mei you”. Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) CT1 20 CT2 20 C 20 I 20 V 15 A 5 C – Project + Presentation I – Interaction/Conversation Practice Text & References: . Numbers. Maps. Wu and Xiang. but the language which will help you through wherever you go is Mandarin.

• “Elementary Chinese Reader Part I” Lesson 1-10 .

Illiffe Books ltd 1968 • T..M. Constant-mesh gearboxes. Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011 References: • J... Module IV: Vehicle dynamics Vehicle dynamics control.. 1995. Design of couplings. Fly Wheel and other components. • The Automotive Chassis: Engineering Principles. Chilton Book Co. axle. Hydraulic brakes. 1992. HA: Home Assignment. Effect of camber. • Giri. • Dean Averns. torque converter. four wheel steering system. shock dampers Module III: Design of Steering Systems and Brakes Power assisted steering. transient effects in cornering. air and endurance brake. driving torques on steering. diesel Engine Design George Nesnes Ltd. Cylinder liner. Connecting rod. steady state cornering. Reed Educational and Professional Publishing Ltd 2002. • Harald Naunheimer Bernd Bertsche Joachim Ryborz Wolfgang Novak.N. Giles.G. Engine Design. heavy vehicle gearboxes. adaptive suspension system. Cylinder. Crank Shaft. Automotive Chassis. design fluid couplings. 1998. Vehicle Handling: Over steer. Aerodynamic design of vehicle. Vehicle Aerodynamics. design fluid couplings. P. differential. Also it includes the study of the design of the engine components. 1982.K. Design of couplings. Illife Book Co. Walshaw. Automotive Transmissions.. S/V/Q: Seminar/Viva/Quiz. Cylinder head. Module II: Design of Transmission Elements Clutch control system. Automobile Mechanics. Combustion Chamber. effect of braking.. SAE – Sep. 1992. synchro-mesh gearboxes. Examination Scheme: Components A CT S/V/Q HA EE Weightage (%) 5 10 8 7 70 CT: Class Test.. under steer. multiple clutches. differential. direct release clutch. Chilton Book Co.VEHICLE DESIGN Course Code: MTT 201 Course Objective: This course gives a vast coverage of the design aspects of different mechanical components of an automobile. vehicle structure. 1953 • Heldt. Credit Units: 04 Course Contents: Module I: Engine Design Design of Piston. Khanna Publishers. Directional stability of vehicles. torque converter. commercial vehicle chassis frames.D. Att: Attendance Text & References: Text: • Julian Happian-Smith.M. Tandem axle suspension. An Introduction to Modern Vehicle Design. axle. P. New Delhi. . Torque Converters. EE: End Semester Examination. • Heldt. antilock brakes. Automobile Chassis Design. centrifugally operated clutches..

AUTOMOTIVE NOISE. modes. brief introduction to experimental model analysis. natural frequencies and modes. nodes. Vibration under periodic force. Numerical methods for solution. vehicular noise level. Model analysis. Two degree of freedom system. limits cycle. Stability of equilibrium state. Rayliegh’s method. Examination Scheme: Components A CT S/V/Q HA EE Weightage (%) 5 10 8 7 70 CT: Class Test. transmission noise. Phase plane techniques. Lagrange’s equation for problem formulation. Vehicle Refinement Controlling Noise and Vibration in Road Vehicles. HA: Home Assignment. vibration isolation. Co-ordinate coupling solution. S/V/Q: Seminar/Viva/Quiz. Credit Units: 04 Course Contents: Module I: Noise Noise characteristics. SAE International 2004 . VIBRATION AND HARSHNESS Course Code: MTT 202 Course Objective: This course is a study of noise and vibration from the point of view of an automobile. Single degree of freedom. types of singularity. bar. noise in auxiliaries. eigen values and vectors. Method of isoclines. graphical. Basic vibration measuring set up. structural noise. Formulation and solution methods: iterative. Module II: Vibration Introduction. Vibration control. transverse vibration of cable. Vibrations References: • Matthew Harrison. Att: Attendance Text & References: Text: • Groover. forced vibration. brake squeal. Application of Fourier series. controlling natural frequencies. Matrix method. Vibrations • H church. Noise Control: Mechanization of noise generation. engine noise. noise level measurement techniques. Balancing of reciprocating and rotating masses. noise control measures. Module IV: Non-linear vibration Basics of non-linear vibration. Road vehicle noise standards. Multi degree of freedom vibration. Holzer’s method. Module III: Vibration of Continuous Systems Vibration of continuous systems. noise control methodologies. torsion vibration of shaft. Reyliegh-Ritz method. vibration absorbers. damped. Sources of noise. wind noises etc. environmental noise management. causes of non-linearity. EE: End Semester Examination. It also covers noise testing and control and non linear vibration.

SAE Publication USA 1980. Biodiesel production and specifications. Compressed natural gas. supply. 2003. Emission regulations. Module IV: Different Aspects of Engine Pollution Pollutants due to transportation systems. production. Effects of engine pollutants on human health. Nature of pollutants and their formation. The Biodiesel Handbook. John Wiley & Sons Ltd 2006 • Ramalingam. 1982. SAE. .840367. storage.. hydrogen induction systems. Scitech publications. Att: Attendance Text & References: Text: • Gerhard Knothe. Credit Units: 04 Course Contents: Module I: Liquid Alternative Fuel Alternative fuels. References: • Nagpal. Barclay.K. Khanna Publishers. Alternative Fuels Guide Book. regulated/unregulated pollutants. Engines and Hydrogen. 1997. Automobile pollution. Chennai. Jürgen Krahl. Jon Van Gerpen. R. AOCS Press 2005. K. • Maheswar Dayal. 841333. Hydrogen. 841334. technologies to control engine pollution and regulations associated is another aspect of this course. 1991. storage. HA: Home Assignment. filling systems. S/V/Q: Seminar/Viva/Quiz. Series No.. Fuel Cells. 841156.841210. transesterification process. • Bechtold. alcohol. production.L. emulsified fuels. I & B Horishr India. Internal combustion engine.19. Energy today & tomorrow. Photochemical smog. EE: End Semester Examination. • Alcohols and motor fuels progress in technology. GTI Module II: Gaseous Alternative Fuel Introduction to gaseous alternative fuels. • Frederick J. • The properties and performance of modern alternate fuels – SAE Paper No.ALTERNATIVE FUELS AND ENGINE POLLUTION Course Code: MTT 203 Course Objective: This course provides an overview of different liquid and gaseous alternative fuels suitable for an automobile. DME. Local and global effects of pollutants. Power Plant Engineering. combustive properties of hydrogen. LPG. • SAE Paper Nos. technologies to control engine pollution Examination Scheme: Components A CT S/V/Q HA EE Weightage (%) 5 10 8 7 70 CT: Class Test. Module III: Fuel Cells Introduction to the development and current status of fuel cells.

types and construction of spark plugs. Storage Batteries. Cut-out. Charging and Ignition Systems Principles and construction of lead-acid battery. Solenoids. security and warning system. 1985.. Headlight dazzling & preventive methods. Advantages of electronic ignition systems Module V: Module X Digital Engine Control System Open loop and closed loop control systems-Engine cranking and warm up control-Acceleration enrichmentDeceleration leaning and idle speed control. Principle & construction of starter motor. English Language Book Society & New Press. McGraw Hill Book Co Inc. Electronic dashboard instruments-Onboard diagnosis system. electronic ignition systems. Crank angle position sensors-Fuel metering/vehicle speed sensor and detonation sensor-Altitude sensor. care and maintenance of starter motor. G. Electrical fuel-pump.. Vehicle motion control. 1998 References: • Young. Exhaust emission control engineering. Horn. Compensated voltage regulator alternators principle & constructional aspects and bridge benefits. Details of head light & side light.. rating capacity and efficiency of batteries.Butter worth Heinemann.P. Chapman & Hall. Electronic management of chassis system. Positive & negative earth systems. Constructional aspect of alkaline battery. L. Types. Various tests on battery condition. Condition at starting. HA: Home Assignment. Fuel. Automobile Electrical Equipment. John Wiley & Sons inc. Credit Units: 04 Course Contents: Module I: Starting. flow sensor. Working of different starter drive units. • Crouse. Throttle body injection and multi port or point fuel injection. Behaviour of starter during starting. A: Attendance Text & References: Text: • Judge.. New York. feed back carburetor systems. Ribbens -Understanding Automotive Electronics.W. Wiper system. Shunt generator characteristics. Characteristics of battery. Series motor and its characteristics. Speedometer. Automobile Electrical Equipment. S/V/Q: Seminar/Viva/Quiz. Throttle position sensors.. 1992. Module III: Automotive Electronics Current trends in modern automobiles. 1980. oil & temperature gauges.. Generation of direct current. 1990. Module II: Lighting System & Accessories Insulated & earth return systems. A. Voltage & current regulators. 5th edition. W. Module IV: Electronic Fuel Injection and Ignition Systems Electronic Fuel Injection and Ignition Systems: Introduction.AUTOMOTIVE ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS AND ELECTRONICS Course Code: MTT 204 Course Objective: This course gives insight of different electronics and electrical systems used in automobiles with necessary details. New York. London. Types of solidstate ignition systems and their principle of operation. Starter Switches. • Vinal. Trafficator. Armature reaction. Modern Electrical Equipment of Automobiles. A. Open and close loop systems-Components for electronic engine management. & Griffiths. Contact less electronic ignition system.. and relays. . stepper motors. EE: End Semester Examination.W. Third brush regulation. Types of sensors such as-Oxygen sensors. charging methods. and electronic spark timing control. Examination Scheme: Components A CT S/V/Q HA EE Weightage (%) 5 10 8 7 70 CT: Class Test. Injection system controls. fuel injection systems. Relative merits. Centrifugal and vacuum advance mechanisms. Sensors and Actuators: Basic sensor arrangement. • William B. Construction & working of battery coil and magneto ignition systems. Distributor less ignition-Integrated engine control systems.H.

