You are on page 1of 8

Manhattan Chapter

News & Views


January 2009 www.hearingloss-nyc.org E-mail: HLAANYC@aol.com
Hearing Loss Association of America exists to open the world of communication to people with hearing loss 
through information, education, advocacy, and support. 

NEW MEETING LOCATION! 
MUHLENBERG LIBRARY BRANCH 
209 West 23rd St.   Editor’s Corner – Elizabeth Stump
(between 7th and 8th Ave., closer to 7th),  
3rd floor—elevator available     Welcome to the January 2009 issue 
of the HLAA‐Manhattan News & Views!  
 
 
Tuesday, January 20, 2009       5:30 – 7:30 PM 
Happy New Year! I hope you emerged from the 
(Socializing at 5:30; program begins at 6:00.)  holidays rested and invigorated, ready to tackle a 
  brand new year.  
Recent Developments in Cochlear Implants   
  I counted down the seconds on New Year’s Eve and 
SPEAKER: Dr. Anil Lalwani, Mendik  spent New Year’s Day in Florida, and then returned 
Foundation Professor of Otolaryngology and  to New York the next day.  To pass some time on the 
Chairman of the Department of  airplane flight I jotted down a few resolutions and 
Otolaryngology; Professor of Physiology,  goals for 2009.  I’m sure many of you also at least 
made a mental list of personal goals and changes 
Neuroscience, and Pediatrics at NYU 
you’d like to fulfill this year. But I have a question for 
 
you: did any of those resolutions involve your 
MEETING LEADER: Shera Katz  hearing loss or our Manhattan Chapter?        
 
*A group will be going out to eat after the meeting.  Of course it’s not a crime if 
Join us! See any Planning Committee member at  your answer is ‘no.’ But now 
the meeting’s end.   if you stop and think about 
  it, as a Chapter member, 
NOTE: Assistive listening help is provided at our  chances are there is at least 
meetings through live CART captioning and a room  one aspect of the Chapter 
loop for those whose hearing aids have a T‐coil.    you’d like to see tweaked or 
FM headsets are also available.  improved. Perhaps you’re wondering how you can 
get more involved so that you can get more out of the 
Chapter. (See “We Want You” on page 7.) It is likely 
there is something related to your hearing loss that 
you would like to remedy—but maybe you don’t 
know that the resources to help exist. All the more 
reason to speak up and alert other members and the 
Planning Committee — we either have the resources 
  already or will start working to get them!  
   
Next Month’s Meeting: Tues., February 17, 5:30 PM After all, our 2009 mission is still to improve access to 
 
Title:  “Your Rights As a Person With a Disability” information and better communication for those with 
 
Speaker: Dr. Joel Ziev, Director of Partners for  hearing loss, through advocacy, education, and 
Access, LLC
1
support. (Judging from its success, 2008 will be a  CHAPTER PLANNING COMMITTEE 
tough year to beat!) Despite daily challenges with  Join us on the first Tuesday of each month to help plan 
hearing loss, we have much to celebrate and much to  programs & events. 
advocate! Outreach efforts can be as simple as   
inviting a hearing‐impaired friend to a chapter  HLAA Manhattan Chapter Phone Number: (voice) 
meeting or suggesting a topic or speaker you’d like to  (212) 769‐HEAR (4327)  
 
learn more about for a chapter meeting.  
Ellen Semel, Planning Committee Chair 
 
and NYC Walk4Hearing Coordinator  
Our speaker at this month’s chapter meeting is Dr.  (212) 989‐0624 ellen13@rcn.com
Anil Lalwani, the Mendik Foundation Professor of   
Otolaryngology and Chairman of the Department of  Barbara Bryan 
Otolaryngology at New York University. He will be  barbarabryan@usa.net
updating us on the myriad developments in cochlear   
implants. Included in the N&V this month are several  Barbara Dagen, Newsletter Committee  
articles from amongst the burgeoning research on  bdagen1@verizon.net
 
cochlear implants.  Several chapter members (myself 
Mary Fredericks, Secretary  
included) and participants in the Walk4Hearing 
(212) 674‐9128 maryfreder@aol.com
currently have cochlear implants, and some of them   
have shared a little about their progress adapting to  Joe Gordon, NYS Chapter Coordinator 
the device in this issue. You can read more on pg. 5.   NYJGordon@aol.com
   
