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New tower rises. Eleven years after terrorists attacked the World Trade Center, the new multi-
billion-dollar World Trade Center once again dominates the lower Manhattan skyline. Hundreds of
construction workers are at the 6.5-hectare site every day, and tourists snap thousands of photos of
the two towers that are nearing completion. But all that magnificence comes with a jaw-dropping
price tag: The foundation that runs the memorial estimates that once the roughly $700 million project
is complete, the memorial and museum will together cost $60 million a year to operate. AP
Surigao culture. Dancers in colorful costumes showcase Surigao’s rich cultural heritage during the
Bonok-Bonok Maradjaw Karadjaw Festival. The name of the festival means heavy rain, which will ensure a
bountiful harvest of fruit and crops. TEDDY PELAEZ
HANDS
OFF ON
POLL
FRAUD
JBC starts
accepting
nominees
for justice
Palace: No
plan to shift
strategy on
Shoal issue
Smuggled rice worth
P200m seized in Bicol
Illegal mining sparks
violence in Zamboanga
House urged to take new tack on RH bill
Malacañang: Puno not
untouchable, above law
Puno’s Glock pistols part
of unauthorized imports
TODAY
www.manilastandardtoday.com • mst@mstandardtoday.com
Standard
Manila
Vol. XXVI No. 178 12 Pages, 2 Sections
P18.00 Tuesday, September 11, 2012
LPA may enter PH
AN ACTIVE low-pressure area
could enter the Philippines Monday
night or onTuesday, the weather bu-
reau said Monday.
Weather forecaster Bernie de
Leon could not say as of Monday
night what areas would be affected
by the weather disturbance, but he
said tit would continue to bring rain
to the Visayas and Mindanao.
By Sara D. Fabunan
THE Palace on Monday said
President Benigno Aquino III’s
defense of his close friend and
shooting buddy, Interior Under-
secretary Rico Puno, did not mean
he was above the law.
“He’s not untouchable. Nobody
is untouchable in this administra-
tion,” said presidential spokes-
man Edwin Lacierda, referring
to Puno, who was removed from
the Department of the Interior and
Local Government in the wake of
several controversies.
Before leaving Russia Sunday,
the President said Puno was pre-
sumed innocent unless proven
otherwise, and defended his ac-
tions on two gun contracts for the
Philippine National Police.
He also said he would offer
Puno another position outside
the department, and replace him
with National Police chief Nica-
nor Bartolome.
“The President is fair in all
his dealings with members of
the official Cabinet,” Lacierda
said, adding that Mr. Aquino
gave no special treatment to
his closest friends.
Over the weekend, Mr. Aquino
said he was the one who instruct-
ed Puno to secure the office of
the late Secretary Jesse Robredo
a day after he died in a plane
crash in Masbate. The statement
seemed aimed at dispelling specu-
lation that Puno had tried to break
By Joel E. Zurbano
THE Coast Guard said Monday it
had seized a cargo vessel loaded
with P200 million worth of smug-
gled Vietnamese rice in Bicol.
Coast Guard Bicol district
commander Joel Garcia said
his group intercepted the ship
following an intelligence report
that the Vietnamese vessel M/V
Minh Tuan 68, which arrived in
the country on Sept. 2, was re-
ported illegally transporting rice
into the country.
Based on the cargo manifest,
the Vietnamese ship was carry-
ing 4,700 metric tons of rice that
Commodore Garcia had esti-
mated to be worth between P180
million and P200 million.
“The Coast Guard has been
providing security in order not
to allow the vessel to unload the
rice since the ship captain failed
to present an import permit docu-
ment from the Department of Ag-
riculture,” Garcia said.
By Maricel V. Cruz
THE violence wracking Zam-
boanga del Sur that has been at-
tributed to illegal mining and the
reports of economic losses as
a result of gold smuggling has
prompted House leaders to seek
an inquiry into the problem in aid
of legislation.
Agham party-list Rep. Angelo
Palmones, Ifugao Rep. Teddy
Brawner Baguilat Jr., and House
Assistant Majority Leader and
party-list Rep. Sherwin Tugna
underscored the need to look into
the illegal mining operations in
Zamboanga del Sur and other
gold-producing areas and the
smuggling of the mined gold out
of the country.
Palmones said he was fil-
ing a resolution on the issue as
he stressed his full support for
the struggle against illegal min-
ing, and in particular the struggle
against illegal mining of Subanon
By Rey E. Requejo
THE Judicial and Bar Coun-
cil has started accepting
nominations and applica-
tions for the post of associ-
ate justice of the Supreme
Court, which was left vacant
following the appointment
of Associate Justice Maria
Lourdes Sereno as the coun-
try’s 24th chief justice.
The eight-member council
will accept nominations and
applications for the post until
Sept. 17, after which it will
interview the nominees and
applicants.
President Benigno Aquino
III will have 90 days, or until
Nov. 22, to appoint Sereno’s
successor to complete the Su-
preme Court’s membership of
15 justices.
The next associate justice will
automatically be assigned to the
Supreme Court’s third division.
The Court conducts sessions as a
By Sara D. Fabunan
A MALACANANG official
said Monday that President
Benigno Aquino III’s failure
to hold bilateral talks with
Chinese president Hu Jintao
during the Asia-Pacific Eco-
nomic Cooperation Summit
in Vladivostok would not
deter the government from
sticking to its stance on the
South China Sea issue.
Manila has been pushing
for a peaceful resolution of
the conflict on the disputed
islands through a multilateral
approach involving the mem-
ber-states of the Association
of Southeast Asian Nations or
through the application of the
Internatioonal Tribunal Law
of the Sea or Itlos.
Presidential spokesman
Edwin Lacierda said, howev-
er, that the conflict on the Pa-
natag or Scarborough Shoal
was not the “sole or end-all
and be-all of the Philippine’s
diplomatic relations with
China.”
By Maricel V. Cruz
A PROPONENT of the controver-
sial Reproductive Health bill on
Monday asked the leaders of the
House of Representatives to draw
up a strategy that will stop the at-
tempts of the bill’s opponents to
further delay its passage.
Gabriela Rep. Luzviminda
Ilagan, one of the co-authors of
House Bill 4244 or the Respon-
sible Parenthood, Reproduc-
tive Health and Population and
Development Act of 2011, said
Congress should muster the po-
litical will to pass the measure.
“The leadership of the House
should do something about those
who are unnecessarily blocking
WEATHER
US, Austria probing
gun shipment to PH
Next page
Next page
Story on A3
“We may have a case here
of gun smuggling that is au-
thorized and legitimized by
the Philippine government be-
cause Trust Trade and Glock
Asia Pacific could not have
imported the pistols without
the purchase order and author-
ity to import signed by Philip-
pine authorities, yet the 28,000
handguns are already here,”
Palmones said.
Palmones chided Interior
Undersecretary Rico Puno,
who was recently relieved, and
National Police chief Nica-
nor Bartolomen for not doing
“serious due diligence” on the
winning bidder, Trust Trade,
when intelligence reports
about the company had been
sent to them.
Bartolome issued the notice
of award to Trust Trade, which
sold the Glock caliber 9 mm
pistol at P16,659.94 each for a
total cost of P997.99 million.
The P1-billion midnight con-
tract was awarded on Aug. 31,
Next page
Next page
Next page
Next page
Next page
Next page
Sereno told:
Next page
P2t budget
presented;
unitemized
funds hit
By Christine Herrera
and Maricel V. Cruz
THE majority party in the
House of Representatives
presented for approval on
Monday the P2.006 trillion
national budget for 2013,
which include P317 billion
“lump sum” appropriation
known as Special Purpose
Fund, party officials said.
“The proposed budget is a
crucial step in our continuing
pursuit of good governance,”
said Cavite Rep. Joseph Aba-
ya, chairman of the House
committee on Appropriations.
But former National Trea-
surer and Social Watch Phil-
ippines convenor Leonor Bri-
ones warned that the special
fund was created to allow the
president to “advance, with-
hold or transfer funds.”
By Christine F. Herrera
THE US State Department and the
government of Austria are investi-
gating the shipment of Glock pistols
to the Philippines, including 28,000
units that arrived in Manila on Sept. 4,
Agham Rep. Angelo Palmones re-
vealed Monday.
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News
ManilaStandardToday mst.daydesk@gmail.com SEPTEMBER 11, 2012 TUESDAY
A2
Customs’ donation. Customs Commissioner Ruffy Biazon shows off 506 bicycles from Japan at
the Bureau of Customs’ warehouse in Manila that he will donate to the Department of Education in
Muntinlupa City. Customs agents seized the smuggled bicycles at the Port of Manila in 2005.
Illegal...
chieftain Timuay Manda. Manda
was ambushed by armed menin
Bayog, Zamboanga del Sur, on
Tuesday, and though he survived
the attack his 11-year- old son
Jordan was killed.
On Saturday, Zamboanga po-
lice arrested two suspects Man-
da’s ambush, and they were said
to be members of AK 76, the se-
curity agency of an illegal mining
operation identified as Lupa Pi-
gigepawan.
Last year, Manda and a co-
complainant filed a case against
Jun Alcorin of Lupa Pigigetawan
and its security guards under AY
76 for grave threats. His co-com-
plainant, Kagawad Rosendo Am-
bucay, was shot dead last year.
Manda had openly declared
that he was against illegal mining
because he was a government of-
ficial who must uphold the law.
Palmones said Lupa Pigige-
wan’s mining operations were
declared illegal by Justice Sec-
retary Leila De Lima in Septem-
ber last year, and that the coming
congressional proble would dig
deeply into the case.
“Our [indigenous peoples] are
always the first victims of abuses
and blatant opportunism by ille-
gal mining operators and unscru-
pulous businessmen,” he said.
“Their lives are threatened,
they suffer serious displacement
by illegal mining operations, they
suffer destruction of their envi-
ronment and the debasement of
their culture.”
Baguilat, chairman of the House
committee on cultural communi-
ties, also rallied behind Manda’s
campaign against illegal mining.
“I support the call of Timuay
Manda to immediately stop all ille-
gal mining activities in Bayog, Zam-
boanga del Sur, and dismantle the
armed groups being used by these
illegal mining operators,” he said. He
said illegal miners were also thriving
in Diwalwal, Compostela Valley and
other parts of the country.
Palmones said the police and
the military should intensify their
campaign against illegal mining
and illegal logging.
“The PNP and the military must be
the champions of the rights of indige-
nous peoples and not act as protectors
of illegal mining operators,” he said.
Tugna said the government
must intensify its campaign
against illegal mining.
“The [Interior Department]
through the [National Police]
should summon its forces and
meet with the governor, mayor of
Bayog to address the issues im-
mediately,” he said.
House...
the measure,” Ilagan told the
Manila Standard.
She said the House should set
a definite timetable on the pas-
sage of the highly divisive bill
to stop the bill’s opponents from
further delaying its passage.
The House officially ended
the debates on the measure last
month and was scheduled to
go into the period of amend-
ments. But anti-RH lawmakers,
mostly from the majority party,
sidetracked the bill by deliver-
ing long privilege speeches on
other issues.
At the Senate, the counterpart
measure has met the same fate.
The measure is yet to go through
the period of amendments, which
can go on indefinitely.
Over the weekend, Speaker
Feliciano Belmonte Jr. played
down the possibility of holding
a special session devoted solely
on the discussion of the RH bill,
saying setting a quorum would
be a problem.
Belmonte said the House would
proceed to its congressional break
on Sept. 21 as scheduled.
“I don’t think it is ideal for us to
hold a special session for the RH
measure. We will take the break
as scheduled,” Belmonte said.
House Majority Leader and
Mandaluyong Rep. Neptali
Gonzales, an RH supporter, said
the holding of a special session
was an “exercise in futility.”
“It’s really difficult for us to
hold a special session. Most
likely there will be no quorum,”
Gonzales said.
He said the proponents of the
RH bill would not yield to the re-
quest of the bill’s critics to scrap
the provisions on the promotion
and funding of contraceptives
such as pills and condoms.
“That is the heart of the mea-
sure. You can’t take that away,”
said Gonzales who vowed to con-
tinue with the deliberations on the
original version of the RH bill if
the Catholic Church decided to
reject the compromise version.
Gonzales said he remained
hopeful that there would be a
breakthrough on the RH mea-
sure during the congressional
break this September through
the proposed meeting of all
stakeholders aimed at ironing
out their differences for the final
version of the bill.
Smuggled...
He said the ship was not al-
lowed to dock in Legaspi, Al-
bay, and that it remained in the
anchorage area.
There reportedly were 16
crewmen on board, all of them
Vietnamese.
“The Vietnamese ship M/V
Minh Tuan came from Ho Chi
Minh. The shipper is a Viet-
namese company,” Garcia said.
“The consignees are one from
Palawan, one from Bulacan and
one from Pampanga, so why
are they going to Albay? Why
did they not directly go to these
provinces where the consignees
are located?”
Coast Guard and Customs of-
ficials in Legaspi boarded the
ship on the night of Sept. 7.
They later asked the customs
broker to appear, but up un-
til Sept. 10 the broker had not
shown up.
“If the customs broker can-
not submit the document, the
Customs will issue a warrant
of seizure and detention. The
Coast Guard and the Customs
will implement it and once we
have seized [the rice], we will
conduct an inventory,” Garcia
said.
Palace...
He said the government re-
mained hopeful that the Philip-
pines could continue to foster
cordial relations with Beijing.
“We are continuing with our
diplomatic relations. We have
certain issues that we need to dis-
cuss, but it doesn’t stop us from
fostering relations with them,”
Lacierda said.
“As we have always stated, we
have several levels of relations
with China, so that should not be
a hindrance to us--to both China
and the Philippines. We continue
to relate with China on several
levels. And, as we have stated,
Scarborough is not the sole or
end-all and be-all of our diplo-
matic relations with China.”
The President said over the
weekend that his administration
was proceeding slowly on its plan
to bring the dispute before the Itlos.
“Take the President’s state-
ment as it is. We are cautious…
the position taken by the Philip-
pine government, based on [the]
advice provided by the lawyers
and also by [Foreign Affairs],”
Lacierda said.
Foreign Affairs Secretary Al-
bert del Rosario said during a
recent visit to Beijing to check
on Ambassador Sonia Brady’s
condition after meeting Chinese
Foreign Minister Yang Jeichi that
Manila was considering to accept
China’s proposal of bilateral talks
between the two countries aimed
at easing the tension in in the
West Philippine Sea.
China has insisted on conduct-
ing bilateral talks with “relevant”
countries that have overlapping
claims on the South China Sea.
“We want to get back on track
in terms of pushing the major bi-
lateral agenda forward as we had
agreed,” Del Rosario said.
“I reminded him [Yang] that
this was a commitment that
both sides have made when our
President visited China, that we
would, in fact, move the bilateral
agenda forward while abstracting
the contentious issues and deal-
ing with that separately.”
Lacierda said that, during Del
Rosario’s visit to Beijing, Hu had
requested separate bilateral talks
with President Aquino.
But the proposed talks in the
Apec Summit failed to materialize
because both sides had “difficulty
finding a common schedule”.
“The real score was we had a
very tight schedule, especially
on the second day which was
the Leaders’ Retreat. After that
several meetings had followed,”
Lacierda said.
“I think both [Foreign Affairs]
and their counterparts were try-
ing to find a common schedule
for them. But they were not able
to do it.
“We weren’t the ones who
asked for the meeting. Just to be
clear, it was they [through Yang]
who asked for the meeting when
Secretary Del Rosario went to
Beijing to visit Ambassador
Brady.
JBC...
full court and in three divisions of
five justices each.
Meanwhile, the JBC has vowed
to review its policies and pro-
cesses in several areas, possibly
including the psychiatric evalua-
tion being made on candidates for
justices in the Supreme Court.
“It was mentioned that it [psy-
chological evaluation] would be
reviewed by the JBC executive
committee,” Senator Francis
Escudero,an ex-officio member
of the council, said in an inter-
view.
“But the JBC executive com-
mittee will also be having a
seminar, a retreat in order to
talk about all of these with the
advent of the appointment of
the new chairman. It is just right
that these [policies] should be
reviewed.”
Escudero said said the review
was normal and that it happened
every time a new chief justice
was appointed. He said even the
council’s budget and policies
were being reviewed.
Sereno was appointed chief
justice on Aug. 24, replacing
Chief Justice Renato Corona
who was impeached on May
29 for not revealing all his as-
sets. She will automatically sit
as the ex-officio chairman of the
council.
Escudero rejected the percep-
tions the psychological test was
a basis for disqualifying a candi-
date for chief justice. not a gauge
to disqualify a justice.
“That’s why there was no truth
to the report that Sereno was dis-
qualified because of the psycho
report,” he said.
He said the psychological test
was not being used to gauge an
applicant’s psychological status.
He said the council had de-
cided earlier to make the results
of the test confidential and used
only to guide the members of the
council.
Escudero said the council had
yet to decide whether to make
public the psychological test of
the applicants to the position of
chief justice since they were still
waiting for the Supreme Court’s
decision on the matter.
“We will cross the bridge when
we get there,” he said.
Malacañang....
into Robredo’s condominium to take docu-
ments related to a controversial gun deal that
was under investigation.
Lacierda also said that Justice Secretary
Leila de Lima had locked down Robredo’s
condominium on her own initiative and not
on orders by the President.
“Secretary Leila de Lima, remember, was
the one who texted the President on the need
to secure the office. I spoke to Secretary Leila
de Lima [to see] if she entered the [condo-
minium] office, and she said yes, she did on
her own initiative because of her concern for
the sensitive nature of the office of Secretary
Robredo,” Lacierda said.
He said it was “prudent” for the President to or-
der Puno, as undersecretary, to secure Robredo’s
office and to make sure nothing was touched.
Earlier, De Lima was quoted in reports as
saying Mr. Aquino had ordered her to seal Ro-
bredo’s office.
But Lacierda said this was not so.
“She was not instructed by the President to
go, as far as I know. That is what she told me.
It’s her own initiative,” Lacierda said.
De Lima said Monday that Robredo’s office
had “vital documents” pertinent to his investi-
gation of a number of cases in the DILG, but
declined to give any details.
She recalled reminding President Aquino
that the crucial documents were with Robredo
and that these needed to be secured.
In a forum Monday, Senate President Juan
Ponce Enrile said he saw nothing irregular in
Puno’s visit to Robredo’s office.
“I don’t think Puno went there to rob the
condo, but to retrieve some records which be-
long to the department... He’s the No. 2 man of
the department. That’s his duty to see to it that
the records of the department are retrieved..,
especially [since] the head of the department
was dead,” said Enrile.
Enrile added that he did not believe Puno
would go to Robredo’s condominium unless
he was authorized to do so.
“He has a valid, legitimate and legal reason
to go there,” said Enrile, adding that the Presi-
dent had the right to see to it that state papers
must be safeguarded.
In the House, Agham Rep. Angelo Palmo-
nes again pressed Puno to resign and not ac-
cept any new government assignment.
Earlier, Palmones highlighted alleged irreg-
ularities in a P1-billion contract to buy 60,000
pistols that had been approved by Puno.
House Majority Leader and Mandaluyong
City Rep. Neptali Gonzales II, on the other hand,
said the President had the sole prerogative to de-
cide if Puno should remain in his Cabinet.
“The appointment is based on trust and con-
fidence,” Gonzales said. “It’s up to the Presi-
dent to make the decision.”
Zambales Rep. Milagros Magsaysay, an op-
position leader, said President Aquino should
stop protecting Puno and give newly desig-
nated DILG Secretary Manuel Roxas II a free
hand at the department.
“He must act accordingly and hold Puno
accountable for his actions,” Magsaysay said.
“Let him answer the questions and stop shel-
tering him from the controversy.”
Also on Monday, Bartolome said he was
inclined to heed the President’s suggestion to
retire early and take Puno’s place in the DILG.
“I will not comment for now. I have to wait
for the President because it is his prerogative and
I will wait for his final word,” Bartolome said.
He said he had spoken to the President ear-
lier and assured him that he was a team player.
With Macon Ramos-Araneta, Maricel Cruz,
Florante S. Solmerin and Rey E. Requejo
LPA ...
Parts of Southern Luzon will
have cloudy skies with scat-
tered rain showers and thunder-
storms, while Eastern Visayas
and Northeastern Mindanao
will have widespread rain.
Metro Manila and the rest of
the country will be partly cloudy
to cloudy with isolated rain
showers or thunderstorms in the
afternoon or evening on Tuesday.
The weather disturbance was
last seen 920 kilometers east of
Mindanao.
Moderate to strong winds
blowing from the southeast will
prevail over Northern Luzon,
where the seas will be rough.
Jonathan Fernandez
US...
on the same day that the newly
appointed secretary of the de-
partment, Manuel Roxas II, an-
nounced Puno’s reassignment,
Palmones said.
Citing intelligence reports on
the exchange of “sensitive in-
formation” between the Austrian
government and its embassy in
Manila and the US State Depart-
ment, Palmones said the Glock
Ges, m.b.h. of Austria stopped
exporting guns to the Philippines
due to corruption in the Philip-
pine National Police, particu-
larly through dealings with Trust
Trade.
Palmones said Trust Trade
had entered into a joint venture
with the Glock Asia Pacific,
but submitted the track record
of another Glock subsidiary,
Glock-Austria, to comply with
bid requirements.
Palmones said the Glock-
Austria had an assembly plant in
Smyrna, Georgia, that sold to US
law enforcement and domestic
retail customers.
He said the Austrian govern-
ment considered the pistols as-
sembled in Georgia as “Austrian
products” and that their re-export
to the US was not authorized.
The Glock-Austria, through
Trust Trade, had stopped export-
ing weapons to the Philippines
after the Austrian government
found that Trust Trade was in-
volved in “large scale and whole-
sale diversion of pistols nominal-
ly intended for the police forces
in the Philippines.”
“The Austrian government
said Trust Trade has routinely
falsified police certificates as the
basis for importing large num-
bers of Glock handguns, which
it then diverts to the private mar-
ket. It said the certificates appear
authentic as these were obtained
via collusion from police of-
ficials, but in the end, the PNP
would simply say they did not
want the Glock and these would
then be sold to the black market
with Trust Trade simply remov-
ing the serial numbers assigned
to the PNP,” Palmones said.
“We noted that the general
representative of Glock in the
Philippines, the company Trust
Trade-Manila, falsified thou-
sands of police IDs [obtained via
collusion from police officials]
and sold the pistols in the black
market,” Palmones said, quoting
the intelligence report.
“Due to this fact and an ex-
tremely negative report of the
Austrian Embassy, Manila on the
corruption situation in the Philip-
pines, Austria completely stopped
weapon shipments to the country
and in particular to Trust Trade,”
the Austrian government said.
“The Government of Austria
now considers all export transac-
tions to Trust Trade to be bogus,”
Palmones quoted the exchange
of cables and intelligence reports.
Peter Go Cheng of Kolonwel
Trading, a losing bidder, said he
objected to Trust Trade’s entry
into the bidding but said he was
ignored.
The Glock-Austria was nei-
ther a bidder nor a partner in the
joint venture of Trust Trade and
Glock-Asia Pacific, Cheng said.
Citing intelligence reports,
Palmones said the Glocks are as-
sembled in the US but the Austrian
government has a standing condi-
tion that the pistols are only for do-
mestic use in the United States, and
that Glock-USA is barred from re-
exporting them to other countries,
including the Philippines.
Palmones said Puno and Bar-
tolome were made aware of the
standing ban of the US and Aus-
tria to export Glocks to the Phil-
ippines but the two officials still
went ahead with the deal with
Trust Trade.
“Had Puno and Bartolome
done their due diligence, they
would have found out that Trust
Trade had been involved in
anomalous transactions in the
past in collusion with PNP offi-
cials,’’ Palmones said
With Macon Ramos-Araneta
and Maricel Cruz
P2t...
“In 2008, the Liberals made it
an issue that the previous govern-
ment released funds more than
the amount appropriated under
the lump sum appropriation. The
same policy is being done now
and this is more dangerous be-
cause it is an election year,” Brio-
nes said.
The Liberal Party of President
Aquino has overwhelming major-
ity in the 284-member assembly.
The minority block has only 28
members.
After the period of interpella-
tions, the assembly was expected
to pass the budget on second read-
ing on Friday. The P2.006 trillion
proposed budget is almost double
than the P1.816 trillion budget
this year.
Abaya said that out of the P317
billion Special Purpose Fund a to-
tal of P22.4 billion was allocated
“to the discretion of the presi-
dent,” and members of the minor-
ity expressed concern that it could
be used as an election fund.
“This government is saying
one thing and is doing another.
The SPF is the same as lump sum
appropriations under the previous
governments,” Briones said.
“The Liberal Party had made
the lump sum appropriations an
issue before and demanded that
these be itemized. But they are
doing the same thing now,” she
said.
Abaya told reporters the SPF
was “temporary housing” for
budget items of various depart-
ments that have yet to flesh out
their various projects and were
given one month to provide the
details.
But Briones said all items un-
der the SPF fall under the sole dis-
cretion of the president, which is
on top of another P117.54 billion
unprogrammed funds.