. London. Tata McGraw Hill Publishing Co. New Jersey. Constable & Co Ltd. Eagle Wood Cliffs.. “Automotive Electrical Equipment”. Kohli P L. 1988. Electrical Ignition Equipment... Prentice Hall. Delhi. Robert N Brady Automotive Computers and Digital Instrumentation. F.G. 2004 .• • • Spreadbury. 1962.

effect of different composition of matrix and reinforcement Credit Units: 03 Course Contents: Module I: Introduction to Composite Materials Introduction. carbon fibres. Autoclave method. Hand lay up method. Functional requirements of reinforcement and matrix. Weaving.C. Clyne. Manufacturing of Ceramic Matrix Composites: Liquid Metal Infiltration. Classification of Composite materials based on structure and based on matrix. Compression moulding. Carbon composites: Knitting. An Introduction to Composite Materials References: • Chawla. Manufacturing of Metal Matrix Composites: Casting – Solid State diffusion technique. S/V/Q: Seminar/Viva/Quiz. Braiding. Liquid phase sintering. Srinivasan. Composite materials • S. Module II: Fibres Fibes: Preparation. Introduction to composite materials .COMPOSITE MATERIALS Course Code: MTT 205 Course Objective: The objective of this subject is to introduce student about composite material and their different properties. Composite Materials • Reinhart. Module III: Manufacturing Composites Polymer matrix composites: Preparation of Moulding compounds and prepregs. Engineering Materials I: An Introduction to Their Properties and Applications • Hull. HA: Home Assignment. Cladding – Hot isostatic pressing. Definition. An Introduction to Composite Products Design: Development and Manufacture • K. Volume 1: Composites • Potter. Reaction injection moulding. Advantages of composites. Module IV Response of Composites to Stresses (a) Iso Strain condition (b) Iso Stress condition (c) Load friction shared by the fibers. Composite Materials: Engineering and Science 1994 • Ashby. particle reinforcements..Application of composites. Composite materials • Dnrick Hall. Sharma. Composite Materials: Science and Engineering • Schwartz. EE: End Semester Examination. Filament winding method. A: Attendance Text & References: Text: • Matthews and Rawlings. Kevlar fibres and metal fibres Properties and applications of whiskers. properties and applications of glass fibres. Examination Scheme: Components A CT S/V/Q HA EE Weightage (%) 5 10 8 7 70 CT: Class Test. Engineered Materials Handbook.

complete combustion C/H/N/O/ systems. Combustion equation for hydrocarbon fuels – minimum air required for combustion – excess air supplied. pressure crank angle diagram. pressure crank angle diagram.S. McGraw Hill Publishing Co. simulation of two stroke Engine. Module II: Adiabatic Flame Temperature Introduction.. calculation of adiabatic flame temperature. brake thermal efficiency. constant – pressure adiabatic combustion. brake thermal efficiency. Engine details.L. Universities Press (I) Ltd. compression of simulated values. S/V/Q: Seminar/Viva/Quiz. engine performance at part throttle. advantages of computer simulation.R. conversion of volumetric analysis to mass analysis. At the end of the course the students will have command over simulation of IC engine process. EE: End Semester Examination. References: • Ramoss. work output and efficiency calculation. Module I: Combustion Stoichiometry Introduction . progressive and actual cycle simulation of SI engine will be taught to the students. temperature drop due to fuel vaporization.N. brake power. • Ashley Campbel.V. gas exchange process. part-throttle operation. deviation between actual and ideal cycle. Credit Units: 03 Examination Scheme: Components A CT S/V/Q HA EE Weightage (%) 5 10 8 7 70 CT: Class Test.SIMULATION OF IC ENGINES Course Code: MTT 206 Course Objective: The main objective of this course is to impart knowledge in computer simulation of IC engine process. friction calculation. compression of simulated values. brake power. friction calculation. super charged operation. effect of speed on performance Module IV: CI Engine Simulation Introduction. full throttle operation. John Wiley & Sons. A. 1992. validation of the computer code.Simulation. A: Attendance Text & References: Text: • Benson. oxford. engine performance simulation. New York. constant – volume adiabatic combustion. effect of speed on performance.D... isentropic changes of state. 1979 • Ganesan. "Computer Simulation of spark ignition engine process". The simulation of two stroke SI engine will also be introduced to the students. SI Engine simulation with air as working medium. . validation of the computer code. Hyderbad. Heat transfer process. fuel air cycle. Pergamon Press. engine performance simulation. HA: Home Assignment. 1986.. gas exchange process. "Thermodynamic analysis of combustion engines". Heat transfer process. The detailed concept of air standard. Whitehouse. "Modelling of Internal Combustion Engines Processes". "Internal Combustion Engines". SI Engines simulation with progressive combustion. Module III: SI Engine Simulation Introduction. 1996.

Pilot. exhaust oxygen level (two step and linear lambda). Electronically controlled Module Injection system. Working of the fuel system components. steering position. Layout and working of SI engine management systems like Bosch Monojetronic. tire pressure. 2nd Edition. Group and sequential injection techniques. Credit Units: 03 Course Contents: Module I: Fundamentals OF Automotive Electronics Components for electronic engine management system. thermistor. engine and wheel speed. Layout of the common rail fuel injection system. HA: Home Assignment. EGR valve. hot wire. introduction to modern control strategies like Fuzzy logic and adaptive control. SAE Publications. Parameters to be controlled in SI and CI engines. fuel pump. PID control. main. Look up tables. A: Attendance Text & References: Text: • Understanding Automotive Electronics William B Ribbens. rail pressure limiter. crank shaft position. brake pressure. c Engine and vehicle design data rash. Working of components like fuel injector. piezo electric. manifold temperature and pressure sensors. knock. SAE Publications. fuel level. Module IV: CI Engine Management Fuel injection system parameters affecting combustion. Module III: SI Engine Management Three way catalytic converter. 3rd Edition. Module II: Sensors and Actuators Inductive. steering torque. Examination Scheme: Components A CT S/V/Q HA EE Weightage (%) 5 10 8 7 70 CT: Class Test. Contactless electronic ignition system. SAE 1998 • Automobile Electronics by Eric Chowanietz SAE References: • Diesel Engine Management by Robert Bosch. 2004 • Gasoline Engine Management by Robert Bosch. engine temperature. Hall Effect.ENGINE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Course Code: MTT 207 Course Objective: To explain the principle of engines electronic management system and different sensors used in the systems. mass air flow. Types of solid state ignition systems and their principle of operation. flow limiter. based sensors. Throttle position. Advantages of electronic ignition systems. L-Jetronic and LH-Jetronic. Electronic spark timing control. advanced post injection and retarded post injection. piezoresistive. EE: End Semester Examination. 2004 . cam position. conversion efficiency versus lambda. noise and emissions in CI engines. S/V/Q: Seminar/Viva/Quiz. open and closed loop control strategies.

5. LR – Lab Record. Credit Units: 02 7. wiper system) Different type of sensors and actuators Electronic ignition system Study of battery charging system and setting of regulators and cutout Different type of electronic Injectors. power window.Performance. 2. PR. 3. Study of Interfacing Stepper motor control and CRT terminal 11. 4. storage oscilloscope and signal analysers used for IC engine testing. EE. Study of Interfacing A/D converter and simple data acquisition 10. Automotive Electrical circuits (lighting. Study of Micro controller programming and interfacing Examination Scheme: IA EE A PR LR V PR V 5 10 10 5 35 35 Note: IA –Internal Assessment. charge amplifier.External Exam.AUTOMOTIVE ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS AND ELECTRONICS LAB Course Code: MTT 220 Course Contents: 1. Study of SCR and IC timer. D/A and A/D converter 8. 6. Study of Pressure pickups. . V – Viva. Study of Assembly language programming exercise 9.

volumetric efficiency and optimum cooling water flow rate in engines. LR – Lab Record. EE. 3. Study of Chemiluminescent NOx analyzer. 2. Diesel smoke measurement. 8. Determination of compression ratio. 6. 7. . Credit Units: 02 Examination Scheme: IA EE A PR LR V PR V 5 10 10 5 35 35 Note: IA –Internal Assessment. 9. V – Viva. Performance and emission characteristic study of petrol and diesel engines both at full load and part load conditions. PR.External Exam.ENGINE TESTING AND POLLUTION MEASUREMENTS LAB Course Code: MTT 221 Course Contents: 1. Testing of 2 and 4 wheelers using chassis dynamometers. O2 using exhaust gas analyzer. Morse test on petrol and diesel engines. Study of NDIR Gas Analyser and FID. CO2. 5. Measurement of HC. 4.Performance. Heat balance test on an automotive engine. CO.