The new U.S. President will be installed on the same  Toni Iacolucci 
day as our chapter meeting this month, but please  giantoni@nyc.rr.com
make a special effort to attend the chapter meeting   
Shera Katz, Web Site Coordinator 
anyway because Dr. Lalwani’s presentation is not to 
sherakatz@verizon.net
be missed— you can always TIVO an hour or two of 
 
the Inauguration Day celebrations on TV to watch  Anne Pope, Immediate Past President, HLAA Board 
later, but you can’t record Dr. Lalwani’s program.   of Trustees 
  atpop24@aol.com
As always, please feel free to e‐mail me   
(ElizabethMStump@gmail.com) if you would like to  Susan Shapiro, Treasurer 
submit a story, joke or cartoon, or suggestions for  sdshappy@aol.com
member spotlights for inclusion in N&V.    
Dana Simon 
 
dana2cat@gmail.com
See you at the chapter meeting on January 20th!  
 
Elizabeth Stump, Newsletter Editor 
ElizabethMStump@gmail.com
 
Diane Sussman 
dlsuss@optonline.net
 
Advisory Members 
Amy McCarthy  
Lois O’Neill  
Help the Chapter Go Green!  
Robin Sacharoff 
Would you like to receive N&V by e‐mail only   
rather than receive a mailed version to help us cut  Professional Advisors: 
 
down on paper consumption and save money? It  Laurie Hanin, PhD, CCC‐A  Exec. Director, League for 
 
costs about $8 a year to provide one member with  the Hard of Hearing 
 
10 issues — that’s more than half of one’s annual   
dues. Please notify HLAANYC@aol.com if you’d  Joseph Montano, Ed.D.  Director, Hearing & Speech, 
like to make this change. The Chapter thanks you!   Weill Cornell Medical College  

2
 
In lieu of our December 
The study, conducted by Anke Hirschfelder, M.D., 
meeting, we had a cheerful 
and colleagues in Berlin, examined the quality of life 
holiday dinner at the Olive 
of 56 cochlear implant recipients using a (self‐
Garden on Dec. 16th. Thank  administered) questionnaire. The assessment covered 
you to the party co‐chairs  sound perception, speech, social interaction, and self‐
(Barbara Dagen and  esteem. Significant improvements in all areas were 
Elizabeth Stump) and the  recorded, particularly in sound perception and social 
Planning Committee for  interaction.  
organizing such an                                                           
excellent event!   Bilateral Implantation  
Cochlear implants in both ears significantly improves 
                                                        the quality of life in patients with profound hearing 
  loss, and the benefits of the second implant outweigh 
its costs, according to a study in the May issue of 
What’s a Cochlear Implant?  
Otolaryngology‐Head and Neck Surgery.  
Here’s a primer before Dr. Lalwani’s 
discussion at our January meeting.   Conducted by Richard Miyamoto, M.D., and 
  colleagues at the Indiana University School of 
A cochlear implant (CI) is an electronic device  Medicine (where there is one of the largest CI 
implanted surgically into the inner ear, for people  programs in the country), this is the first study 
who are profoundly deaf or severely hard of hearing.  demonstrating that bilateral implantation improves 
A cochlear implant does not amplify sound like a  factors contributing to quality of life. Such factors 
hearing aid, but bypasses the damaged parts of the  include hearing in noisy environments, focusing on 
inner ear (specifically the damaged hair cells that line  conversations, and speaking at a proper volume. The 
the cochlea) by sending electrical impulses directly to  second CI led to greater self‐esteem and emotional 
the auditory nerve, which the brain then recognizes  well‐being, as well.  
as sound. The user wears an external microphone, 
Since it was found that the benefits of the second 
held in place by a magnet, which transmits the sound 
implant offset its added cost, the results may 
to a chip implanted under the scalp. These sound 
persuade more health insurance companies to cover 
signals are then sent to the nerve.  
the cost of bilateral implants rather than just the 
                                       
standard single implant, the study authors wrote.  
The FDA first approved a CI for adults in 1985 and 
for children in 1990; only people who were almost   
completely deaf and who could only perceive  MRI Scanners Cause Damage 
vibrations with a hearing aid were eligible. However,  A December 2008 study in 
now adults with severe‐to‐profound hearing loss  Otolaryngology – Head and Neck 
(those who understand less than 50% of sentences  Surgery found that certain 
spoken to them) in at least one ear qualify as CI  magnetic imaging devices such 
candidates, thanks to the improvement in CI  as 3T MRI machines can 
technology. Once implanted, each person’s ability to    demagnetize a patient’s cochlear  
hear varies, but in general it is a very helpful device.  
implant. (Magnets are in the implants to allow 
connection through the skin to a processor.) 3T MRI 
Recent and pivotal studies about cochlear 
scanners are the latest version of MRI scanners, and 
implants: 
are much more powerful than 1.5T MRI scanners.  
 