“The SPF is a special fund
created under the constitutional
provisions with all items subject
to the approval of the President,”
Briones said.
“The government should dis-
close the details of where the SPF
funds would go because there
seems to be duplications of these
allocations in other budget items,”
she said.
Briones questioned, for ex-
ample, the P44 billion Budgetary
Support to Government Corpora-
tions under the SPF, which was a
duplication of the P16.82 billion
Budgetary Support to GOCCs
and P60.86 billion in Debt Man-
agement Program, both under the
unporgrammed funds.
SEPTEMBER 11, 2012 TUESDAY
A3 News
ManilaStandardToday mst.daydesk@gmail.com
CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK
Hands off on poll fraud, Sereno told
IN BRIEF
Skewed
tax rate
opposed
VLADIVOSTOK (via PLDT)—President Benigno
Aquino III said Movie and Television Review and
Classification Board chairperson Grace Poe Llaman-
zares has joined the senatorial slate of the Liberal Party
for the 2013 polls.
“She is already in the ticket,” the president said
before returning to Manila on Sunday evening after
attending the 20
th
Asia Pacific Economic Coopera-
tion summit here in Russky Island.
Llamanzares is the daughter of the late actor
and National Artist Fernando Poe Jr.
Llamanzares was also being courted by the
United Nationalist Alliance for its own senatorial
line-up, but she chose to join the administration
coalition instead. Joyce Pangco Pañares
REPUBLIC OF THE PHILIPPINES
COMMISSION ON APPOINTMENTS
A N N O U N C E M E N T
(MST-Sept. 11, 2012)
President Benigno S. Aquino III has submitted to the
Commission on Appointments (C.A.) for confrmation the
nominations of the following offcials:
Cabinet Secretaries
Hon. Manuel A. Roxas II – Secretary, Department
of Interior and Local Government and Hon. Joseph
Emilio A. Abaya – Department of Transportation
and Communications
The public may submit any information, written report
or sworn complaints or oppositions in forty (40) copies
on the above nominations to the CA Secretariat, 6
th
Floor,
PNB Financial Center, Roxas Boulevard, Pasay City,
Metro Manila.
For the schedule of the public hearings, the CA
Secretariat can be reached through telephone numbers
551-7532, 831-0893, 831-1824, 834-2706, 831-1566 and
834-2713.
10 September 2012.

ARTURO L. TIU
Secretary
This time, the inhibition
was sought in connection with
the case questioning the con-
stitutionality of the Joint De-
partment of Justice-Commis-
sion on Election Investigative
and Preliminary Investigation
Panel, which filed charges of
electoral sabotage against for-
mer President and now Pam-
panga Rep. Gloria Macapagal
Arroyo.
The electoral fraud case re-
sulted in the arrest and deten-
tion of Mrs. Arroyo for more
than eight months until she was
released on bail by the Pasay
City regional trial court. Mr.
Arroyo is a co-accused in the
electoral fraud case.
Lawyer Ferdinand Topacio
said that if the high court rules
in favor of the Arroyos, all
charges of electoral sabotage
against the former president
will be dismissed, and the war-
rant for her arrest immediately
dissolved.
In a motion filed by Topacio
and co-counsel Joselito Lo-
mangaya, Mr. Arroyo claimed
that during the oral arguments
before the Supreme Court en
banc, Sereno—then an Asso-
ciate Justice—made “obvious
and palpable efforts to prac-
tically coach the Solicitor-
General as to what to state in
his Memorandum, including
jurisprudence, to bolster the
government’s chances of a fa-
vorable ruling.”
The motion also alleged that
“(t)he Chief Justice’s solicitude
towards the Solicitor-General
cannot be ignored,” he said.
The former first gentleman also
took the Chief Justice to task for
what he termed as “the CJ’s ab-
normal interest in the purported
‘escape’ of former President Ar-
royo; in fact, her use of the word
“escape” immediately betrays
her bias and slant.”
Mr. Arroyo said that “all of
these acts and circumstances,
when added up, weave a tapes-
try of prejudice and unfairness
that may only be ignored at
the peril of trenching upon the
Petitioner’s constitutionally-
guaranteed rights of due pro-
cess and an impartial judge and
tribunal.”
In seeking the inhibition of
Sereno, Mr. Arroyo pointed out
that “rightly or wrongly, there
is the perception—being culti-
vated by Palace spokesmen no
less—that the incarceration and
continued prosecution of Mrs.
Arroyo on an electoral sabo-
tage indictment is the lynchpin
of the current administration’s
self-declared crusade for good
governance, and a matter of
pride and ‘face’ for the incum-
bent President.
Hence, if the Joint Panel is
struck down, the sitting President
will be embarrassed and his po-
litical stock diminished, Mr. Ar-
royo said.
It is thus not far-fetched to
assume that Sereno will once
again come to the rescue of
President Cojuangco-Aquino
III by voting in favor of the
Joint Panel’s legality, Mr.
Arroyo said.
By Macon Araneta
SENATE President Juan Ponce
Enrile on Monday vowed to
block the “distorted nature” of
the cigarette tax increase being
pushed by the House of Rep-
resentatives and the govern-
ment’s finance sector.
Enrile however clarified that
he is not against measures to
generate additional revenues
for the government, but said he
cannot allow unreasonable and
unjust taxation.
“I am in favor of increasing
taxes, but it must be up to a rea-
sonable level to be determined
by us,” he told newsmen at
the regular “Kapihan sa Dia-
mond Hotel.” The government
proposed to increase by 700
percent the tax on low-priced
cigarette.
The lawmaker said taxes
must be equitable. “We can’t
tax the poor similar to the rich.
Their capacity to pay is so dif-
ferent,” he said. “So, let’s study
and come up with reasonable
measure that will not shock the
market, and the economy.”
Enrile said he had discussed
this matter with Senator Ralph
Recto, chairman of the senate
committee on way and means
who’s conducting public hear-
ing on the proposed measure to
re-structure excise tax on the
so-called “sin products.”
“He (Recto) said he is try-
ing to craft a tax measure that
will be fair to the government,
to the people and to those that
raise the golden egg,” he said.
Apart from the planned tax
hike, health issues have also
muddled the bill on cigarettes.
While health advocates have
blamed smoking as the No. 1
cause of lung cancer deaths in
the country, Dr. Tony Dans of
the UP College of Medicine
told senators that 60% of lung
cancer cases are caused by air
pollution.
While smoking is a major
cause of lung cancer, he said it
is air pollution which “should
be causing about 60% of the
lung cancer” cases.
WITH President Aquino setting in mo-
tion a crisis management manual, several
companies including the Manila North
Tollways Corp. of business titan Manuel
Pangilinan have also begun reactivating
their disaster control systems in the after-
math of the recent flooding, typhoons and
earthquakes that hit parts of the country
recently.
On Thursday before he left for the
Apec Summit in Vladivostok , Mr.
Aquino issued executive order No.
82 which activated the crisis manual,
a move that prompted the Pangilinan
group to follow suit.
One the group’s affiliates, the Manila
North Tollways Corporation- builder and
concessionaire of North Luzon Express-
way Corp.- drew up long-term preventive
measures to address flooding problems,
which were experienced recently at the
tollways.
MNTC president Rodrigo E. Franco dis-
closed that the higher rainfall intensity val-
ue brought by the prolonged and extensive
monsoon rains was a big factor.
DCCD Engineering Corporation
Engr. Ben Galang said that the return
period, a statistical measurement denot-
ing the average recurrence interval over
an extended period of time of the re-
cent floods, exceeded drainage design
parameters that follow standards of the
Department of Public Works and High-
ways.
“The recent floods reached up to 100 to
150-year return periods, far surpassing the
designed capacities of structures intended
to accommodate the floodwater, which
are 25-year return period for box culverts
and 50-year return period for bridges,” ex-
plained Galang.
For his part, MPTC president Ramon S.
Fernandez reiterated the commitment of
the company to look at both the short and
long-term effects of climate change in the
construction and operation of tollroads,
especially considering the impact on mo-
torists’ safety.
Some areas of NLEX were submerged
in floodwater resulting in hundreds of
stranded motorists. Affected areas were
the Balintawak Cloverleaf, the Valenzuela
Interchange, Meycauayan Interchange,
Marilao Interchange, Bocaue Interchange
and Burol Interchange.
As an immediate measure, Franco said
that MNTC would install more flood
monitoring devices along NLEX as an
early warning system about the water
level on the affected areas during heavy
rains.
“A detention tank will be built near
Balintawak Interchange,” Franco said. A
detention tank is a big artificial reservoir
of rainwater or flood. It is like a swim-
ming pool.
MNTC has planned major infrastruc-
ture building activities for roads in the
affected areas, which include elevating
roads and redesigning drainage structures.
Sara Fabunan
BASES Conversion and Development Authority
president and CEO Arnel Paciano Casanova addresses
the 500 participants of Subic Bay Maritime Confer-
ence and Exhibit held at the Subic Bay Exhibition
and Convention Center,
Subic Bay. In his speech,
Casanova emphasized
the role of BCDAin link-
ing former baselands in
Northern and Central
Luzon through infra-
structure development
such as the Subic-Clark-
Tarlac Expressway and
the development of the
airports in Clark Free-
port Zone and Poro
Point Free Port Zone. He
added that the successful conversion of the military
camps in Metro Manila, particularly Fort Bonifacio,
now Bonifacio Global City and part of Villamor Air
Base, now Newport City, and the former US military
facilities in Central and Northern Luzon have set the
trend to develop other business districts and modern
cities using BCDA’s business mode. He also men-
tioned the future plans of BCDAto develop a Green
and Smart City half the size of Metro Manila in Clark,
and a monorail that will link the Metro Rail Transit’s
(MRT) at EDSA-Guadalupe station all the way to the
Bonifacio Global City and the Ninoy Aquino Interna-
tional Airport Terminal III. The Subic Bay Maritime
Conference and Exhibit themed as “Subic Bay: Asia’s
Emerging Logistics and Investments Hub,” was a two-
day event aimed at looking at the advantages of Subic
as a vital investment area for local and international
shipping and logistics company.
SOME 264 Filipino workers from war-torn Syria are
expected to arrive today (Tuesday) at the NAIA ter-
minal 1 on board a Jordanian air chartered flight JAV
4371 at 11:55 P.M. courtesy of the International Or-
ganization for Migration, putting the total number of
repatriates to 2,404.
Foreign Affairs Secretary Albert F. del Rosario
said he expects more Filipinos to ask to be repa-
triated in the days to come.
The Philippine Embassy in Damascus led by
Chargé d’Affaires Nestor N. Padalhin led the prepa-
rations for the repatriation of the 264 Filipinos who
stayed in the Embassy’s halfway house while wait-
ing for their flight home. Eric B. Apolonio
THE Labor Department on Monday warned Fili-
pinos who are looking for jobs to be wary of fake
job offers being circulated through an e-mail
claiming that the United Nations Children’s Fund
(UNICEF) was hiring English teachers.
Labor Secretary Rosalinda Baldoz aired the warn-
ing following a POEA report about e-mails prolifer-
ating in the Internet inviting addresses to an English
training and employment opportunity with the UNI-
CEF. The invitation, however, comes with a fee.
“This is simply a scammer trying to pull a fast one
over first-time job hunters,” Baldoz said. Vito Barcelo
By Rey Requejo
THE camp of former First Gentleman
Jose Miguel Arroyo on Monday filed
another motion asking for the inhibition
of Chief Justice Maria Lourdes Sereno.
Poe’s daughter joins LP
Exodus from Syria
Beware of job scammers
Game changer: Infra build-up
Dentistry board chairman. Professional Regulatory Commission Chairman Teresita R. Manzala (seated, right) signs the
papers of Dr. Steve Mark Gan (left) as chairman of the Board of Dentistry at the PRC office in Manila. Rep. Ferdinand Martin
Romualdez of Leyte (standing, third from right) and PRC officials are on hand to witness the event.
Crisis manual: Tollways plan counter measures
ONLY 8-10 of every 100 students who enter basic
education could get to college, according to a study
on Philippine education.
This situation prompted the heads of state colleges
and universities to beg from benevolent groups and
individuals who have the heart for education.
In some cases, these heads of state colleges even re-
sort to fund-raising schemes courtesy of their faculty,
alumni and student bodies just to stay afloat – year
after year.
On this premise, San Juan City Rep. Joseph
Victor Ejercito has file House Bill 6465 propos-
ing that a portion of the funds generated by the
Philippine Amusement and Gaming Corporation
be utilized to bankroll the state universities and
colleges.
The bill is now under consideration by the House
committee on games and amusement, chaired by Ma-
nila Rep. Amado Bagatsing.
Meanwhile, the Commission on Higher Education
is conducting a graduate tracer study to assess the em-
ployability of college graduates.
The study seeks to determine if skills match jobs,
considering that the unemployment and underem-
ployment rates are among the highest in the Asian
region, according to Maricar Prudente, assistant
project leader. Maricel Cruz, Gigi David
CA Photofolio. The Commission on Appointments has launched a coffee-table book, CA Photofolio,
to mark its 25th anniversary. At the book launching are (from left) Photofolio Executive Editor/
Information and Planning Service Director Gerry R. Josue, Vice Chairman of the Commission Rep. Roilo
Golez and Secretary of the Commission Arturo L. Tiu. The book publication titled The Commission
on Appointments Journey: 25 Years of Pursuing the Mandate to Confirm, serves as a testimony to the
commission’s performance as a constitutional body mandated to consider the fitness and qualifications
of presidential nominees and appointees.
Pagcor funds eyed
for state colleges
Opinion Adelle Chua, Editor
ManilaStandardToday
mst.lettertotheeditor@gmail.com SEPTEMBER 11, 2012 TUESDAY
A4
WHO should the public believe?
On one hand, the spokesman
of the family of the late Interior
and Local Government Secretary
Jesse Robredo says that it was the
secretary’s wife who requested
Justice Secretary Leila de Lima
to secure Robredo’s offices and
condominium unit.
The request came after Mrs.
Leni Robredo was told that a
group of men had tried to gain
access to the home on the morning
of Aug. 19, the day after the crash
of the private plane carrying her
husband.
The group was led by Interior
Undersecretary Rico Puno.
As a result, De Lima personally
went to the condomium unit to
secure Robredo’s documents
beginning Aug. 20.
On the other hand, President
Benigno Aquino III—after
three days of silence—said it
was he who instructed Puno, on
the night of Aug. 18, to secure
Robredo’s offices. He issued
the order to Puno after De Lima
called him to “remind” him that
Robredo’s documents needed
securing.
When asked why Puno included
the residence in his “mission”
when the order was only for the
offices, Mr. Aquino’s lame reply
was that maybe Puno thought
there were more documents to
secure in the residence.
The President’s words and
actions boggle the mind.
Foremost, he knew that
Robredo had been investigating an
alleged anomalous procurement
of guns involving Puno. Why
send Puno himself to “secure”
documents that may be pertinent
to his own case?
Second, Mr. Aquino insists
that what was being investigated
was the process and not the
person. How is this possible?
There will be no process without
an actor.
Third, why does the President
take lightly the fact that Puno
went to the condominium when
the order was only for the
offices?
Fourth, why was he thinking
of documents on the evening of
the 18th—at a time when he was
supposedly leading the nation in
praying that Robredo had been
rescued somehow?
Fifth, why do the statements of
this supposedly honest President
conflict with the statements of
everybody else, including his
own Cabinet members and the
Robredo family?
Sixth, why does he still sound
tentative about Puno’s removal
from the DILG and his prospects
in the administration after it?
Mr. Aquino must not make the
mistake of simply transferring his
friend Puno to a less prominent
position in his team. This man
has created enough trouble for
him already.
We look forward to the Senate
investigation into the matter. In
the end, Filipinos do not care
that President Aquino and Puno’s
friendship go way back. We
care only that our leader is so
focused on being a good friend
that he forgets he should first be
a President.
First a friend
EDITORIAL
Measuring the hype
LAST week saw the latest Social Weather
Stations quarterly survey reward the
President with a net satisfaction rating of
+67 (gross of +77), the highest so far in his
administration. The news was music to
the ears of the administration, prompting
Palace spokesman Edwin Lacierda to
link it to a similar improvement in the
country’s global competitiveness rating
by the World Economic Forum.
The claim is far-fetched, of course.
The competitiveness ratings are a
composite of opinions on various topics
drawn from a wide range of respondent
organizations here and abroad, mostly
academic institutions, think tanks,
and NGOs. They would be related to
the results of local popularity surveys
only to the extent that the variables
being considered by both groups of
respondents are similar and are being
evaluated similarly.
This is where the questions
begin. The size of Aquino’s survey
improvement, by 25 percentage points
(from +42 previously), is enormous for
a single quarter. It is a dead giveaway of
the fickleness that underlies the mood of
the masses. During the week the SWS
survey was taken (August 24-27), the
media headlines included the following
events:
Death of DILG Secretary Robredo
(good for a sympathy vote). Security
concerns over Kalayaan islands (tells
people to “rally ‘round the flag”).
Economic growth
of 5.9 percent
in the second
quarter. Move of
the Ombudsman
runs after Corona
assets, and the
appointment of the
first woman chief
justice appointed
(reminds people of an impeachment
process that, though shamelessly waged,
was ultimately successful).
Deconstructing the President’s ratings
improvement is easier if we look at
another survey conducted over the same
period (August 24-30) by Ed Malay’s
The Issues and Advocacy Center. In
their 3rd quarter “Pulso ng Pilipino”
survey for the year, the Center found a
net satisfaction rating for the President
of +45 (gross of +68), virtually the
same as his net rating by them of +46
previously. [The net rating subtracts the
“not satisfied” score from the “satisfied”
score.]
The difference between the Center’s
+45 and SWS’ +67 is huge, for two
surveys conducted in the same period
with the same number of respondents
(around 1,200). I do NOT have the
details of the SWS survey, so I can only
guess at some of the possible reasons for
the disparity of results:
• The Center limited its sampling to
major metropolitan areas only.
• The Center used face-to-face
interviews (not phone interviews),
which presumably elicit more thoughtful
responses.
• The Center specifically asked
respondents to evaluate Aquino’s
performance over the last two years (“sa
loob ng nakaraang dalawang taon”),
which again presumably elicits more
thoughtful responses than open-ended
questions like “Today, what do you think
of….?”
***
But what is really interesting from
the Center’s latest survey are the insights
it provides into the likely sources of
Aquino’s popularity. Compared to his
still-respectable overall satisfaction
ratings of +68 gross or +45 net, here are
his gross and net satisfaction ratings on
SPECIFIC issues that were asked from
the respondents:
What accounts for the spread between
a +68 overall gross popularity rating
and an average +51 on specific issues?
Or the even bigger spread between a +45
overall net rating and an average of only
+1.7 on those same issues?
This spread is a good measure of the
hype that brought Aquino into high office
and upon which―not performance―he
continues to depend for validation. It tells
me that his media team has been doing
a decent job―although I suspect that
most of the credit should go to broadcast
media guru and Presidential cousin
Maria Montelibano, the one who’s really
calling the shots.
Whether it’s Kris, the country’s
foremost celebrity endorser, or those
periodic yellow-army orgies of nostalgia
over Ninoy and Tita Cory, or Aquino’s
flings with assorted women, or his
macho fascination with guns, or his
folksy aw-shucks down-home winning
ways―whatever may be grist for the
Palace media mill rarely escapes them.
However they’re being rewarded, they’re
certainly earning their keep.
***
By the way, the same survey by the
Center came up with the following
opinions on the current legal plight of
former President Arroyo:
• 69 percent agree with the Pasay RTC
decision to grant her bail
• 61 percent are in favor of allowing
her to leave the country and seek
treatment abroad
The 64-peso question is this: Will
the President give as
much consideration to
these particular lop-
sided survey results
as he does to the lop-
sided public sentiments
of satisfaction with his
performance?
gbolivar1952@gmail.com
GARY
OLIVAR
BYPASS
‘Ituloy ang laban’
JOJO
A. ROBLES
LOWDOWN
THAT was a slap on the face of
President Noynoy Aquino delivered
by his Chinese counterpart, Hu
Jintao, who snubbed Aquino at the
Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation
meeting in Vladivostok, Russia.
“Scheduling problems” are never
resorted to by country leaders who fear
they may insult a foreign counterpart
that they really want to meet.
Chalk up another insult by the
Chinese on the Philippine leader
that they have
been calling “the
smiling dog” for
more than two
years now. And
Aquino just took
it all on the chin.
* * *
So this is
what “ituloy ang
laban” (continue
the fight) really
means. Having
d e m o l i s h e d
all significant
o p p o s i t i o n
outside of it,
the Aquino
administration now seems hell-bent
on continuing a war of attrition that
has spread to within its own ranks.
The appointment of Mar Roxas
as secretary of interior and local
government to replace the late Jesse
Robredo has placed the chieftain
of the Liberal Party on a collision
course with one of the most powerful
advisers of President Noynoy Aquino
in DILG Undersecretary Rico Puno.
And because Roxas will not allow
himself to be put in a Robredo-like
situation where he runs less than half
of a department, he had to remove the
President’s shooting buddy from the
picture.
It’s important to remember that
the revival of suspicions against Puno
in the wake of Robredo’s death in a
plane crash did not come unbidden or
as a result of any official investigation
into that sorry incident. The
administration, after all, was perfectly
willing to ignore initial reports of
supposed skulduggery that attended
the securing of papers belonging to
Robredo immediately after his death.
But that was before Roxas, his party
and his palace faction began worrying
that they would lose DILG to someone
who would not advance the LP
agenda (and Roxas’ presidential plans
for 2016). And before, in a move that
many thought was of dubious value in
Roxas’ pursuit of Malacanang Palace,
Aquino’s losing running mate decided
that he himself would make a suitable
replacement for Robredo.
When it became clear to Roxas
and his confederates in the so-called
“Balay” faction that Puno would not
leave DILG of his own accord and
that the undersecretary in fact still
enjoyed the all-important trust and
confidence of his friend the President,
the campaign to uproot Puno, as it
were, began in earnest.
* * *
But there is simply no way that
this matter will be put to rest without
Aquino himself taking firm and
decisive action. After all, Aquino
may have caused the whole problem
when he promised that Roxas would
have a free hand in running DILG
even while he allowed Puno to remain
despite Roxas’ declaration that all
key personnel identified with his
predecessor would have to go.
Roxas, after all, is not Robredo
—a good man, by all accounts, but
someone who allowed himself to be
treated like a doormat by the President
who appointed him and a Congress
that did not even deem it important
to confirm his
a p p o i n t me n t .
Roxas, above all,
saw the DILG
post as his ticket
to the presidential
elections in 2016
and as the staging
point for a victory
in the 2013 polls
that would create
the conditions that
would send him
to the presidential
palace.
Aquino should
have known
that his dilly-
dallying on the Puno question would
have elicited the response that the
ambition-driven Roxas camp finally
made. But Aquino is always loath to
give the impression that he is turning
his back on his closest friends.
As it is, Aquino’s belated and
weak-kneed reactions in defense of
Puno’s actions after Robredo’s death
could only have supplied Roxas and
his camp with more ammunition to
go after the undersecretary. And now,
instead of retaining the high moral
ground on an intramural issue, Aquino
is being forced to admit—even before
any open and official probe of Puno
has started—that he may be hiding
something to protect his friend.
Aquino’s dilemma is painfully
apparent: If he tells Roxas and his
people to back away from the Puno
controversy, Aquino will risk losing
support within his party and come
out like the protector of the illegal
actions of a close friend—regardless
of whether that friend is guilty or not.
On the other hand, if he fires
Puno and keeps him away from
government for the rest of his term
(something not a lot of people
who know how loyal Aquino is to
those closest to him expects him to
do), he will become a permanent
hostage to the political operators
who worked for him to become
President. And after these people
have successfully removed Puno,
it’s logical to expect that they
will go after all the other “Samar”
functionaries who have so far
prevented the Balay faction from
making him into a talking dummy
in front of the presidential seal.
Meanwhile, it’s tuloy ang laban
inside the presidential palace. And
Aquino, because he is such a weak
leader, fully deserves the pain he’s
been receiving.
Because he
is such a weak
leader, Aquino
fully deserves the
pain he’s been
receiving.
ROLANDO G. ESTABILLO Publisher
RAMONCHITO L. TOMELDAN Managing Editor
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ROGELIO C. SALAZAR President & CEO
MEMBER
Philippine Press Institute
The National Association
of Philippine Newspapers PPI
can be accessed at:
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SEPTEMBER 11, 2012 TUESDAY
A5 Opinion Adelle Chua, Editor
ManilaStandardToday
mst.lettertotheeditor@gmail.com
THE drama of the procurement of
overpriced guns for the Philippine
National Police and the “raid” of the
offices and the condominium unit of
the late Interior and Local Government
Secretary Jesse Robredo, with DILG
Undersecretary Rico Puno as the
principal persona, continues to unfold.
What we are seeing now may just
be the tip of the iceberg. There are
reports that Robredo had also started
an investigation into the involvement
of local government officials, the
police and even higher-ups in jueteng
and illegal logging
when he died in
a plane crash last
month.