II Course Code: MTT 241 Course Objective: To enrich the understanding of English language and communication. Cambridge .COMMUNICATION SKILLS . informal and formal Module II: Verbal Communication (Written) Business Letter Social correspondence Writing resume and Job applications Module III: Speaking skills Conversational English Guidelines to give an effective presentation Activities to include: Presentations by students Just a minute Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) CT1 20 CT2 20 CAF 25 V 10 GD 10 GP 10 A 5 CAF – Communication Assessment File GD – Group Discussion GP – Group Presentation Text & References: • • • Business Communication. Raman – Prakash. Oxford Textbook of Business Communication. Porter-Ladousse. structure. Ramaswami S. Credit Units: 01 Course Contents: Module I: Fundamentals of Communication Role and purpose of communication: 7 C’s of communication Barriers to effective communication Enhancing listening Forms of Communication: one-to-one. style. and vocabulary for global business purposes. Macmillan Speaking Personally. usage.

Inter Personal Communication and Human Relationships: Third Edition.II (BEHAVIOURAL COMMUNICATION AND RELATIONSHIP MANAGEMENT) Course Code: MTT 243 Course Objective: This course aims at imparting an understanding of: Process of Behavioural communication Aspects of interpersonal communication and relationship Management of individual differences as important dimension of IPR Credit Units: 01 Course Contents: Module I: Behavioural Communication Scope of Behavioural Communication Process – Personal. Mark N. Symmetrical and Parallel Types – Self and Other Oriented Steps to improve Interpersonal Communication Module V: Interpersonal Relationship Development Relationship circle – Peer/ Colleague. Interaction and Transaction Patterns – Complementary.BEHAVIOURAL SCIENCE . Knapp. maintaining and terminating IPR Direct and indirect strategies of terminating relationship Model of ending relationship Module VI: End-of-Semester Appraisal Viva based on personal journal Assessment of Behavioural change as a result of training Exit Level Rating by Self and Observer Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) SAP 20 A 05 Mid Term Test (CT) 20 VIVA 30 Journal for Success (JOS) 25 Text & References: • Vangelist L. Anita. Allyn and Bacon • Julia T. Impersonal and Interpersonal Communication Guidelines for developing Human Communication skills Relevance of Behavioural Communication in relationship management Module II: Managing Individual Differences in Relationships Principles Types of issues Approaches Understanding and importance of self disclosure Guidelines for effective communication during conflicts Module III: Communication Climate: Foundation of Interpersonal Relationships Elements of satisfying relationships Conforming and Disconfirming Communication Culturally Relevant Communication Guideline for Creating and Sustaining Healthy Climate Module IV: Interpersonal Communication Imperatives for Interpersonal Communication Models – Linear. Interpersonal Communication everyday encounter . Superior and Subordinate Initiating and establishing IPR Escalating. Wood.

Christine. Beebe and Redmond. Interpersonal Communication. 1996. Naylor. .• • • Simons. Allyn and Bacon Publishers. 1997 1st Edition Cassell Harvard Business School. Belinda: Effective Communication for Managers. Effective Communication: United States of America Beebe.

un SNCF – Imaginer un dialogue 2. décrire un logement 4. 5 Contenu lexical: horaire Unité 3: Organiser son temps 1. exprimer le doute ou la certitude. situer un lieu 2. Adjectifs possessifs/exprimer la possession à l’aide de: i. 4. demander/donner des informations sur un emploi du temps passé. « de » ii. »/ «il ne faut pas… » 5. 6 Module B: pp. donner/demander des informations sur un emploi du temps. interrogative construction à l'infinitif 4. 3. s’orienter. Questions directes/indirectes Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) CT1 20 CT2 20 C 20 I 20 V 15 A 5 C – Project + Presentation I – Interaction/Conversation Practice Text & References: le livre à suivre: Campus: Tome 1 . répondre Unité 4: Découvrir son environnement 1. 2. 47 to 75 Unité 4. Adjectifs démonstratifs 2. Credit Units: 02 Course Contents: Module A: pp. 3. 5.38 – 47: Unité 3: Objectif 3. passé composé 6. Conjugaison pronominale – négative. A+nom/pronom disjoint 3. savoir s’informer Contenu grammatical: 1. Chercher.II Course Code: MTT 244 Course Objective: • • To enable the students to overcome the fear of speaking a foreign language and take position as a foreigner speaking French. To make them learn the basic rules of French Grammar . découvrir les relations entre les mots 4.interroger. s’informer sur un itinéraire. Faire un programme d’activités imaginer une conversation téléphonique/un dialogue Propositions. rédiger un message/ une lettre pour … i) prendre un rendez-vous/ accepter et confirmer/ annuler ii) inviter/accepter/refuser 3. donner une explication. connaître les rythmes de la vie Unité 5: s’informer 1. Impératif/exprimer l’obligation/l’interdiction à l’aide de « il faut….FRENCH .

2 & 3 Rosa-Maria Dallapiazza et al. schlafen. read and write in the language with the help of the basic rules of grammar. Deutsch Interessant. Module III: Separable verbs To comprehend the change in meaning that the verbs undergo when used as such Treatment of such verbs with separable prefixes Module IV: Reading and comprehension Reading and deciphering railway schedules/school time table Usage of separable verbs in the above context Module V: Accusative case Accusative case with the relevant articles Introduction to 2 different kinds of sentences – Nominative and Accusative Module VI: Accusative personal pronouns Nominative and accusative in comparison Emphasizing on the universal applicability of the pronouns to both persons and objects Module VII: Accusative prepositions Accusative propositions with their use Both theoretical and figurative use Module VIII: Dialogues Dialogue reading: ‘In the market place’ ‘At the Hotel’ Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) CT1 20 CT2 20 C 20 I 20 V 15 A 5 C – Project + Presentation I – Interaction/Conversation Practice Text & References: • • • • • • Wolfgang Hieber. Weekdays. and others. Grundkurs . months. to learn the conjugations of the same. (fahren. Tangram Aktuell A1/1.GERMAN – II Course Code: MTT 245 Course Objective: To enable the students to converse. Schmöe.L Aneja.2 Braun. Adverbs of time and time related prepositions Module II: Irregular verbs Introduction to irregular verbs like to be. political situation and economic opportunities available in Germany Introduction to Grammar to consolidate the language base learnt in Semester I Credit Units: 02 Course Contents: Module I: Everything about Time and Time periods Time and times of the day. geography.1. which will later help them to strengthen their language. lessen. Sprachkurs Deutsch Schulz Griesbach. seasons. Deutsche Sprachlehre für Ausländer P. Nieder. essen. To give the students an insight into the culture. sprechen und ähnliche). Deutsch als Fremdsprache 1A. Lernziel Deutsch Hans-Heinrich Wangler.

my school/institution. my house. Credit Units: 02 Course Contents: Module I Revision of earlier modules.descriptions of people. Introduction to root changing and irregular AR/ER/IR ending verbs Module III More verbal phrases (eg. bastante. computer/internet related vocabulary Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) CT1 20 CT2 20 C 20 I 20 V 15 A 5 C – Project + Presentation I – Interaction/Conversation Practice Text & References: • • Español. Simple texts based on grammar and vocabulary done in earlier modules. Module IV Possessive pronouns Module V Writing/speaking essays like my friend. Module II Some more AR/ER/IR verbs. Que lastima etc). Dios Mio. grammar. myself…. En Directo I A Español Sin Fronteras . objects etc. Verbal Phrases to understand simple texts and start describing any person or object in Simple Present Tense.SPANISH – II Course Code: MTT 246 Course Objective: To enable students acquire more vocabulary. poco). mucho. muy. adverbs (bueno/malo.

Learning Outcome  Students can speak the language describing above-mentioned topics. Inviting somebody for lunch. audio-aids. dinner. Methods of Private study /Self help   Handouts. articles and likes and dislikes. intransitive verbs Module II: More prepositions More particles. At a post office. movie and how to accept and refuse in different ways Module VI: Comprehension’s Short essay on Family. Module V: Invitations and celebrations Giving and receiving presents. Module IV: Adverbs Different adverbial expression. Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) CT1 20 CT2 20 C 20 I 20 V 15 A 5 C – Project + Presentation I – Interaction/Conversation Practice Text & References: Text: • Teach yourself Japanese References: • Shin Nihongo no kiso 1 . hospital etc.JAPANESE . family Module VIII: Illness Going to the doctor. Module VII: Conversations Situational conversations like asking the way. Friend etc. Module III: Terms used for instructions No parking. no smoking etc. and self-do assignments. Credit Units: 02 Course Contents: Module I: Verbs Transitive verbs.II Course Code: MTT 247 Course Objective: To enable the students to converse in the language with the help of basic particles and be able to define the situations and people using different adjectives. visiting and watching movies in Japan and culture center every Friday at 6pm. Use of library.

