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Journal
VOL LVII, NO. 3, SEPTEMBER 2012
WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG The Garden Club of Virginia
Te Garden Club of Virginia exists to
celebrate the beauty of the land, to conserve
the gifts of nature and to challenge future
generations to build on this heritage.
From The Editor
Whatever happened to those lazy, hazy, crazy days of summer? Mine are
wilted. My petunias are pooped, the fritillaries are fried, and the hydrangeas have
had it. I’m looking forward to pansies. With their happy panda-bear faces, a pot full
of pansies is just about as cheerful a sight as can be. Tere’s something therapeutic
about all of those beaming faces, a tonic for the wilted gardener.
In this issue, you should fnd plenty of tonic for the soul and other liquid
pleasures, from a charming ditty about watering roses to a timely discussion of rain
gardens, a story about our Tidewater-native president and cocktails in the garden
with faeries. What’s your pleasure?
Write to us at Journal@gcvirginia.org.
Journal Editorial Board
2012-2013
Editor and Chairman: Jeanette McKittrick, Tree Chopt Garden Club
ExOfcio Members
GCV First Vice President Jeanette Cadwallender, Immediate Past Journal Editor,
Te Rappahannock Valley Garden Club
GCV Corresponding Secretary Betsy Worthington, Te Lynchburg Garden Club
GCV Photographer Jane Cowles, Te Boxwood Garden Club
Journal Advertising Chairman Katya Spicuzza, Albemarle Garden Club,
Te Garden Club of the Northern Neck
Members
Betty Anne Garrett, Te Garden Club of the Middle Peninsula
Julie Grover, Te Blue Ridge Garden Club, Te James River Garden Club
Mary Ann Johnson, Te Roanoke Valley Garden Club
Susan Morten, Te Martinsville Garden Club
Grace Rhinesmith, Te Garden Club of the Middle Peninsula
SEPTEMBER 2012 WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG 1
Te Garden Club of Virginia
Journal
Te Garden Club of Virginia Journal
(USPS 574-520, ISSN 0431-0233) is
published four times a year for members
by the GCV, 12 East Franklin St.,
Richmond, VA 23219. Periodical postage
paid in Richmond, VA. Single issue price,
$5.00.
Copy and ad deadlines are:
January 15 for the March issue
April 15 for the June issue
July 15 for the September issue
October 15 for the December issue
Email copy to the Editor and advertising
to the Ad Chairman
President of the Garden Club of Virginia:
Ann Gordon Evans
Journal Editor:
Jeanette McKittrick
5111 Cary Street Road
Richmond, VA 23226
Phone: (804) 288-2512
Email: journal@gcvirginia.org
Journal Advertising Chairman:
Katya Spicuzza
P.O. Box 411
Irvington, VA 22480
Phone: (804) 435-1782
Email: ksspicuzza@yahoo.com
Vol. LVII, No. 3
Printed on recycled paper by
Carter Printing Company
Richmond, VA
ON THE COVER...
In honor of Te Nansemond River
Garden Club, host of October’s Board
of Governors meeting, our cover features
cattails, an apt symbol for a club so
devoted to protecting the beauty and
conservation of its namesake river and
historic gardens, including its 30-year-
old Ecology Camp for children, and the
restoration of centuries-old Cedar Hill
Cemetery, for which the club won the
Common Wealth Award.
IN THIS ISSUE ...
Meet Ann Gordon Evans .............................. 3
Gardening with Species Lilies ..................... 5
74th Annual Rose Show ................................ 6
GCV Conservation Forum ............................ 7
Stratford Hall Landscape ..................................... 8
My Wife, the Faerie Queene .......................... 9
Locating a Rain Garden .............................. 11
70th Annual Lily Show ......................... 12, 13
Te Ugly Container Gift ............................. 14
An Antique in the Garden ........................... 17
80th Historic Garden Week ........................ 18
Ex Libris ...................................................... 19
Putting the Public in Public Gardens ......... 21
GCV Position on Uranium Mining .................. 22
Rose Notes ................................................... 24
Contributions .............................................. 25
OTHER REFERENCES...
Kent-Valentine House
Phone: (804) 643-4137 Fax: (804) 644-7778
Email: director@gcvirginia.org
Historic Garden Week Ofce
Phone: (804) 644-7776 Fax: (804) 644-7778
Email: gdnweek@verizon.net
www.VAGardenWeek.org
2 WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG The Garden Club of Virginia
GARDEN CL UB
E S T . 1 9 1 3
A L B E M A R L E
GARDEN CL UB
E S T . 1 9 1 3
A L B E M A R L E
y The z
Whe r e Hi s t or y & Hor t i c ul t ur e Me e t
ij
featuring
J A C K S TAU B &
R E N N Y R E Y N O L D S
of H O R T U L U S F A R m
GA R D E N & N U R S E R Y
Thursday, Ocober 18, 2012
FARmi NGTON COUNTRY CLUB
Charlottesvile, Virginia
F O R T i C K E T S ( $ 7 5 ) & mO R E i N F O R mAT i O N V i S i T
w w w . t h e d e s i g n f o r u m . o r g
w 9am Registration w 9:30am Presentation w 10:30am Boutique w
C
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b
rat i ng 100
y
e
a
r
s
P R E S E N T S
Cel ebrat i ng 100 years
D E S i GN F O R U m
SEPTEMBER 2012 WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG 3
Meet Ann Gordon Evans,
47
th
President of the Garden Club of Virginia
by Jeanette McKittrick
Editor, GCV Journal
President, Tree Chopt Garden Club
W
hen Ann Gordon Evans lifted the gavel for the frst time
as president of the Garden Club of Virginia, she said she
did so “with humility.” Such is the uncommon grace of
our 47
th
president.
Born in California because her father was stationed there
during World War II, rumor has it that Ann Gordon was bundled
up and back to Virginia so quickly the frst thing her eyes could
focus on were the blue skies of the Old Dominion. As native to
Hampton as her favorite blue crabs, she’s a lifetime member of
First United Methodist Church and a graduate of Hampton High
School. Following graduation from Mary Baldwin College, Ann Gordon returned to
the Peninsula to teach mathematics in the Hampton City School System.