While some say
that Malacañang
intends to replace
Puno with
Philippine National
Police chief
Nicanor Bartolome,
the President
continues to have
trust and confidence
in his friend Puno.
This gives us more
questions than answers.
What is it with Puno that the
President trusts him so much with
the peace and order situation of
the country? Because of Puno, the
late Robredo was deprived of full
leadership of the DILG.
If it is true as reported that Puno,
together with other members of the
PNP bids and awards committee, went
to Israel to look at the background of
one of the bidders, then that is a clear
conflict of interest and a mockery
of the President’s “daang matuwid”
campaign.
The President was also quoted to
have started the investigation of the
alleged anomalous procurement, but
he insists the probe was on the process
and not on Puno’s involvement.
This is incomprehensible. How
can you look at the process without
looking at who is involved?
I find the contradictory statements
from the Palace difficult to understand.
Was it the President who ordered the
lockdown of the offices of Robredo,
and when did he order it?
Records show that Puno and his
companions also tried to break into
Robredo’s condo unit.
It was after Robredo’s wife told
Social Welfare Secretary Dinky
Soliman of the need to secure the
condo unit that Justice Secretary Leila
de Lima ordered it secured.
But why the condominium unit?
What is in there that Puno and
company were desperate to get?
Now there is talk that Puno will
be given another Cabinet post. After
everything that Puno has been involved
in, why should he be deserving of
another post? Puno once said that only
he could tame the President and that
he could not be replaced. It seems he
was telling the truth.
Recall that there was a
recommendation that Puno, in charge
of the police, be charged criminally
and administratively after the Luneta
hostage tragedy which claimed the
lives of Chinese tourists. But what did
the President do? He gave his friend a
slap on the wrist and allowed him to
continue.
Why is the President so protective
of Puno? This is a mystery.
Perhaps a little background will
provide the answer. The young
Noynoy Aquino put up BSA Security
Agency after his mother assumed
power in 1986. The agency then
cornered all the security contracts of
sequestered corporations. It was Puno
who trained the guards how to shoot.
Soon enough, the young Aquino began
to fancy guns as well and became very
good friends with Puno.
The agency
had a lawyer,
B i e n v e n i d o
Reyes, who is now
in the Supreme
Court, having
been appointed by
Aquino.
***
The answer to
the Puno mystery
can only be
unearthed through
a congressional
investigation. It
is sad that what
is happening seems to mock the so-
called straight and narrow path of the
President.
Note that funding and grassroots
following in next year’s polls can spell
the difference. That can only mean the
proliferation of jueteng and illegal
logging—these translate to big bucks
in the provinces.
Indeed, with investigations into
jueteng, small-town lotteries and
illegal logging, political fortunes will
rise or fall.
***
It’s difficult to understand why
Tourism Secretary Ramon Jimenez is
cool to the proposal of Presidential
Commission on Good Government
Chairman Dean Andy Bautista to put
on exhibit the P15-billion jewelry
collection of former First Lady Imelda
Marcos, preparatory to auctioning
them either to Sotheby’s or Christie’s.
I thought Jimenez was good in
promotion and marketing.
The Imelda collection comes from
three sources—the Palace cache
left by the Marcoses when they left
for exile; the Honolulu collection
seized by the US Customs when the
Marcoses landed in Hawaii; and the
Demetrio Roumeloites collection
when the Greek friend of Imelda
tried to spirit them out but was
caught at the airport.
The PCGG has tried time and again
to put the jewelry collection on exhibit,
but to no avail. This is a good time to
do it to enable the Filipino people to
realize the excesses of the Marcos
dictatorship. Besides, the PCGG is
already winding up.
For nearly three decades, the
jewelry collections have been stored
at the Bangko Sentral vaults. But,
strangely, Jimenez sees “no fun” in
an exhibition that would enhance the
collection’s value.
Just the tip
of the iceberg
Winds of change
THIS is the seventh of a series on
renewable energy, and logically after
solar (the topic of my last column),
wind energy is the obvious next topic.
Generally speaking, wind and solar
energy complement each other: weather
dynamics tend to make one follow
the other. Therefore, it should make
sense to invest in wind-based electrical
production as much as we should in its
solar counterpart, in establishing the
foundations of our country’s renewable
energy policy and infrastructure. As with
sunshine, the Philippines’ geographic
position, as amply demonstrated by
the effects of the southwest monsoon
(Habagat) over the past month, leaves
it ripe to exploit the fruits of wind
power―as we have already begun to
do.
As with solar, wind power is
scalable from end-user microgeneration
(generally less than 50 kilowatts) to
large-scale utility production. Whereas
solar energy revolves around the
easily-deployable photovoltaic cell,
wind energy is usually based on high-
mounted turbines which must withstand
the stresses of gale force winds and
turbulence, especially if permanently
mounted. Wind is more intermittent
than sunlight, across both time and
different locations, with similar effects
on electrical output. Further, wind
turbines work best within a specific
wind speed bracket: light breezes
won’t generate power, and turbines risk
damage at storm-level speeds. These
tend to restrict the deployability of wind
turbines: they are best suited, experts say,
for utility and rural deployment, with
the best locations having dependable
winds being on mountain ridges, and
shorelines and offshore sites.
Despite these restrictions, the US
National Renewable Energy Laboratory
estimates that we can tap over 76
gigawatts, particularly noting six wind-
rich regions, ranging from the waters off of
Batanes and the Ilocos region in the north,
to the heights of Mindanao in the south.
So far, the 20 shoreline turbines of the
Northwind Bangui Bay Project in Ilocos
Norte generate 33 megawatts of power.
The largest wind energy proposal to date
comes from the Sorsogon-based Coastal
Power Development Corporation’s
Gubat-Prieto Diaz wind farm, claiming
up to 420 MW estimated capacity when
fully online. To be fair, that is a highly
optimistic number, and the Department
of Energy has warned that individual
proposals should proceed on the strength
of their own feasibility studies. Still, there
is considerable potential in the Philippines’
climate profile for wind energy.
There is also the potential for
distributed microgeneration for rural
communities. Wind power is one of
mankind’s most ancient sources of
civilization-building energy, having
been used by agricultural communities
to pump water and power grain mills
long before the advent of the Industrial
Revolution. It should be no surprise
that wind energy would still find good
use in farms today. For example, Sibol
ng Agham at Teknolohiya, Inc. helped
establish wind turbine installations
Brgy. Lamag, Quirino, Ilocos Sur,
to provide lighting and power the
community sugar industry.
Urban deployment of wind power
microgeneration, however, tends to
be more problematic. William Olson
notes the challenges observed by
experts: lower average wind speeds in
cities, highly gusty and turbulent wind
patterns around buildings, the danger of
lightning strikes, and the safety needs of
the population-dense surrounding area.
Advances in technology can mitigate
these risks, though the observation is that
it is still early in the game to mainstream
urban wind microgeneration, in the same
fashion we could do with solar right
now. Considering how Typhoon Ondoy
brought down Metro Manila’s iconic
advertising billboards, such safety
concerns are not unfounded. There are
additional concerns, particularly for the
large utility-scale turbines, that they
could hinder bird migration, and are
often viewed as unsightly, especially
in tourist spots or near residential
communities.
Deployability and intermittency
issues notwithstanding, wind power
is here to stay as an indispensable
component of a comprehensive
renewable energy strategy at both micro
and utility generation levels. Here at
home, both wind and solar Feed-in-
Tariff policies face the same kind of
opposition, that their respective high
rates would lead to upward spikes
in consumer power costs. As I had
mentioned before, such fears are
ultimately unfounded―or, at the least,
the actual increase will be bearable
and not dramatic―and that it’s not
just solar or wind alone, but a holistic,
power sector-wide transformation/
upgrade that will be required to resolve
the Philippines’ energy woes, of which
promoting RE technologies like wind
could spur the transformation.
Not wind alone, but with wind,
definitely. We’ve seen Philippine winds
at their worst, tearing roofs off homes
come typhoons. We’ve also seen winds
at their best, the cool summer breeze
of inland farms, seaside communities,
and our local tourist traps. We can put
all that energy in between to work, to
sail with the proverbial wind, and mark
off another milestone in our journey
towards an energy-and-environment-
secure Philippines. Yes, the winds of
change are coming.
Facebook Page: Dean Tony La Vina
Twitter: tonylavs
EMIL
P. JURADO
TO THE POINT
DEAN TONY
LA VIÑA
EAGLE EYES
IT’S probably pointless to expect
Senator Tito Sotto to grasp the full
extent of the mess he has found himself
in today. The foremost question that has
been running in people’s minds in the
last few weeks has been: Can someone,
in this case, a senator, really be able to
sink so low in the bar of public opinion?
I don’t think Sotto is that dense; it’s
just that pretty much like the Catholic
bishops and the others who are staunchly
against the reproductive health bill, he
has already made up his mind about
the absoluteness of his position a long
time ago and there’s just no way that
he is willing to reconsider his hardline
stance. As far as Sotto and his supporters
are concerned, their position is the only
correct one and they are willing to
put everything on the line, including
personal honor and integrity. They want
to oppose the bill whatever it takes—
consequences be damned.
I don’t begrudge Sotto his dogged
determination to stop the RH bill
from becoming a law. There is more
than enough room in this country for
divergent opinions. However, I do
think it’s important to point out the
many things that are wrong in the way
he is conducting himself and fighting
the battle even if the chances of his
listening to the criticism is very remote.
We cannot as a society afford to let his
various transgressions go unchecked
because, first, it is wrong; and second,
because we need to explain to others
why the behavior cannot be held up as
an example of proper conduct. I am
writing this piece not for Sotto and his
supporters, but for others out there who
need to be reminded that there is room
for ethical, professional, logical, and
yes, gentlemanly conduct even in the
most contentious debates.
The reason Sotto is being pilloried
in various social networking sites is
not anymore because of what he is
saying about the RH bill. It’s about
the fact that he is passing off other
people’s ideas as his own. This is
called plagiarism. In plain simple
terms, the act is called stealing. It
really doesn’t matter who he stole the
ideas from, or whether he translates
another person’s words into another
language. It doesn’t take much to
attribute; a simple “a wise man once
said” would suffice in many instances.
We need to make a strong position
against plagiarism because in this day
and age when everything is readily
accessible through the Internet, we
must try harder to instill particularly
among the young, the importance of
creative insight. If we allow people
to simply copy from others we will be
ushering the death of original insight
and creativity. As a college professor,
I demand integrity among my students
when they write their thesis and
reflection papers; why should Sotto be
exempt from the rules on plagiarism?
Sotto and his supporters continue
to insist that the plagiarism issue is
an attempt to obfuscate facts; that
pro-RH advocates are shooting the
messenger because they cannot shoot
the message. This is a lame attempt to
deflect attention from the plagiarism
issue. The truth is that many experts
have already refuted each of the points
Sotto made in his speeches. But
granting for the sake of argument that
there is some truth to the accusation
that there are indeed people who are
focused on “shooting the messenger,”
are they saying then that a stolen idea
should still be considered despite its
doubtful provenance? It’s like saying
that we should still buy stolen goods
despite the fact that they have been
proven to be stolen simply because
they have some redeeming value. I
think the legal dictum “fruit of a
poisonous tree” applies in this case.
Of course it has been pointed out
that Sotto rose to national prominence
in the eighties on the strength of the
parodies he made of other people’s
works. As part of the wacky trio
called Tito, Vic and Joey, the senator
lampooned other people’s works with
impunity. He must be reminded that
he is now senator and is expected
to conduct himself in a much more
dignified and professional way.
Sotto has tried to paint himself as
a victim of cyberbullying. He points
to the many ways in which people
have lampooned him in various social
networking sites. I am against any
form of bullying. But we must learn
to make an important distinction.
Bullying involves situations where
there is imbalance of power. Bullying
is something that happens to people who
are powerless and not in positions of
power. As a senator who has access to
immense resources, Sotto cannot, by any
stretch of the imagination, claim to being
a victim of bullying. Besides, that kind
of criticism and call for accountability is
expected of people in high positions of
power. It is simply inappropriate for a
senator to whine publicly about being in
the eye of a storm, particularly if he put
himself there.
Sotto must be made accountable
By Mark Buchanan
HUMANS’ power to determine the
future of planet Earth is increasing
exponentially. The result could be
disastrous unless we change the way we
think.
Climate scientist Will Steffen of the
Australian National University makes
a powerful case about the uniqueness
of our time: A few hundred years ago,
more or less in sync with the Industrial
Revolution, various indicators such as
global population, water use, number
of rivers dammed, global economic
output, number of species extinctions
and atmospheric carbon dioxide started
following a steepening path upward.
The sudden explosion in human
activity was a sharp break from the
preceding tens of thousands of years,
when things changed much more
gradually. The shift is so pronounced
that scientists now talk about a new
geological era—the “Anthropocene,”
in which all Earth processes come to be
powerfully shaped by human activity.
Of all the usable energy reaching the
Earth from the sun, we humans already
gather and exploit as much as 5 percent.
Nearly half of the planet’s land surface
has been altered by human action and
practice.
This is all the result of the singular skill
that sets us apart from all other species—
our unparalleled capacity for innovation,
especially through technology. New
techniques for everything from farming
to computation interact and combine to
drive the creation of more innovations in
an ever-accelerating spiral. Paradoxically,
technological innovation has also created
our biggest problems, including climate
change, environmental destruction and
the threat of nuclear annihilation.
Finite planet
What comes next? Exponential
growth on a finite planet simply cannot
continue. If innovation is both the key
to our success and the primary threat
to our existence, what can we do?
Can we innovate differently? More
intelligently?
Some valuable thinking on the subject
comes from Sander van der Leeuw,
dean of the School of Sustainability at
Arizona State University, who takes
an optimistic view. We may indeed be
able to use technology to find a path to
a sustainable future, he suggests, if we
use our technology in a fundamentally
different way.
The gist of his argument: Humans
suffer from a mismatch between
our thinking about what we do and
the truth of what we do. Our brains
make sense of a multifaceted world
by ignoring much of its complexity
—a trait Van der Leeuw calls “low
dimensional” thinking. In engineering a
dam, assessing how agricultural runoff
influences an estuary or figuring out
how automobile emissions might alter
the atmosphere, our conceptual models
(or those of our scientists and engineers)
at best consider only a few of the true
pathways of cause and effect. As Van
der Leeuw puts it, “every human action
upon the environment modifies the
latter in many more ways that its human
actors perceive, simply because the
dimensionality of the environment is
much higher than can be captured by the
human mind.”
This is a profound insight. It helps
explain why our innovations, even as
they help us in ways that we see clearly
and understand, also end up affecting
our environment in ways that we mostly
fail to recognize. Effects build up in
the environment—and this includes the
social environment, as well as biological
or physical—over the long term. We’re
unaware, until eventually we have the
famous “unintended consequences” so
familiar from technological history. We
may, for example, not yet know what lies
behind the obesity epidemic in Western
nations, but it is surely a consequence
of one or more technologies—in food
manufacturing and distribution, in
human transportation, in entertainment
and advertising.
Reckless innovation
If Van der Leeuw’s analysis is right,
then we should be worried about the
future. We’re currently locked into a
strategy of almost reckless innovation.
If we seek further economic growth
only through faster innovation, the
unintended impact on our environment
promises to grow even faster.
Van der Leeuw’s solution: Learn
to innovate differently, by using
technology to reduce the mismatch
between our brains and reality.
Computing and communications
technology can improve our ability to
handle large quantities of information.
They make it possible, in principle, to
help our brains build more accurate
models of reality. Indeed, this is
already happening in some areas,
in large-scale models of climate,
which include thousands or millions
of atmospheric variables, or in new
models of economies that try to include
every last business or household.
In the end, Van der Leeuw’s
perspective is both sobering and
inspiring. We have an unprecedented
opportunity as the first humans to
be able to address our cognitive
limitations consciously and directly,
by using technology to increase our
brain capacity and understand our
interactions with the world in far more
detail. All we require is the wisdom to
make this our goal.
Mark Buchanan, a theoretical
physicist and the author of “The Social
Atom: Why the Rich Get Richer,
Cheaters Get Caught and Your Neighbor
Usually Looks Like You”. Bloomber g
How hacking the human brain can save civilization
BONG C.
AUSTERO
ARE WE THERE YET?
Why is the
President so
protective of
Puno?
News
ManilaStandardToday
mst.daydesk@gmail.com SEPTEMBER 11, 2012 T UESDAY
A6
6 eyed in Morales slay
IN BRIEF
Govt simplifies process
for alien work permits
CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK
Republic of the Philippines
DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS AND HIGHWAYS
Region IV-B, MIMAROPA
OFFICE OF THE DISTRICT ENGINEER
Mindoro Oriental District Engineering Offce
Masipit, Calapan City 5200, Oriental Mindoro
Tel. No (043) 288-2365
I NVI TATI ON TO BI D
(MST-Sept. 11, 2012)
The Bids and Awards Committee (BAC) of the DPWH, Mindoro Oriental
District Engineering Offce, through the Government of the Philippines 2012,
invites contractors to bid for the following projects:
1.) Contract ID : 12ED0071
Contract Name : Rep ai r / Reh ab i l i t at i o n / I mp r o v emen t
of Cal apan Nor t h Road K0033+600 -
K0033+743.50 with Exception
Contract location : San Teodoro, Oriental Mindoro
Scope of Work : Repair/Rehabilitation of 124 L.m. Slope
Protection including Guardrails, Lined Canal &
Concreting of Shoulder
Approved Budget for the Contract (ABC): Php 9,899,998.43
Contract Duration : 90 calendar days
The BAC will conduct the procurement process in accordance with
the Revised IRR of R.A. 9184. Bids received in excess of the ABC shall be
automatically rejected at the opening of bid.
To bid for this contract, a contractor must submit a letter of Intent (LOI),
purchase bid documents and must meet the following major criteria: (a) prior
registration with DPWH, (b) Filipino citizen or 75% Filipino-owned partnership,
corporation, cooperative, or joint venture, (c) with PCAB license applicable to
the type and cost of this contract, (d) completion of a similar contract costing at
least 50% of ABC within a period of 10 years, and (e) Net Financial Contracting
Capacity at least equal to ABC, or credit line commitment at least equal to 10%
of ABC. The BAC will use non-discretionary pass/fail criteria in the eligibility
check and preliminary examination of bids .
Unregistered contractors, however, shall submit their applications for
registration to the DPWH-POCW Central Offce before the deadline for the
receipt of LOI. The DPWH-POCW Central Offce will only process contractors’
applications for registration with complete requirements and issue the
Contractor’s Certifcate of Registration (CRC). Registration Forms may be
downloaded at the DPWH website www.dpwh.gov.ph.
The signifcant times and deadlines of procurement activities are shown
below:
1. Issuance of Bidding Documents September 04, 2012 to September 25, 2012
2. Pre-Bid Conference September 11, 2012
3. Deadline of Receipt of LOI from
Prospective Bidders
September 19, 2012
4. Receipt of Bids September 25, 2012 up to 10:00 A.M.
5. Opening of Bids September 25,2012 @ 2:00 P.M
The BAC will issue hard copies of Bidding Documents (BD’s) at BAC
Offce, DPWH, Mindoro Oriental District Engineering Offce, upon payment
of a non-refundable fee of Five Thousand Pesos (P 5,000.00) for item 1 and
Ten Thousand Pesos ( P 10,000.00 ) for Item 2. Prospective bidders may also
download the BD’s from the DPWH web site, if available. Prospective bidders
that will download the BD’s from the DPWH website shall pay the said fees on
or before the submission of their bid Documents. The Pre-Bid Conference shall
be open only to interested parties who have purchased the BD’s. Bids must be
accompanied by a bid security, in the amount and acceptable form, as stated
in Section 27.2 of the Revised IRR.
Prospective bidders shall submit their duly accomplished forms as specifed
in the BD’s in two (2) separate sealed bid envelopes to the BAC Chairman. The
frst envelope shall contain the technical component of the bid, which shall include
a copy of the CRC. The second envelope shall contain the fnancial component
of the bid. Contract will be awarded to the lowest Calculated Responsive Bid as
determined in the bid evaluation and post-qualifcation.
The DPWH, Mindoro Oriental District Engineering Offce reserves the right
to accept or reject any bid, to annul the bidding process at any time prior to
contract award, without thereby incurring any liability to the affected bidder/s.
Approved by:
(Sgd.) NESTOR L. DEL ROSARIO
BAC Chairman
DPWH INFRA-07 - Standard Advertisement Revised IRR
Republic of the Philippines
Department of Public Works and Highways
OFFICE OF THE DISTRICT ENGINEER
Albay III, District Engineering Offce
Paulog, Ligao City
(MST-Sept. 11, 2012)
I NVI TATI ON TO BI D
The Depar t ment of Publ i c Wor ks and Hi ghways Al bay 3r d Di st r i ct
Engi neeri ng Of f i ce, through its Bids and Awards Committee (BAC), invites
contractors to apply to bid for the following contract( s):
Contract ID: 12FO0075
Contract Name: Pr event i ve Mai nt enance (Int er mi t ent Sect i on)
As phal t Ov er l ay, Pol angui Pobl ac i on Road,
K0491+(-923) - K049+402 & K0491+700 - K0491+1000
Contract Location: Pol angui Al bay
Scope of Work: Asphal t Overl ay
Approved Budget for the Contract (ABC): Php.12,811,500.71
Contract Duration: 45 cal endar days
Procurement will be conducted through open competitive bidding procedures
in accordance with R.A. 9184 and its Revi sed Impl ement i ng Rul es and
Regul ati ons.
To bid for this contract, a contractor must submit a letter of Intent (LOI)
and must meet the following major criteria: (a) prior registration with DPWH,
(b) Filipino citizen or 75% Filipino-owned partnership, corporation, cooperative, or
joint venture with PCAB License applicable to the type and cost of this contract,
(c) completion of a similar contract costing at least 50% of ABC within a period
of 10 years, and (d) Net Financial Contracting Capacity at least equal to ABC, or
credit line commitment for at least 10% of ABC. The BAC of the DPWH Regional
Office no. V will conduct the eligibility checking using the Civil Works Registry
(CWR) System and the preliminary examination of bids will be conducted by the
BAC of this office .
Likewise, the Contractor must submit a notari zed commi tment that they
could provide the required Bituminous materials and equipment, (however,
preferably owned Asphalt Batching Plant) thus complete the project on time.
Unregistered contractors, however, shall submit their applications for
registration to the DPWH-POCW Central Office before the deadline for the receipt
of LOI. The DPWH-POCW Central Office will only process contractor’s applications
for registration, with complete requirements, and issue the Contractor’s Certificate
of Registration (CRC). Registration Forms may be downloaded at the DPWH
website www.dpwh.gov.ph.
The Signifcant times and deadlines of procurement activities are shown below:
1. Submission of :LOI from Prospective
Bidders
Deadline: September 18, 2012 until 10:00 A.M.
2. Schedule of Site Inspection September 6-until 10:00 A.M. of September 25, 2012
3. Pre-Bid Conference September 13, 2012 at 10:00 A.M.
4. Issuance of Bidding Documents September 6-25, 2012 until 10:00 A.M.
5. Receipt of payments of Bid Documents September 25, 2012 until 10:00 A.M.
6. Submission of Bids September 25, 2012 until 2:00 P.M.
7. Opening of Bids September 25, 2012 at 2:01 P.M.
Interested contractor must download the Bidding Documents including the plans at
DPWH website or PhilGEPS and must submit letter of Intent (LOI) before the deadline
of submission and must paid Php. 10,000.00 for Bidding Documents on or before the
deadline for payments of Bidding Documents at DPWH Albay 3
rd
District Engineering
Offce Paulog, Ligao City. Bids must be accompanied by a bid security in the required
amount and acceptable form, as stated in Section 27.2 of the Revised IRR.
Letter of Intent should only be submitted by the duly authorized liaison offcer
refected at the CRC, and it must be accompanied with photocopy of CRC, PCAB
license and Tax clearance, original copy of those documents must be presented for
validation/Verifcation. Only those that will passed the validation/verifcation will be
accepted.
Prospective bidders shall submit their duly accomplished forms as specifed in
the BD’s in two (2) separate sealed bid envelopes to the BAC Chairman. The frst
envelope shall contain the technical component of the bid, which shall include the
eligibility requirements. The second envelope shall contain the fnancial component
of the bid. Contract will be awarded to the Lowest calculated Responsive Bid as
determined in the bid evaluation and the post-qualifcation.
The DPWH Albay 3
rd
District Engineering Offce, Paulog, Ligao City reserves
the right to accept or reject any or all bid and to annul the bidding process anytime
before Contract award, without incurring any liability to the affected bidders.