I am learning Chinese. Module V The verb “qu” Going to the library issuing a book from the library Going to the cinema hall.. “ma” with a third tone. Days of week. Expression ‘yao”. Introduction of basic sentence patterns.. the language of Mainland China. “gen”. Use of interrogative pronoun – “duoshao” and “ji”.. night. Etc. How to tell time. house or hostel room. Morning. to end …. Saying the units of time in Chinese. Evening. Is Chinese difficult? Module IV Counting from 1-1000 Use of “chang-chang”. buying tickets Going to the post office... Tone practice. and same syllables with different tones mean different things. More sentence patterns on Days and Weekdays. Module II Where do you live? Learning different colors. etc Going to the buy clothes …. 10:30 P.M. Hobby. The course aims at familiarizing the student with the basic aspects of speaking ability of Mandarin. Making an Inquiry – What time is it now? Where is the Post Office? Days of the week. falling. xia Furniture – table. it mean horse and “ma” with the first tone is Mother. Months in a year. Learning to say useful phrases like – 8:00.CHINESE – II Course Code: MTT 248 Course Objective: Chinese is a tonal language where each syllable in isolation has its definite tone (flat. morning 3:58. Night. wais hang. “xiang” and “yaoshi” (if). etc. one hour. . 11:25. Measure words. Use of Preposition – “zai”. Credit Units: 02 Course Contents: Module I Drills Practice reading aloud Observe Picture and answer the question. afternoon. Description of room. chair. Practice using the language both by speaking and by taking notes. The course aims at training students in practical skills and nurturing them to interact with a Chinese person. “Whose”??? Sweater etc is it? Different Games and going out for exercise in the morning. eg what is placed where and how many things are there in it? Review Lessons – Preview Lessons. rising and rising/falling). I also like swimming. everyday. Afternoon. When you say. Glad to meet you. bookshelf. months in a year etc. Comprehension and answer questions based on it. bed. etc. Module III Use of words of location like-li. to begin. evening. Tones of “bu” Buying things and how muchit costs? Dialogue on change of Money. buying stamps Going to the market to buy things.

Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) CT1 20 CT2 20 C 20 I 20 V 15 A 5 C – Project + Presentation I – Interaction/Conversation Practice Text & References: • “Elementary Chinese Reader Part I” Lesson 11-20 .

working independently. 4. Pick a topic of your interest at the beginning of the semester. *Each student is required to write a comprehensive report about the seminar. 2. Doing implementations/writing large programs. The report should consist of 15 to 20 pages describing the topic selected.SEMINAR Course Code: MTT 255 Seminar 1. The report should be in the format as given by the department Examination Scheme: V PER FES 5 10 10 Note: V – Viva. Present before a committee. Credit Units: 02 Not expected: 1. reading research papers. Emphasis: communication skills. 5. Write report*. Doing research. . Collect information about the topic. 2. FES – Feedback from External Supervision. PER – Presentation. Organize information collected. 3.

Module IV: Vehicle Aerodynamics Various body optimization techniques for minimum drag. • Heinz Heisler.G. “Advanced Vehicle Technology”.. Flow visualization techniques. Segmental construction of driver’s cab. concept. J. 2002 . Effects of a cab to trailer body roof height. ‘Body Construction and Design’. Credit Units: 04 Course Contents: Module I: Car body details Types of car bodies . driver's visibility. 1975 References: • John Fenton ‘Vehicle Body layout and analysis’. Butterworth and Co. Giles. Examination Scheme: Components A CT S/V/Q HA EE Weightage (%) 5 10 8 7 70 CT: Class Test. A: Attendance Text & References: Text: • Powloski. New York. 1984. Commercial vehicle drag reducing devices.VEHICLE BODY ENGINEERING Course Code: MTT 301 Course Objective: The main objective of this course is to impart knowledge in the construction of vehicle.visibility: regulation. Module II: Bus body details Classification of bus bodies – based on distance traveled. Modern painting process of a passenger car body. 1970 • J. safety aspects. EE: End Semester Examination. methods of improving visibility. Construction of Conventional and integral type bus. Constructional details of a passenger car. Dimensions of drivers seat in relation to controls. Construction of Tanker body and Tipper body. Driver’s cab design. ‘Vehicle Body Engineering’.. Module III:Commercial vehicle details Classification of commercial vehicle bodies. Test with scale models. At the end of the course the student will be well versed in the design and construction of external body of the vehicles. HA: Home Assignment. paneling of passenger car body trim. Effects of different cab to trailer body Forebody pressure distribution.safety: safety design. Compactness of Driver’s cab. Butterworth – Heinemann.. Effects of rounding sharp front body edges. second edition. Mechanical Engineering Publication Ltd. based on capacity of the bus and based on style & shape. S/V/Q: Seminar/Viva/Quiz. Principle of wind tunnel technology. aerodynamic. Types of metal section used in the construction. Business Books Ltd.

body coach work. • Ernest Venk. maintenance and servicing of steering system-Manual & Power Steering system. • Frazee. Taraporevala Sons.AUTOMOTIVE MAINTENANCE AND MANAGEMENT Course Code: MTT 302 Course Objective: To introduce the concepts of maintenance management for automobiles and automotive systems.. body repair tools & equipments. factors considered for design & development of modern service garages / dealers shops. London. London. chassis frame alignment. lubrication chart.. Automatic transmission. 1963 References: • Stator Abbey.B. Fleet maintenance. Taraporevala Sons. Maintenance of high speed diesel engines. Sir Issac Pitman. • V. wheel alignment. maintenance of tyres. repair and servicing of clutches. Maleev. pitman publishing.W. Module V: Vehicle Body Maintenance & repair of vehicle body: Passenger comfort parameters. HA: Home Assignment. different garage layouts. fledell. effects & remedies. braking and suspension overhaul. gear boxes. inspection and checking of components visually and dimensionally. Automotive Transmission servicing and overhaul. Credit Units: 04 Course Contents: Module I: Introduction Maintenance records and schedule: Importance of maintenance with different types. Newyork. maintenance of ignition systems. Bombay. Chicago. Petrol fuel and diesel fuel system maintenance. London.student edition. • W.L.Crouse. Bombay. anti corrosion additives. Automotive maintenance and trouble shooting.W. maintenance records. A: Attendance Text & References: Text: • A. McGraw Hill. 1956.-Automobile collision Work. 1995. London. special tools & advanced equipments. dry & wet liners. Edward spicer. Fluid flywheel. MPFI maintenance.Judge. TMH. tyre rotation. window rattling. Automotive steering. Intl. Chassis lubrication. Module III: Chassis and Transmission Chassis Dive-line Maintenance: Maintenance. Module II: Engine Engine Maintenance: Engine troubles. noise & vibration. maintenance and care of storage batteries. air systems. American technical publications. lubrication system services. reconditioning methods of engine components. • Vehicle servicing manuals. battery testing methods. • Ernest Venk. CVT unit. suspension systems. anti freezing solutions. differential unit. different major & minor services for engine. S/V/Q: Seminar/Viva/Quiz. servicing of brake systems. 1984 • A. brake bleeding and brakes adjustments. . tyre service & reconditioning. frame defects. 1963 • S. engine tune-up. polishing and painting of new and old vehicle body Examination Scheme: Components A CT S/V/Q HA EE Weightage (%) 5 10 8 7 70 CT: Class Test. Everyday Automobile repair. 3rd Edition. McGraw Hill Book CO. 1986. Pitman Paperpack... D.B.hydraulic. D. 1971. Edward Spicer. propeller shaft. 1969. 1971. Abbey. • John Dolce. New Delhi. Motor Vehicle Servicing. Spicer. Chapman Hall Ltd. front axle and rear axle. wheel balancing. 1953. Diesel Engine operation and maintenance. Module IV: Auxiliaries Maintenance and servicing of auxiliaries: Cooling system service. Automotive maintenance and trouble shooting. Judge. Newyork. EE: End Semester Examination.