What a stroke of luck that was, as she followed in her parents’ example of a
lifetime of service to others. “I grew up knowing how important it was to be a volunteer
in the community. My parents instilled in me how each of us can make a diference in
our city, our town or our county.”
Ann Gordon has made a diference, as president of the Junior League of Hampton
Roads, chairman of the board of trustees of her church, president of the Mary Baldwin
College Alumnae Association, president of Te Huntington Garden Club, chairman of
the GCV Common Wealth Award Committee, director-at-large of the GCV, member
of the editorial board of the Journal, GCV recording secretary, second vice president,
and frst vice president.
In her remarks at the annual meeting in Williamsburg in May, Ann Gordon
said she joined the club because it “was the best of both worlds. I could continue my
volunteer work and learn things I had never even dreamed of knowing. I could be with
women who were talented, hard-working community leaders and who seemed to enjoy
all that they did.”
In addition to why she joined, Ann Gordon explained why she stayed. “I stayed
because of you, every single one of you. I cannot wait to visit you in your place, in your
town, in your city. I cannot wait to learn about your community projects … Te beauty
of being a member of the Garden Club of Virginia is that we have each other as we
work together. Our friendships will last a lifetime.”
Ann Gordon carries her commitment to service with a gentle authority earned
through years of experience. Quick to recognize the accomplishments of others, she’s
committed to remain focused on the mission of the GCV, planning for important
milestones in the celebration of the 80
th
anniversary of Historic Garden Week in 2013
and the 100
th
anniversary of the GCV in 2020.
When she’s not covering miles and miles of Virginia country roads and interstate
highway, Ann Gordon and her husband of 44 years Rusty enjoy travel together here
and abroad. Tey have two grown children, Mary Katherine and Russ. ❁
Ann Gordon Evans
4 WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG The Garden Club of Virginia
SEPTEMBER 2012 WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG 5
Gardening with Species Lilies
By Laura Anne Brooks
GCV Lily Committee,
Te Garden Club of the Middle Peninsula
S
everal years ago, if you belonged to the Species Lily
Society, you grew rare plants. Today, nodding species
lilies are widely available from mail-order catalogs, the web
and bulb farms. Tey dance in the garden on Turk’s-cap bracts,
on dangling stems, just in time for Horticulture Field Day and Fourth
of July picnics.
At GCV lily shows, awards have long gone to dramatic trumpets like Lilium
longiforum or the occasional L. regale. Recently, the Japanese L. leichtlinii has won
blue. However, we seldom show the L. henryi that blooms throughout July on tall
stems of curling blooms, defying soaring temperatures. Loving dappled shade in the
summer are L. speciosum rubrum and L. album, Oriental favorites.
Since many inter-divisional hybrids fll our markets, it is important to learn the
wild lilies that form the genetic base of Asiatic lilies, the LA hybrids (Longiforum-
Asiatics) and the new OT (Oriental-Trumpet) that are often called “lily trees.” When
these hybrids are left undisturbed in a microclimate suitable for their culture, species
lilies will bloom several years and often set seed to form a colony. Te tetraploid big
guys, such as ‘Alchemy’, ‘Arabesque’ and ‘Scheherazade’, often bloom magnifcently the
frst season, only to dwindle in subsequent years.
One can obtain species lilies for the garden and show bench from diferent garden
sources. Brent and Becky’s Bulbs in Gloucester ofers an assortment of lilies, such as
L. martagon, L. longiforum, L. superbum, and others. A Virginia Beach service, K.
Van Bourgondien, features a variety of old fashioned “tiger lilies” (L. lancifolium) that
should be planted away from other lilies, as they carry a hidden virus. Also, this source
features the tiny L. tenuifolium, a red-hot pumilum type.
South Carolina’s Wayside Garden sells the scarlet L. pumilum and down-
facing, chartreuse-magenta L. napalense. On the West Coast, Te Lily Garden advertizes
Turk’s-cap species: L. amabile and L. leucanthum from easy-to-grow epigeal seeds.
Also in this catalog is L. lankongense: ‘Ariadne’, ‘Angela North’, and the waltzing ‘Last
Dance’.
McClure & Zimmerman sell a species lily from Wisconsin using the L. Harlequin
hybrids popular in the 1950s and 1960s, but it is difcult for Virginia gardens. B &
D Lilies, our Washington source for GCV club collections, features L. pardalinum, L.
tsingtauense, and L. martagon from Manitoba, Canada.
Tese varieties ofer lyrical accents to a meadow garden, rockery or perennial
border. If you live in the Piedmont or Blue Ridge shelf of Virginia, many of the
nodding lilies will win ribbons. For Middle Peninsula, Tidewater and Eastern Shore
gardens, try species lilies in pots of sand, grit and forest soil mix. Hide them in your
garden amongst foliages of kniphofa, canna, and amaryllis. Species lilies will dance
joyfully with late spring herbs and summer wildfowers. ❁
Te Editorial Board welcomes submissions and reserves the right to edit them.
6 WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG The Garden Club of Virginia
"The world is a rose, smell it and pass it to your friends."
— Chinese Proverb —
— the garden club of virginia —
74th annual rose show
Hosted by
The Boxwood Garden Club
Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden
Educational Building
1800 Lakeside Ave.
Richmond, VA 23228
Sanctioned by
The American Rose Society
For more information:
Contact Molly Hood 804-285-8511
mgshood@yahoo.com
Wednesday, October 3, 2012
2pm to 6pm
Thursday, October 4, 2012
9am to 1 pm
Open to the public
Green Offering
Or visit the Flower Shows website:
www.gcvirginia.org
SEPTEMBER 2012 WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG 7
What’s Bugging You?
GCV Conservation Forum Bites Of Pesticides,
Hosts National Panel of Experts and Encore
Presentation by Doug Tallamy
By Chamie Grandy Valentine, Chairman, 2012 Conservation Forum
GCV Conservation and Beautifcation Committee
Te James River Garden Club
G
arden Club of Virginia members count numerous friendships begun upon
a mutual interest in fowers. Tis year the Conservation and Beautifcation
Committee will present a forum dedicated to maintaining healthy gardens
as well as healthy friends: How to Reduce Garden Pests: A Modern Gardener’s Guide for
Healthy Living.