Approved by:
(Sgd.) ROLANDO G. CATAHAN
BAC Chai rman
Noted:
(Sgd.) EFREN C. MANALO, MPA
Di stri ct Engi neer
Advertisement-Revised IRR
Republic of the Philippines
Department of Public Works and Highways
OFFICE OF THE DISTRICT ENGINEER
Albay III, District Engineering Offce
Paulog, Ligao City
(MST-Sept. 11, 2012)
I NVI TATI ON TO BI D
Advertisement-Revised IRR
The Depart ment of Publ i c Works and Hi ghways Al bay 3rd Di st ri ct
Engi neeri ng Offi ce, through its Bids and Awards Committee (BAC), invites
contractors to apply to bid for the following contract( s):
Contract ID: 12FO0076
Contract Name: Pr event i ve Mai nt enance (Int er mi t ent Sect i on)
Asphalt Overlay, Oas Poblacion Road, K0496+-256-
K0496+886 & K0496+933 - K0498+007
Contract Location: Oas Albay
Scope of Work: Asphalt Overlay
Approved Budget for the Contract (ABC): Php.11,264,141.40
Contract Duration: 45 calendar days
Procurement will be conducted through open competitive bidding procedures in
accordance with R.A. 9184 and its Revised Implementing Rules and Regulations.
To bid for this contract, a contractor must submit a letter of Intent (LOI) and must
meet the following major criteria: (a) prior registration with DPWH, (b) Filipino citizen
or 75% Filipino-owned partnership, corporation, cooperative, or joint venture with
PCAB License applicable to the type and cost of this contract, (c) completion of a
similar contract costing at least 50% of ABC within a period of 10 years, and (d) Net
Financial Contracting Capacity at least equal to ABC, or credit line commitment for
at least 10% of ABC. The BAC of the DPWH Regional Offce no. V will conduct the
eligibility checking using the Civil Works Registry (CWR) System and the preliminary
examination of bids will be conducted by the BAC of this offce .
Likewise, the Contractor must submit a notarized commitment that they could
provide the required Bituminous materials and equipment, (however, preferably owned
Asphalt Batching Plant) thus complete the project on time.
Unregistered contractors, however, shall submit their applications for registration
to the DPWH-POCW Central Offce before the deadline for the receipt of LOI.
The DPWH-POCW Central Offce will only process contractor’s applications for
registration, with complete requirements, and issue the Contractor’s Certifcate of
Registration (CRC). Registration Forms may be downloaded at the DPWH website
www.dpwh.gov.ph.
The Signifcant times and deadlines of procurement activities are shown below:
1. Submission of :LOI from Prospective
Bidders
Deadline: September 18, 2012 until 10:00 A.M.
2. Schedule of Site Inspection September 6-until 10:00 A.M. of September 25, 2012
3. Pre-Bid Conference September 13, 2012 at 10:00 A.M.
4. Issuance of Bidding Documents September 6-25, 2012 until 10:00 A.M.
5. Receipt of payments of Bid Documents September 25, 2012 until 10:00 A.M.
6. Submission of Bids September 25, 2012 until 2:00 P.M.
7. Opening of Bids September 25, 2012 at 2:01 P.M.
Interested contractor must download the Bidding Documents including the
plans at DPWH website or PhilGEPS and must submit letter of Intent (LOI) before
the deadline of submission and must paid Php. 10,000.00 for Bidding Documents
on or before the deadline for payments of Bidding Documents at DPWH Albay 3
rd

District Engineering Offce Paulog, Ligao City. Bids must be accompanied by a bid
security in the required amount and acceptable form, as stated in Section 27.2 of
the Revised IRR.
Letter of Intent should only be submitted by the duly authorized liaison offcer
refected at the CRC, and it must be accompanied with photocopy of CRC, PCAB
license and Tax clearance, original copy of those documents must be presented for
validation/Verifcation. Only those that will passed the validation/verifcation will be
accepted.
Prospective bidders shall submit their duly accomplished forms as specifed in
the BD’s in two (2) separate sealed bid envelopes to the BAC Chairman. The frst
envelope shall contain the technical component of the bid, which shall include the
eligibility requirements. The second envelope shall contain the fnancial component
of the bid. Contract will be awarded to the Lowest calculated Responsive Bid as
determined in the bid evaluation and the post-qualifcation.
The DPWH Albay 3
rd
District Engineering Offce, Paulog, Ligao City reserves
the right to accept or reject any or all bid and to annul the bidding process anytime
before Contract award, without incurring any liability to the affected bidders.
Approved by:
(Sgd.) ROLANDO G. CATAHAN
BAC Chai rman
Noted:
(Sgd.) EFREN C. MANALO, MPA
Di stri ct Engi neer
Morales, brother of incumbent Ma-
linao Vice Mayor Alice Morales, was
killed around 10:30 a.m. of Sept. 7 out-
side the St. Nicolas Parish Church in
Barangay Estancia in Malinao, about 75
kms east of this city, where he stood as a
wedding sponsor along with his sister.
Bicol regional police spokesman Supt.
Renato Bataller identified the suspects as
Christian Saysay, Roderick Saysay Sara-
jan, Gilbert Concepcion and his brother
Ramon, Wilfredo Sasota and another still
unidentified suspect.
Morales, who has been Makati
City engineer since 1997, had earlier
declared his intention to run for Mali-
nao mayor in next year’s election and
was named provincial chairman of the
United Nationalist Alliance coalition
of Vice President Jejomar Binay and
former President Joseph Estrada.
The vice mayor escaped unhurt, but
By Florencio P. Narito
LEGAZPI CITY – The police have identi-
fied six suspects, one of whom died over the
weekend, in the killing of Makati City Engineer
Nelson Morales who was shot dead in Malinao,
Albay last Friday.
the engineer died at the Dr. Amando
Cope Memorial Hospital in Tabaco
City later that afternoon. The engi-
neer’s aide Raul Capital also sustained
bullet wounds and is recuperating at
the Bicol Regional Training and Teach-
ing Hospital in Legazpi City.
Bataller said Saysay died on Saturday
at the Josefina Duran Memorial Hospital
in Ligao City, apparently because of gun-
shot wounds sustained during the assassi-
nation, but the spokesman did not explain
why Saysay was not included among the
casualties in the initial police report.
On the other hand, Bataller said
Sarajan was arrested while driving an
unregistered motorcycle in Libon town,
about 75 miles northwest Legazpi.
The spokesman said all the suspects
were apparently from Libon town and
investigators are looking into the pos-
sibility that they were hired guns.
They were all charged in an inquest
proceedings on Sunday with murder
for the killing of Morales, attempted
murder for the attempt on the life of
Vice Mayor Morales and frustrated
murder for wounding Capital.
Binay condemned Morales’ killing
and urged the police to solve the assas-
sination at the soonest possible time.
Meanwhile, officials and employees
of Makati City, led by Mayor Jejomar
Erwin Binay, held a necrological ser-
vice for Morales at the City Hall Park-
ing Building.
The Makati City government earlier
issued a statement praising Morales’
service as city engineer.
“Engineer Nelson Morales was a
hardworking city official and a depend-
able co-worker. He is also one of sev-
eral city officials who enjoyed the full
trust of Vice President Jejomar Binay
during his term as mayor, and incum-
bent Mayor Jun Binay.”
No comment. Senior Police Officer 4 Jose De La Pena, who appeared at the Quezon
City police headquarters on Monday, refused to answer journalists’ questions on
Sept. 4 incident when he allegedly tried to extort P20,000 from a college student who
turned out to be the son of Metro Manila police chief Leonardo Espina.
MANNY PALMERO
THE Department of Labor and Em-
ployment has simplified “the sub-
stantive and procedural aspects” of
receiving, renewing and revoking
alien employment permits.
Labor Secretary Rosalinda Bal-
doz said Department Order 120-12
removed the unnecessary proce-
dures in process, but also imposed
stricter provision on the grounds for
cancellation and revocation of for-
eigners’ working permits.
The alien employment permits
are issued to non-resident foreign-
ers seeking admission to the Phil-
ippines for employment purposes
after a determination of the non-
availability competent, able and
willing Filipinos.
The new work permits will now be
required of foreign nationals who as-
sume a new job position within their
current organizations, transfer to a
new position within related compa-
nies or commence employment with
a new company, she said.
New applications will be subject
to the law’s publication requirement
and the public will have 30 days
from the time of publication to ob-
ject to the new employment or job
change of the foreign national.
Foreigners found to be working in
the Philippines without a valid work
permit will be fined P10,000 for every
year of illegal work or fraction there-
of. The organization illegally employ-
ing them will also be subject to a fine
of P10,000 for every year of illegal
employment or a fraction thereof.
The department’s regional direc-
tors can now deny an application
for an AEP if the applicant has been
convicted of a criminal offense or is
a fugitive from justice.
Fees, documents and processing
times of application for AEP have
also been amended. Aside from the
P8,000 fee, the applicant shall also
pay a courier fee of P 200 when us-
ing the AEP online application sys-
tem. Modifying a foreigner’s AEP
now requires a payment of P750 in
order to replace his current permit.
New and renewal applications
for work permits will now be issued
within 24 working hours of publica-
tion and payment of required fees.
Under the previous department or-
der, the processing period starts 24
hours after the publication of the ap-
plication. Vito Barcelo
Missing cop surfaces
THE police sergeant who allegedly tried
to extort P20,000 from the son of Metro
Manila police chief Leonardo Espina for
the nonexistent crime of “engaging in
phone sex” finally surfaced at the Quezon
City police headquarters on Monday.
Accompanied by his lawyers, Senior
Police Officer 4 Jose dela Pena refused
to answer questions from journalists as
he presented himself to QCPD director
Chief Supt. Mario dela Vega, who de-
manded he turn over his gun and badge.
“No comment, I invoke my right to
remain silent,” said Dela Pena, who al-
legedly accosted Espina’s son on Sept.
4 and accused the son of “engaging in
phone sex” when he stopped his car to
answer a mobile phone call.
Dela Vega said it was actually the
eighth time Dela Peña was slapped
with an administrative case.
Florante S. Solmerin
Ex-Chief now a ‘Kapuso’
FORMER Supreme Court Chief Justice
Reynato Puno has been named vice
chairman and independent director of
GMA Network’s socio-civic arm, GMA
Kapuso Foundation.
Puno was unanimously elected dur-
ing GMAKF’s joint membership and
board of trustees meeting on August 28,
GMA Network chairman and lawyer Fe-
lipe L. Gozon.
“His proven track record in public
service, not to mention his unblemished
image, makes him a fitting choice to
become part of GMA Kapuso Founda-
tion,” said Gozon.
Puno served as the 22nd Chief Justice
of the Supreme Court of the Philippines
and is an alumnus of the University of the
Philippines, of which he is also a incum-
bent member of the Board of Regents.
QC tagged ‘epal’ capital
CELEBRATED tour guide Carlos
Celdran and comedienne Mae Paner,
alias Juana Change, went around the
Quezon City to launch a tour showcasing
publicity-seeking, colloquially called
“epal,” politicians who promote
themselves using taxpayers’ money.
Describing Quezon City as the coun-
try’s “epal” capital, Celdran and Paner
pointed out tarpaulins, streamers and
poster-plastered walls bearing the names
and faces of incumbent councilors and
those aspiring to run for the 2013 mid-
term elections. Rio N. Araja
SEPTEMBER 11, 2012 TUESDAY
A7 Sports Riera U. Mallari, Editor
ManilaStandardToday
sports_mstandard@yahoo.com
CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK
Judgment call, commissioner’s wisdom compromised?
THE game’s score was 75-all. This was
last week—Wednesday to be exact—at
the Mall of Asia Arena in Pasay City.
The match was between Far Eastern
University and National University in
the ongoing Season 75 of the University
Athletic Association of the Philippines
basketball tournament.
FEU has been a perennial title-contend-
er, but never been a winner the few times
that it made the Finals, including the last
two which Ateneo had won to make it
four straight from 2008.
NU has been a perennial cellar-dwell-
er, but has now become a hot pretender,
although its new owners—the famous,
lovable Sys of SM chain of malls—insist
their aim is a modest Final 4 finish.
In Wednesday’s game, only 9.7 sec-
onds remained after NU had knotted the
count at 75.
After a timeout, FEU almost bungled
its inbound attack when NU swiped the
ball away near the Tamaraw keyhole.
But the Bulldogs, in their hurry to
score, also fumbled, resulting in a turn-
over—also near their own keyhole.
Next thing we saw was, the most fa-
mous fastbreak pitch of the game fell into
the hands of Tamaraw RR Garcia, who
scooted for home to sink what appeared
like a buzzer-beating, left-handed lay-up.
There was ecstatic frenzy, euphoria
spilling over the FEU bench.
The NU camp protested, contending
that Garcia’s shot had come with no more
time left in the game clock.
A review of Garcia’s basket, done sev-
eral times, would, indeed, yield unclear
results to the naked eye.
I say that because I couldn’t categori-
cally say myself that the ball had left Gar-
cia’s fingertips with time unexpired. And
I have 20/20 vision (ahem!).
Indeed, the shot was so shrouded with
doubt that it took a little extra time for the
referees to review the instant video replay
before deciding the basket was good.
I couldn’t help comparing the incident
to the ongoing US Open tennis tournament
in New York, where a shot challenged by a
player goes to a Chase Review.
Is the shot good or not?
In the US Open and other majors, the vid-
eo replay clearly shows if a ball is out or not.
Unfortunately, in the video review of
Garcia’s shot, it was, indeed, unclear if
the ball had left Garcia’s hand or not with
time still alive.
Sad to say but, seemingly, the video re-
play in the UAAP is a bit low-tech. In the
case at hand, the video machine did not
perfectly establish flawless data. In short,
doubt, more than factual truth, was at is-
sue in the Garcia shot.
This was the basis by the UAAP board
in reversing the verdict of UAAP Com-
missioner Ato Badolato upholding the ref-
erees’ decision to call Garcia’s shot good.
The board deemed Garcia’s shot “in-
conclusive and unclear.”
In a statement released through Henry
Atayde, the board said, “The pieces of
evidence/statements/video used in the de-
liberation were inconclusive and unclear
and most of the points brought up showed
that time had expired before the ball was
fully released.”
The board ordered a replay of the game
on Sept. 23.
To summarize, the two referees and
Badolato saw Garcia’s shot as good. The
board did not—unanimously.
Whatever happened to judgment call,
an exclusive domain of the referees?
Whatever happened to the commis-
sioner’s inherent power to call it as he
sees it and, right or wrong, he can’t be
overruled?
I don’t know what Badolato feels right
now.
Insulted, maybe?
What if this happened in the PBA?
Will Commissioner Chito Salud resign for
having been overturned by the PBAboard?
Or, in the NBA: Will Commissioner
David Stern resign?
Now back to the shot: Was there still
time when the ball left Garcia’s fingertips?
Honestly, I can’t say.
But this much I can say: Lo-tech gadget
helped kill judgment call. And the commis-
sioner’s wisdom became collateral damage.
* * *
ALL IN. The Leads-CEGP 6972 will
re-launch the book, “Not On Our Watch,”
on Sept. 14 at 5 p.m., Fully Booked, The
Fort, Taguig City. The book’s first launch
on June 10 had been sold out. Authors
in the book about Martial Law include
Jaime FlorCruz (CNN Beijing bureau
chief), Butch Dalisay, Dr. Manuel Dayrit,
Diwa Guinigundo, Toti Chikiamco, Jay
Valencia-Glorioso, Vic Manarang, Angie
Castillo, Obet Versola, Jack Teotico, Aus-
tralia-based Edd Aragon, Sol F. Juvida,
Al S. Mendoza and Vic “Wency” Wenc-
eslao. Conrad de Quiros, who wrote the
introduction, will deliver remarks before
the book-signing presided over by Cherrie
Mijares and Elso Cabangon, the Leads-
CEGP 6972 president…Happy birthday
(Sept. 14) to Ramon Uy, the foremost
golfing environmentalist of Bacolod.
Cheers for beers!
Zambales
hosts 3-day
sportsfest
Rizal Tech, Miriam clinch no. 1
Malabanan, Farr qualify
for Indonesian bike tourney
Legaspi, Yee return to power jungolf squads to the top
Patriots face Sea Lions in finals
IN BRIEF
Chiefs, Engineers win
PBA mediaman’s bro dies
CONRADO Eduardo Coros, younger
brother of Philippine Basketball Asso-
ciation Media Bureau staff Dave Coros,
died Sunday afternoon due to lingering
illness. He was 41.
He is survived by mother Tacing, wife
Precy, son Ian Dave, and brothers and
sisters. His remains lie at the family resi-
dence in Tondo, Manila.
Interment is tentatively scheduled on
Thursday at the Manila North Green
Park cemetery.
THE Arellano University Chiefs and the
Technological Institute of the Philippines
Engineers continued to stamp their class
in the 10th Fr. Martin Division 2 Cup
basketball tournament at the TIP gymna-
sium in Quiapo, Manila.
The Chiefs, who got 21 points from
Dionce Holts, banked on the split free
throws of Al Ho in the dying seconds
to put away the Ateneo Blue Eagles,
85-82.
The TIP Engineers, with Jeffrey
Yanes leading with 18 points, banked
on a big, third-quarter run to repel the
Angeles University Foundation Great
Danes, 77-65.
Ho’s baskets allowed the Chiefs
to notch their third straight win in
Group B of this cagefest supported
by Gerry’s Grill and Gloria’s Bulalu-
han Restaurant.
The Engineers, who never looked back
after taking a 12-6 run in the third, im-
proved to 2-3 in Group A.
RIZAL Technological University, Miriam College, Centro Escolar
University and host De La Salle Zobel completed their elimination-
round assignments unbeaten to make the quarterfinals of the 43d
Women’s National Collegiate Athletic Association tournament over
the weekend.
RTU downed Emilio Aguinaldo College, 65-41, to sweep all its
four matches in Senior A at its home-court in Mandaluyong.
EAC and St. Scholastica’s College will join RTU in the quarterfinals.
In Senior B, defending champion CEU dumped Miriam, 73-25,
for a similar 4-0 slate and towed Philippine Women’s University
and San Beda College Alabang to the next round.
University of Asia and the Pacific will meet Assumption Col-
lege while Miriam will tangle with La Consolacion College Manila
with the winners grabbing the two remaining Last Eight berths this
weekend.
In the volleyball tournament at the St. Scholastica Manila gym,
Miriam completed a 4-0 sweep in Senior B after dominating EAC,
25-7, 25-4, 25-16, while San Beda plucked the No. 2 slot with a 25-14,
18-25, 25-21, 25-23 triumph over PWU which ended up in third spot.
In Senior A, CEU wound up No. 1 with a 4-0 record while St.
Scholastica ended up No. 2 slot after a 25-15, 25-21, 25-15 victory
over La Consolacion. Defending champion RTU will take the No.
3 slot in the tournament being supported by Goody, Mikasa, Mol-
ten, MJC Photography, network partner AKTV and radio partner
Monster Radio RX 93.1.
The other two quarterfinal slots will go the winners of the UA&P
versus EAC and La Consolacion versus Assumption duels also this
weekend.
The Patriots earned a return trip
to the finals yesterday after a seven-
year wait in the 11th Universities
and Colleges Athletic Association
men’s basketball tournament.
They relied on a big scoring run
in the endgame to finish off the
Manuel L. Quezon University Stal-
lions, 79-68, in their
stepladder semifinal
showdown at the
Ugnayang La Salle
gymnasium in Das-
mariñas, Cavite.
Lloyd Pono
banged in 20 points,
including one of three crucial tri-
ples during a crucial six-minute
stretch in the last period that keyed
the win for the Patriots in this
cagefest supported by Mikasa and
Molten Balls.
Pono scored his trey after a split
free throw from teammate Jeff
Manuel shattered a 60-all deadlock,
giving La Salle a 64-60 lead, before
two more triples from Jeoffrey Acain
and Clifford Castro from a 10-3 run
allowed the Patriots to gain a 74-63
cushion in the remaining 1:45.
Acain shot 16 points, while
Manuel had 12. K-Boy Torres
tallied 10.
Roland Dulalia and Leonard
Tamayo topscored with 15 and 14
points, respectively, for the Stal-
lions, who eventually settled for
third place.
The Patriots, who fought for the
crown against 2005 champion,
Emilio Aguinaldo
College Generals,
will have a best-of-
three title series with
the Olivarez College
Sea Lions starting on
Wednesday, 1 p.m. at
the Olivarez College
gymnasium in Sucat, Parañaque.
“Nagkumpiyansa ang mga bata
sa opensa nu’ng umpisa. Akala
nila, dahil homecourt, ganoon-
ganoon lang ang Stallions. Buti
na lang, nag-click ang matchup
namin sa kanila,” said Patriots
coach Macky Torres.
Torres, who is on his second year
as coach, said this is big achieve-
ment for the team after placing last
the previous season.
The Stallions, who were ahead,
36-32, at halftime, took charge in
the third behind an 11-5 run, which
gave them a 48-37 spread.
TEAM Prima riders Eugenio “Jing” Mala-
banan and Frederick “Eboy” Farr topped
their respective divisions recently in the
three-leg national series of Downhill Riders
Organization of the Philippines to qualify
for the coming Asia Pacific Downhill Chal-
lenge on Nov. 17 and 18 in Sentul, West
Java, Indonesia.
Malabanan, a veteran mountain biker, ruled
the ranking 30 to 39-year-old category in the
Manila, Visayas and Mindanao national legs
to accumulate a leading 995 points, while Reu
Balicha (444) and Epi Cruz (429) settled for
second and third places, respectively.
“It was a great motivation I got from Team
Prima and my family as I swept the entire
national series, to qualify as one of the rep-
resentatives of the Philippines in the Indone-
sian tournament,” said Malabanan, express-
ing his gratitude to Team Prima owner Alex
Lim for his all-out support for the Prima
cycling team.
Farr, for his part, qualified for the Indone-
sia meet after leading in the Expert category
with 907.5 total points, followed by Erick
“Jon-Jon” De Leon with 830 and Eugenio
Jong Sunga with 659 in second and third
places, respectively.
“It really inspires me to represent my coun-
try on behalf of DROP and Team Prima,” said
Farr, who also won a gold medal in last year’s
Downhill Masters’ event at the Singapore Na-
tional Open Cycling Championship.
Farr’s son John Derick (Jerich), also
from Team Prima, finished second place in
the Open Elite class with 810 total points
behind national team rider, Eleazar Barba,
who topped the category with 980 points.
Parabanne Mendoza settled for third with
700.5 points.
Jerich, 15, is the youngest rider competing
in the Open Elite Category.
The Team Prima riders competed in the
first national leg at the Patis Racetrack in
Montalban, Rizal last April, followed by the
second leg in Ravina, Guimaras in Iloilo last
June and lastly at the recent Malasag Race-
track in Cagayan De Oro.
The qualifying system for the Asia Pa-
cific Downhill Challenge in Indonesia is
based on the points accumulated in the
three national legs.
MULTI-TITLED Mia Legaspi and
Miggy Yee returned to action in local
jungolf play to power St. Paul’s College
and La Salle Greenhills to the top in the
Girls’ 1 and Juniors’ divisions, respec-
tively, of the International Container
Terminal Services Inc.-JGFP Inter-
school golf tournament.
Legaspi, a two-time Junior World
champion, fired a four-under-par 58 at
Ayala Greenfield and with the 53 of Dani-
ella Uy, St. Paul’s totalled 111 opened up
a hefty 35-point lead over Ateneo, which
finished with a 76 in the division for the
combined girls and high school field.
Overshadowed by Legaspi’s solid form
was the return to jungolf competition of
former standouts Paulina Sotto, who led
scoring for Ateneo with a 40, and Chris-
tina Potenciano, who did not count with a
32 as Nicole Barreto’s 36 counted as the
second team score.
At Aguinaldo, Yee suited up anew for
his team after a long absence, shooting
a one-over 53 to join hands with Luigi
Guerrero and JP de Claro, who both had
49s, for a 151 team total and a 10-point
lead over La Salle Zobel in the tourney
backed chiefly by ICTSI and also spon-
sored by the Pancake House Group, Siz-
zlin’ Pepper, Pancake House and Philip-
pines Airlines.
Jama Reyes carded 49 while Miguel
Shah and Jaime Oposa chipped in 48 and
44, respectively, for La Salle Zobel.
LSGH 3 was running third at 128,
Ateneo 1 at 122, Xavier 1 at 121, Marist
at 104 and Brent at 98.
Legaspi and Uy were running 1-2 in the
individual race while teammate Annika
Cedo was sharing third at 50 with Dana
Gonzales of Marist.
Raymart Tolentino of Marist upstaged
Yee with a three-under 57 for the solo lead
in the juniors category. Behind him were
LSGH bets Yee, de Claro and Guerrero.
The tourney featuring more than 250
jungolfers from 40 schools and a separate
league at the Riviera Executive course
resumes today with the Boys Seniors at
Capitol Hills and Midgets’ 1 at the Ayala
Greenfield. La Salle Taft is ahead in se-
niors’ play after the first round at Intramu-
ros, Ateneo leads both the Midgets’ 1 and
Midgets’ 2 categories and Assumption is
on top of Girls’ 2.
THE province of Zambales lives
up again to its emerging reputa-
tion as a major sports hub in the
region with the three-day Zam-
bales Multi-Sports Festival set
set on Nov. 9 to 11.