HA: Home Assignment.. Module IV: Wind tunnels for automotive aerodynamics Introduction – Principles of wind tunnel technology – Limitation of simulation – Stress with scale models – full scale wind tunnels – measurement techniques – Equipment and transducers – road testing methods – Numerical methods. the students will be able to apply basic principles of aerodynamics for the design of vehicle body. New York. A: Attendance Text & References: Text: • Hucho. Wind Tunnel Testing. Module III: Vehicle handling The origin of force and moments on a vehicle – side wind problems – methods to calculate forces and moments – vehicle dynamics Under side winds – the effects of forces and moments – Characteristics of forces and moments – Dirt accumulation on the vehicle – wind noise – drag reduction in commercial vehicles. fast back and square back – Dust flow patterns at the rear – Effect of gap configuration – effect of fasteners. References: • Automotive Aerodynamics: Update SP-706. SP-1145. Ltd. SAE. S/V/Q: Seminar/Viva/Quiz. 1994.AUTOMOTIVE AERODYNAMICS Course Code: MTT 303 Course Objective: At the end of the course. 1996. A. • Pope. Butterworths Co.. 1987. 2nd Edn. EE: End Semester Examination. Module II: Aerodynamic drag and shape optimization of cabs Car as a bluff body – Flow field around car – drag force – types of drag force – analysis of aerodynamic drag – drag coefficient of cars – strategies for aerodynamic development – low drag profiles. SAE. Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) A 5 CT 10 S/V/Q 8 HA 7 EE 70 CT: Class Test.H.. . 1997. Front and modification – front and rear wind shield angle – Boat tailing – Hatch back. John Wiley & Sons. Aerodynamics of Road vehicles. Credit Units: 04 Course Contents: Module I: Introduction Scope – historical development trends – Fundamentals of fluid mechanics – Flow phenomenon related to vehicles – External & Internal flow problems – Resistance to vehicle motion – Performance – Fuel consumption and performance – Potential of vehicle aerodynamics. W. • Vehicle Aerodynamics.

Kinematics for loader and bulldozer operational linkages. double decker. Body hoist and bucket operational hydraulics.SPECIAL TYPE OF VEHICLES Course Code: MTT 304 Course Objective: The main objective of this course is to introduce the concept and principle of operation of special vehicles such as Bulldozers. Ltd. 1971. 1974. scrappers. borewell machines. military vehicles etc. Module I: Earth Moving and Constructional Equipments Construction layout. Module II: Power Train Concepts Engine – converter match curves. London. Selection criteria for universal joints. Epicyclic type transmissions. • A. power take off. Moscow. Power steering system. capacity and applications of earthmovers for dumpers. Hydro-pneumatic suspension cylinders. special implementations. excavators. Features Brake system and actuation – OCDB and dry disc caliper brakes. 1995. Ditchers. front-end loaders. Tokoyo. Mcgraw Hill. MIR Publisher. . Module IV: Special Purpose Vehicles for Industrial Applications Constructional features. Design aspects on dumper body. Vibratory compactors. Frederic Warne and co. capacity and stability of jib cranes. At the end of the course.. safe warning system for dumper. MIR Publishers. ‘Industrial Hydralics’. concrete mixtures. gun carriers and transport vehicles. 1975. Fire fighting equipment. Bucket excavators. A: Attendance Text & References: Text: • Pipenger. Katayer. Astakhov. Abrosimov. Module III: Vehicle Systems. ‘Tanks and Transport Vehicles’. EE: End Semester Examination. Credit Units: 04 Examination Scheme: Components A CT S/V/Q HA EE Weightage (%) 5 10 8 7 70 CT: Class Test. Harvesting vehicles. the students can have a better understanding of the application of the special types of vehicles in the excavation of earth. Special features and constructional details of tankers. farm equipments. • K. 1979. S/V/Q: Seminar/Viva/Quiz. Stackers. ‘Road making machineries’. Ride and stability characteristics. Bromberg and F. Safety features. Moscow. loader bucket and water tank of sprinkler. References: • Bart H Vanderveen. ‘Truck cranes’. HA: Home Assignment. A. Articulated vehicles. • SAE Handbook – Vol III. criteria for selection of prime mover fro dumpers and front end loaders based on vehicle performance characteristics. motor graders etc. Constructional details of steerable and drive axles of dumper. backhoe loaders. bulldozers.

L.. Halderman. “Automotive air conditioning”. • MacDonald. Theodore Audel series. duct systems. valves.F. multi utility and commercial vehicle. 1974 • Paul Weiser.900084. A: Attendance Text & References: Text: • Tom Birch. Lubricants. 1990 • Goings. Preventive and Total Preventive Maintenance system. duct design. • Vehicle service manuals. Dwiggins.Hill Inc.. Heater system for winter conditioning.. 1978. Reston Publishing Co Inc. K. Module II: Psychometrics Human comfort. Installation of Air conditioning system in vehicle Module III: Load estimation Heat transfer from exterior wall.. McGraw . Module IV: Maintenance and Repair Maintenance and repair of air conditioning systems. 850040.. Refrigerants. Repair techniques..L. 2004.870029 etc. Condensers. 1990. “Automotive air conditioning”. • Boyce H. Power required for Airconditioning system of passenger car. References: • William H Crouse and Donald L Anglin. S/V/Q: Seminar/Viva/Quiz. Periodicity of Maintenance. .SAE paper No: 931121. Delmer Publisher.AUTOMOTIVE AIR CONDITIONING Course Code: MTT 305 Course Objective: Study of air conditioning systems which have acquired great importance in modern automobiles. Equipment and infiltrated air. Air-conditioning equipment. electrical circuits and devices. Examination Scheme: Components A CT S/V/Q HA EE Weightage (%) 5 10 8 7 70 CT: Class Test. “Automotive Heating and Air-Conditioning”.931137. Credit Units: 04 Course Contents: Module I: Fundamentals of Refrigeration Air-conditioning Simple vapour compression refrigeration system (V. • James D. “Automotive air conditioning”. EE: End Semester Examination. “Automotive air conditioning”. Maintenance techniques.R. and Air Conditioning Systems”. Pearson Education Inc. Ventilation. HA: Home Assignment. evaporators. Jack Erjavec. Driers.S). “Automotive Heating. 2003.C. Refrigeration components and controls.. “Automotive Heating and Air Conditioning” Pearson Education Inc.. 2001. Beakdown. American Technical services. Requirement of air and air distribution systems. components and controls. passenger.

Module II: Servo.and Proportional Control Systems Module III: Fluidics Introduction to fluidic devices and sensors. Design Method and Worked Examples”. Wall attachment and vortex devices. Examination Scheme: Components A CT S/V/Q HA EE Weightage (%) 5 10 8 7 70 CT: Class Test. Germany. It gives an overview of control systems associated with hydraulic applications. Types and utility. Pneumatic valves. Transient forces and valve stability. Steady state operating forces. “Pneumatic Controls: An introduction to principles”. Delhi. S/V/Q: Seminar/Viva/Quiz.. UK. Germany. Fifth Edition. Festo. 1975 References: • Pippenger. Hydraulic and pneumatic drives. Programmable logic controllers and their applications. Analog signal control techniques. 2003. Lumped and distributed parameter fluid systems.Hill Publishing Company Ltd. systems and operation and application. Valve configurations and constructions. Pearson Education (Singapore) Pte. “ Fluid Power with Application”.R. McGraw Hill. 2002. S..Ltd. 2003 • Werner Deppert and Kurt Stoll. • Peter Rohner. electro pneumatic components. Credit Units: 04 Course Contents: Module I: Hydraulic and Pneumatic Systems Introduction to control system. • Majumdar. New Delhi. EE: End Semester Examination. J. Fourth Reprint. Design of pure fluid digital elements. “Industrial Hydraulic & Pneumatics”. “Fluid Power Logic Circuit Design – Analysis. HA: Home Assignment. 1999 . India. “Oil Hydraulic Systems: Principles and Maintenance”. Circuit design. Tata McGraw. The Macmillan Press Ltd. • Festo KG. Valve control pressure flow relationship for hydraulic valves. • Andrew Parr. Hydraulic power generation and transmission.J. A: Attendance Text & References: Text: • Anthony Espisito. First Indian Reprint. 1979. Fluid mechanics of jets. “Pneumatic Tips”. Module IV: Electro-hydraulic and Electro-pneumatic Systems Electro-hydraulic and electro-pneumatic components. “Hydraulic and Pneumatics”. Jaico Publishing House. 1987. Vogel-Druck Wurzburg..PNEUMATIC AND HYDRAULIC CONTROL Course Code: MTT 306 Course Objective: The course elaborates principles of hydraulic and pneumatic devices. Pure fluidic analog amplifiers.