On the frst of three panels, Dr. Michael Weaver, a Virginia Tech professor
and director of Virginia Tech Pesticide Programs, will share the history of Virginia’s
pioneering eforts in pest management and pesticide safety. Liza Fleeson, Program
Manager for the Ofce of Pesticide Services, Division of Consumer Protection at the
Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, will teach the safest and
most efective ways to use approved pesticides. Dr. Wayne Surles, a consultant for the
pesticides industry, will share his perspective on integrating chemical and non-chemical
practices to reduce toxic exposure.
Te second panel will address the relationships among chemical applications,
endocrine (hormone) disruptors, and cancer. Dr. Warren Porter, a zoologist from the
University of Wisconsin, Dr. Amy Brown, an entomologist from the University of
Maryland, and Dr. John Peterson Myers, an ornithologist and the CEO and Chief
Scientist of Environmental Health Sciences in Charlottesville, will share their ongoing
research. Dr. Myers also will address his current work with international chemical
companies to establish the frst framework for creating chemicals that do not disrupt
hormones. His work and presentation inspire hope for the future.
Also on this second panel will be Dr. Christopher Weis. He is a senior advisor
to Dr. Linda Birnbaum, Director of the National Institute of Environmental Health
Sciences/National Toxicology Program (NIEHS/NTP) at the National Institutes of
Health. Dr. Weis specializes in rapid exposure and risk evaluation, and will share the
NIEHS/NTP perspective on regulating chemicals in the garden.
Te third panel addresses organics and biodiversity in gardening practices. One
speaker, Charles “Chip” Osborne, Jr., founder and president of Osborne Organics,
LLC, has extensive professional experience in creating safe and sustainable landscapes.
As one of the country’s leading experts on growing sustainable, natural turf, he will
speak on organic lawns, playing felds, and golf courses, as well as vegetable and fower
gardens, even roses.
Back by popular demand, our fnal speaker is Dr. Douglas Tallamy, an
entomologist at the University of Delaware. He will teach us how biodiversity reduces
the need for pesticides and how to encourage biodiversity in our gardens.
With so much to discuss and learn, please plan to attend. Te forum will be
held from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. at the Jepson Alumni Center at the University of
Richmond on Monday, November 12, 2012. Tickets will be available October 1 on the
GCV website.
8 WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG The Garden Club of Virginia
Centuries-old Stratford Hall Landscape to
Come to Virtual Life
By Charlotte S. Benjamin, GCV Restoration Committee
Te Garden Club of Fairfax
C
ultural landscape research at Stratford Hall, circa 1738, has entered the 21st
century with 3-D technology. Soon visitors will be able to see virtual models
of the property’s topography, vegetation and hydrology. Te historic landscape
will come to life, via technology of the University of Georgia’s Center for Remote
Sensing and Mapping Science. Visitors will have a much better understanding of
landscape relationships. Te 3-D technology ofers a research tool that should enable
Stratford to manage the property’s cultural and ecological resources efectively.
Stratford’s move into this new territory prompted creation of a cultural landscape
laboratory by the Robert E. Lee Memorial Association. Te memorial association owns
and administers the property, which became home to the Lee family after Tomas Lee
purchased the land in 1717.
Te laboratory’s stated mission is “to ensure the long-term stewardship and
sustainability of Stratford Hall as one of America’s most treasured cultural and ecological
resources, and to advance the theory and practice of cultural landscape conservation.”
Te cultural landscape laboratory is overseen by the Stratford Hall Landscape Advisory
Panel, whose membership includes a Garden Club of Virginia representative serving in
an ex-ofcio role.
Te Stratford Hall property is extensive, comprising more than 1,900 acres and
two miles of Potomac River shoreline. It has never been studied as a whole and has
many secrets to reveal, from pre-historic time to the 21st century.
Te cultural landscape laboratory is expected to foster an in-depth understanding
of the landscape’s natural and historical elements, thanks to partnerships with the
University of Georgia’s College of Environmental Design, Te Jaeger Company,
the memorial association, Stratford staf, historic landscape professionals and other
stakeholders. By coupling the information from the 3-D study with historical
documents, the cultural landscape laboratory will be able to show what signifcant
changes have occurred.
A comprehensive report, especially recommendations for the East Garden, could
hold special interest for the Restoration Committee and GCV members. Te East
Garden was frst restored by the GCV in 1930. Te East Garden has historical merit
and “has been the single most enduring feature of Stratford’s landscape for many
decades,” according to a 1992 report by Mrs. James G. Hanes III to the Robert E. Lee
Memorial Association. She was a director on the memorial association’s board, and
chaired the Gardens and Grounds Committee.
A fnal report should be completed this summer, with recommendations that
are expected to relate to the Great House grounds in general and the East Garden in
particular. Any changes to this garden must have the approval of the GCV Restoration
Committee. ❁
SEPTEMBER 2012 WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG 9
My Wife, the Faerie Queene
By Kelly Sutton
Honorary Member, Tree Chopt Garden Club
S
penser had his Tanaquill, Shakespeare his Titania, Disney his Tinker Bell, and I
have my Rhonda – all true faerie queenes. Other than size, the biggest diference
among these four is that, when yearning for their own gardens, only one could ask
her husband to help. (Te other three could wave a wand.)
Tus was the beginning of our miniature, or as we like to call it, our faerie garden.
After seeing one at a nearby nursery and using it as guidance, our frst eforts were
quickly dashed by Hurricane Irene. Irene split in half the centerpiece of the new garden,
a river birch, and destroyed the small bluestone terrace along with the sedums. Te
destruction upset Rhonda to the point that she was not certain whether she wanted to
fy away or to cast a spell that would bring the garden back.