The sportsfest is expected to
attract more than 4,000 partici-
pants including the 5K to 10K
fun runs that will usher in the
event on the first day.
However, the more exciting
and daring events will take place
in the next two days with the ex-
panded second leg of the Philip-
pine Kayaking Series 2012, an
eco-adventure sport of open water
swimming, kayaking, running,
and biking to be highlighted by
the 32K kayak marathon from
Candelaria to Masinloc and back
and the 18K tri-plus one event.
“We believe that sports tour-
ism will play a key role in at-
tracting visitors to Zambales
and this three-day multi-sports
festival will certainly give them
a chance to explore and enjoy
our natural attractions, “ said
Zambales Gov. Jun Ebdane,
who has already hosted differ-
ent sporting events in the prov-
ince, lots of them outdoor ones.
The tri-plus one event features
a 1.5K open water swim, 5K
kayak, 10K bike, and a 2K beach
run, while a 60K duathlon race
will also be part of the activities.
Organizers expect a good turn-
out of participants not just from
the province, but from neighbor-
ing provinces, including those
from the Visayas.
For those interested to join this
multi-sports festival as sponsors
or participants, contact person is
Didi Camara at tel. nos. 468-7091
or 0915 3752225. FB is philippine
kayaking series, website is www.
kayakphilippines.com.
DASMARIÑAS, Cavite—The La
Salle-Dasmariñas Patriots are back in
the finals.
AL S. MENDOZA
ALL THE WAY
PSA Forum tackles football
IT’S a special dual football session in
today’s edition of the Philippine Sports-
writers Association Forum at Shakey’s
Malate.
Manila Mayor Alfredo Lim, along
with Philippine Football Association
secretary general and National Capital
Region Football Association president
Atty. Roland Tulay, are the major guests
in the 10:30 a.m. public sports program
to talk about the Manila Kasibulan set
Sept. 19 to 21.
Joining them in the discussion is As-
sistant Superintendent of Manila Dr.
Cristina C. Reyes of the Department of
Education.
The other football event featured in the
session presented by Smart, the Philip-
pine Amusements and Gaming Corpo-
ration, and Shakey’s, are Azkals player
Anton and Arman Del Rosario, and Eu-
ropean Chamber of Commerce of the
Philippines Henry Schumacher for the
1st Manila Football Cup.
lagay mo roundup 1.psaforum 2. martin 3. obit
Jing Malabanan (right) and Frederick Farr (third from left) will take part in the Asia Pacific
Downhill Challenge on Nov. 17 and 18 in Sentul, West Java, Indonesia. They are joined
here by fellow riders (from left) Epi Cruz and JerichFarr.
Game Tomorrow
(Game 1 at the Olivarez
College gymnasium,
Sucat, Parañaque)
1 p.m. • Olivarez College
vs DLSU-Dasma
SEPTEMBER 11, 2012 TUESDAY
A8
Williams caps off great summer with US Open win
NEW YORK—Serena Williams
wrapped up her remarkable summer with
the latest rendition of a scene that has
become familiar the past few months.
-Williams jumping up and down on
the tennis court with a mile-wide smile
across her face.
-Williams picking up a big-time prize
—this time, the U.S. Open trophy, which
will look good somewhere near the gold
medals she won at the Olympics and the
silver plate she took home from Wim-
bledon.
If there was anything unexpected
about her latest triumph, it was the chal-
lenge she faced from Victoria Azarenka,
especially considering the way Williams
dominated everyone she faced on the
way to Sunday’s final, to say nothing of
the way the final started.
Come the third set, with the sun go-
ing down and the stadium completely
blanketed in shadows, Williams stood
only two points away from a loss. She
rediscovered her form in time, took the
last four games of the match and won
her fourth title at Flushing Meadows and
15th Grand Slam title overall with a 2-6,
6-2, 7-5 victory. It was the first women’s
U.S. Open final to go three sets since
1995.
‘’If it was anybody other than Serena
on the other side of the court, I’m not
sure we’d be talking now,’’ said Patrick
Mouratoglou, a coach who has been
working with Williams recently. ‘’But it
was Serena. She was there. She’s a win-
ner and she’s a champion.’’
Mouratoglou helped Williams engi-
neer a restoration that began shortly after
she lost in the first round of the French
Open in May, the only opening-round
exit of her 49 career Grand Slam appear-
ances.
‘’She said, ‘I want to win Wimbledon,
I want to start now,’’’ Mouratoglou said.
‘’That’s simple. That’s how it started.’’
Since then, Williams won both sin-
gles and doubles at Wimbledon, then
matched that feat a month later at the
London Olympics.
The U.S. Open was the clincher - a
two-week clinic during which she lost
only 19 games over her first six match-
es, then put on a display in how to play
pressure tennis when the stakes were
the highest. Trailing 5-3 and serving at
30-all against Azarenka, the Australian
Open champion seeded first in this tour-
nament, Williams wrested back control
of the match by winning 10 of the next
12 points.
‘’Obviously, I never give up,’’ Wil-
liams said. ‘’I never, never quit. I’ve
come back so many times in so many
matches. I wasn’t too nervous.’’ AP
CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK
Sports
Manila Standard TODAY
sports@manilastandardtoday.com sports_mstandard@yahoo.com Riera U. Mallari, Editor
Promoter Arum has no idea who Pacquiao wants to fight
By Ronnie Nathanielsz
TOP Rank promoter Bob Arum has no
idea what’s going on with Fighter of the
Decade Manny Pacquiao, who has been
evasive and non-committal on who he
plans to fight on Dec. 8 amidst specula-
tion that he may not wish to fight this year.
In a brief overseas conversation with the
Manila Standard on Monday from his home
in Las Vegas, Arum said he has had no word
from Pacquiao on his choice of an opponent.
Asked whether he had any idea of
what’s going on, Arum replied: “Nope.”
There are reports that Pacquiao doesn’t
want to fight this year and is waiting for
Arum to work something out for a mega-
buck fight with undefeated Floyd May-
weather Jr.
“I have no idea. I don’t understand
what’s going on,” said Arum, reflecting
the views of many others both in and out-
side the Pacquiao camp.
However, Pacquiao’s Filipino lawyer
Franklin “Jeng” Gacal was more positive
in his outlook.
“I think he will definitely fight on Dec. 8
and he is deciding on whether it is (Timo-
thy) Bradley or (Juan Manuel) Marquez,”
said Gacal.
Pacquiao dropped a widely condemned
split decision to Bradley and lost his World
Boxing Organization welterweight title.
He faced Marquez three times, draw-
ing the first, winning the second by a
majority decision and the third by a con-
troversial split decision.
The lawyer disclosed that Pacquiao will
be leaving for Los Angeles on Sept. 14 to
do two of his GMA 7 shows and may an-
nounce a choice of opponent “before he
flies or when he gets there.”
Arum earlier said they have plenty of
time, noting that they would “do the promo-
tional tour and the press conferences imme-
diately after the Julio Cesar Chavez Jr.-Ser-
gio ‘Maravilla’ Martinez fight, which is on
this Sunday.
By Jeric Lopez

REVENGE exacted.
Calvin Abueva recorded yet an-
other triple-double with 21 points,
20 rebounds and 10 assists as San
Sebastian College bucked a le-
thargic start to get back at Mapua,
77-62, in the 88th National Col-
legiate Athletic Association bas-
ketball tournament at the Flying V
Arena in San Juan yesterday.
Following a slow start, which
saw them trail by 14 points early in
the second period, the Stags came
to their senses in the second half and
eventually took over the game.
After struggling in the first
half with only three points, the
reigning Most Valuable Player
gathered himself in the third pe-
riod, where he fired 13 points.
The Stags outscored the Car-
dinals, 32-18, in the third canto
to turn a 25-32 halftime deficit
into a 57-50 advantage, heading
into the final 10 minutes of play,
where they were never threat-
ened by the team that gave them
one of their three defeats.
San Sebastian moved half-a-
game behind league leader San
Beda College as it improved to
11-3, with four games left in the
season. The Stags also moved
closer to a Top 2 finish, wherein
it will be granted a twice-to-beat
advantage in the Final Four.
SSC Stags
get back
at Cards
PARKS IS TOP CAGER
THE Philippine Basketball
Association will lend its full
support to the Samahang Basketbol
ng Pilipinas when the cage
body lobbies for the country’s
hosting of the FIBA-Asia Men’s
Championship next week.
CARMEL, Ind.—
Rory McIlroy was
right where he want-
ed to be, even if the
kid was two weeks
ahead of schedule.
Having disposed
of a world-class field
at Crooked Stick for
a two-shot win that
looked even easier,
McIlroy sat next to
the two trophies he
won Sunday in the BMW Champi-
onship. One was from the tourna-
ment, one from the Western Golf
Association, the longtime host of
this storied event.
‘’Hopefully, in a couple weeks’
time, I’ll be sitting right here again
with two trophies beside me,’’ Mc-
Ilroy said with a smile.
McIlroy and the rest of the PGA
Tour takes a much-needed break this
week before resuming at the Tour
Championship in At-
lanta, where McIlroy
will try to cap off an
already amazing sea-
son by winning the
Tour Championship
and the FedEx Cup,
with its $10 million
bonus.
There appears to
be no stopping Boy
Wonder.
Even against the
very best in golf, McIlroy beat them
with a 5-under 67 for a two-shot
win over Phil Mickelson and Lee
Westwood. That came just six days
after he rallied against Louis Oost-
huizen and held off Tiger Woods to
win at the TPC Boston.
The 23-year-old from Northern
Ireland now has won three of his
last four tournaments, scoring a
combined 53-under par.
‘’I just want to try and keep this
run going and keep the confidence
level up where it is,’’ he said.
His confidence is about as high
as that 4-iron from 233 yards that
dropped from a blue sky over India-
napolis and landed softly on the par-
5 ninth green, where so many other
shots came in low and hot and bound-
ed through the green. It set up a two-
putt birdie, and a wedge into 5 feet for
birdie on the 10th hole enabled him to
start breaking away from a crowded
collection of All-Stars.
There was a sense that moment it
was over, because few others can hit
shots like that right now. And if that
wasn’t enough, McIlroy hit another
towering 4-iron, this one covering
226 yards, that landed just as softly on
the horseshoe green at the par-5 15th
to within 15 feet for another birdie.
That was followed by another wedge
to about the same distance, and he
buried that birdie putt on the 16th to
build a three-shot lead. AP
CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK
Rory on a roll in FedEx Cup playoffs
League commissioner Chi-
to Salud confirmed he’ll form
part of the delegation that trav-
els to Tokyo, Japan on Sept.
18 to make a case before ex-
ecutives of FIBA-Asia about
the Philippines’ capability to
stage an event as big as the
qualifier for the 2014 FIBA-
World Championships.
Salud will be with a
small, but important group
of Filipino basketball of-
ficials traveling to the Japa-
nese capital for the country’s
presentation of its hosting
bid. The SBP will be led by
president Manny V. Pangil-
inan, vice chairman Ricky
Vargas, executive director
Sonny Barrios, and former
FIBA-Asia secretary general
Moying Martelino.
The PBA Board of Gover-
nors will also pitch in its sup-
port as Salud is going to be
accompanied by Chairman
Robert Non, Vice Chairman
Ramon Segismundo, and
Treasurer Ely Capacio.
Aside from the Philip-
pines, also bidding to host
the 2013 FIBA-Asia meet
are Iran and late entry Japan.
“I intend to impress upon
our leaders in FIBA-Asia
that the PBA is one with
the SBP in its quest to re-
gain basketball supremacy
here in Asia,” said Salud.
“Unequivocal is our support
of SBP’s quest to host the
FIBA-Asia qualifying tour-
nament here in 2013 and we
want to make sure (FIBA-
Asia) secretary general
Hagop Khajirian of Lebanon
gets that message.”
Khajirian recently visited
the country for an ocular in-
spection of the Mall of Asia
Arena, and was impressed
with the newly built playing
venue patterned after some
of the arenas owned by NBA
teams.
The country hosted the in-
augural staging of the biennial
meet in 1960 when it was still
known as the Asian Basket-
ball Confederation Champi-
onship. A five-time winner
—second in the history of
the event—the Philippine last
hosted the cagefest in 1973.
Salud believes Filipino
basketball fans are excited
about the prospect of bring-
ing the FIBA-Asia cham-
pionship here after Smart
Gilas-Pilipinas 2.0 won the
34th William Jones Cup bas-
ketball tournament in Taipei
recently.
P0.0M+
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6/45 000000000000
4 DIGITS 00000000
3 DIGITS 000000
2 EZ2 0000
LOTTO RESULTS
BOBBY Ray Parks remains on track for
a second straight Most Valuable Player
award, but the National University star
would rather keep his focus on boosting
the Bulldogs’ UAAP Final Four bid. Parks
earned his second UAAP Press Corps
Player of the Week award after lifting the
Bulldogs past the La Salle Green Archers,
72-62, to grab solo fourth (7-4) in the
men’s basketball competition.
Chessers place 21
st
GRANDMASTERS Eugene Torre and Mark Paragua
lost to their respective rivals as the 35th-seed Philip-
pines suferred a heart-breaking 1-3 defeat at the hands of
25th-seed Romania in the 11th and last round, finishing
21st overall at the conclusion of 40th FIDE World Chess
Olympiad at the WOW Convention Center in Istanbul,
Turkey on Sunday.
The 60-year-old Torre (ELO 2469), appearing in a
record 21st Olympiad, bowed to GM Levente Vajda
(2612) on board 3 after 36 moves of Scotch Potter
Variation duel.
The former 1998 World Under-14 rapid champion
Paragua (2508), on the other hand, yielded to GM
Vladislav Nevednichy (2554) on board 4 after 40 moves
of Pseudo-King’s Indian skirmish.
FILIPINO paddlers recently
claimed two bronze medals in
the recent 10th Asian Dragon
Boat Championships in Busan,
South Korea last Saturday.
The Filipinas first landed
third in the grand finals of the
200-meter event with a clocking
of 58.79 seconds.
Philippine Dragon Boat Fed-
eration president Marcia Cris-
tobal confirmed this following the
team’s return from Korea.
China took the gold in 57.38
seconds, while Tahiti settled for
the silver in 58.40 seconds.
A third-place finish also came
the Filipinas’ way in the grand fi-
nals of the 500-meter action with
their time of 2:32.10.
China (2:25.73) was first, fol-
lowed by Tahiti Nui Benjamin Ra-
mos, Asian Dragon Boat Federation
vice president, awarded the medals
to the winners. Peter Atencio
Paddlers take
2 bronze medals
Job well done. Members of the Smart Gilas team, led by coaches Chot Reyes and Ryan Gregorio, hold the Senate Resolution commending the team
for winning the 34th edition of the William Jones Cup in Taipei. They are joined here by Senate President Juan Ponce Enrile and senators Jinggoy Estrada
Koko Pimentel. LINO SANTOS
Pro league backs PH’s Fiba bid
Serena Williams holds the championship
trophy after beating Victoria Azarenka of
Belarus in the championship match of the
2012 US Open tennis tournament Sunday in
New York. AP
McIlroy
Business
Manila Standard TODAY
SEPTEMBER 11, 2012 TUESDAY
B1
CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK
CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK
Ray S. Eñano, Editor extrastory2000@gmail.com
Roderick T. dela Cruz, Assistant Editor
IN BRIEF
Peso strengthens to 4-year high
Neda: Reliance on remittances declines
Govt to explore Benham Rise for oil and gas San Miguel to redeem
P72.8b worth of debt
VOLUME 804.500M
PSE COMPOSITE INDEX
ClosingSeptember 10, 2012
OIL
PRICES
TODAY
P584-P695
LPG/11-kg tank
P47.15-P53.07
Unleaded Gasoline
P38.40-P41.05
Diesel
P40.30-P52.20
Kerosene
P27.20-P31.00
Auto LPG
FOREI GN EXCHANGE RATE
Currency Unit US Dollar Peso
United States Dollar 1.000000 41.7420
Japan Yen 0.012781 0.5335
UK Pound 1.600500 66.8081
Hong Kong Dollar 0.128937 5.3821
Switzerland Franc 1.058761 44.1948
Canada Dollar 1.023123 42.7072
Singapore Dollar 0.809258 33.7800
Australia Dollar 1.038098 43.3323
Bahrain Dinar 2.652872 110.7362
Saudi Arabia Rial 0.266660 11.1309
Brunei Dollar 0.805997 33.6439
Indonesia Rupiah 0.000105 0.0044
Thailand Baht 0.032072 1.3387
UAE Dirham 0.272264 11.3648
Euro Euro 1.281000 53.4715
Korea Won 0.000885 0.0369
China Yuan 0.157654 6.5808
India Rupee 0.018093 0.7552
Malaysia Ringgit 0.321543 13.4218
NewZealand Dollar 0.809979 3.8101
Taiwan Dollar 0.033702 1.4068
Source: PDS Bridge
Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas
Monday, September 10, 2012
PESO-DOLLAR RATE
40
42
44
46
48
P41.615
CLOSE
Closing SEPTEMBER 10, 2012
5,190.81
10.51
HIGH P41.540 LOW P41.620AVERAGE P41.583
5200
4460
3720
2980
2240
1500
1200
Six-month
FDI flows
rose 10.6%
to $917m
By Anna Leah G. Estrada
NET foreign direct investments
reached $73 million in June,
after the acquisition of shares by
a Dutch company in Alaska Milk
Corp., the Bangko Sentral said
Monday.
This brought the six-month
FDI inflows to $917 million,
higher by 10.6 percent than the
$829 million registered in the
same period a year ago.
Bangko Sentral said the
increase was driven by strong
investor sentiment that resulted
in the more than fourfold increase
in net inflows amounting to $1.1
billion as of end-June from $260
million a year earlier.
Equity capital accounted for
the bulk of FDI inflows in the first
semester. Reinvested earnings also
posted net inflow of $74 million,
although this was lower by 57
percent than the $172 million posted
in the same period last year.
“Investor sentiment was
buoyed by the country’s sound
macroeconomic fundamentals,
such as the subdued inflation
environment, strong fiscal
performance and favorable
external payments position,” the
Bangko Sentral said.
The rise in foreign investments
in June was led by equity
infusion by Dutch dairy firm
Royal FrieslandCampina in
Alaska Milk.
“The bulk of investments
coming from the Netherlands, the
United States, Japan, Germany
and Singapore were channeled
mainly to manufacturing, real
estate, mining and quarrying
sectors, wholesale and retail
trade, and accommodation and
food service activities,” the
Bangko Sentral said.
By Alena Mae S. Flores
THE Energy Department is
set to conduct seismic surveys
to determine the oil and gas
potential of Benham Rise, with
the possibility of including the
area in the next contracting round
for petroleum exploration.
Benham Rise, also known as
the Benham Plateau, is a massive
formation of basalt, a common
volcanic rock and is described in
a study as a thickened portion of
the Philippine oceanic crust.
The UN Convention on the Law
of the Sea announced in April that
Benham Rise, which is believed to
be larger than the island of Luzon,
is part of the country’s continental
shelf and territory. The plateau,
which is rich in natural gas and
manganese nodules, is located
east of the Philippines.
“For us to be able to offer
those areas for PECR [Philippine
Energy Contracting Round],
we need data...Now that it is
ours, it might be a good time to
acquire seismic data,” Energy
Undersecretary Jay Jose Layug
Jr. told reporters Monday.
Layug said four companies
were set to conduct seismic
surveys in the eastern side
of the Philippines, where the
Benham Rise is located under
“deep water and volcanic
formations.” Benham Rise sits
approximately 250 kilometers
east of the northern coastline
of Dinapigue, Isabela.
“It takes one to two months for
the seismic [study],” Layug said.
The energy official said they were
hoping to include the Benham Rise
in PECR 5. The department has
successfully concluded the bidding
round for petroleum exploration
under PECR 4 in July but no
service contract has been awarded
to the winning bidders yet.
“It would be nice to do it
alongside PECR 5. It will be
good to include that in PECR 5,”
Layug said.
Exploration permits cut
THE Energy Department hopes to entice more
investments in the oil and gas sector by cutting
down the 200 permits required from oil and gas
firms to half and reduce the processing time to
six months from more than one year, an official
said Monday.
Energy Undersecretary Jose Layug Jr. told
reporters this was the mandate of the members
of the Philippine Upstream Petroleum Task
Force. “We want to cut it at least by half, all
permittings, to six months [from one year] be-
cause it includes obtaining an ECC [environ-
mental compliance certificate. But we have
secured a commitment from the DENR that
certainly for upstream petroleum projects, they
will provide attention to it and reduce the pro-
cess,” Layug said.
President Benigno Aquino earlier issued Ex-
ecutive Order No. 60, Series of 2011, creating
the Philippine Upstream Petroleum Task Force
to ensure facilitation of governmental permits
for exploration activities in the Philippines.
The task force, headed by the department,
is mandated to streamline government rules
and regulations for petroleum operations in the
Philippines.
“EO 60 creates the upstream petroleum task
force. The Philippine upstream petroleum task
force is an inter-agency task force headed by the
doe and the primary thrust is to provide support
mechanisms, streamline government processes
for all those who are undertaking exploration
activities in the Philippines,” Layug said,
Layug said the task force has reduced the pro-
cesses for tax exemptions to two to three weeks
from five to six weeks. Alena Mae S. Flores
Germany extends $42.2m
GERMANY and the Philippines signed Mon-
day a $42.2-million agreement to implement
climate change projects in the country.
“This is a new project under the Philippine-
German Development Cooperation on Climate
Change. The partnership has already identified
programs that will be covered under this initia-
tive,” Presidential assistant for climate change
Elisea Gozun said in a briefing at the Intercon-
tinental Hotel in Makati City.
The agreement called for technical and fi-
nancial support by the German Development
Cooperation-Deutsche Gesellshaft fur Interna-
tionale Zusammennarbeit.
Secretary Mary Ann Lucille Sering, vice
chairman of the Climate Change Commission,
said that the GIZ was providing the needed
support for local initiatives designed to help
communities adapt to the impacts of climate
change. Othel V. Campos
By Maria Bernadette Lunas
THE Philippines has reduced its
dependence on remittances from Filipinos
working in other countries over the last
three years, according to the National
Economic and Development Authority.
Rosemarie Edillon of the Neda-
National Planning and Policy Staff made
the statement, based on the narrowing
net primary income, or the difference
between money received abroad and the
money paid abroad.
“Whenever our growth in net primary
income is higher than the gross domestic
product, it means that we are heavily
relying on remittances. But in the past
few years, the Philippines’ GDP [gross
domestic product] growth has been
higher than its net primary income from
abroad,” Edillon said.
Data from the National Statistical
Coordination Board showed GDP grew
7.6 percent in 2010, while net primary
income grew 10 percent.
Edillon said this pattern started to
reverse in 2011, when net primary
income grew by only 1 percent compared
to a GDP gain of 3.9-percent.
She said in the first quarter of 2012,
GDP grew 6.3 percent, while net primary
income only grew 1.7 percent. Net
primary income rebounded to 4.5 percent
in the following quarter, but it was still
lower than the 5.9 percent GDP gain.
“In the economic profile, we are seeing the
case where our GNI [gross national income]
growth is actually less than our GDP growth,
which is a good thing,” Edillon said.
GNI, formerly called national gross
domestic product, is the sum of the GDP
and the net factor income from abroad.
Edillon, however, said the country would
not be totally independent from money sent
from abroad as remittances continued to be
a significant source of investments.
“Zero dependence on remittances
is probably very ambitious. In reality,
overseas remittances are a significant
part of a country’s economy, whether
developed, developing, or at any stage of
economic development,” Edillon said.
She said the primary goal of the
government was to attain inclusive
growth, in which remittances played an
important role, specifically as source of
human capital.
By Jenniffer B. Austria
SAN Miguel Corp. said Monday
it will redeem P72.8 billion
worth of Series 1 preferred
shares starting October.
The conglomerate said in a
disclosure to the stock exchange
the preferred shares would be
redeemed at P75 per share.
“Proceeds from the
redemption of the shares and
all accumulated unpaid cash
dividends shall be paid on Oct.
5, 2012 to the stockholders of
record as of Sept. 11, 2012,”
San Miguel said.
The government currently
holds 754 million worth of
Series 1 preferred shares valued
at P55.8 billion.
The conglomerate is currently
selling P80 billion worth of
Series 2 preferred shares, which
will be used to repay the Series
1 preferred shares.
San Miguel plans to issue 1.067
billion Series 2 preferred shares,
consisting of 960 million primary
shares and 107 million shares
to cover oversubscription, at an
issue price of P75 per share.
The offer shares will come
from the proposed increase
in the company’s authorized
capital stock from P22.5 billion
to P30 billion.
The preferred shares are
redeemable in five, seven, and 10
years and will carry an interest
rate of 7.5 percent, 7.635 percent
and 8 percent, respectively.
THE peso climbed to its strongest level
in more than four years, as the country
continues to attract foreign funds seeking
higher yields in emerging markets such as
the Philippines.