. conditional safety.passive safety: exterior safety.K. tyre pressure control system. Credit Units: 04 Course Contents: Module I: Introduction Design of the body for safety. Module III: Safety Equipments and Convenience Systems Seat belt. rear vehicle object detection system. S/V/Q: Seminar/Viva/Quiz. deceleration on impact with stationary and movable obstacle. safety sandwich construction. frontal object detection. automatic seat belt tightener system.McGraw-Hill Inc. causes of rear end collision. electronic system for activating air bags. EE: End Semester Examination. London . Module II: Safety Concepts Active safety: driving safety. tiltable steering wheel. environment information system. engine location. antiskid braking system. Module IV: Collision Warning and Avoidance Collision warning system.AUTOMOTIVE SAFETY Course Code: MTT 307 Course Objective: At the end. speed control devices.1969. Examination Scheme: Components A CT S/V/Q HA EE Weightage (%) 5 10 8 7 70 CT: Class Test.1999. bumper design for safety. satellite control of vehicle operation for safe and fast travel. interior safety. HA: Home Assignment. regulations. perceptibility safety. 2004. collapsible steering column. speed and acceleration characteristics of passenger compartment on impact. rain sensor system.Business books limited. • ARAI Safety standards . the student will have good exposure to automotive safety aspects including safety equipments. manual and automated wiper system. regenerative braking system. Steering and mirror adjustment.“Vehicle Body Engineering” .Powloski . central locking system.“Automotive Electronics Handbook” . deformation behaviour of vehicle body. concept of crumble zone. • Ronald. object detection system with braking system interactions. 6th edition. driver fitness detection. Garage door opening system.Jurgen . deceleration of vehicle inside passenger compartment. A: Attendance Text & References: Text: • Bosch. SAE. operating safety. “Automotive HandBook”. air bags. References: • J..Second edition.

noncircular bearings and multi side surface bearings. wear resistance material and coatings and failure mode analysis. factors affecting wear.hydrodynamic lubrication Ball and roller element bearings. SOAP. lubrication of tribological components. conical and spherical pad thrust bearing. slider bearings. Engine friction – Losses and engine design parameters. • Engineering Tribology. reciprocating components. short and finite bearings. characteristics. fatigue. coefficients. Module V: Rheodynamic lubrication Non-Newtonian fluids. materials and Bingham solids. Air and gas lubricated bearings. Hand book of Tribology -. • Friction &Wear. lubrication system. thixotopic. Cambridge University Press . Stability. temperature. capillary.Bharat Bhusan. Examination Scheme: Components A CT S/V/Q HA EE Weightage (%) 5 10 8 7 70 CT: Class Test. Flat. Engine wear. Gwidon W. piston assembly.wear mechanism. Wear: Economic role of wear – type of wear. 2002. etc. Tribology aspects of engine components such as bearings. selection and life estimation. Bharat Bhusan. Ltd. Tribology components in extreme environments like vacuum. sintered bearing. EE: End Semester Examination. Engine tribology basics. John Williams. HA: Home Assignment. Lubricants. measurement of wear. cams. Butterworth & Co. Credit Units: 04 Course Contents: Module I: Introduction Introduction of Tribology. orifice and flow control valve. tribometers and tribometry. monitoring of ball / roller bearings. Module II: Friction and Wear Natural of metal surfaces – Surface properties – Surface parameters and measurements. selection of materials for different wear situations. gears. Module IV: Elasto. ferrography and other rapid testing methods for lubricants contamination. John Wiley & Sons Inc. Grease lubrication and care. S/V/Q: Seminar/Viva/Quiz. fixed & pivoted shoe bearings. Friction – Sliding friction – Rolling friction characteristics of common metals and non-metals–friction under environments. 1991. pressure. thrust bearings. Hydrostatic bearing: basic concepts. type of lubricants. John Wiley & Sons References: • Engineering Tribology. Multi-recess journal and thrust bearings. B. Andrew W. Stochowiak. properties and testing. diagnostics. A: Attendance Text & References: Text: • Bharat Bhusan. hydrodynamic journals bearings. B. General tribological considerations in the design of bearings.K Gupta. generalized Reynolds equation. mechanisms. service. Batchelor • Principles and Applications of Tribology. lubricant monitoring. classification. 1973. Externally pressurized hydrodynamic bearings. 1999. restrictors. bearing pads. McGraw Hill • Introduction to Tribology .Pugh. valve train and drive train components etc.TRIBOLOGY Course Code: MTT 308 Course Objective: Study of air conditioning systems which have acquired great importance in modern automobiles. Tribological testing and standards. general recommendations of lubricants SAE and other cloud numbers. Module III: Hydrodynamic and Hydrostatic Lubrication Theory of hydrodynamic lubrication. Classification of lubricants. bearing characteristics number and performance coefficients. 2005.

Design of connecting rod Design of crank shaft Design of valves Design of flywheel Credit Units: 02 Examination Scheme: IA EE A PR LR V PR V 5 10 10 5 35 35 Note: IA –Internal Assessment. PR. . 4. 5. V – Viva. 3.AUTOMOBILE COMPONENTS MODELLING LAB Course Code: MTT 320 Course Contents: 1. EE.Performance. LR – Lab Record. Design of piston 2.External Exam.

LR – Lab Record. V – Viva. brake shoes. Credit Units: 02 Examination Scheme: IA EE A PR LR V PR V 5 10 10 5 35 35 Note: IA –Internal Assessment. PR. 6. . 4. overhauling of system and the adjusting of the system and its testing. Replacing of ring and studying the method of replacing piston after repair. 7. EE.II (MAINTENANCE LAB) Course Code: MTT 321 Course Contents: 1. Valve refacing and valve seat grinding and checking for leakage of valves Trouble shooting in cooling system of an automotive vehicle Trouble shooting in the ignition system.External Exam.Performance. 3. 2. 5.AUTOMOBILE ENGINEERING LAB . Trouble shooting in braking system with specific reference to master cylinder. setting of contact breaker points and spark plug gap Demonstration of steering system and measurement of steering geometry angles and their impact on vehicle performance. Fault diagnosis in transmission system including clutches. gear box assembly and differential.

Minutes Report Writing Module III: Business Presentations Planning. N. E mails. Circulars. Notices. Macmillan Raman Prakash.COMMUNICATION SKILLS . design and layout of presentation Information Packaging Audience analysis Audio visual aids Speaking with confidence Case Studies Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) CT1 20 CT2 20 CAF 25 V 10 GD 10 GP 10 A 5 CAF – Communication Assessment File GD – Group Discussion GP – Group Presentation Text & References: • • Krishnaswamy.office communication: Business Letter.III Course Code: MTT 341 Course Objective: Credit Units: 01 To initiate the learners with the basic mechanics of writing skills and facilitate them with the core skills required for communication in the professional world. Course Contents: Module I: Mechanics and Semantics of Sentences Writing effective sentences Style and Structure Module II: Developing writing skills Inter . Oxford. Netiquette Intra – office communication: Memos. Creative English for Communication. . Business Communication.

1992 Edition. Goal Analysis and Team Roles Module II: Team & Sociometry Patterns of Interaction in a Team Sociometry: Method of studying attractions and repulsions in groups Construction of sociogram for studying interpersonal relations in a Team Module III: Team Building Types and Development of Team Building Stages of team growth Team performance curve Profiling your Team: Internal & External Dynamics Team Strategies for organizational vision Team communication Module IV: Team Leadership & Conflict Management Leadership styles in organizations Self Authorized team leadership Causes of team conflict Conflict management strategies Stress and Coping in teams Module V: Global Teams and Universal Values Management by values Pragmatic spirituality in life and organization Building global teams through universal human values Learning based on project work on Scriptures like Ramayana.) Theories and Models in Applied Behavioural Science. Module VI: End-of-Semester Appraisal Viva based on personal journal Assessment of Behavioural change as a result of training Exit Level Rating by Self and Observer Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) SAP 20 A 05 Mid Term Test (CT) 20 VIVA 30 Journal for Success (JOS) 25 Text & References: • Organizational Behaviour.BEHAVIOURAL SCIENCE . 2002. Charles: Team Management. Pfeiffer & Company • Smither Robert D. viva books • J William Pfeiffer (ed. Group (1996). group Effective Team Mission and Vision Life Cycle of a Project Team Rationale of a Team. The Psychology of Work and Human Performance. Davis. Mc Cann & Margerison. Response Books (Sage).III (LEADING THROUGH TEAMS) Course Code: MTT 343 Course Objective: Credit Units: 01 This course aims to enable students to: Understand the concept and building of teams Manage conflict and stress within team Facilitate better team management and organizational effectiveness through universal human values.Harcourt College Publishers • LaFasto and Larson: When Teams Work Best. Effective Small Group and Team Communication. Course Contents: Module I: Teams: An Overview Team Design Features: team vs. Vol 2. New Delhi • Dick. Judhith D. Harper Collins College Publishers .. • Hoover. Gita etc. 2001. 1994. K. Mahabharata.

parler des différentes occasions de faire la fête Unité 7: Cultiver ses relations 1. décrire un objet (forme. 7. 3.III Course Code: MTT 344 Course Objective: Credit Units: 02 To provide the students with the know-how • To master the current social communication skills in oral and in written. ne…rien/personne/plus Questions avec combien.Je crois que/ Je pense que/ Je sais que Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) CT1 20 CT2 20 C 20 I 20 V 15 A 5 C – Project + Presentation I – Interaction/Conversation Practice Text & References: le livre à suivre: Campus: Tome 1 . Impératif avec un pronom complément direct ou indirect 10. quel… expressions de la quantité ne…plus/toujours . accord des adjectifs qualificatifs articles partitifs Négations avec de. deux façons d’exprimer la quantité. exprimer un souhait. the linguistic tools and vary the sentence construction without repetition. 89 to103 Unité 7 Contenu lexical: Unité 6: se faire plaisir 1. acheter: exprimer ses choix. 4. 6. 8. maîtriser les actes de la communication sociale courante (Salutations. 76 – 88 Unité 6 Module C: pp. caractériser une personne (aspect physique et caractère) Contenu grammatical: 1.encore pronoms compléments directs et indirects accord du participe passé (auxiliaire « avoir ») avec l’objet direct 9. poids et matières) payer 2. 2. s’excuser par écrit. Course Contents: Module B: pp. • To enrich the formulations.FRENCH . dimension. remercier. présentations. construction avec « que » . commander un repas au restaurant 3. 3. 5. invitations. remerciements) 2. annoncer un événement. parler de la nourriture.