All attempted spells failing, coupled with her lack of that aforementioned magic
wand possessed by real faerie queenes, Rhonda disappeared into the front yard on
a mission. Weeks of continual digging, countless trips to a nursery for more fats of
plants, and numerous requests for me to build small things, such as benches, swings and
trellises, fnally piqued my curiosity as to what was happening in our front yard.
My mother and former Tree Chopt Garden Club member Lucy Gordon Sutton,
was an avid collector of miniature furniture and accessories for dollhouses. Rhonda and
I have inherited some of these, and have continually rearranged and added pieces over
the years. Having been surrounded by miniatures and having built some pieces myself,
I have developed quite an admiration for the efort that goes into creating anything in
miniature scale. Rhonda’s faerie garden is no exception.
Te garden is truly magical, with its graveled pathways, bluestone patio, tree swing,
garden benches, pond, slate terrace, and myriad of little trees and fowers. Numerous
mosses surround a sandbox, two birdbaths, and a quiet little area with two chairs and
bottles of wine awaiting the arrival of the faeries, which join us each night while we have
a drink on our human-size patio next to them.
Someone once said seven grains of wheat laid on top of a four-leaf clover will
enable one to see faeries. Build a faerie garden, and see if it works. ❁
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10 WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG The Garden Club of Virginia
VI RGI NI A MUSEUM OF FI NE ARTS
200 N. Boul evar d | Ri chmond
Thu– Sun | Oc t 25– 28
Information and
Tickets
804.340.1405 or
www.VMFA.museum/FAF
Floral designs inspired by
museum masterworks
Lectures and demonstrations
Luncheons
Flower-inspired fashion show
Wine tasting and live music
Oct 24 Gala Preview
An Evening of Petals and Glass
Presented by Te Council of VMFA.
Floral designs contributed by members
of the Garden Club of Virginia,
Virginia Federation of Garden Clubs,
and Garden Clubs of Virginia.
Ofcial supplier of fowers and plant
material:

SEPTEMBER 2012 WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG 11
Locating a Rain Garden
By Lucha Taylor
GCV Horticulture Committee
Te Hunting Creek Garden Club
L
ate summer storms may inspire many a gardener to consider a rain garden. Proper
location is essential to their success.
Not every low-lying dip in the yard will necessarily achieve the true environmental
purpose of a rain garden. During a storm, a rain garden should reduce erosion by
slowing the speed of water. It should capture and flter pollutants from the runof
of impervious surfaces, and it should pond water long enough to allow for ground
penetration, thereby reducing the amount of water entering the storm water system.
One rain garden may not be able to achieve all of this, but if the yard is large enough,
several rain gardens appropriately sited might. Te homeowner has to set priorities.
A priority may be to capture most of the water coming of the roof and currently
fowing into a neighbor’s yard. To avoid fooding your basement, locate the rain garden
a minimum of 10 feet away from the house, and redirect the roof ’s drainpipe in that
direction. Remember that water always fows downhill.
Alternatively, a priority may be to keep pollutants from the driveway out of the
public storm water system. In this case, build the rain garden on the downhill side of
the driveway to capture the frst fush from a rainstorm. Te frst half-inch of rain carries
the most pollutants.
Research is underway to determine which plants best capture contaminants from
the soil. Heavy metals stay in plants, so do not be tempted to plant your zucchini in this
rain garden. Our GCV horticulture site has an extensive plant list for rain gardens and
the Virginia Department of Forestry site (www.dof.virginia.gov) is an excellent source of
information.
Another priority may be simply to reduce the erosion in a sloping part of the yard.
A rain garden appropriately located will detain water, and allow time for ground water
infltration and replenishment of the water table. A very steep site may need a cascade of
rain gardens to slow the downhill surge of rainwater.
Finally, do not locate a rain garden less than 2 feet from any utility lines, under the
drip line of a tree, too near a house or on a slope that is too steep and long. Water picks
up speed the longer it travels downhill.
Next time it rains, take a walk around your property and note the direction water
is fowing. Follow the water, and you will know where to locate your rain garden. ❁
12 WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG The Garden Club of Virginia
Te Ugly Container Gift
By Chris Howison
Te Blue Ridge Garden Club
P
erhaps you’re thinking about your programs for upcoming garden club
meetings. Consider the experience of the ladies of Te Blue Ridge Garden Club
in Lexington.
Last Christmas, our program chairman, Ann Murchison, wrote a poem and put
copies into unusual fower containers. Ann put each container (a Mason jar, a labeled
soup can, an old tennis shoe, a thrift shop vase, and the like) into a Christmas gift
bag with a member’s name on the bag. Te bags were hand-delivered by Ann and her
committee.
Te poem’s message was a set of instructions that the container should be flled
with foral materials and submitted at the January meeting. Tat meeting’s program
featured two Garden Club of Virginia judges, Linda Holden and Anne Vanderwarker,
who judged the “ugly” container creations. Te judges made a comment on each of our
33 entries. One blue ribbon went to Ursula Keeley, who had arranged her fowers in
a turkey soup can. Her fowers resembled a turkey, complete with twig feet. Another
member created a duck blind, with her container placed on a mirror (water) and little
toy ducks swimming along in the “water.”
Our members learned from this very entertaining program that they could
make something beautiful using an ugly container. Here’s the poem that inspired the
creations:
A Very Ugly Gift
Merry Christmas and blessings to each garden club member!
Here’s your “ugly” container that you may remember,
You must adorn for the January meeting.
Let’s pray for good weather—that there’ll be no sleeting,
So guest judges can make it to the Murchison house
Where we will gather, and with the help of Ann’s spouse,
Set up our arrangements and show of our “stuf,”
‘Cuz we gals are GOOOOOOD. And that’s true, sho’ nuf!
Te goal is to recycle—making beauty from trash—
So reach in your brains and pull out your stash
Of ideas on color, textures, and tone,
Perspective, proportion, store-bought or homegrown
Materials may be used—be they fresh or dried;
A Very Ugly Gift
– continued on the following page
SEPTEMBER 2012 WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG 13
Accessories, too—if you’ve something to hide.
You must make sure that your “vase” isn’t leaking—
Unless you’d enjoy Ann’s hysterical shrieking!