Better Quality of Life  Omid Majdani, M.D., Ph.D., of Vanderbilt University, 
Recipients of cochlear implants have major  and his team of American and German researchers 
improvements in their quality of life, including  tested several cochlear device magnets on a 3T MRI 
improved speech recognition, according to a recent  scanner at different angles and for different lengths 
study in the March 2008 issue of Otolaryngology —  of time, and discovered that an unacceptable level of 
Head and Neck Surgery. 
3
demagnetization occurred often. Once the damage  development is up to about 18 months, when neural 
was done it was not possible to fully remagnetize the  pathways in the brain are developing.  
devices — the damage was permanent.    
A 2007 study in the Journal of Speech, Language, and 
The study authors recommend that 3T MRI scanners  Hearing Research showed that children who received 
should not be used on patients with cochlear  an implant between 12 and 16 months — before an 
implants; 3T scanners should only be used if a 1.5T  extensive delay in spoken language developed — 
machine is unavailable and if the benefits of the scan  were more likely to achieve spoken language 
significantly outweigh the risk of demagnetization.  considered age‐appropriate. Yet children who 
received the implants after age 2 never caught up 
with their hearing peers in age‐appropriate language 
skills, although they did continue to improve over 
time. In other words, very young children with the 
CI make greater gains than children implanted when 
Metropolitan Calendar 
they are older. Also, implanted children seem to 
acquire listening skills with less effort than do 
 
Tuesday, Jan. 20: HLAA Chapter Meeting  children using hearing aids.  
Thursday, Jan. 22: LHH Cochlear Implant Support   
Group at the League for the Hard of Hearing   Currently, experts recommend cochlear implants for 
    50 Broadway, 2nd Floor; 5:30pm to 7pm  eligible children at age 12 months. However, children 
      *For more information, call (917) 305‐7751   who become deaf at age 3 or 4 can do well if they are 
        or e‐mail audiology@lhh.org.  implanted within a year of onset. Neonatal screening 
Saturday, Feb. 14: Happy Valentine’s Day!  and early detection have been instrumental in 
Tuesday, Feb. 17: HLAA Chapter Meeting   ensuring that children who are candidates for CIs 
  receive the implants at an early age. Children with 
*Register for the annual national convention — and  two implants rather than one do better because their 
HLAA’s 30th birthday — occurring June 18‐21, 2009,  overall hearing is improved.  
in Nashville, Tennessee. Go to   
www.hearingloss.org.  Other factors critical to language development, 
  besides age of implantation, include having the 
                                                                              intellectual skills and the parental and educational 
Children’s Book Corner:  support to develop normal speech and language.  
    
  Hearing Aids Plus CIs: Bimodal Devices   
Abby Gets a Cochlear Implant, by Maureen 
  Studies have shown that people with a CI in one ear 
Cassidy Riski; Cassidy Publishing (2008).  
  and a hearing aid in the other (bimodal listening) 
  
have better speech‐recognition than people with 
Order a copy at 
  bilateral hearing aids or people with only one 
www.Abbygetsacochlearimplant.com. 
  hearing aid or one CI.  
   