Deutsche Sprachlehre für Ausländer P. At the Tourist Information Office. geography.L Aneja. Grundkurs . accusative and dative pronouns in comparison Module V: Dative prepositions Dative preposition with their usage both theoretical and figurative use Module VI: Dialogues In the Restaurant. Deutsch als Fremdsprache 1A. Sprachkurs Deutsch Schulz Griesbach. Schmöe. comparison with accusative case Dative case with the relevant articles Introduction to 3 different kinds of sentences – nominative. read and write in the language with the help of the basic rules of grammar. political situation and economic opportunities available in Germany Course Contents: Module I: Modal verbs Modal verbs with conjugations and usage Imparting the finer nuances of the language Module II: Information about Germany (ongoing) Information about Germany in the form of presentations or “Referat”– neighbors. To give the students an insight into the culture. 2 & 3 Rosa-Maria Dallapiazza et al. important cities and towns and characteristic features of the same. Deutsch Interessant. Module III: Dative case Dative case. A telephone conversation Module VII: Directions Names of the directions Asking and telling the directions with the help of a roadmap Module VIII: Conjunctions To assimilate the knowledge of the conjunctions learnt indirectly so far Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) CT1 20 CT2 20 C 20 I 20 V 15 A 5 C – Project + Presentation I – Interaction/Conversation Practice Text & References: • • • • • • Wolfgang Hieber. Tangram Aktuell A1/1. Nieder. which will later help them to strengthen their language.1. states and capitals.2 Braun.III Course Code: MTT 345 Course Objective: Credit Units: 02 To enable the students to converse. and also a few other topics related to Germany. Lernziel Deutsch Hans-Heinrich Wangler.GERMAN . accusative and dative Module IV: Dative personal pronouns Nominative.

En Directo I A Español Sin Fronteras -Nivel Elemental . Course Contents: Module I Revision of earlier semester modules Set expressions (idiomatic expressions) with the verb Tener.SPANISH – III Course Code: MTC 346 Course Objective: Credit Units: 02 To enable students acquire knowledge of the Set/definite expressions (idiomatic expressions) in Spanish language and to handle some Spanish situations with ease. English-Spanish. How to ask for directions (using estar) Introduction to IR + A + INFINITIVE FORM OF A VERB Module IV Simple conversation with help of texts and vocabulary En el restaurante En el instituto En el aeropuerto Module V Reflexives Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) CT1 20 CT2 20 C 20 I 20 V 15 A 5 C – Project + Presentation I – Interaction/Conversation Practice Text & References: • • Español. Weather Module II Introduction to Gustar…and all its forms. Revision of Gustar and usage of it Module III Translation of Spanish-English. Poner. Ir…. Practice sentences.

which help them at the time of placements. Learning Outcome   Students can speak the language and can describe themselves and situations effectively They also gain great knowledge in terms of Japanese lifestyle and culture. Methods of Private study /Self help   Handouts. and self-do assignments. possess. Usage in negative sentences as well. Note: The Japanese script is introduced in this semester.III Course Code: MTT 347 Course Objective: Credit Units: 02 To enable the students to converse in the language with the help of basic verbs and to express themselves effectively and narrate their everyday short encounters. formal and informal etc. audio-aids. Past continuous tense. Students are also given projects on Japan and Japanese culture to widen their horizon further. Module V: Comparison Comparative and Superlative degree Module VI: Wishes and desires Expressing desire to buy. Comparative degree. hold. Use of library. Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) CT1 20 CT2 20 C 20 I 20 V 15 A 5 C – Project + Presentation I – Interaction/Conversation Practice Text & References: Text: • Teach yourself Japanese References: • Shin Nihongo no kiso 1 . Course Contents: Module I: Verbs Different forms of verbs: present continuos verbs etc Module II More Adverbs and adverbial expressions Module III: Counters Learning to count different shaped objects. Module IV: Tenses Past tense. Superlative degree.JAPANESE . Module VII: Appointment Over phone. visiting and watching movies in Japan and culture center every Friday at 6pm.

in front. Module V Persuasion-Please don’t smoke. left.. bottom. inside. Grammar use of “li” and “cong”. the language of Mainland China. xibian. zhongjian. Please speak slowly Praise – This pictorial is very beautiful Opposites e. Examination Scheme: Components Weightage (%) CT1 20 CT2 20 C 20 I 20 V 15 A 5 . Character writing and stroke order Module II Measure words Position words e. Easy-Difficult. Description about class schedule during a week in school. middle. Talking about studies and classmates Use of “it doesn’t matter” Enquiring about a student. Traveling. by airplane. train. Going to the Park. Little-More. Bus. dongbian. Slow-Fast … etc. “keyi”. BigSmall. The course aims at training students in practical skills and nurturing them to interact with a Chinese person. by bus. right. stomach ache. by boat. top. boat. Comprehension reading followed by questions. Directional words – beibian.g. outside. The course aims at familiarizing the student with the basic aspects of speaking ability of Mandarin. on the bike.CHINESE – III Course Code: MTT 348 Course Objective: Credit Units: 02 Foreign words are usually imported by translating the concept into Chinese. Practice reading aloud Practice using the language both by speaking and by taking notes.g. cold. What game do you like? Difference between “hii” and “neng”.g. head ache. use of to enter to exit Structural particle “de” (Compliment of degree). mei tian. Old-New. Course Contents: Module I Drills Dialogue practice Observe picture and answer the question.g. behind. description about study method. Boy-Girl. by train. Not feeling well words e. the emphasis is on the meaning rather than the sound. Our school and its different building locations. Module IV The ordinal number “di” “Mei” the demonstrative pronoun e. bike etc. fever.g. Module III Changing affirmative sentences to negative ones and vice versa Human body parts. Black-White. Introduction of written characters. But the system runs into a problem because the underlying name of personal name is often obscure so they are almost always transcribed according to their pronciation alone. etc. straight. Clean-Dirty. mei nian etc. side. nanbian. car.. Young-Old. Grammar: Negation of a sentence with a verbal predicate. Use of the modal particle “le” Making a telephone call Use of “jiu” and “cal” (Grammar portion) Automobiles e.

C – Project + Presentation I – Interaction/Conversation Practice Text & References: • “Elementary Chinese Reader Part I. Part-2” Lesson 21-30 .

A report must be submitted to the school for evaluation purpose at the end of the semester in a specified format. Examination Scheme: Literature study/ Fabrication/ Experimentation Written Report Viva Presentation Total 40 20 15 25 100 .MINOR PROJECT Course Code: MTT 360 Credit Units: 02 The student will submit a synopsis at the beginning of the semester for the approval to the school project committee in a specified format. The student will have to present the progress of the work through seminars and progress report.

an exploratory study. In case of sponsored project the lay out of the project could be as prescribed by the sponsoring organization. It provides exposure to research methodology and an opportunity to work closely with a faculty guide. The project/ assignment may also be a part of the bigger research agenda being pursued by a faculty/ institution/ department The Project File is the principal means by which the work carried out will be assessed and therefore great care should be taken in its preparation. discuss and compare these with those from other workers. Year and Semester and Name of the Faculty Guide. procedures followed and precautions. Table of Contents Titles and subtitles are to correspond exactly with those in the text. taking into account that initial drafts should be critically analyzed by the faculty guide and corrected by the student at each stage. a variety of experimental techniques. It should not exceed more than 1000 words. rather than discuss in detail . Research is genuine exploration of the unknown that leads to new knowledge which often warrants publication. Student’s Name. In writing this section. so excessive details should be avoided. the File should be comprehensive and include: A short account of the activities that were undertaken as part of the project. Any activities planned but not yet completed as part of the project. Introduction Here a brief introduction to the problem that is central to the project and an outline of the structure of the rest of the report should be provided. PROJECT FILE The Project File may be a very useful tool for undertaking an assignment along-with a normal semester. Acknowledgement(s) Acknowledgment to any advisory or financial assistance received in the course of work may be given. The abstract does not have to be an entire summary of the project. PROJECT REPORT The Project Report is the final research report that the student prepares on the project assigned to him. Abstract A good "Abstract" should be straight to the point. The introduction should aim to catch the imagination of the reader. Any problems that have arisen and may be useful to document for future reference. But whether or not the results of a research project are publishable. It includes organization site(s). A statement about the outcomes of the evaluation and dissemination processes engaged in as part of the project. instruments used with its validation. Methodology should be mentioned in details including modifications undertaken. a project undertaken during summer period or any other period where the researcher is not working with a company/organization. A statement about the extent to which the project has achieved its stated objectives. but rather a concise summary of the scope and results of the project. the project should be communicated in the form of a research report written by the student. sponsored projects. in other cases the following components should be included in the project report: Title or Cover Page The title page should contain Project Title. etc. and state-of-the-art instrumentation. Programme.SUMMER PROJECT Course Code: MTT 361 Credit Units: 09 GUIDELINES FOR PROJECT FILE AND PROJECT REPORT Research experience is as close to a professional problem-solving activity as anything in the curriculum. It is incomplete without student’s signature. It usually requires the use of advanced concepts. not too descriptive but fully informative. emphasis should be laid on what has been performed and achieved in the course of the work. materials used (wherever applicable). This file may be considered in continuous assessment. However. Materials and Methods This section should aim at experimental designs. Sufficient time should be allowed for satisfactory completion of reports. First paragraph should state what was accomplished with regard to the objectives. if any. Results and Discussion Present results. sample. or as a future initiative directly resulting from the project. In general.