The peso closed at 41.62
against the US dollar on Monday,
up by 0.2 percent from its last
week’s finish of 41.68 against
the greenback. It traded within
a range of 41.54 to 41.62 to the
dollar, a level not seen since
April 2008.
Some $804.5 million changed
hands during the currency
trading Monday, slightly lower
than Friday’s $883 million.
“The peso is definitely
benefiting from inflows of
foreign money into equities”
given the speculation on
monetary easing by the Fed, said
Jose Vistan, head of research at
AB Capital Securities Ltd. in
Manila. “There’s also increased
confidence in the Philippine
economy, with the possibility of
a rating upgrade.”
Foreign investors bought $17
million of local shares last week,
taking this year’s net purchases to
$2.12 billion, according to stock
exchange data.
The country was upgraded one
level to Ba2 by Moody’s Investors
Service in June last year, or two
levels below investment grade.
Standard & Poor’s raised its
rating one step to BB+ on July
4 this year, or one level below
investment grade.
Several economists, however,
claimed that the strengthening
of the peso was hurting the
competitiveness of the export
and business process outsourcing
sectors.
The better economic growth
this year has bolstered the local
stock and debt markets. The Asian
Development Bank said in its Asia
Bond Monitor the Philippines had
the fastest-growing corporate
bond market in the region in the
second quarter.
Data showed that the
Philippines had P3.7 trillion,
or $87 billion, in outstanding
peso-denominated bonds as of
the second quarter. This was a
growth in local currency terms of
2.9 percent on quarterly basis and
12.4 percent on a yearly basis,
due to strong growth in both
treasury and corporate markets.
Its corporate bond market rose
11.5 percent quarter-on-quarter
to $12 billion as of the second
quarter, outpacing the 7.4-percent
increase in Indonesia and 5.8
percent in Singapore.
The ADB report said Philippine
banks tapped the bond market
to improve their capitalization
and liquidity ratios in advance
of the adoption of the Basel III
regulations.
The report, however, warned
that policymakers in the region
should brace themselves for
further shock and volatility from
the global financial markets.
“Our local currency bond
markets are emerging as a safe
haven in the midst of the crisis,
but we should not be complacent,”
said Iwan Azis, head of ADB’s
Office of Regional Economic
Integration, which produced the
Asia Bond Monitor report.
“Volatile markets can deter
long-term investment and hurt the
economy by making it costlier for
governments and companies to
raise funds. Moreover, uncertain
market reaction to policy action
is undermining the predictability
and thus the effectiveness of
conventional policymaking,”
Azis said in a statement.
He said greater regional
participation in emerging
East Asia’s bond markets and
cooperation were needed to
counter the volatility from
external shocks and to strengthen
regional financial safety nets.
Anna Leah G. Estrada,
with Bloomberg
RCBC is best SME bank. The Asian Banking & Finance Magazine named Rizal Commercial Banking Corp. as the Philippines’
SME Bank of the Year during the 2012 Retail Banking Awards held recently in Singapore. RCBC was cited for consistently rolling
out pioneering initiatives and implementing programs that directly benefit the country’s small and medium enterprises. Shown
receiving the award from ABF Magazine editor-in-chief Tim Charlton (left) are RCBC first senior vice president Reynaldo Orsolino
and assistant vice president Nerissa Toledo.
Business
ManilaStandardToday
extrastory2000@gmail.com
SEPTEMBER 11, 2012 TUESDAY
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Market dips; 7-Eleven
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52 Weeks Previous % Net Foreign (Peso)
High Low STOCKS Close High Low Close Change Volume Trade/Buying
MST BUSINESS DAILY STOCKS REVIEW
MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2012
M
S
T
FINANCIAL
70.50 46.00 Banco de Oro Unibank Inc. 60.50 60.50 59.60 59.60 (1.49) 2,235,430 (53,685,944.00)
77.45 50.00 Bank of PI 73.20 73.20 72.70 72.90 (0.41) 1,473,340 (33,607,549.00)
1.82 0.68 Bankard, Inc. 0.70 0.70 0.70 0.70 0.00 61,000
595.00 370.00 China Bank 52.55 53.95 52.00 53.65 2.09 491,620 (561,975.00)
2.20 1.42 BDO Leasing & Fin. Inc. 1.96 1.96 1.96 1.96 0.00 130,000
23.90 13.80 COL Financial 20.50 20.65 20.15 20.50 0.00 99,600 (624,000.00)
20.70 18.50 Eastwest Bank 20.20 21.25 20.40 20.95 3.71 4,264,100 10,357,910.00
22.00 7.95 Filipino Fund Inc. 11.00 11.00 11.00 11.00 0.00 1,400
0.95 0.62 First Abacus 0.76 0.78 0.78 0.78 2.63 380,000
89.00 50.00 First Metro Inv. 74.75 79.00 73.10 73.10 (2.21) 930 (2,990.00)
3.26 1.91 I-Remit Inc. 2.91 2.89 2.88 2.89 (0.69) 15,000
650.00 420.00 Manulife Fin. Corp. 460.00 480.00 460.00 477.00 3.70 240
39.20 3.00 Maybank ATR KE 25.00 25.00 25.00 25.00 0.00 4,900
102.50 60.00 Metrobank 92.65 93.20 92.30 93.10 0.49 1,323,410 (22,436,770.00)
77.80 41.00 Phil. National Bank 69.90 69.95 69.80 69.90 0.00 45,450
500.00 210.00 PSE Inc. 370.00 373.80 370.00 373.60 0.97 6,750 917,710.00
45.50 29.45 RCBC `A’ 44.00 43.95 43.55 43.60 (0.91) 85,500.00 (777,065.00)
155.20 77.00 Security Bank 154.00 160.00 154.00 158.80 3.12 1,456,640 166,039,362.00
1100.00 879.00 Sun Life Financial 910.00 949.00 940.00 940.00 3.30 20
140.00 58.00 Union Bank 102.00 102.80 102.50 102.50 0.49 2,320 (30,750.00)
2.06 1.43 Vantage Equities 1.80 1.82 1.82 1.82 1.11 125,000
INDUSTRIAL
35.50 26.50 Aboitiz Power Corp. 33.55 34.10 33.55 34.00 1.34 4,598,800 94,940,795.00
13.58 8.00 Agrinurture Inc. 8.40 8.40 8.36 8.40 0.00 61,100
23.95 11.98 Alaska Milk Corp. 23.45 23.55 23.50 23.55 0.43 14,900
1.70 0.97 Alliance Tuna Intl Inc. 1.51 1.60 1.51 1.58 4.64 8,423,000 (2,342,400.00)
48.00 25.00 Alphaland Corp. 29.60 29.70 29.60 29.70 0.34 2,500 (44,400.00)
1.62 1.08 Alsons Cons. 1.33 1.35 1.33 1.35 1.50 770,000
Asiabest Group 20.55 21.45 20.25 20.40 (0.73) 53,900 (106,250.00)
2.96 2.12 Calapan Venture 2.87 2.70 2.65 2.70 (5.92) 36,000 27,000.00
2.75 2.30 Chemrez Technologies Inc. 2.60 2.60 2.55 2.58 (0.77) 530,000 (292,000.00)
9.74 7.41 Cirtek Holdings (Chips) 9.64 9.60 9.40 9.60 (0.41) 1,200
6.41 4.83 Energy Devt. Corp. (EDC) 5.91 5.93 5.82 5.86 (0.85) 12,037,900 (13,974,416.00)
7.77 2.80 EEI 7.35 7.45 7.25 7.42 0.95 609,200 36,403.00
19.40 12.50 First Gen Corp. 18.62 18.70 18.40 18.50 (0.64) 318,700 (1,614,386.00)
79.30 51.50 First Holdings ‘A’ 76.90 77.95 76.90 77.30 0.52 544,790 10,283,819.50
27.00 17.50 Ginebra San Miguel Inc. 19.00 19.50 19.00 19.00 0.00 7,000
0.02 0.0110 Greenergy 0.0170 0.0170 0.0160 0.0160 (5.88) 232,700,000 (1,364,800.00)
13.10 7.80 Holcim Philippines Inc. 12.92 13.00 12.98 12.98 0.46 270,100 1,696,940.00
6.00 3.80 Integ. Micro-Electronics 4.05 4.35 4.08 4.12 1.73 184,000
2.35 0.61 Ionics Inc 0.620 0.640 0.620 0.640 3.23 101,000
120.00 80.00 Jollibee Foods Corp. 96.50 96.30 94.50 94.50 (2.07) 133,410 (6,793,872.50)
Lafarge Rep 9.45 9.60 9.40 9.45 0.00 102,000 (47,750.00)
91.25 25.00 Liberty Flour 38.00 40.00 40.00 40.00 5.26 3,700
8.40 1.04 LMG Chemicals 2.24 2.24 2.11 2.15 (4.02) 269,000
3.20 1.32 Manchester Intl. “A” 2.50 2.51 2.51 2.51 0.40 15,000
27.45 18.10 Manila Water Co. Inc. 26.35 26.40 26.25 26.35 0.00 1,208,000 (3,100,965.00)
18.10 8.12 Megawide 16.300 16.320 16.300 16.300 0.00 18,700 (221,690.00)
280.60 215.00 Mla. Elect. Co `A’ 252.20 256.60 250.00 256.60 1.74 151,640 16,065,654.00
12.20 7.50 Pancake House Inc. 7.00 7.00 6.90 6.90 (1.43) 34,000 (235,700.00)
3.65 1.96 Pepsi-Cola Products Phil. 3.95 4.00 3.84 3.91 (1.01) 5,695,000 1,249,380.00
16.00 9.70 Petron Corporation 10.20 10.60 10.20 10.44 2.35 13,028,300 (792,236.00)
13.70 10.20 Phinma Corporation 10.90 10.90 10.90 10.90 0.00 100
14.94 8.05 Phoenix Petroleum Phils. 8.15 8.20 8.15 8.15 0.00 22,500
4.42 1.01 RFM Corporation 4.12 4.14 4.07 4.08 (0.97) 529,000 180,050.00
3.90 2.01 Roxas Holdings 2.70 2.75 2.75 2.75 1.85 50,000
6.50 2.90 Salcon Power Corp. 5.10 5.66 5.66 5.66 10.98 100
34.60 26.50 San Miguel Brewery Inc. 34.40 34.40 34.00 34.40 0.00 90,300
129.20 110.20 San Miguel Corp `A’ 111.10 111.00 110.80 110.90 (0.18) 184,680 (4,173,775.00)
2.62 1.25 Seacem 2.47 2.53 2.39 2.39 (3.24) 6,102,000 (53,920.00)
0.196 0.112 Swift Foods, Inc. 0.140 0.140 0.139 0.139 (0.71) 850,000
14.66 3.30 Tanduay Holdings 11.80 12.18 11.66 12.06 2.20 1,114,700 3,050,140.00
2.88 1.99 TKC Steel Corp. 2.20 2.20 2.05 2.20 0.00 7,000
1.41 0.90 Trans-Asia Oil 1.18 1.18 1.16 1.17 (0.85) 286,000
69.20 37.00 Universal Robina 64.30 64.30 63.80 63.90 (0.62) 634,670 21,509,719.00
5.50 1.05 Victorias Milling 1.29 1.29 1.27 1.28 (0.78) 842,000 12,900.00
0.77 0.320 Vitarich Corp. 0.600 0.600 0.590 0.590 (1.67) 100,000
18.00 2.55 Vivant Corp. 9.30 9.00 9.00 9.00 (3.23) 500
1.22 0.77 Vulcan Ind’l. 0.96 0.96 0.96 0.96 0.00 82,000
HOLDING FIRMS
1.18 0.65 Abacus Cons. `A’ 0.72 0.74 0.71 0.73 1.39 23,131,000
59.90 35.50 Aboitiz Equity 48.00 48.90 48.00 48.90 1.88 506,500 18,085,735.00
0.019 0.014 Alcorn Gold Res. 0.0180 0.0170 0.0170 0.0170 (5.56) 5,000,000
13.70 8.00 Alliance Global Inc. 12.50 12.76 12.48 12.64 1.12 32,774,300 250,015,938.00
2.60 1.80 Anglo Holdings A 2.00 2.00 1.98 2.00 0.00 101,000
6.98 0.260 Asia Amalgamated A 4.95 5.00 4.95 4.95 0.00 3,000
2.98 1.49 ATN Holdings A 1.58 1.58 1.57 1.58 0.00 6,000
4.16 2.30 ATN Holdings B 1.61 1.68 1.63 1.67 3.73 190,000 (50,350.00)
485.20 272.00 Ayala Corp `A’ 421.00 422.60 413.00 414.00 (1.66) 365,830 (69,700,840.00)
64.80 30.50 DMCI Holdings 56.45 56.60 56.20 56.50 0.09 327,530 (2,172,685.00)
5.20 3.30 Filinvest Dev. Corp. 4.00 4.10 4.06 4.10 2.50 354,000
0.98 0.10 Forum Pacific 0.249 0.249 0.249 0.249 0.00 80,000
556.00 455.40 GT Capital 550.00 564.00 551.00 558.00 1.45 62,860 18,157,165.00
5.22 2.94 House of Inv. 4.80 4.81 4.80 4.80 0.00 52,000
36.20 19.00 JG Summit Holdings 32.25 32.80 32.20 32.40 0.47 1,390,100 33,357,755.00
6.21 4.00 Lopez Holdings Corp. 5.11 5.24 5.14 5.20 1.76 1,843,100 3,876,574.00
1.54 0.61 Lodestar Invt. Holdg.Corp. 1.05 1.06 1.03 1.05 0.00 658,000
0.91 0.300 Mabuhay Holdings `A’ 0.430 0.455 0.425 0.450 4.65 110,000
3.82 1.800 Marcventures Hldgs., Inc. 2.30 2.30 2.25 2.26 (1.74) 306,000
4.65 2.56 Metro Pacific Inv. Corp. 4.21 4.29 4.22 4.27 1.43 12,888,000 20,050,790.00
6.24 3.40 Minerales Industrias Corp. 5.08 5.08 5.03 5.03 (0.98) 56,200 (131,300.00)
9.66 1.22 MJCI Investments Inc. 6.79 6.74 6.67 6.67 (1.77) 500
2.20 1.20 Prime Media Hldg 1.400 1.380 1.380 1.380 (1.43) 3,000
0.82 0.44 Prime Orion 0.470 0.475 0.475 0.475 1.06 40,000
0.490 0.285 Sinophil Corp. 0.315 0.315 0.315 0.315 0.00 400,000
760.00 450.00 SM Investments Inc. 721.00 722.50 720.00 721.50 0.07 238,030 (1,654,260.00)
2.71 1.08 Solid Group Inc. 2.10 2.11 2.08 2.08 (0.95) 75,000 52,000.00
1.57 1.14 South China Res. Inc. 1.18 1.20 1.18 1.20 1.69 172,000
850.00 425.00 Transgrid 460.00 495.00 495.00 495.00 7.61 90
0.620 0.082 Wellex Industries 0.3250 0.3200 0.3150 0.3200 (1.54) 160,000
0.980 0.380 Zeus Holdings 0.400 0.405 0.400 0.400 0.00 240,000
P R O P E R T Y
3.34 1.70 A. Brown Co., Inc. 3.03 3.00 2.95 3.00 (0.99) 65,000
0.83 0.42 Araneta Prop `A’ 0.600 0.530 0.530 0.530 (11.67) 100,000
24.15 13.36 Ayala Land `B’ 22.95 22.90 22.30 22.30 (2.83) 1,907,600 (11,301,710.00)
5.62 3.08 Belle Corp. `A’ 4.85 4.90 4.84 4.86 0.21 1,421,000 (484,000.00)
9.00 2.26 Cebu Holdings 5.37 5.50 5.37 5.39 0.37 458,000 1,325,305.00
2.85 1.35 Century Property 1.50 1.51 1.46 1.50 0.00 9,418,000 104,300.00
2.91 1.20 City & Land Dev. 2.47 2.47 2.47 2.47 0.00 5,000
1.50 1.05 Cityland Dev. `A’ 1.15 1.14 1.10 1.14 (0.87) 2,000
1.11 0.67 Cyber Bay Corp. 0.80 0.80 0.80 0.80 0.00 145,000
0.94 0.54 Empire East Land 0.840 0.840 0.830 0.840 0.00 9,026,000
3.80 2.90 Eton Properties 3.75 3.78 3.69 3.75 0.00 55,000 (37,500.00)
0.310 0.10 Ever Gotesco 0.205 0.204 0.201 0.203 (0.98) 3,030,000 12,210.00
2.74 1.63 Global-Estate 1.90 2.01 1.90 2.01 5.79 16,605,000 14,258,030.00
1.44 0.98 Filinvest Land,Inc. 1.32 1.33 1.31 1.32 0.00 1,982,000 2,152,500.00
3.80 1.21 Highlands Prime 1.76 1.76 1.76 1.76 0.00 5,000
2.14 0.65 Interport `A’ 1.28 1.22 1.20 1.22 (4.69) 75,000
2.34 1.51 Megaworld Corp. 2.23 2.23 2.19 2.19 (1.79) 83,707,000 (69,439,760.00)
0.36 0.150 MRC Allied Ind. 0.1640 0.1630 0.1590 0.1630 (0.61) 1,190,000 16,200.00
0.990 0.089 Phil. Estates Corp. 0.6800 0.6800 0.6700 0.6800 0.00 1,500,000
19.94 10.00 Robinson’s Land `B’ 18.36 18.68 18.36 18.36 0.00 2,151,700 (3,888,958.00)
7.71 2.51 Rockwell 3.40 3.54 3.39 3.39 (0.29) 127,000 10,260.00
2.85 1.81 Shang Properties Inc. 2.80 2.70 2.62 2.70 (3.57) 114,000
8.95 6.00 SM Development `A’ 6.09 6.10 6.07 6.10 0.16 729,500 (2,687,177.00)
18.20 10.94 SM Prime Holdings 13.96 14.10 14.02 14.10 1.00 2,925,700 23,015,822.00
0.91 0.64 Sta. Lucia Land Inc. 0.70 0.70 0.67 0.70 0.00 212,000
4.55 1.80 Starmalls 4.00 3.99 3.90 3.99 (0.25) 91,000 31,680.00
4.66 2.60 Vista Land & Lifescapes 4.580 4.590 4.500 4.510 (1.53) 5,929,000 (7,876,780.00)
S E R V I C E S
4.72 1.20 2GO Group’ 1.76 1.76 1.76 1.76 0.00 17,000
42.00 24.80 ABS-CBN 28.20 28.50 28.05 28.25 0.18 208,300
18.98 1.05 Acesite Hotel 1.42 1.42 1.38 1.41 (0.70) 177,000
0.78 0.45 APC Group, Inc. 0.630 0.610 0.600 0.610 (3.17) 18,000
10.92 7.30 Asian Terminals Inc. 9.00 9.10 9.05 9.10 1.11 10,000 90,750.00
102.80 4.45 Bloomberry 9.65 9.70 9.60 9.60 (0.52) 5,540,500 (4,545,537.00)
0.5300 0.1010 Boulevard Holdings 0.1600 0.1600 0.1550 0.1550 (3.13) 25,450,000 152,570.00
24.00 5.20 Calata Corp. 5.59 5.73 5.48 5.49 (1.79) 446,100
82.50 60.80 Cebu Air Inc. (5J) 59.50 59.65 58.50 58.85 (1.09) 928,020 2,129,579.50
10.60 8.20 Centro Esc. Univ. 10.20 10.10 10.10 10.10 (0.98) 5,000
9.70 5.44 DFNN Inc. 5.79 5.51 5.48 5.48 (5.35) 45,000
1270.00 831.00 Globe Telecom 1109.00 1115.00 1102.00 1105.00 (0.36) 11,895 1,782,395.00
11.00 6.18 GMA Network Inc. 9.80 9.80 9.65 9.80 0.00 110,500
77.00 43.40 I.C.T.S.I. 68.00 68.80 68.00 68.25 0.37 293,050 7,585,512.00
4.70 1.75 IP Converge 2.05 2.06 2.05 2.06 0.49 20,000
34.50 0.036 IP E-Game Ventures Inc. 0.025 0.025 0.023 0.023 (8.00) 80,600,000
3.87 1.00 IPVG Corp. 1.00 1.02 0.99 1.00 0.00 979,000 54,000.00
0.0760 0.042 Island Info 0.0460 0.0460 0.0460 0.0460 0.00 300,000
5.1900 2.550 ISM Communications 3.0300 3.0500 3.0300 3.0500 0.66 56,000
10.30 5.90 Leisure & Resorts 7.50 7.64 7.35 7.50 0.00 565,100
3.70 2.60 Liberty Telecom 2.69 2.72 2.68 2.72 1.12 22,000
4.08 1.21 Manila Jockey 2.94 2.99 2.85 2.86 (2.72) 932,000
22.95 13.80 Pacific Online Sys. Corp. 14.06 14.06 14.06 14.06 0.00 23,000
8.58 5.35 PAL Holdings Inc. 7.70 7.70 7.50 7.68 (0.26) 29,800
3.39 1.05 Paxys Inc. 2.75 2.78 2.65 2.65 (3.64) 795,000
10.00 5.00 Phil. Racing Club 9.50 9.41 9.41 9.41 (0.95) 25,000
71.00 18.00 Phil. Seven Corp. 68.00 71.00 68.10 70.00 2.94 41,283,290 502,612,160.00
17.88 12.10 Philweb.Com Inc. 16.98 17.00 16.96 17.00 0.12 339,700 2,803,168.00
2886.00 2096.00 PLDT Common 2750.00 2786.00 2750.00 2760.00 0.36 57,030 23,347,630.00
30.15 10.68 Puregold 29.60 29.80 29.30 29.30 (1.01) 1,292,200 4,853,385.00
3.30 2.42 Transpacific Broadcast 2.55 2.62 2.51 2.63 3.14 11,000
0.79 0.34 Waterfront Phils. 0.435 0.465 0.465 0.465 6.90 10,000
MINING & OIL
0.0083 0.0038 Abra Mining 0.0047 0.0045 0.0045 0.0045 (4.26) 230,000,000
6.20 3.01 Apex `A’ 4.99 4.92 4.91 4.91 (1.60) 17,000
6.22 3.00 Apex `B’ 4.65 4.99 4.99 4.99 7.31 2,000
20.80 14.50 Atlas Cons. `A’ 17.08 17.16 17.04 17.12 0.23 488,100 (3,177,078.00)
48.00 20.00 Atok-Big Wedge `A’ 27.90 28.05 24.60 24.60 (11.83) 1,700
0.345 0.170 Basic Energy Corp. 0.255 0.255 0.255 0.255 0.00 600,000
34.00 21.20 Benguet Corp `B’ 23.95 23.10 23.10 23.10 (3.55) 10,000
2.23 1.05 Century Peak Metals Hldgs 1.04 1.04 1.03 1.04 0.00 43,000
61.80 6.96 Dizon 22.35 24.05 22.10 22.70 1.57 105,100
1.21 0.50 Geograce Res. Phil. Inc. 0.56 0.57 0.56 0.56 0.00 2,016,000
1.81 1.0600 Lepanto `A’ 1.120 1.150 1.100 1.130 0.89 16,453,000
2.070 1.0900 Lepanto `B’ 1.190 1.210 1.170 1.200 0.84 7,942,000 (1,315,620.00)
0.085 0.042 Manila Mining `A’ 0.0600 0.0600 0.0580 0.0600 0.00 58,570,000
0.840 0.570 Manila Mining `B’ 0.0590 0.0610 0.0590 0.0610 3.39 52,700,000
36.50 15.04 Nickelasia 17.20 18.08 17.20 17.80 3.49 2,074,300 8,129,886.00
12.84 2.91 Nihao Mineral Resources 7.14 7.38 7.10 7.21 0.98 482,000
8.40 2.99 Oriental Peninsula Res. 4.470 4.490 4.350 4.400 (1.57) 2,456,000 (92,920.00)
0.032 0.014 Oriental Pet. `A’ 0.0180 0.0180 0.0170 0.0170 (5.56) 6,600,000
7.05 5.10 Petroenergy Res. Corp. 5.96 6.01 6.00 6.01 0.84 114,200
28.25 18.40 Philex `A’ 17.20 16.70 14.98 15.80 (8.14) 19,781,600 (53,321,870.00)
48.00 3.00 PhilexPetroleum 33.00 33.00 31.80 33.00 0.00 183,800 105,440.00
0.062 0.017 Philodrill Corp. `A’ 0.048 0.049 0.048 0.048 0.00 110,500,000
257.80 161.10 Semirara Corp. 219.00 219.00 215.00 215.00 (1.83) 223,400 (16,048,422.00)
0.029 0.015 United Paragon 0.0150 0.0150 0.0150 0.0150 0.00 1,100,000
PREFERRED
50.00 23.05 ABS-CBN Holdings Corp. 28.00 28.70 27.80 27.90 (0.36) 787,200 (15,114,650.00)
580.00 535.00 Ayala Corp. Pref `A’ 545.00 545.00 545.00 545.00 0.00 190
103.50 100.00 First Gen G 103.10 103.10 103.10 103.10 0.00 300
109.80 101.50 First Phil. Hldgs.-Pref. 102.50 102.00 101.80 101.80 (0.68) 6,000
11.02 6.00 GMA Holdings Inc. 9.70 9.70 9.69 9.70 0.00 64,500
116.70 108.90 PCOR-Preferred 108.10 108.10 107.90 107.90 (0.19) 9,900
80.00 74.50 SMC Preferred 1 73.50 74.20 74.20 74.20 0.95 10
1050.00 1000.00 SMPFC Preferred 1012.00 1013.00 1012.00 1013.00 0.10 2,185
WARRANTS & BONDS
1.31 0.62 Megaworld Corp. Warrants 1.23 1.21 1.21 1.21 (1.63) 50,000
0.210 0.00 Omico Corp. Warrant 0.0160 0.0240 0.0240 0.0240 50.00 400,000
TRADI NG SUMMARY
SHARES VALUE
FINANCIAL 12,203,091 723,642,124.35
INDUSTRIAL 292,845,729 649,744,989.77
HOLDING FIRMS 83,401,032 1,192,678,575.96
PROPERTY 143,032,261 409,060,169.33
SERVICES 163,520,427 3,418,584,451.974
MINING & OIL 513,075,251 468,773,675.258
GRAND TOTAL 1,208,077,791 6,862,483,986.644
FINANCIAL 1,307.35 (UP) 3.47
INDUSTRIAL 7,915.22 (DOWN) 0.86
HOLDING FIRMS 4,385 (UP) 18.42
PROPERTY 1,996.87 (DOWN) 22.2
SERVICES 1,765.48 (UP) 2.29
MINING & OIL 20,460.57 (DOWN) 253.31
PSEI 5,190.81 (DOWN) 10.51
All Shares Index 3,453.09 (DOWN) 1.74
Gainers: 70; Losers: 73; Unchanged:49; Total: 192
CHIN WONG
DIGITAL LIFE
Alliance
Select
acquires
6 vessels
IN THE bad old days before networking was
common, the only way to send a file to another
computer was to save it to a floppy disk and carry
it over to the other machine. This wasn’t so bad if
the other computer was just a few desks away at
the office—and if the file wasn’t too large, since
the old 5-1/4-inch floppy disks could only hold 1.2
megabytes of date, not nearly enough to store even
your average MP3 song. But if the other computer
was halfway across town, you’d need to get your
walking shoes on, hence the term “Sneakernet.”