Recent and pivotal studies about cochlear  There is still debate concerning the effectiveness of 
implants, continued:  bimodal devices versus bilateral CIs. However, the 
  use of bimodal devices is the recommended 
Children With Cochlear Implants   treatment for people who are CI candidates but who 
Children who receive cochlear implants can acquire  have some usable hearing in one ear — it’s the 
language skills as good as hearing children, if the  successful alternative to one CI alone or bilateral 
implantation occurs before age two and it is followed  hearing aids.     
with auditory‐verbal therapy, experts say. There is a 
gradual decline in developing language learning 
skills as children age, although this varies from child 
to child. The most critical stage for language 
 
4
  need different volume adjustments to work with the 
Journey From Silence to Sound assistive listening device in the theater. Robin admits 
she likes the quality of sound she gets with her 
Four to six weeks after the surgery, the implant  hearing aid more than the quality of sound from the 
processor is activated. During the first few months,  CI — it’s more natural. “The CI definitely adds a lot 
hearing sound through a CI is often unstable and  to my hearing but I donʹt like just wearing the CI 
unpredictable as the quality of sounds change and  alone, because it doesnʹt sound totally normal to me. 
the brain adapts. Some people describe the first  With both devices it is good.”  
sounds they hear as being “like ducks quacking” or 
Gayle Greenstein  (Profiled in the November N&V): 
“robotic.” 
Gayle’s CI was activated on Nov. 24, and since then 
The CI processor is programmed by an audiologist  Gayle has been doing very well. In the few weeks 
over a lengthy period of time. The programming  since the activation, she says, itʹs been an absolutely 
consists of establishing a balance of sounds —  amazing experience and she’s hearing a great deal.  
finding sounds just barely audible (to establish a   
threshold) and finding sounds that are comfortably  “I donʹt think I had a hard time adjusting at 
loud. These levels are tweaked at each visit, although  all! Everyone scared me into thinking it could be a 
the rate of adjustment varies from person to person.   while before I liked it and got used to it, but that was 
not the case at all!” she says. “It was a tad weird the 
Aural rehabilitation follows programming. It is 
first few days but I got used to it fast and my brain 
critical for helping the CI wearer interpret sound in 
started making sense of everything really quickly. 
his/her environment. For children and adults, aural 
My audiologist and speech therapist really think Iʹm 
rehabilitation aids in the development of speaking 
doing so well for such a short period of time.   
and listening skills, as well as assessing those abilities 
 
in order to provide feedback to the audiologist about 
“Iʹm already understanding almost all words and 
the CI processor settings. CI wearers also need to 
sentences they say to me with their mouth covered 
practice listening without visual cues. 
(so that I canʹt lip read).  I have even talked on the 
  phone few times already and have done well. TV is 
Cochlear Implant Wearer Profiles:  still tough but Iʹm working at that! Listening at work 
on speaker phone to conference calls is also still 
Robin Sacharoff:  tough. As they say, it will only get better in time and 
Robin was implanted with a CI in her right ear on  itʹs only been a few weeks. So, Iʹm patient!”  
September 24, 2008. She wore two hearing aids prior   
to the surgery, but her hearing was much worse in  Ed McGibbon: Best wishes to Ed for a successful CI 
her right ear. Now she still wears a hearing aid in her  experience. Ed is a former president of our chapter 
left ear, and since she has a lot of low‐frequency  and still a member. He had the surgery in December 
hearing in that ear, she is not planning on getting a  and will be turned on Jan. 14. 
CI for that side.    
   
Robin works full‐time as an occupational therapist 
with little kids and then goes home to her two   Hearing Assistive Technology Training Program 
The Hearing Assistive Technology (HAT) Training 
children, so at both her workplace and her home, 
 is a two‐day workshop that will explain the use of 
there has been a great deal to adjust to. “Iʹm doing  assistive technology and how you can educate 
alright with the cochlear implant, and I get much   your local HLAA Chapter about assistive 
more hearing with the CI than I did with the hearing  technology. It will be occurring on February 6‐8, 
aid,” she says. “I really canʹt take my hearing aid off   2009, at San Diego State University in California. 
much so it might take a bit longer to totally adjust to  For more information, contact Christopher T. 
the CI.”   Sutton at www.hearingloss.org/staffcontact6.asp/. 
  
There are both ups and downs: It’s “nice to hear   
things I didnʹt before,” but going to the movies is 
more challenging because the hearing aid and the CI  Wonder what speech and music would sound 
like if you had a cochlear implant? Go to these 
5
Web pages for acoustic simulations that greatly  *For more information on CIs, visit HLAA at 
resemble what a cochlear implant wearer  http://www.hearingloss.org/learn/hat.asp.  
hears: www.hei.org/research/aip/audiodemos.htm    
 