8 (suppl 1): 116–117. the technical merit of the project and the project execution. (2002) Antibacterial activity of Thai medicinal plants against enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157: H7. Clin Microbiol Infect. The Project should fulfill the following assessment objectives • • • • • Range of Research Methods used to obtain information Execution of Research Data Analysis (Analyze Quantitative/ Qualitative information) Quality Control Conclusions . Supawita T. numbered. Technical merit attempts to assess the quality and depth of the intellectual efforts put into the project.what is readily available in text books. Conclusion(s) & Recommendations A conclusion should be the final section in which the outcome of the work is mentioned briefly. Appendices The Appendices contain material which is of interest to the reader but not an integral part of the thesis and any problem that have arisen that may be useful to document for future reference. in the same orientation as the main text.M. it should lead to generalization of data on the chosen sample. Results and its discussion should be supporting/contradicting with the previous research work in the given area. the assessment will be based on the quality of the report. Avoid writing straight forward conclusion rather. Popaya W. abbreviations must comply with an internationally recognised system. books etc. all figures and tables should as far as possible be next to the associated text. if they are. referred to in the body of the report. An opening and closing paragraph in every chapter could be included to aid in smooth flow. write at length about the the various statistical tools used in the data interpretation. Usually one should not use more than two researches in either case of supporing or contradicting the present case of research. This data interpretation should be in congruence with the written objectives and the inferences should be drawn on data and not on impression.(1976) Transduction of effectiveness in Rhizobium meliloti. Examples For research article Voravuthikunchai SP.5 • Top and bottom margins: 1 inch/ 2. 7: 63-67 The Layout Guidelines for the Project File & Project Report • A4 size Paper • Font: Arial (10 points) or Times New Roman (12 points) • Line spacing: 1. Pongpaichit S. Ninrprom T. The result interpretation should be simple but full of data and statistical analysis. Lortheeranuwat A.5 cm. Avoid abrupt changes in contents from section to section and maintain a lucid flow throughout the thesis. References References should include papers. Note that in writing the various secions. All major equations should also be numbered and unless it is really necessary. These should be written in the alphabetical order of the author's surname. SYMBIOTIC NITROGEN FIXATION PLANTS (editor P. and given appropriate titles or captions. While presenting the results.S. The titles of journals preferably should not be abbreviated.25 inches/ 3 cm ASSESSMENT OF THE PROJECT FILE AND THE PROJECT REPORT Essentially. Project execution is concerned with assessing how much work has been put in. For book Kowalski. Nutman IBP). left and right margins: 1. do not write in “point” form. Check that your work answers the following questions: • Did the research project meet its aims (check back to introduction for stated aims)? • What are the main findings of the research? • Are there any recommendations? • Do you have any conclusion on the research process itself? Implications for Future Research This should bring out further prospects for the study either thrown open by the present work or with the purpose of making it more comprehensive.

regularity of work. as reflected in the Project File. presentation/ viva) . achievement of objectives. analysis and results. refinements/ mid-course corrections etc.) Final Evaluation: 60% (Based on the Documentation in the file. Final report layout. adherence to plan and methodology.Assessment Scheme: Continuous Evaluation: 40% (Based on punctuality.

• In many ways. defined broadly. • Establishing the precise focus of your study by deciding on the aims and objectives of the dissertation. • related to one or more of the subjects or areas of study within the core program and specialisation stream. • The writing of a plan is the first formal stage of the writing process. • It provides your faculty-guide with an opportunity. and perhaps. Dissertation Seminar & Progress Report Comprehensive Viva Credit Units: 30 The aim of the dissertation is to provide you with an opportunity to further your intellectual and personal development in your chosen field by undertaking a significant practical unit of activity. Normally we would expect it to be: • relevant to business. leading to production of a structured report. Selecting the Dissertation Topic It is usual to give you some discretion in the choice of topic for the dissertation and the approach to be adopted. the dissertation plan is an outline of what you intend to do. The timetable should include writing of the dissertation and regular meetings with your dissertation guide. at an early stage of your work. The title may not be decided until the dissertation has been written so as to reflect its content properly. • of value and interest to you and your personal and professional development. There are several reasons for having a dissertation plan • It provides a focus to your thoughts. chapter wise and therefore should reflect the aims and objectives of your dissertation. the dissertation plan generally provides a revision point in the development of your dissertation report in order to allow appropriate changes in the scope and even direction of your work as it progresses. involving a systematic approach to gathering and analysis of information / data. Planning the Dissertation This will entail following: • Selecting a topic for investigation. Few restrictions are placed on the choice of the topic. Consider very carefully what is worth investigating and its feasibility. Workout various stages of dissertation • Devising a timetable to ensure that all stages of dissertation are completed in time. Deciding this is often the most difficult part of the dissertation process. thinking and writing in a systematic and integrated way. having an educational value at a level commensurate with the award of your degree The dissertation can be defined as a scholarly inquiry into a problem or issues. • Finally. and therefore helps build up your confidence. subject to the availability of adequate sources of information and to your own knowledge. The topic is the specific area that you wish to investigate. to make constructive comments and help guide the direction of your research. 2.DISSERTATION Course Code: MTT 455 1. • clearly focused so as to facilitate an in-depth approach. The Dissertation plan or outline It is recommended that you should have a dissertation plan to guide you right from the outset. Essentially. 3. or formulating questions to be investigated. Keeping records This includes the following: . the plan encourages you to come to terms with the reading. • Drawing up initial dissertation outlines considering the aims and objectives of the dissertation. You will need to ensure that your dissertation is related to your field of specialization. with plenty of time left for changes. you have been thinking of a topic for some time. It is important to distinguish here between ‘dissertation topic’ and ‘dissertation title’.

Making an accurate note of all quotations at the time you read them. Has the student developed an appropriate analytical framework for addressing the problem at hand. you should give any appendices. pp 791-832. Nov. Is this based on up-to-date developments in the topic area? 5.) Final Evaluation: Based on. on a critical review of the previous relevant work relating to your major findings. 1996. Assessment Scheme: Continuous Evaluation: (Based on Abstract.• Making a note of everything you read. do these constitute parts of a whole? 3. No6. These should be cross . Adherence to initial plan. Do the conclusions relate well to the objectives of the project? 9. title. • Ensuring that when recording sources. graphs and tables giving titles and page references. the following details are required e.g.5 cm. date of publication. For books. Has the student been regular in his work? 10. author. • Front page should provide title. place of publication and publisher are included. Dissertation format All students must follow the following rules in submitting their dissertation. If there is more than one objective. left and right margins: 1. 4. giving the background to the dissertation. These should only include relevant statistical data or material that cannot be fitted into the above categories. • Second page should be the table of contents giving page references for each chapter and section. Contents & Layout of the Report. Draper P and Pandyal K. (You may consider starting a card index or database from the outset). For articles from journals. • Other chapters will constitute the body of the dissertation. Regularity. New York. Name of degree/diploma and the date of submission.references with your text. Has the student made a clear statement of the objective or objective(s). faculty guide will consider the following aspects: 1. The Layout Guidelines for the Dissertation • A4 size Paper • Font: Arial (10 points) or Times New Roman (12 points) • Line spacing: 1. 3rd Ed. • Next to follow should be a synopsis or abstract of the dissertation (approximately 500 words) • Next is the ‘acknowledgements’. a discussion of their implications. • Chapter I should be a general introduction. Layout of the written report. and conclusions. The number of chapters and their sequence will usually vary depending on. • After this concluding chapter. Vol18. Prentice Hall. among others. M. 2. the plan. Objectives & Methodology and Implications & Conclusions Viva & Presentation 20 05 05 10 20 40% 60% . Records etc. the following details are required: Levi. Journal of Business Finance and Accounting. • The next page should be the table of appendices. • Make clear what is a direct a direct quotation and what is your paraphrase. the rationale for the dissertation. author’s name and initials. The limitations of the dissertation should also be hinted in this chapter. methodological issues and problems. The Investment Trust Discount Revisited. Has the student collected information / data suitable to the frameworks? 6. Conceptual Framework. 1996 • Finally. International Financial Management. 1991.5 • Top and bottom margins: 1 inch/ 2. possibly with a suggestion of the direction of future research on the area. the objectives of the dissertation. Has the student succeeded in drawing conclusion form the analysis? 8. Are the techniques employed by the student to analyse the data / information appropriate and relevant? 7.25 inches/ 3 cm Guidelines for the assessment of the Dissertation While evaluating the dissertation. including those discarded. you should give a list of all the references you have used.

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