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VOLUME 5 | ISSUE 31 | SEPTEMBER 12, 2012
I N S I D E : PRI ZEWEEK PUZZLE: PG. 4 • PET CARE GUI DE • SCHOLARSHI P OPS: PG. 13, 20
C
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L
ike the bloom of daffodils in early spring, the
political yard signs are starting to blossom from
the earth throughout the region. And don’t be
surprised if you see more of these campaign tools clut-
tering the landscape in the coming months than you
usually would see during election season. That’s
because area voters will have more decisions to make
than ever before when they enter the voting booth on
November 6. Not only will voters choose from
amongst candidates for President of the United States,
U.S. Senator, U.S. House Representative, and County
Freeholders, but they’ll also be selecting local officials
in races not normally decided upon in a November
general election.
At the county level, voters will select two candi-
dates to serve on the Cumberland County Board of
Chosen Freeholders. The two seats are currently held
by Republicans Tom Sheppard and Mary Gruccio, both
running for reelection. In last November’s elections,
Republicans took control of the freeholder board for
the first time in decades. Now the party needs to
defend both Sheppard’s and Gruccio’s seats to main-
tain control of the board. The candidates running on
the Democrats’ ticket are Joe Derella, Jr. and Doug
Long. This race will be hotly contested.
Voters in 13 of Cumberland County’s 14 municipali-
ties will elect school board members in two months,
rather than in separate springtime elections. Only
Bridgeton elected not to take advantage of a recent
change in state statute that now gives New Jersey
communities the option to move the date of elections
for school board members from April to November.
In Vineland, candidates for mayor and five city
council seats will appear on the November ballot rather
than in municipal elections normally held in May.
While Millville and Bridgeton voters won’t see can-
didates for municipal offices appear on the November
ballot this year, they will in 2013 and 2014, respectively.
Q
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CONNECTI NG YOU TO SOUTH JERSEY. WEEKLY.
E C R W S S
L o c a l
R e s i d e n t i a l C u s t o m e r
First Days of School
Wearing colorful new clothes and fresh faces express-
ing the full gamut of youthful emotion, more than 10,000
students returned to classes Wednesday as the Vineland
Public Schools 2012-2013 school year started in high gear.
The first few days of school can be both an exciting
and stressful occasion for children and parents alike,
experts say. Exciting because it's a milestone, stressful
because it means separation. In most families, it causes
butterflies and even some tears for a few days. Some
Pivotal Election Season Kicks Off
Hotly contested races, recent changes in election law give voters much more than
usual to consider when heading to the polls on November 6.
{ BY MIKE EPIFANIO }
Continued on page 14
Continued on page 10
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{
STAFF
}
{
CONTENTS
}
MIKE EPIFANIO Editor & Publisher
DEBORAH A. EIN Managing Editor
GAIL EPIFANIO Controller
MARIE HALPIN-GALLO Advertising Executive
MICHELE LOW Advertising Executive
TRACY BUSCHAM Graphic Designer
RYAN DINGER Editorial/Sales Assistant
The Grapevine
907 N. Main Rd., Ste. 205, Vineland, NJ 08360
PHONE: 856-457-7815 • FAX: 856-457-7816
EMAIL: letters@grapevinenewspaper.com
WEB: www.grapevinenewspaper.com
The Grapevine is published on Wednesdays by
Grapevine News Corp. Copyright © 2012. All
rights reserved.
1 Election Roundup
Mtktktktktktktktkktktktkt.
MIKE EPIFANIO
1 First Days of School
3, 8 Faces in the News
4 Prizeweek Puzzle
6 News in Brief
16,26 Community Calendar/
Sports
18 Event Planning
How an idea becomes an event.
TODD NOON
18 Food for Thought
Blackberry jam stars in a tart.
JEAN HECKER
20-21 PET CARE
22-23 HOME AND GARDEN
24 REAL ESTATE
27 DINING: Famous Last
Words Reflections on a summer
past. FRANK GABRIEL
30 Entertainment
31 CLASSIFIEDS
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Vintage Vineland { VINCE FARINACCIO }
Vineland vs.
Southbury
The Southbury Training School opened in 1940 and
soon became as noted as its Vineland counterpart.
T
he week screenwriter Abby
Mann spent at the Training
School at Vineland resulted in
the script for A Child is Waiting,
which was first produced as the 22nd
episode of the CBS television series Studio
One’s ninth season. It aired March 11, 1957,
at 10 p.m. and starred Pat Hingle as Dr.
Clark, the fictional director of a facility not
unlike Vineland’s who believes in allowing
the mentally challenged children under his
care to reach their full potential in life. The
film also featured Mary Fickett as Jean
Horst, the instructor whose emotional
attachment to her students challenges
Clark’s methods.