www.ucihs.uci.edu/hesp/Simulations/simulationsm Participate in a Local Hearing Study at NYU  
ain.htm
Assistant Professor Chin‐Tuan Tan, Ph.D., of NYU 
Practice listening sites for people with cochlear  School of Medicine is conducting a study on music 
implants who want to work on their listening  and speech in the hearing‐impaired. He is looking 
skills. Check out these online sites with  for hearing‐impaired subjects (preferably hearing aid 
listening exercises (some are developed for  users) to listen to speech and music that are distorted, 
people learning English as a second language):  and rate the quality of their perception. Subjects must 
have hearing loss within 25 dBHL and 70 dBHL for 
Auditory Verbal Training:  all frequencies, and should have completed 
www.auditoryverbaltraining.com/websites.htm   audiograms. Each listening session will take 1 to 2 
hours, and subjects will be paid $15 per hour. For 
Aural Rehabilitation: 
more information and if you would like to be 
www.hearinglossweb.com/tech/ci/arhb/resb.htm  
considered for the study, contact: Dr. Tan at Chin‐
Beginner Level Learning ‐ Listening Comprehension:  Tuan.Tan@nyumc.org / 212‐263‐7785; or Meagan 
http://esl.about.com/od/listening/Beginning_Level_ Robles at Meagan.Robles@nyumc.org / 212‐562‐2015. 
English_Listening_Comprehension_Exercises.htm
 
 
English Pronunciation: 
http://international.ouc.bc.ca/pronunciation/
 
ESL Independent Study Lab: 
www.lclark.edu/%7Ekrauss/toppicks/toppicks.html
 
 
News From National HLAA: 
  HLAA Social Network and Web Chats:  
Make new friends without leaving the house!  HLAA convened with other organizations 
 
Check out the online community from HLAA at  representing the hard‐of‐hearing and members of the 
  http://myhearingloss.org. Find hearing loss  Obama‐Biden Transition Team on December 11, 
resources, post messages for other members, and  and presented a consensus document on the issues 
  join in the chat room as guest speakers share their  impacting the hearing‐impaired and deaf. The 
story and answer your questions.    Transition Team said the new administration wants 
  
people with disabilities to have a seat at the table 
Upcoming Expert Chat: January 13, 7 PM, with  when decisions affecting their lives are being made. 
 
Deanna P. Baker on captioning.   Their Web site, at 
  Go here to submit questions:  http://change.gov/open_government/yourseatattheta
www.hearingloss.org/Community/askExpert.asp   ble, features HLAA’s consensus document, as well as 
   information on the Team’s other meetings with 
Cochlear Implant Chat: Every Monday night, 8 PM various organizations on different aspects of public 
  Regular Chat: Every Wednesday night, 9 PM 
policy. Visit the site to learn more and leave 
  comments.  

  Special thanks to 
Randi Friedman, 
  Keith Muller, & 
Isabelle Mugavero 
 
for their kind 
  donations to the 
  chapter.  
  
   
6
  Access to the Arts in New York City 

OPEN‐CAPTIONED THEATER ‐ Find captioned theater listings nationwide on www.c2net.org 
Theater Access Project (TAP) captions Broadway and Off‐Broadway productions each month. Tickets are 
discounted. For listings & application www.tdf.org/tap or 212‐221‐1103, 212‐719‐45377 (TTY) 
*Upcoming OPEN‐CAPTIONED Shows: [See TAP for tickets] 
Speed‐The‐Plow (1/7, 8 PM); South Pacific (1/21, 2 PM); August: Osage County (1/31, 2 PM); 
Shrek (2/24, 7 PM); The American Plan (3/7, 2 PM)  
 
 
OPEN‐CAPTIONED MOVIES –  
For updated listings, go to www.insightcinema.org or www.regalcinemas.com/movies/open_cap.html
REGAL BATTERY PARK STADIUM 11,102 N. End Avenue–Vesey & West Streets (212) 945‐4370.  
REGAL–UA KAUFMAN STUDIOS CINEMA 14, 35th Ave. & 38th St., Long Island City (718) 786‐1722 
REGAL–UA SHEEPSHEAD BAY‐BROOKLYN, Knapp St & Harkness Ave (718) 615‐1053.
 