Include your intentions on a 3 x 5 card
Be they traditional, modern or ultra avant-garde!
List your materials. On the back, write your name—
‘Cuz that way the judges will know whom to blame
Or rather—to award the blue ribbon prize
For the arrangement most pleasing their expert eyes!
And we’ll have had fun making “best” out of “worst”
And for garden tour creations become well rehearsed. ❁
Te Garden Club of Virginia appreciates responsible advertising and reserves the right
to accept or reject submitted advertisements. Inclusion in the Journal is not to be
construed as an endorsement by the Garden Club of the advertised goods or services.
NUMBER OF HORTICULTURE EXHIBITORS: 58
NUMBER OF HORTICULTURE STEMS: 190
NUMBER OF ARTISTIC ARRANGEMENTS: 115
“Where the Past and the Present Intersect”
June 20 – 21
The 70th Annual Lily Show, 2012
Sponsored by The Garden Club of Fairfax
The 70th Annual Lily Show, 2012
14 WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG The Garden Club of Virginia
For more photos and a complete list of winners, go to www.gcvirginia.org and see Flower Shows
Grateful appreciation is extended to Mary Wynn and Charles McDaniel and Hilldrup Moving and Storage for support of the GCV Flower Shows
Inter Club Class 51C
A French Rococo
Arrangement
Te Garden Club of
the Northern Neck
Blue
Inter Club Class 51D
A Late Colonial Arrangement
Te Martinsville Garden Club
Blue
Inter Club Class 51A
An Early Georgian Arrangement
Te Franklin Garden Club
Blue and Quad Blue
Class 54
A Pave Arrangement
Peyton Wells
Te Tuckahoe Garden Club
Best Artistic and
Best Arrangement
Inter Club Class 51B
A Horizontal Line
Arrangement
Dolley Madison
Garden Club
Blue
Most Creative
Caroline Parrish
Te Warrenton
Garden Club
Artistic Awards
NUMBER OF HORTICULTURE EXHIBITORS: 58
NUMBER OF HORTICULTURE STEMS: 190
NUMBER OF ARTISTIC ARRANGEMENTS: 115
“Where the Past and the Present Intersect”
June 20 – 21
The 70th Annual Lily Show, 2012
Sponsored by The Garden Club of Fairfax
The 70th Annual Lily Show, 2012
SEPTEMBER 2012 WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG 15
For more photos and a complete list of winners, go to www.gcvirginia.org and see Flower Shows
Grateful appreciation is extended to Mary Wynn and Charles McDaniel and Hilldrup Moving and Storage for support of the GCV Flower Shows
‘Ortega’
Te Eugenia Diller Award
Best Oriental/Trumpet
Hybrid Lily
Celeste Adams
Fauquier and Loudoun
Garden Club
‘Eudoxia’
President of
Member Clubs Cup
Helen Murphy
Te Garden Club
of the Northern Neck
‘El Condor’
Te Garden Club of Virginia Cup
Best Lily Stem in Show
Te Lily Committee
Interdivisional Hybrid
Lily Award
Katherine Beale
Harborfront Garden Club
‘Katinka’
Te Sponsor’s Cup
Best Asiatic Lily
David Diller
Te Spotswood Garden Club
‘Anaconda’
Te Vicki Bowen Award
Best Trumpet Lily
Harriett Condon
Fauquier and Loudoun
Garden Club
Horticulture Awards
‘Aladdin’s Sun’
Te James A. McKenney Award
Best Longiforum/Asiatic
Hybrid Lily
Glenna Graves
Te Spotswood Garden Club
16 WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG The Garden Club of Virginia
Hilldrup Moving and Storage and the McDaniel family are delighted
to support the commendable efforts of the Garden Club of Virginia.
For a free in-home consultation
call (866) 487-6780 or visit
www.hilldrup.com
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SEPTEMBER 2012 WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG 17
An Antique in the Garden
by Margaret McLaughlin Grove
Te Charlottesville Garden Club
W
hen I celebrated my 81
st
birthday last August, I decided to take the leg-
endary Nellie Hough garden class ofered by the Albemarle Garden Club.
Tis course, started in the 1940s, “is designed for participants of all levels
of gardening experience who wish to gain and to share insights into the rewards and
challenges of gardening.” After years of gainful employment and such loving duties as
motherhood, I felt I deserved this chance. So, in September, of I went, antique though
I be.
We were a class of 25 -- one brave gentleman, three garden club members, an
author of garden books, an artist, young mothers and career women. Under the enthu-
siastic leadership of Krista Davis and Merrick Murray, we started at the Carter family’s
historic Redlands.
Our frst lecturer was Ian Robertson, author and noted landscape designer, who
talked about the history of gardening and shared slides of gardens throughout the
world. We were now eager for our next class.
Next, we watched Beverley Hereford use greenery and branches from the garden
at Rabbit Run. Her magic made arranging seem like fun. Rabbit Run is a lovely house
with spectacular gardens.
Our third gathering was in Charlottesville, with the city’s landscape manager. We
visited Washington Park’s bog garden, Greenleaf ’s rain garden, and the newest bio-flter
at the high school.
Now October, the grounds manager at Farmington Country Club shared color
and texture ideas, and inspired us to try newer plants and perennials. At our ffth
session, another garden club member shared her country home, and High Peak Farm’s
owner showed us a variety of new plant materials.
We were sorry to end our course so had a fnal “graduation” party in my garden
for cofee, plant exchange, and promises to keep gardening and learning.
When my husband and I moved to Charlottesville in 1956, I was comfortable
being a hostess during Historic Garden Week and knowing the “basics:” a dogwood
and a redbud. Ten, I learned the diference between American and English boxwood,
and was able to identify correctly diferent azaleas, tulips, and ivy. Now, I’ve learned of
plants around the globe, many of which
I couldn’t pronounce, let alone spell. I’ve
been introduced to new mixtures of foli-
age and a knowledge of ideas not thought
of 56 years ago. I am so grateful that this
course broadened my horizons, if not in
years, in expanded interests.