The development of networks, both wired and
wireless, made life a little easier. You could save
the file to a folder on the server and allow other
users on the network to gain access to it.
Or, after the Internet became common, you could
simply attach the file to an e-mail and send it off.
The major disadvantage to this approach is that
large files take quite awhile to upload—before you
can send them to some server halfway around the
world, which would then forward the message back
to your colleague seated next to you.
The newest versions of the Windows and
Mac operating systems have options for ad hoc
file sharing, but these aren’t very easy to set up,
especially if you want to share files across two
different platforms.
The Mac introduced a feature called AirDrop
starting with Mac OS X Lion that enabled two
similarly configured Macs to send files wirelessly
to each other even without a Wi-Fi network.
Unfortunately, this approach didn’t work with older
Macs, and of course, wouldn’t work with Windows
or Linux PCs.
If you’re transferring files between notebooks,
you could try Bluetooth, but this, too, can be a pain
to set up, and the data transfer rate is slow. It also
won’t work if you’re trying to send a document to
a desktop PC, which typically has no Bluetooth
capability.
Then, there’s the modern-day equivalent of
the floppy, the USB stick, but this requires the
annoying, extra step of safely removing the device
afterward, or even more irksome, the possibility
that you’ll forget to retrieve your storage device.
In search of a more convenient way to share
files across platforms, I recently came across the
free and open source application called NitroShare
(https://launchpad.net/nitroshare), which runs on
Linux, Windows and Mac OS X.
Written by Nathan Osman, NitroShare is designed
to be a hassle-free way to send and receive files
to and from machines sharing the same wireless
network.
To get it up and running, simply download
the appropriate version of the program for your
operating system and run it. There’s no need
to enter any network settings; the program will
automatically discover all other machines on the
network running NitroShare.
The application integrates with the operating
system, using application indicators on Ubuntu
Linux, the system tray on Windows, or the status
menu on the Mac.
NitroShare also creates a small widget, called a
ShareBox, on the bottom right of the screen. To send
a file to another machine on the network, simply
drag it from your file manager into the ShareBox
and tell it where you want to send the file. You can
create dedicated ShareBoxes on your desktop so
you can skip the destination pop-up.
You can use the drop-down menu from the tray
icon to send a file. If you’re running Ubuntu Linux,
a third method is to right-click on the file in the
Nautilus file manager and choose “Send item with
NitroShare.” Recipients get a pop-up asking them
if they will accept an incoming file.
By default, NitroShare puts incoming files onto
the desktop, but you can change this and other
preferences by using the Settings menu item.
File transfers are pretty fast, but if you want to
speed them up, particularly on larger files, you can
also use on-the-fly compression to decrease the
transfer time and the bandwidth used.
NitroShare was one of 130 programs submitted to
the App Showdown contest organized by Ubuntu’s
sponsor, Canonical, in June. Even though it didn’t
make it into the top three, it’s a big winner in my
book.
Column archives and blog at:
http://www.chinwong.com
By Jenniffer B. Austria
PUBLICLY listed tuna canning
firm Alliance Select Foods
International Inc. said Monday
it acquired six commercial tuna
fishing vessels in a bid to have
direct access to raw materials.
Alliance Select said in
a disclosure to the stock
exchange the fishing vessels
were acquired from BSJ
Fishing & Trading Inc., settling
in full the latter’s obligation to
the tuna manufacturer for fish
deposits worth $15 million.
“With the acquisition of the
fishing vessels, Alliance Select
expects to ease its dependence
on fish suppliers for its tuna
business as it will have the
company direct access to raw
materials,” the company said.
The company said the
acquisition also represents
another step in the direction of
vertical integration.
Its Indonesian subsidiary
earlier obtained fishing
allocation from the Indonesian
government. A l l i a n c e
Tuna also acquired 80-
percent stake in New Zealand
salmon marine farming and
processing operation, Akaroa
Salmon NZ Ltd.
Akaroa is among the
pioneers of salmon farming in
New Zealand. It was formed
in 1985 and currently operates
two marine farms in Akaroa
Harbor South Island. It is
one of the three companies in
New Zealand that can supply
fresh salmon to its customers
throughout the year.
STOCKS traded lower Monday, after a
surprise drop in Chinese imports in Au-
gust pointed to a slowdown in the world’s
second-largest economy, where other
Asian countries rely for export growth.
The Philippine Stock
Exchange index, the 30-company
benchmark, shed 10 points, or
0.2 percent, to close at 5,190.81,
with three of the six subsectors
ending in the red. Mining and
oil, property and industrial
companies incurred losses.
The heavier index, representing
all shares, also inched down by
1 point to 3,453.09, as losers
outnumbered gainers, 73 to
70, with 49 issues unchanged.
Value turnover amounted to P6.9
billion.
Philippine Seven Corp.,
operator of the 7-Eleven
convenience stores, was the
most actively traded stock, rising
2.9 percent to P70. Some 41.3
million shares of the company,
worth P2.9 billion were traded
Monday. Net foreign buying
of the stock amounted to P503
million .
Security Bank Corp. rose 3.1
percent to P158.80 while East
West Banking Corp. increased
3.7 percent to P20.95.
Philex Mining Corp. sank to a
17-month low, as its operations
remained suspended, losing P30
million a day. Philex dipped 8.1
percent to P15.80.
Imports declined 2.6 percent
from a year earlier, below
analysts’ expectations of growth
in low single digits, data showed
Monday. That came on top of
August’s decline in factory output
to a three-year low and other
signs growth is still decelerating
despite repeated stimulus efforts.
Meanwhile, Asian stocks were
also mostly lower Monday, as
investors awaited a meeting by
Federal Reserve policy makers
who are expected to announce
new plans to stimulate a sluggish
US economy in response to a
disappointing jobs report.
The US government reported
Friday that 96,000 jobs were
created in the US last month,
fewer than economists had
forecast. The unemployment
rate fell to 8.1 percent from 8.3
percent, but only because many
people gave up looking for work,
so they were no longer counted
as unemployed.
But market losses were kept in
check, since investors now think
the Fed might announce another
round of bond-buying, known as
quantitative easing, at its next
meeting on Sept. 13 to help lower
interest rates and thus boost loan
growth.
South Korea’s Kospi was
nearly unchanged at 1,929.59
and Hong Kong’s Hang Seng
added 0.1 percent to 19,819.86.
Australia’s S&P/ASX 200 was
flat at 4,326.10. Benchmarks
in Taiwan, India and mainland
China rose. Singapore and
Indonesia fell.
Japan’s Nikkei 225 index fell
less than 0.1 percent to 8,866.84
after the government said the
economy grew at a slower pace
than earlier estimated for the April-
June quarter. Growth stood at an
annual 0.7 percent, slower than the
1.4 percent given in August.
Fears of a global economic
slowdown were compounded after
China released trade data showing
that imports shrank and export
growth was muted in August. That
came on top of the release over the
weekend of data showing sluggish
Chinese industrial production and
investment.
With Bloomberg, AP
CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK
SEPTEMBER 11, 2012 TUESDAY
B3
Classifeds
ManilaStandardToday
adv.mst@gmail.com
Page Compositor: Diana Keyser Punzalan
Republic of the Philippines
DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS AND HIGHWAYS
Sorsogon Second District Engineering Offce
Bagacay, Gubat, Sorsogon
I NVI TATI ON TO BI D
(MST-Sept. 11, 2012)
The Bids and Awards Committee (BAC) of the DPWH, Sorsogon Second
District Engineering Offce, Bagacay, Gubat, Sorsogon, invites contractors to
bid for:
Contract ID : 12FL0013
Contract Name : Constructi on of Carri edo Ri ver Control wi th
Floodway Clearing
Contract Location : Carriedo, Irosin, Sorsogon
Scope of Work : Construction of River Control and Floodway Clearing
Approved Budget for the Contract (ABC): Php 19,100,000.00
Contract Duration : _195_ calendar days
The BAC will conduct the procurement process in accordance with
the Revised IRR of R.A. 9184. Bids received in excess of the ABC shall be
automatically rejected at the opening of bid.
To bid for this contract, a contractor must submit a Letter of Intent (LOI),
purchase bid documents and must meet the following major criteria: (a) prior
registration with DPWH, (b) Filipino Citizen or 75% Filipino-owned partnership,
corporation, cooperative, or joint venture, (c) with PCAB license applicable to
the type and cost of this contract, (d) completion of similar contract costing at
least 50% of ABC within a period of 10 years, and (e) Net Financial Contracting
Capacity at least equal to ABC, or credit line commitment at least equal to 10%
of ABC. The BAC will use non-discretionary pass/fail criteria in the eligibility
check and preliminary examination of bids.
Unregistered contractors, however, shall submit their applications for
registration to DPWH-POCW Central Offce before the deadline for the receipt of
LOI. The DPWH-POCW Central Offce will only process contractors’ applications
for registration with complete requirements and issue the Contractors’ Certifcate
of Registration (CRC). Registration Forms may be downloaded at the DPWH
website www.dpwh.gov.ph.
The signifcant times and deadlines of procurement activities are shown
below.
1. Issuance of Bidding Documents From September 7, 2012 to September 28, 2012
2. Pre-Bid Conference September 14, 2012 at 10:00 AM
3. Deadline of Receipt of LOI from
Prospective Bidders September 21, 2012 at 3:00 PM
4. Receipts of Bids Deadline: September 28, 2012 at 10:00 AM
5. Opening of Bids September 28, 2012 at 2:00 PM
The BAC will issue hard copies of Bidding Documents (BD’s) at DPWH
Sorsogon 2
nd
DEO, Bagacay, Gubat, Sorsogon upon payment of a non-refundable
fee of P 10,000.00. Prospective bidders may also download the BD’s form at
the DPWH website, if available. Prospective bidders that will download the BD’s
from the DPWH website shall pay the said fees on or before the submission of
their Bid Documents. The Pre-Bid Conference shall be open only to interested
parties who have purchased the BD’s. Bids must accompanied by a bid security,
in the amount and acceptable form, as stated in Section 27.2 of the Revised IRR.
Prospective bidders shall submit their duly accomplished forms as specifed
in the BD’s in two (2) separate sealed bid envelopes to the BAC Chairman. The
frst envelope shall contain the technical component of the bid, which shall include
a copy of the CRC. The second envelope shall contain the fnancial component
of the bid. Contract will be awarded to the Lowest Calculated Responsive Bid
as determined in the bid evaluation and post-qualifcation.
The DPWH, Sorsogon 2
nd
DEO, Bagacay, Gubat, Sorsogon reserves the
right to accept or reject any bid, to annul the bidding process at any time prior
contract award, without thereby incurring any liability to the affected bidder/s.

Approved by:
(Sgd.) ROMEO F. CIELO
BAC Chairman
NOTED:
(Sgd.) JUANITO R. ALAMAR
District Engineer
ANNEX “A”
Invitation to Bid for Supply and Delivery of Eight (8) Lots Hardware
and Upholstery Materials for the Fabrication of 120 Slot Machine
Stands and 300 Slot Machine Stools
FOR CF - CEBU UNDER ITB NO. 09-04-2012
Phi l i ppi ne Amusement & Gami ng Corporati on
A Sure Bet for Progress in Gaming, Entertainment and Nation Building
(MST-Sept. 11, 2012)
The Philippine Amusement and Gaming Corporation (PAGCOR) is inviting all interested
bidders in its forthcoming bidding for the Supply and Delivery of Eight (8) Lots Hardware
and Upholstery Materials (Lot 1: Plywood; Lot 2: Metal; Lot 3: Electronics (IEOE); Lot 4:
Carpentry; Lot 5: Painting; Lot 6: Foam; Lot 7: Leatherette and Lot 8: Other Upholstery
Materials) for the fabrication of 120 Slot Machine Stands and 300 Slot Machine Stools
for CF - Cebu under ITB No. 09-04-2012
Description Approved Budget
VAT Exclusive, Zero Rated
Transaction
Delivery Schedule
Lot 1: Plywood LOT 1: P 417,120.00
Two (2) staggered deliveries
within 25 calendar days from
the effectivity date specifed in
the Notice to Proceed
Lot 2: Metal LOT 2: P 560,857.00
Lot 3: Electronics (IEOE) LOT 3: P 122,568.60
Lot 4: Carpentry LOT 4: P 297,214.50.
Lot 5: Painting LOT 5: P 300,533.46
Lot 6: Foam LOT 6: P 220,440.00
Lot 7: Leatherette LOT 7: P 144,375.00
Lot 8: Other Upholstery
Materials
LOT 8: P 16,579.20
Source of Fund:
Internally Funded
NOTE: Bidders may bid on any or all lots
This bidding is open to all suppliers; provided that the winning bidder should be registered
with PAGCOR prior to award of contract. Unregistered suppliers must register at the
Suppliers Registration & Evaluation Section (SRES), Procurement Department (PD),
2nd Floor PAGCOR House, 1330 Roxas Blvd., Ermita, Manila, Tel. No. 526-0573.
Bidders should have completed, within the last three (3) years before the date of submission
and receipt of bids, a contract similar to the Project. The description of an eligible bidder
is contained in the Bidding Documents, particularly, in Section II. Instructions to Bidders.
Bidding will be conducted through open competitive bidding procedures using a non-
discretionary “pass/fail” criterion as specifed in the Implementing Rules and Regulations
(IRR) of Republic Act (RA) 9184, otherwise known as the “Government Procurement
Reform Act”.
Bidding is restricted to Filipino citizens/sole proprietorships, partnerships, or organizations
with at least sixty percent (60%) interest or outstanding capital stock belonging to citizens
of the Philippines, and to citizens or organizations of a country the laws or regulations of
which grant similar rights or privileges to Filipino citizens, pursuant to RA 5183 and subject
to Commonwealth Act 138.
All particulars relative to Pre-Bid Conference, Evaluation of Bids, Post-Qualifcation and
Award of Contract shall be governed by the pertinent provisions of R.A. 9184 and its IRR.
The schedule of activities is listed, as follows:
Activities Schedule
Issuance of Bid Documents September 11, 2012 to October 01, 2012
Pre-Bid Conference September 18, 2012, 10:00 A.M.
Deadline for Submission of Bids October 01, 2012, 2:00 P.M.
Opening and Preliminary Examination of Bids October 01, 2012, 2:00 P.M. Onwards
Complete details of the project are indicated in the bid documents which will be available
to prospective bidders at the BAC Secretariat Unit, Procurement Department (BSU-PD),
upon payment of a non-refundable bidding fee which shall be provided by the BAC
Secretariat Unit (BSU) upon request.
Prospective bidders may also download the Bidding Documents free of charge from
the following websites: www.pagcor.ph and www.philgeps.net and may be allowed
to submit bids provided that bidders shall pay the non-refundable bidding fee not later
than the date of the submission of bids. The Pre-bid Conference is open to all interested
bidders. Prospective bidders should present to PAGCOR’s Cashier at 6th foor, PAGCOR
Corporate Offce, M.H. del Pilar cor. Pedro Gil Sts., Malate, Manila either the Bidding Fee
Slip which may be secured from the BSU-PD or a copy of this ITB in effecting payment
for the Bidding Documents. All Bids must be accompanied by a bid security in any of
the acceptable forms and in the amount stated in ITB Clause 18.
PAGCOR assumes no responsibility whatsoever to compensate or indemnify bidders
for any expenses incurred in the preparation of their bids.
PAGCOR reserves the right to accept or reject any Bid, and to annul the bidding process
and reject all Bids at any time prior to contract award, without thereby incurring any
liability to the affected bidder or bidders.
Please address all communications to the Bids and Awards Committee thru the BAC
Secretariat Unit, Room 205, Second Floor, PAGCOR House, 1330 Roxas Boulevard,
Ermita, Manila, Tel No.: 524-3911, 521-1542 local 223/571.
(SGD) VISITACION F. MENDOZA
Chairperson
Bids and Awards Committee (BAC) 2
OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT
NATIONAL HOUSING AUTHORITY
(MST-Sept. 11, 2012)
The National Housing Authority (NHA), through the Corporate Budget
approved by the NHA Board for the year 2012 intends to apply the sum of
the Approved Budget for the Contracts (ABCs) to payments for the following
contracts:
Ref. No. Projects ABC/ Source of
Funds (P)
Duration
(c.d.)
Required
PCAB License
Work
Description
2012-066 Land Development of Isarog
Heights Subdivision, Brgy.
Carolina, Naga City
9,999,676.49/
NG Subsidy
120 At least Cat. “C
& D” & “Small
B” for Roads
Land
development &
road works
2012-067 Land Development of
Presidential Proclamation
(PP) 574 Housing Site,
Narra, Palawan
8,586,682.86/
NG Subsidy
180 At least Cat. “C
& D” & “Small
B” for Roads
Land
development &
road works
2012-068 Construction of 3 Units
Covered Court/Multi-Purpose
Centers at San Simon, Apalit
and Sto. Tomas, Pampanga
18,168,804.00/
NG Subsidy
150 At least Cat.
Cat. “B” &
“Med A” for
Building
Construction of
3 Buildings
Bids received in excess of the ABC shall be automatically rejected at bid
opening.
The NHA now invites bids for the above-cited project. Completion of the
Works is required within the duration herein cited upon receipt of the Notice
to Proceed. Bidders should have completed within 10 years from the date of
submission of bids, a single contract similar to the Project costing at least ffty
percent (50%) of the ABC. The description of an eligible bidder is contained
in the Bidding Documents, particularly, in Section II. Instructions to Bidders.
Bidding will be conducted through open competitive bidding procedures using
non-discretionary pass/fail criterion as specifed in the Implementing Rules
and Regulations (IRR) of Republic Act 9184 (RA 9184), otherwise known as
the “Government Procurement Reform Act”.
Bidding is restricted to Filipino citizens/sole proprietorships, partnerships, or
organizations with at least seventy fve percent (75%) interest or outstanding
capital stock belonging to citizens of the Philippines.
A complete set of Bidding Documents shall be issued only to bidders/authorized
offcial representatives or employees of the bidder who can show proof of
Notarized Authority to secure bid documents for the specifc Project and Offcial
Company ID upon submission of a Letter of Intent (LOI), presentation of original
PCAB License, Contract Agreement and Certifcate of Completion/Acceptance
for completed similar project/s and upon Cash Payment of non-refundable
fee of P10,000.00 for Ref. Nos. 2012-066 and 067 and P15,000.00 for
Ref. No. 2012-068 at the Offce of the NHA-BAC Secretariat, 3
rd
Floor NHA
Main Building, Diliman, Quezon City from 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. starting on
September 11, 2012. Deadline of submission of LOI is on September 19, 2012.
The BAC Secretariat may be contacted at Tel/FAX No. 929-8016.
The NHA will hold a Pre-bid Conference on September 20, 2012, at 10:00
a.m. at the NHA Operations Center, 3
rd
Floor NHA Main Building, Diliman,
Quezon City, which shall be OPEN ONLY to bidders who have purchased
the Bidding Documents.
Bids must be delivered at the NHA Operations Center on October 03, 2012,
not later than 9:00 a.m. All Bids must be accompanied by a bid security in
any of the acceptable forms and in the amount as stated in Bid Data Sheet
(BDS). Bid opening shall follow immediately after the deadline of submission
of bids at the same venue. Bids will be opened in the presence of the Bidders’
representatives who choose to attend at the address below. Late bids shall
not be accepted.
The NHA reserves the right to accept or reject any bid, to annul the bidding
process, and to reject all bids at any time prior to contract award, without
thereby incurring any liability to the affected bidder/s.
(Sgd.) FROILAN R. KAMPITAN
Assistant General Manager/
Chairperson, Bids and Awards Committee (BAC)
NATIONAL HOUSING AUTHORITY
Elliptical Road, Diliman, Quezon City
I nvi t at i on t o Bi d
Republic of the Philippines
COURT OF APPEALS
Manila
INVITATION TO BID
For Supply and Delivery of Four (4) Units Vehicle
1. The Court of Appeals, through the 2009 Continuing Appropriations intends to apply
the sum of P5,200,000.00 being the Approved Budget for the Contract (ABC) to
payments under the, contract for the Supply and Delivery of Four (4) Units vehicle
for the offcial use of four (4) Associate Justices or P1,300,000.00 per unit. Bids
received in excess of the ABC shall be automatically rejected at bid opening.
2. The Court of Appeals through its Bids and Awards Committee now invites bids for
the Supply and Delivery of Four (4) Units SUV described as follows:
Two (2) Units SUV Gas 4x 2 G A/T
One (1) Unit SUV DSL 4 X 2 A/T
One (1) Unit SUV 2WD 2 .5 L Diesel A/T
Delivery of the vehicles is required ffteen (15) days after receipt of P.O, Bidders
should have completed , within three (3) years from the date of Submission and
receipt of bids, a contract similar to the Project. The description of an eligible bidder
is contained in the Bidding Documents.
3. Bidding will be conducted through open competitive bidding procedures using a
non-discretionary “pass/fail” criterion as specifed in the Implementing Rules and
Regulations (IRR) of Republic Act (RA) 9184, otherwise known as the “Government
Procurement Reform Act.”
Bidding is restricted to Filipino citizens/sole proprietorships, partnerships, or
organizations with at least sixty percent (60%) interest or outstanding capital stock
belonging to citizens of the Philippines, and to citizens or organizations of a country
the laws or regulations of which grant similar rights or privileges to Filipino citizens,
pursuant to RA 5183 and subject to Commonwealth Act 138.
4. Interested bidders may obtain further information from the BAC Secretariat, c/o Offce
of the Clerk of Court and inspect the Bidding Documents at the address given below
during offce hours.
A complete set of Bidding Documents may be purchased by interested Bidders
starting September 11 , 2012 from the address below and upon payment of a non-
refundable fee in the amount of P1,300.00 per vehicle.
It may also be downloaded free of charge from the website of the Philippine
Government Electronic Procurement System (Phil-GEPS) and the website Court
of Appeals, provided that Bidders shall pay the nonrefundable fee for the Bidding
Documents not later than the submission of their bids.
5. The Court of Appeals through its Bids and Awards Committee will hold a Pre -Bid
Conference on September 24, 2012 at 2:00PM at the Conference Room, Ground
Floor, Annex 1 Building, Ma. Orosa St., Ermita, Manila which shall be open only to
all interested parties who have purchased the Bidding Documents.
6. Bids must be delivered to the BAC Secretariat. c/o Offce of the Clerk of Court,
Room 101, Main Building, Ma, Orosa St. , Ermita Manila on October 5, 2012, from
8:00AM- 12:00 NOON. All bids must be accompanied by a a bid security in any of
the acceptable forms and in the amount stated in ITB.