REAR‐WINDOW CAPTIONED MOVIES ‐ For listings go to www.FOMDI.com. Ask for a special window 
when buying your ticket.  The window reflects the text that’s shown on the rear of the theater 
AMC Empire on 42nd Street.  (212) 398‐2597, call Tues afternoon for next week’s schedule 
Clearview Chelsea Cinemas, 260 W.  23rd St., Auditorium 4, 212‐691‐5519. www.clearviewcinemas.com/tripod.shtml
The Bronx: AMC Cinema Bay Plaza, 718‐320‐1659. 
 
MUSEUMS WITH CAPTIONED EVENTS & ASSISTIVE DEVICES ‐ 
The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1000 Fifth Ave. 212‐879‐5500 Ext. 3561 (V), 212‐570‐3828 (TTY) 
Real‐Time Captioning of lectures upon request – This new service requires at least three weeks notice. 
Gallery Talk with ALDs (meet at gallery talk station, Great Hall)  
The Museum of Modern Art, 1 East 53rd St., Access Programs 212‐708‐9864, 212‐247‐1230 (TTY) 
ALDs are available for lectures, gallery talks, & Family Programs. Infrared is available in Titus Theaters. 

Inquiring Minds Want  Cochlear Americas Celebration  We Want You! 


to Know…  2009 The HLAA Manhattan Chapter is 
  always looking for members who 
Cochlear Celebration, a four‐day event 
What kind of question  want to put their eagerness and 
featuring social and educational 
about hearing loss  talents to good use! Would you like 
activities for the Cochlear 
would you like to see  to become more involved with our 
community, will be taking place in 
answered on these pages  Web site or learn our new room 
Anaheim, California, on March 26‐29, 
by an audiologist for the  loop/PA system? Do you have 
2009. Meet peers with cochlear 
“Ask the Expert”  accounting skills? Or maybe you’d 
implants and experts in the field, and 
section? E‐mail your  like to volunteer as a greeter or 
enjoy a private party at Disneylandʹs 
questions to Elizabeth at  provide refreshments for our 
Big Thunder Festival Arena and a 
ElizabethMStump@gma meetings?  
Twilight Pass to Disneyland. Go here 
il.com with “Ask the  If interested, please contact the 
for more information and registration: 
Expert” in the subject  Manhattan Chapter at (212) 769‐4327 
www.cochlearamericas.com/celebrati
line.   or HLAANYC@aol.com.  
on.  

Mention of suppliers or devices in this newsletter does not mean HLAA‐Manhattan endorsement, 
nor does exclusion suggest disapproval. 7
c/o Barbara Dagen, 
141 E. 33rd St. (3B)  
New York, NY 10016 

FIRST CLASS MAIL


(DATED MATERIAL)

Please check your address label for the date of your last dues payment and, if you are a National member, there will be
an “NM” after the date. Report any discrepancies to Mary Fredericks. Thanks!

Manhattan Chapter Annual Membership Application HLAA Membership Application


Please complete and return this form, with your Please complete and return this form, with your dues
chapter dues of $15 (payable to HLAA-Manhattan) payment of $35 for a one-year membership
for the period September 1, 2008, to August 31, 2009 (including subscription to Hearing Loss Magazine)
Send to: Mary Fredericks To: HLAA Membership, 7910 Woodmont Ave.
520 East 20th St. (8E) Suite 1200, Bethesda, MD 20814.
New York, NY 10009
NAME (please print)
NAME (please print)_____________________ ADDRESS/APT_____________________________
ADDRESS/APT_____________________________ ____________
CITY/STATE/ZIP________________________ CITY/STATE/ZIP________________________
PHONE (Home or Work?)_________________ PHONE (Home or Work)__________________
E-MAIL ADDRESS_______________________ E-MAIL ADDRESS_______________________
SEND A NEWSLETTER BY EMAIL YES NO ARE YOU NOW A MEMBER OF HLAA
MEMBER OF HLAA NATIONAL? YES NO NATIONAL? YES NO
HOW DID YOU HEAR ABOUT US? (receiving the Hearing Loss Magazine)?______
________________________ IF YES, I.D. No.________________

ADDITIONAL DONATION_$_______________ ADDITIONAL DONATION_$_______________


TOTAL ENCLOSED_$____________________ TOTAL ENCLOSED_$____________________

HLAA is a volunteer association of hard of hearing people, their relatives and friends. It is a nonprofit, non-sectarian educational organization devoted
to the welfare and interests of those who cannot hear well.
Your contribution is tax deductible to the extent allowable by law. We are a 501(c)(3) organization.