While I had begun this venture feel-
ing that perhaps I was too “mature,” I left
feeling not antique but young again in the
garden! Moral to this story:
It is never too late to learn. ❁
Margaret in the Garden
18 WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG The Garden Club of Virginia
Happy Birthday to Historic Garden Week!
By Anne Geddy Cross, Chairman, Historic Garden Week, Te Ashland Garden Club
and Karen Cauthen Miller, Director, Historic Garden Week
T
he Garden Club of Virginia will be celebrating the 80
th
anniversary of Historic
Garden Week next spring. We will highlight our restoration properties during
this special year. Te goal is to showcase the sites, the special activities at these
sites, and other events associated with this anniversary year. Te 80
th
Anniversary
Committee, the Restoration Committee, the 2013 tour chairmen and their club
presidents, as well as the stafs and directors of restoration sites, are all busy working
together. Ambitious or simple, traditional or new, free or ticketed, the coordination
and promotion has already begun.
Our best tool for communicating these exciting initiatives is our website. Last
summer’s HGW website makeover yielded a 69.7% increase in unique visitors. Last year
it had almost three million hits. Check out www.vagardenweek.org for a compiled list of
anniversary events. Te information there will be continuously updated as we get closer
to April. We’ve also added a section to the Historic Garden Week website especially for
out-of-town visitors and tour groups. All of these fans of Historic Garden Week will
appreciate a convenient way to learn about the myriad activities occurring during April
20 – 27 without having to read the entire guidebook. Information is now available in a
convenient format in time for visitors who are planning their trips to Virginia, especially
during Historic Garden Week.
In addition to a constantly updated list on the website, a print piece is being
designed as a single listing of all of the lectures, lunches, exhibits, demonstrations, post-
tour events, book signings and other activities taking place throughout the state during
Historic Garden Week.
Last year was an overwhelming fnancial success for Historic Garden Week, netting
more than half a million dollars to support the restoration and preservation work of the
Garden Club of Virginia. But fnancial success is only sweet if the efort involved in
getting there has been positive and fulflling. Tank you so much for all that you do.
We are so appreciative of your hard work and dedication. ❁
Our marketing eforts have been recognized by the American Bus Association, which
named the 80
th
Anniversary of Historic Garden Week as a Top 100 Event for 2013.
SEPTEMBER 2012 WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG 19
Ex Libris
Making Summer Last
A Review of Te Decorative Art of Dried Flower
Arrangement
By Molly H. Sammler, GCV Library Committee
Te Petersburg Garden Club
C
reating fower arrangements can be a challenge in winter, as there are rarely
any homegrown fowers to work with at that time of year. Our club has had
the honor of arranging fowers for the Kent-Valentine House in February,
and it has always amazed me how club members have come up with arrangements
using dried specimens from the summer and fall. Te Kent-Valentine House library’s
extensive collection of books about preserving and arranging with those dried-yet-
vibrant wonders includes a volume from the early 1970s: Te Decorative Art of Dried
Flower Arrangement. Its author, Georgia S. Vance, donated an autographed copy.
It is, as the cover notes, “the defnitive book on arranging fowers in every style,
fully illustrated … and the best step-by-step methods.”
Georgia Vance introduces her work by saying, “may this book be … an invitation
to the history, techniques and possibilities of this old but ever-new art. …” She notes
that there is a modern-day fascination with the centuries-old art. Rightly so, as the
ability “to capture the characteristic form of a blossom at its loveliest stage … and
yet to have it possess new attributes and new charm as a dried fower, is an exciting
accomplishment.”
Te book gives a detailed history of styles of fower arrangement, all the way
from Italian Baroque to Ikebana, as well as more contemporary styles. It ofers how-to
descriptions for creating those styles with dried fowers. Te book’s four-part guide to
the techniques and methods of drying fowers captured the attention of this dried-
fower novice. Te book concludes with a concise guide to the best methods and hints
for preservation of 155 varieties of dried fowers, listed alphabetically from acacia to
zinnia.
With the passage of 40 years, newer techniques and products to dry fowers
have developed. Books have followed suit, and the Kent-Valentine library has many,
including “dried fowers” by Hilary Mandleberg, with how-to instructions for making
one-of-a-kind designs. Still, it was Georgia Vance’s volume that inspired me to go out
and get those blooms, pods, stems and branches now in order to enjoy them long after
the summer season. Make your summer last. ❁
20 WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG The Garden Club of Virginia
The Gardener’s Workshop
Cut-Flower Farm
Online Garden Shop
757-877-7159 Local
1-888-977-7159 Toll Free
info@shoptgw.com


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www.thebizarrebazaar.com
Mark Your
Calendars!
The 37
th
CHRISTMAS
COLLECTION
2012
Thursday, November 29
th
, 10-7
Friday, November 30
th
, 10-7
Saturday, December 1
st
, 10-7
Sunday, December 2
nd
, 10-5
RICHMOND RACEWAY COMPLEX
600 E. Laburnum Ave. - Richmond, VA 23222
Friday, April 5
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Saturday, April 6
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Sunday, April 7
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The 21
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presents...
&
SEPTEMBER 2012 WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG 21
Putting the Public in Public Gardens
By Jane Baber White and Mary Kathryn McIntosh
Hillside Garden Club
C
entral Virginia has a wealth of
public gardens, some gems that
visitors and residents alike might
enjoy. As individuals who love gardens
and enjoy introducing tourists to the place
we call home, we worked with the city
of Lynchburg to launch a promotion of
Central Virginia public gardens. While
ours was not a garden club-sponsored
efort, a garden club might want to
appropriate the idea for a project in its area.
We lifted the concept from a brochure about Philadelphia’s public gardens, and adapted
that model to ft.
Te brochure highlights 14 select public gardens. Tose include four Garden Club
of Virginia restoration sites: Tomas Jeferson’s Poplar Forest, Te Anne Spencer House
& Garden Museum, the Miller-Claytor House and Sweet Briar College.
Our joint efort resulted in 50,000 full-color Central Virginia Public Gardens
brochures for information racks at tourist centers and venues visitors frequent.