Bid opening shall be on October 5, 2012 at 2:00 P.M. at the Conference Room,
Ground Floor, Annex 1 Bldg. Bids will be opened in the presence of the Bidders’
representatives who choose to attend , Late bids shall not be accepted.
7. The Court of Appeals reserves the right to reject any or all eligibility documents or
proposals without offering any reason, waive any defect or formalities contained
therein , accept any proposal which is considered most advantageous to the
government or annul the bidding process prior to contract award.
8. The Court of Appeals assumes no responsibility whatsoever to compensate or
indemnify bidders for any expenses incurred in the preparation of the bid.
9. For further inquiries, contact the BAC Secretariat, c/o Offce of the Clerk of Court at
523-21-13 or 524-12-41 loco 219, 315. telefax 526-58-34.
Approved by:
(Sgd.) J. JAPAR B. DIMAAMPAO
Bid & Awards Committee on
Purchase and Acquisition of Court
Faciilities, Equipment and Supplies
(MST-Sept. 11, 2012)
Republic of the Philippines
DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS AND HIGHWAYS
OFFICE OF THE DISTRICT ENGINEER
Cebu 1st District Engineering Offce
Regional Equipment Services Compound
V. Sotto Street, Cebu City
(MST-Sept. 6 & 11, 2012)
I NVI TATI ON TO BI D
The Bids and Awards Committee (BAC) of the Department of Public Works and
Highways, Cebu 1
st
District Engineering Offce, through its Bids and Awards Committee
(BAC), invites contractors to bid for the aforementioned project :
Item No. 1
a. Contract ID : 12HD0048
b. Contract Name : Cluster XXIV – Road Upgrading (Gravel to Paved) of National Road
at Antonio Y de Pio Highway:
1. KO118+641 to KO118+775; - Php3,316,285.87
2. (KO126+228 to KO126+409)
KO120+282 to KO120+372 – 0.090km;
(KO127+(-159) to KO127+000)
KO120+372 to KO120+542 – 0.170km; - Php6,119,367.79
3. KO121+459 to KO121+525; - Php1,724,869.51
4. (KO127+000 to KO127+031)
KO120+880 to KO120+910 - Php799,935.84
Total - Php11,960,459.01
c. Contract Location : Antonio Y de Pio Highway, Cebu
d. Scope of Work : Concreting
e. Approved Budget for the Contract (ABC) : Php11,960,459.01
f. Contract Duration : 121 Calendar Days
g. Funding Source : CY 2013 Infra.
h. Bid Document Fee : Php10,000.00
Item No. 2
a. Contract ID : 12HD0049
b. Contract Name : Cluster XXV – Rehab./Reconstruction/Upgrading of National Roads:
1. Road Upgrading (Gravel to Paved) Php1,902,810.69
of National Road, Sogod-Tabuelan -
KO110+490 to KO111+ (-422) - 0.80km
2. Rehabilitation/Reconstruction/Upgrading - Php12,311,353.06
of Damaged Paved National Road
(intermittent sections) Sogod-Tabuelan
KO114+867 to KO115+520 – 0.741km

3. Road Upgrading (Gravel to Paved) of - Php1,286,907.10
National Road Sogod- Tabuelan
KO110+414 to KO110+466 - 0.052km
Total - Php15,501,070.85
c. Contract Location : Tabuelan, Cebu
d. Scope of Work : Concreting
e. Approved Budget for the Contract (ABC) : Php15,501,070.85
f. Contract Duration : 121 Calendar Days
g. Funding Source : CY 2013 Infra.
h. Bid Document Fee : Php10,000.00
Procurement will be conducted through open competitive bidding procedures in
accordance with R.A. 9184 and its Revised Implementing Rules and Regulations.
To bid for this contract, a contractor must submit a Letter of Intent (LOI) and must meet
the following major criteria: (a) prior registration with DPWH, (b) Filipino citizen or 75%
Filipino-owned partnership, corporation, cooperative, or joint venture with PCAB license
applicable to the type and cost of this contract, (c) completion of a similar contract costing
at least 50% of ABC within a period of 10 years, and (d) Net Financial Contracting Capacity
at least equal to ABC, or credit line commitment for at least 10% of ABC. The BAC will use
non-discretionary pass/fail criteria in the eligibility check and preliminary examination of bids.
Unregistered contractors, however, shall submit their applications for registration to the
DPWH-POCW Central Offce before the deadline for the receipt of LOI. The DPWH-POCW
Central Offce will only process contractor’s applications for registration, with complete
requirements, and issue the Contractor’s Registration Certifcate (CRC). Registration Forms
may be downloaded at the DPWH website www.dpwh.gov.ph
The signifcant times and deadlines of procurement activities are shown below:
1. Issuance of Bidding Documents : September 05, 2012 to September 17, 2012
2. Pre-bid Conference : September 10, 2012 at 2:00 p.m.
3. Receipt of LOI’s from Prospective Bidders : September 11, 2012 to September 17, 2012
4. Receipt of Bids : September 24, 2012 at 8:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m.
5. Opening of Bids : September 24, 2012 at 11:00 a.m.
Prospective bidders shall submit their duly accompanied forms as specifed in the BD’s
in two (2) separate sealed bid envelopes to the BAC Chairman. The frst envelope shall
contain the technical component of the bid, which shall include the eligibility requirements.
The second envelope shall contain the fnancial component of the bid. Contract will be
awarded to the Lowest Calculated Responsive Bid as determined in the evaluation and
the post qualifcation.

The Department of Public Works and Highways – Cebu I
st
District Engineering
Offce reserves the right to accept or reject any or all bid and to annul the bidding process
anytime before Contract award, without incurring any liability the affected bidders.
Approved by:
(SGD) MARIETTA D. ECARMA
BAC Chairman
NOTED:
(SGD) WILFREDO AV. ENCISO, CEO VI
District Engineer
Republic of the Philippines
Kagawaran ng Pagawain at Lansangang Pambayan
Tanggapan ng Distrito Inhenyero
Telepono: 0917-7079668
Negros Oriental 1
st
District Engineering District Offce
Bindoy, Negros Oriental, Rehiyon VII
I NVI TATI ON TO BI D
(MST-Sept. 5 & 11, 2012)
The DPWH, Negros Oriental 1
st
District Engineering Offce, through the Bids and Awards Committee
(BAC), invites contractors to apply to bid for the contract(s);
1.) Contract ID 012HJ0007
Contract Name Rehabilitation/Reconstruction/Upgrading of Damaged Paved National Roads
(Intermittent Sections)
Contract Location K0111+680 – K0112+234.23
Scope of Works SPL I Mobilization and Demobilization, SPCL II Facilities for the Engineers,
SPCL III Facilities for Handicapped Persons (BP 344), SPCL IV Safety and
Health Programs, SPCL V Facilities for Gender and Development (GAD-5%
of Appropriation) - Additional Stone Masonry Open Canal, SPCLVI Installation
of Billboard, 101(3a) Removal of Existing Dilapidated Asphalt Pavement,
102(4) Surplus Common Excavation (Canal), 104(1) Embankment, 105(1)
Subgrade Preparation (Common Materials), 201 Aggregate Base Course,
311(1) Portland Cement Concrete Pavement (Plain, t=280mm), 311(2) Portland
Cement Concrete Pavement (Reinforced, t=280mm), 505(5) Riprap and
Grouted Riprap, Class “A”, 704 Masonry Units (Stone Masonry Open Canal),
612(1) Refectorized Thermoplastic Pavement Markings (white), and 612(2)
Refectorized Pavement Markings (Yellow)
Approved Budget for the Contract (ABC) P 9,475,930.00
Duration 120 Calendar Days
2.) Contract ID 012HJ0008
Contract Name Reconstruction of Habag Bridge
Contract Location La Libertad, Negros Oriental
Scope of Works A.1 Construction of Detour
101(1) Removal of Structure and Obstruction, 102(4) Surplus Unclassifed
Excavation, 103(3) Foundation Fill, 104(1) Embankment, 201 Aggregate Base
Course, 505(a) Grouted Riprap, Class “A”, 500(1)c 910mmФRCPC

A.2 Construction of Bridge Structure
101(3) Removal of Detour Road, 101(4)a Removal of Existing Damage
Concrete Pavement, 101(2) Removal of Damage Existing Bridge, 103(2)
Bridge Excavation, 311(2) PCC Pavement (Reinforced), 280mm thk., 400(22a)
Reinforced Concrete Test Pile (F&D), 400(22b) Reinforced Concrete Pile (F &
D), 401 Bridge Railings, 404(1) Reinforcing Steel Grade 40 (FCHB & P), 405(1)
Structural Concrete Class “A”, 405(1a) Structural Concrete Class “A” (fc=28
mpcs), 406 Pre-Stressed Structural Concrete Girder, 506 Stone Masonry,
SPL-1 Mobilization and Demobilization, SPL-2 Facilities for the Engineers,
SPL-3, Provide Project Sign Board, SPL-4 Construction Safety and Health
Program, SPL-5 Facilities for Handicapped Persons (BP 344) and SPL-6
Facilities for Gender and Development (5%)
Approved Budget for the Contract (ABC) P 12,222,000.00
Duration 162 Calendar Days
3.) Contract ID 012HJ0009
Contract Name Reconstruction of Martilo Bridge
Contract Location La Libertad, Negros Oriental
Scope of Works A.1 Construction of Detour
102(4) Surplus unclassified Excavation, 103(3) Foundation Fill, 104(1)
Embankment, 201 Aggregate Base Course, 505(a) Grouted Riprap, Class
“A” , 500(1)c 910mmФRCPC
A.2 Construction of Bridge Structure
101(2) Removal of Damage Existing Bridge, 103(2) Bridge Excavation,
400(22a) Reinforced Concrete Test Pile (F & D), 400(22b), Reinforced
Concrete Pile (F & D), 401 Bridge Railings, 404(1) Reinforcing Steel Grade 40
(FCHB & P), 405(1) Structural Concrete Class “A”, 405(1a) Structural Concrete
Class “A” (fc=28 mpcs), 406 Pre-stressed Structural Concrete Girder, SPL-1
Mobilization and Demobilization and SPL-3 Provide Project Sign Board
Approved Budget for the Contract P 10,290,000.00
Duration 162 Calendar Days
Procurement will be conducted through open competitive bidding procedures in accordance with
R.A. 9184 and its Revised Implementing Rules and Regulations.
To bid for the contract, a contractor must submit a Letter of Intent (LOI), purchased bid documents
and must meet the following major criteria; (a) prior registration with DPWH, (b) Filipino Citizen owned
partnership, corporation, cooperative, or venture (c) with PCAB License applicable to the type and the cost
of this contract, (d) completion of a similar contract costing at least 50% of ABC, or credit line commitment
at least equal to 10% of ABC. The BAC will use non-discretionary pass/fll criteria in the eligibility check
and preliminary examination of bids.
Unregistered contractors, however, shall submit their applications for registration to the DPWH-POCW
Central Offce will only process contractor’s applications for the registration with complete requirements
and issue the Contractors Certifcate of Registration (CCR). Registration forms may be downloaded at
the DPWH website www.dpwh.gov.ph.
The signifcant time and deadlines of procurement activities are shown below:
1. Receipt of LOI from Prospective Bidders Deadline: September 12, 2012
2. Issuance of Bidding Documents September 12, 2012 to October 2, 2012
3. Pre-Bid Conference September 18, 2012 @ 10:00 A.M.
4. Receipt of Bids October 2, 2012 (12:00 Noon)
5. Opening of Bids October 2, 2012 @ 1:30 P.M.

The BAC will issue hard copies of Bidding Documents (BD’s) upon payment of a non-refundable
fee of P 10,000.00 per Contract ID respectively.
Prospective bidders may also download the BD’s from the DPWH website, if available. Prospective
bidders that will download form the DPWH website shall pay the said fees on or before the submission
of their documents. Bids must be accomplished by a bid security, in the amount and acceptable form, as
started in Section 27.2 of the Revised IRR.
Prospective bidders shall submit their duly accomplished forms as specifed in the BD’s in two
(2) separate sealed bid envelopes to the BAC Chairman. The frst envelope shall contain the technical
component of the bid, which shall include a copy of the CRC. The second envelope shall contain the
fnancial component of the bid. Contract will be awarded to the lowest calculated responsive bid as
determined in the bid evaluation and post-qualifcation.
The DPWH, Negros Oriental 1
st
District Engineering District Offce reserves the right to accept
or reject any or all bid and annul the bidding process anytime before contract award, without incurring
any liability to the affected bidders.

Approved:

(Sgd.) SALOME C. GRAVADOR
(Vice-Chairman)
NOTI CE OF EXTRAJ UDI CI AL
SETTL EMENT
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GI VEN THAT THE
ESTATE OF THE
L AT E HE RB E RT
T. VELOSO WAS
EXTRAJUDI CI ALLY
SETTLED BY HEIRS
AS PER DOC. NO. 71;
PAGE 16; BOOK NO.
X; SERIES OF 2012
BEFORE NOTARY
P U B L I C A T T Y.
GERVACIO B. ORTIZ
JR. OF MAKATI CITY
(MST-Sept. 11, 18 & 25, 2012)
For f as t ad r es ul t s ,
pl eas e c al l
659-48-30
l oc al 303
or
659-48-03
CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK
For
f ast
ad
r esul t s,
pl ease
c al l
6594830
or
6594903
(MST-Sept 10, 11 & 12, 2012)
Republic of the Philippines
Presidential Commission on Good Government
INVITATION TO BID
Sale of 157,500 total shares (Class “A” and “B”) of SHOWA UNITED
FOODS, INC. (in the name of Performance Investment Corporation).
Minimum Bid Price: P37,034,250.00
BIDDING SCHEDULE
Issuance of Bid Documents 10-18 Sept. 2012
Conduct of Due Diligence 24-28 Sept. 2012
Pre-Bid Conference 25 Sept. 2012
Submission and Opening of Bids 02 Oct. 2012
Bid Documents are available for a non-refundable fee of P5,000.00
from the PCGG Asset Management Department, IRC Building, 82 EDSA,
Mandaluyong City, c/o Ms. Alma M. Provido, tel. 9079127 or 7256958.

PCGG reserves the right to reject any or all bids, waive any formality
and/or defects in the bids received, and to award to the bidder whose
bid is most advantageous to the Government.
PCGG Bids and Awards Committee
Republic of the Philippines
Department of Public Works and Highways
Caraga, Region XIII
OFFICE OF THE DISTRICT ENGINEER
Agusan del Norte Engineering District
Butuan City
(MST-Sept. 11, 2012)
The DPWH DISTRICT ENGINEERING OFFICE, J. Rosales Avenue,Butuan
City, Agusan del Norte, through its Bids and Awards Committee ( BAC), invites
contractors to apply to bid for the following contract(s):
Contract ID: 12NA0030
Contract Name: Asphal t Overl ay al ong Butuan-Cagayan de
Oro-Iligan Road
Contract Location: (Agusan-Misamis Oriental), Agusan del Norte
Approved Budget for the Contract (ABC): Php 6,636,560.00
Contract Duration: 25 calendar days
Procurement will be conducted through open competItive bidding procedures
in accordance with R.A. 9184 and its Revi sed Impl ementi ng Rul es and
Regulations.
To bid for this contract, a contractor must submit a Letter of Intent ( LOI )
and must meet the following major criteria: (a) prior registration with DPWH,
(b) Filipino citizen or 75% Filipino-owned partnership, corporation, cooperative,
or joint venture with PCAB license applicable to the type and cost of this
contract, (c) completion of a similar contract costing at least 50% of ABC
within a period of 10 years, and (d) Net Financial Contracting Capacity at least
equal to ABC, or credit line commitment for at least 10% of ABC. The BAC will
use non-discretionary pass/fail criteria in the eligibility check and preliminary
examination of bids.
Unregistered contractors, however, shall submit their application for
registration to the DPWH-POCW Central offce before the deadline for the
receipt of LOÌ. The DPWH-POCW Central Offce will only process contractor's
applications for registration, with complete requirements, and issue the
Contractor's Certifcate of Registration (CRC). Registration Forms may be
downloaded at the DPWH website www.dpwh.gov.ph.
The signifcant times and deadlines of procurement activities are shown below:
1. Receipt of LOI from Prospective Bidders Sept. 19, 2012 10:00 a.m.
2. Issuance of Bid - Documents Sept. 7,2012 to Sept. 26,2012
3. Pre-Bid Conference Sept. 14, 2012 10:00 a.m.
4. Receipts of Bids Sept. 26, 2012 at 8:00 to 10:00 a.m.
5. Opening of Bids Sept 26, -2012 10:15 a.m.
The BAC will issue hard copies of Bidding Documents (BD' s) at DPWH
DISTRICT ENGINEERING OFFICE, Butuan City, Agusan del Norte, upon
payment of a non-refundable fee of (P 10,000.00). Prospective bidders may also
download the BD's, if available, from the DPWH web site. Prospective bidders
that will download the BD's from the DPWH website shall pay the said fees on
or before the submission of their bids Documents.
The Pre-bid Conference shall be open only to interested parties who have
purchased the BD' s. Bids must accompanied by a bid security, in the amount
and acceptable form, as stated in Section 27.2 of the IRR.
Prospective bidders shall submit their duly accomplishment forms as
specifed in the BD's in two (2) separate sealed bid envelopes to the BAC
Chairman. The frst envelop shall contain the technical component of the bid,
which shall include the eligibility requirements. The second envelope shall
contain the fnancial component of the bid. Contract will be awarded to the
Lowest Calculated Responsive Bid as determined in the Bid evaluation and
the post-qualifcation.
The DPWH DISTRICT ENGINEERING OFFICE, J. Rosales Avenue, Agusan
del Norte, reserves the right to accept or reject any or all bid and to annul the
bidding process anytime before Contract A ward, without incurring any liability
to the affected bidders.
Approved by:
(Sgd.) CLARO S. COMILING
Chief MQC Section
BAC Chairman
DPWH INFRA -07- Standard Advertisement-Revised IRR
I NVI TATI ON TO BI D
CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK
SEPTEMBER 11, 2012 TUESDAY
B4
CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK
Manila Standard TODAY
Provinces
Edited by Leo A. Estonilo www.manilastandardtoday.com•leoestonilo@gmail.com
Aleco rushes reforms
to avert disconnection
IN BRIEF
Binay awards titles to Pinatubo settlers
By Florencio P. Narito
LEGAZPI CITY—The interim board and management of
cash-strapped Albay Electric Cooperative Inc. are working
out reforms to prevent any service disruption.
At a press conference held last Sept. 7 at
the Aleco board room, Bishop Joel Baylon,
interim chairman, was joined by board
members Augusto Villalon, Benjamin
Santiago, lawyer Jose Vicente Fernandez
along with OIC general manager Reynaldo
Reverente and lawyer-accountant
Veronica Briones and consumers to come
up with measures to keep the cooperative
in shape.
“As of Aug. 12, 2012 Aleco has
accumulated payables totaling P3.433
billion but our biggest and most urgent
bill is the P974 million account with
the Philippine Electricity Marketing
Corporation (PEMC),” Villalon said.
“Because of this account, Aleco is always
facing threat of disconnection.”
Aleco sold P281.7 million worth of
electricity but collected only P241.9
million or a shortfall of P40 million.
Due to defective transformers, kilowatt-
hour meters and other electrical equipment
plus pilferages, Aleco has incurred a 25.17
percent systems loss but only 13 percent
is allowed under the law. The coop pays
P1 million for every percent above the 13
percent ceiling.
Aleco has a 60 percent bilateral contract
with the Aboitiz Power Renewables Inc.,
30 percent with the Wholesale Electricity
Spot Market and 10 percent with San
Miguel Energy Corp.
Villalon noted that on May 14,
2011 the Special General Membership
Assembly held at Bicol College,
Daraga, Albay, approved a resolution
for a Special Payment Arrangement for
an additional P0.58 per kilowatt-hour
voluntary contribution refundable after
three years. This voluntary contribution is
intended to pay for P974 million account
with PEMC.
Briones, general manager of Camarines
Sur IV Electric Cooperative and project
supervisor of Aleco, cited Casureco IV’s
23% percent system loss that was reduced
to 15% during her watch.
“What reforms we had implemented at
Casureco IV could also be adopted here in
Aleco,” she said.
Villalon said investors can be invited
to bring in fresh capital and manage the
co-op.
Online license
renewal piloted
By Dexter A. See
BAGUIO CITY—Professionals
can now renew their licenses in 10
days online with the Professional
Regulations Commission Baguio
field office.
Commissioner Jennifer Jardin
Manalili held the pilot recently
to reduce the service period that
took four to five months.
“The PRC is on the process
of procuring additional printing
machines for our regional offices
to trim down the waiting time of
our board exam applicants and
our professionals renewing their
expired licenses,” Manalili told
Manila Standard.
She invited Engr. Edilberto
Carabbacan, Regional Director
of the Department of Public
Works and Highways, to renew
his Civil Engineer license during
the pilot test.
He offered to endorse the
service to fellow officials and
staff along with members of
the Cordillera Association of
Regional Executives.
Manalili said kiosks will be put
up in malls to de-clog regional
offices.
“We already have a Memorandum
of Agreement with SM, which
aside from Baguio and Rosales,
Pangasinan, will pave the way for
the opening of PRC ID renewal
centers in about 66 SM malls,
Hypermarkets and Save more
outlets, nationwide,” Manalili said.
Meanwhile, PRC Baguio
Regional Director Teofilo Gaius
Sison Jr. is putting together
the Expanded Walk-in Client
Examination for Northern Luzon
applicants.
According to Manalili, the pilot
is set for October, when the PRC-
Baguio office, joins the National
Statistics Office in CTLL Building
on Abanao Street
VICE President Jejomar Binay on Monday
awarded housing units and land titles to 175
families displaced by the eruption of Mount
Pinatubo in 1991.
“Sa sukat na 94 na
square meters bawat lote
at single-detached pa, talo
pa ang ibang mga bagong
tayong private subdivisions
(Measuring 94 square meters,
our single-detached (unit
here) beats those in private
subdivisions),” Binay, the
Chairman of the Housing
and Urban Development
Coordinating Council, told
the beneficiaries.
He said only 358 families
have obtained their titles
since they moved to the
EPZA Resettlement Project
in 1994.
“Of 1,553 beneficiaries
at EPZA, many have yet to get their
titles,” Binay said. “No need to worry. I
have directed the NHA (National Housing
Authority to process those pending.”
He said the awardees belong to sixteen
Pinatubo resettlement sites in Zambales,
Tarlac, and Pampanga.
Binay asked them to take care of their
houses, noting that those who had sold
their lots are barred from
other government housing
projects.
“In NHA’s list, at least 481
families appear to be illegal
occupants,” he said.
“Some beneficiaries have
sols their rights even without
holding a title.”
Binay awarded over the
weekend Transfer Certificate
of Titles to 38 families
under the Social Housing
Finance Corp.’s Community
Mortgage Program in Cebu.
Binay also witnessed the
signing of a Memorandum
of Agreement between
the Provincial Capitol
and 13 homeowners’ associations for the
distribution of lots to the families in the
remaining nine barangays covered by
Provincial Board Resolution 93-1.
Sara Suzanne T. Fabunan
Solana to hold
Abayaw Festival
TUGUEGARAO CITY—Solana Mayor
Meynard Carag is launching the Abayaw
F e s t i v a l
this week
to salute
f a r m e r s
who have
m a d e
the town
one of
Cagayan’s
l e a d i n g
rice and
c o r n
producers.
“ W e
m a k e
sure that
everything
is prepared for a more meaningful, exciting
and colorful celebration for the residents
and visitors in the locality to enjoy the 1st
Abayaw,” he said.
Administrator Narciso Taquiqui said
several themes were considered to depitct
the bountiful harvest of the town.
The chosen term is an Itawes word for
‘Kamarin’ or stockade of grains and other
staples.
He said a newly built gymnasium is been
timed for holding the festivities Sept. 14
to 16 lining up the search of Ms. Solana,
sports and an agriclutural fair among other
activities. Jessica M. Bacud
Town hosts police
oath-taking rites
MARIVELES—Mayor Jesse Concepcion
hosted the oath-taking of officers
belonging to the Criminal Investigation
and Detection Group-Complementary
Justice System for Bataan province in
Barangay Alas-asin.
Lawyer Samuel Pagdilao Jr., CIDG chief,
assisted by Supt. Rudy Lacadin, swore into
office more than 100 CIDG-CIS members
mostly coming from this industrial
Municipal Administrator Luis Gonzales
welcomed Pagdilao, his college mate and
fraternity brother at the University of Sto.
Tomas.
Pagdilao welcomed Concepcion’s
support to police and CIDG staff for crime
prevention.
“There should be symbiotic relationship
with the community and the peacekeeping
force,” Concepcion said, acknowledging
the spirit of volunteerism on the part of
citizens.
Pagdilao, other officials, and latest batch
of investigators planted trees after the
ceremonies. Butch Gunio
Solid bloc. Nacionalista Party President Manuel Villar congratulates local officials from Gamu and Quezon towns of Isabela province on
Monday after taking their oath as members. LINO SANTOS

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