Here’s what we did:
First, we approached the Lynchburg Marketing Partnership, including the
Chamber of Commerce and some city departments. Tey liked the idea and committed
$5,000 as seed money.
Formation of a working committee followed. It included representatives of the
Central Virginia Regional Convention and Visitors Bureau, and the city departments
of Parks and Recreation, Communications and Marketing, and Public Works. Te
committee also included a writer, and two citizen volunteers (us).
We decided to highlight public gardens in Lynchburg and the contiguous counties
of Amherst, Bedford and Campbell. We decided that gardens must be walkable,
as opposed to just looking good for a drive-by viewing. Te gardens should have
an interpretive element on site, such as brochures, signage, or plant identifcation.
Tey should be consistently maintained, and have a primary focus of horticulture
or arboriculture. We also took into account possible fees, handicapped accessibility,
restrooms, birding, and picnic facilities.
We solicited applications from public gardens through newspaper publicity and
calls to some sites to encourage their participation. Applicants could download a form
from the city website and were asked to submit photographs. A $25 application fee
helped defray expenses. Te committee visited all applicant sites.
A city graphic designer designed the brochure gratis. Te seed money helped cover
printing costs and the services of a brochure manager to keep certain highly visible
brochure racks stocked. Te brochure has a shelf life of two to three years, at which
time the application and evaluations process will begin again. A public gardens webpage
was created on the DiscoverLynchburg.org website.
Te project kicked of with a garden party, naturally. We’ve since heard reports
from a number of sites that visitation has increased signifcantly. ❁
For information, contact JaneBaberWhite@gmail.com or mkmcintosh@verizon.net
P
h
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b
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Central Virginia Public Gardens
22 WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG The Garden Club of Virginia
The Women’s Committee
Martha Jefferson Hospital
presents
Martha’s
Market
A Collection of Unique Boutiques
Proceeds beneft Breast Health Programs and
Women’s Health Care in Central Virginia
Preview Party
Thursday, October 11
6:30 pm - 9:30 pm
For Preview Party Information & Tickets
434-654-8258
October 12 – 14, 2012
Friday 9:30 am - 7 pm
Saturday 10 am - 6 pm
Sunday 10 am - 4 pm
admission price
$10.00
One Ticket Gives You Entrance for the Weekend!
Free Admission for Children 13
and Younger
John Paul Jones Arena
Charlottesville, Virginia
Plentiful Parking in the JPJ Garage & Front Lot
Martha’s Market 2012 Corporate
sponsors
Wells Fargo
Everyday Café
Lite Rock Z-95.1
SMG
SNOW’S Garden Center
ACAC CenturyLink
Charlottesville Radiology &
CRL Surgical Associates
McGuireWoods, LLP
NBC29/CW29
PBM Pharmaceuticals
StellarOne
www.mjhfoundation.org
Foundation Offce 434-654-8258
Te Garden Club
of Virginia’s
Position Statement
on Uranium Mining
in Virginia
By Anne Beals, Chairman, GCV
Conservation and Beautifcation Committee
Te Rappahannock Valley Garden Club
S
ince the Conservation Forum of
2011 gave us a great deal of very
useful and timely information about
uranium mining, and in particular about
the mining of uranium in Virginia, the
Garden Club of Virginia has recognized
the importance of this issue and has kept
informed on the subject. As a result,
the Conservation and Beautifcation
Committee voted unanimously to create
a position statement for the Garden Club
of Virginia. Here is what was presented
to the GCV Board of Directors at its
meeting in Fredericksburg in July and was
adopted.
Te Garden Club of Virginia exists to
celebrate the beauty of the land, to conserve
the gifts of nature and to challenge future
generations to build on this heritage.
Te Garden Club of Virginia supports
the continuation of the moratorium on
uranium mining until the commonwealth is
assured that the mining can be done safely,
and that fnancial resources are available
to fund a sufciently long-term regulatory
oversight system to conserve and protect
Virginia’s natural resources.
Te Board of Directors feels that this
statement accurately refects our mission.
At the same time, it admits to the primary
drawbacks of uranium mining in Virginia:
that of regulation of the activity as well
as the potential threats to our resources,
including populations and economies,
far into an unknown future. Science and
industry have not yet been able to solve
the problems presented by these threats;
we all look forward to the day when they
are addressed, and all our natural resources
can be adequately protected.❁
SEPTEMBER 2012 WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG 23
Formerly
Night
Blooms
a play by
Margaret Baldwin
In 1965 Selma, Alabama, a night
blooming Cereus comes to life on
the porch as an historic movement
marches forward in the streets.
Playwright Margaret Baldwin is a
graduate of St. Catherine’s School
and University of Virginia.
September 28 - October 21
at the historic November Teatre
(formerly the Empire Teatre)
For tickets or more information
call 804-282-2620
or visit www.va-rep.org
Group rates available.
Horticulture Workshop
with Master Horticulture Judge Julia Clevett
Monday, October 15, 2012
10:30 a.m.
Kent-Valentine House
Open to all Club Presidents, GCV Board Members,
and Club Horticulture Chairmen or their representatives
More information can be found on the GCV website.
24 WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG The Garden Club of Virginia
Rose Notes
By Rachel Hollis, GCV Rose Chairman
Spotswood Garden Club
M
other Nature has had her way with us long enough. It’s time to get back
to our three yearly bloom cycles so we can be assured of having lots of
blooming roses for the 74th Annual Rose Show on October 3 and 4.
Te show takes place at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden in Richmond, hosted by Te
Boxwood Garden Club.
Bloom cycles are usually 45 to 60 days. Given that we are at the beginning of the
second bloom cycle at the time this article is being written (July), it is possible that we
may well have fewer blooms for our show. Although as GCV rose chairman I cannot
exhibit at the show, I am hoping for enough specimens to have an interesting display.
June’s Rose Notes covered Earth-Kind roses and how little care they need. Earth-
Kind, a program of the Texas AgriLife Extension Service, uses research-based techniques
that combine organic and traditional gardening to ofer real-world efectiveness along
with environmental responsibility. One GCV rose collection is designated as Earth-
Kind, while the other is for general exhibition. Each collection has three roses. If you
have never entered a specimen in a rose show, 2013 might well be the year to grow and
show.
Member club rose chairmen are encouraged to join the American Rose Society,
which publishes American Rose six times yearly. Articles range from those for the
beginner to the most advanced grower. Many articles also translate to best practices in
any garden. Subscribers receive a bonus publication, the ARS Handbook for Selecting
Roses, which is, essentially, a guide to buying roses. It evaluates each one in a number of
diferent categories over a three-year period. Te handbook assigns a rating for each rose
listed. Ratings are submitted by any rose grower, and from these ratings a value is given
so that you can buy a rose based on performance across the country.
Te GCV annual meeting includes reports from all ofcers and committee
chairmen. Mine was a little of-beat; it featured a ditty. I was asked to include this ditty
in this edition of Rose Notes. Sing it to the tune of “Music, Music, Music,” a song popular
during the 1950s. ❁
“Scratch the fertilizer in, spray to keep out bad ver-min, all I want to do this week
is water, water, water.
Blackspot, mildew, thrips and such, only need a fungal touch, all I want to do this
week is water, water, water.
Disbud, deadhead, seal the canes, all you have to use is brains, all I want to do this
week is water, water, water.
Touch of Class is eight point nine, Pristine is not far behind, all I want to do this
week is water, water, water.” ❁
28 WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG The Garden Club of Virginia
Bessie Bocock Carter Conservation Award Fund
Donor In Memory of
Te Hon. and Mrs. W. Tayloe Murphy, Jr. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mrs James B. Murray
Common Wealth Award Fund
Provides monies to individual clubs for local civic beautifcation eforts.
Donor In Honor of
Linda L. Consolvo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Betsy Worthington
Johanna Rucker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Betsy Worthington
Garden Club of Virginia Endowment
Supports the ongoing preservation of the historic Kent-Valentine House,
headquarters of the Garden Club of Virginia and Historic Garden Week.
Donor
Hillside Garden Club
Barbara L’O .Catlett
Margaret Hamer
Denise Revercomb
Donor In Honor of
Te Blue Ridge Garden Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Katherine Howison
Te Huntington Garden Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ann Gordon Evans
Te Little Garden Club of Winchester . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Victoria Alexander
Lynn Gas
Mill Mountain Garden Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mill Mountain Garden Club
Te Nansemond River Garden Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kimbrough K. Nash
Linda Pinkham
Te Petersburg Garden Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Joan Pollard
Te Rappahannock Valley Garden Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Marion Zimmermann
Sally Guy Brown . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kimbrough K. Nash
Deedy Bumgardner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Restoration Committee 2010-12
Rieley & Associates
Linda L. Consolvo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kimbrough K. Nash
Ann Gordon Evans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kimbrough K. Nash
Mary Bruce Glaize . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mary Hart Darden
Kimbrough K. Nash
Mary Ann Johnson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jeanette McKittrick
Carolyn Holland Kahn. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Barbara Holland
Katherine Turner Mears . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mrs. James B. Murray
Kathryn Q. Wafe. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Catherine Madden
Mary Lou and Charlie Seilheimer
Betsy Worthington . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mina Wood
Marty Whipple
Margo Eppard
Sally Guy Brown
Mary Hart Darden
Dianne Spence
Donor In Memory of
Te Garden Club of Fairfax. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mary Beth Hodges
Eleanor Craighill Perry Read
Te Garden Study Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Polly Randolph
Te Lynchburg Garden Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Peggy Teague
SEPTEMBER 2012 WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG 29
Te Garden Club of the Middle Peninsula . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ruby Lee Norris
Te Garden Club of the Northern Neck . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Kathy Farmar
Sally Guy Brown . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nancy St. Clair Talley
Capitol Hill Strategies, LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . JoAnn Bukaty Muir
Lisa Caputo & Rick Mims . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . JoAnn Bukaty Muir
Herb and Carolyn Davis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . JoAnn Bukaty Muir
Peggy Dent. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . JoAnn Bukaty Muir
Fontheim International, LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . JoAnn Bukaty Muir
Elizabeth C. Galloway . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hubert Shands Taylor III
John Michael Gonzalez . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . JoAnn Bukaty Muir
H. M. & Company. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . JoAnn Bukaty Muir
Perry Malouf . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . JoAnn Bukaty Muir
Joy Marlowe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . JoAnn Bukaty Muir
Steve Norton. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . JoAnn Bukaty Muir
Linda Olson Schlesinger. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dr. James R. Hundley
Anne Overman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Florence Adams
Space Telescope Science Institute. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . JoAnn Bukaty Muir
Kathryn J. Turner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . JoAnn Bukaty Muir
Fran and Bobby Watson. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . JoAnn Bukaty Muir
Jacqueline Whisman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . JoAnn Bukaty Muir
Mina Wood . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nancy St. Clair Talley
GCV Conservation Fund
Supports GCV clubs in local and statewide conservation projects.
Donor
Te Blue Ridge Garden Club
Donor In Honor of
Te Martinsville Garden Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Karen Jones
Te Garden Club of the Northern Neck . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lois Spencer
Donor In Memory of
Karen Jones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nancy Jiranek
Matthew Martin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . JoAnn Bukaty Muir
Gifts-in-Kind
Donor
Mrs. O. Christian Bredrup, Jr.
Hilldrup Moving & Storage
Charlie and Mary Wynn McDaniel
Restoration
Supports GCV Restoration projects across the Commonwealth.
Donor
Mary Wynn Richmond McDaniel Fund
Donor In Honor of
Te Rappahannock Valley Garden Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kathleen Glass
Mary Dame Broad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cecile Mears Turner
Candace Carter Crosby . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mary Ann Johnson
Katherine Van Allen
Suzanne Wright
KVA Foundation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . GCV Restoration Committee
Suzanne Wright . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fleet Davis
Donor In Memory of
Te Garden Club of Fairfax. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jan Grimes
WWW.GCVIRGINIA.ORG The Garden Club of Virginia
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