The New York Times gave it a glowing
review for its script and for its bravery in
presenting the topic of mental retardation
on a prime time television show, citing the
character of Clark as the means through
which “Mr. Mann spoke eloquently of the
need to accept the retarded child, to give
the youngster the blessing of affirmative
understanding and not to reject him by
standards that cannot apply.”
David Goode, in his study, “And Now
Let’s Build a Better World: The Story of
the Association for the Help of Retarded
Children [AHRC], New York City 1948-
1998,” credits Mann’s script as “the first
dramatic show on network TV to deal with
the problem of mental retardation,” noting
that “it had a great impact on public
awareness at that time.”
But according to Gary Rutkowski, the
role of technical advisor for the TV version
of Mann’s play is credited to the Southbury
Training School in Southbury,
Connecticut. The Training School at
Vineland then seems to have served strict-
ly as a research center for Mann, a circum-
stance that has largely gone without recog-
nition over the years.
The Southbury Training School opened
in 1940 and, despite its relatively late entry
into the field of mental studies, soon
became as noted as its Vineland counter-
part. Suzanna Andrews, in a 2007 inves-
tigative Vanity Fair article about Daniel
Miller, son of playwright Arthur Miller and
a resident of the Southbury facility,
described the Connecticut facility in flat-
tering terms somewhat reminiscent of
Vineland’s campus: “Set on 1,600 acres in
the rolling hills of central Connecticut, it
was magnificent to behold, with porticoed,
neo-Georgian red-brick buildings sur-
rounded by endless lawns. It had a school
and job-training programs, and its residents
were housed in “cottages”—with their own
living areas and kitchens. Well into the
1950s, Southbury was so highly regarded
that wealthy families in New York City
would buy country homes in Connecticut
to establish residency so that, for a minimal
fee, they could place their children there.”
The use of the Connecticut facility as
technical advisor for the New York-based
Studio One production of A Child is
Waiting is undoubtedly due to its
Manhattan proximity and its reputation
with New Yorkers. It probably can be said
that the Southbury School was at its peak
of popularity in 1957. But unlike Vineland’s
Training School, which would change its
name but maintain its standing in the field,
Southbury’s institution entered the 1970s
overcrowded and understaffed while bran-
dishing a tarnished reputation.
Andrews describes Southbury Training
School in the 1970s as consisting of “nearly
2,300 residents, including children, living
in rooms with 30 to 40 beds. Many of the
children wore diapers, because there
weren’t enough employees to toilet-train
them. During the day, they sat in front of
blaring TVs tuned to whatever show the
staff wanted to watch. The most disabled
children were left lying on mats on the
floor, sometimes covered with nothing but
a sheet. ‘In the wards you had people
screaming, banging their heads against the
wall, and taking their clothes off,’ says
David Shaw, a leading Connecticut disabil-
ity lawyer. ‘It was awful.’”
The success of Studio One’s production
of A Child is Waiting meant that a
Hollywood version wouldn’t be too far
behind. It would be another two years
before producer/director Stanley Kramer
expressed interest in filming A Child is
Waiting. Known for his socially conscious
movies, Kramer announced his decision to
produce A Child is Waiting in February
1961. Seven months later, after all the key
people involved in the production were
assembled, Vineland became a serious con-
sideration as a shooting location. I
Next Week Scouting Vineland
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I
Grapevine 1-2 091212-de:Layout 1 9/10/12 7:49 PM Page 2
Romano
Recognizes
Sacred Heart
Mayor Robert Romano pre-
sented a “Certificate of
Recognition” to Sacred Heart
High School for 80 years of
academic excellence in educa-
tion. On behalf of the City of
Vineland, the Mayor extended
best wishes to faculty, staff
and students for a wonderful
school year ahead. Accepting
the certificate is Dr. Albert
Monillas (left), Head of
School, while Mr. Anthony
Stefano, Class of 1972, looks
on proudly.
NEW CLOTHES,
NEW CLASSES, AND
A NEW SMILE FOR A
NEW SCHOOL YEAR!
Getting back to school means meeting new friends, new
classes and exciting new times. Ìt's also a great time to
get a new smile without anyone knowing. Now is your
chance to have the straight, beautiful smile you deserve.
Just call our offce today and we'll evaluate your smile at
a no-charge Ìnvisalign consultation.
Ìnvisalign Teen Full Treatment,
Opalescence Professional Tooth
Whitening, Consultation, Records,
Radiographs and a Two Year
Supply of Vivera Retainers!!!
Usual Fee $5,100
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Patient must qualify for available fnancing. Based
on a $3,900 case fnanced over 60 months.
)5$1.$ 3(77,6$1, '0'
)$0,/< *(1(5$/ '(17,67
1500 South Lincoln Ave. Vineland, NJ 08361 , (856) 691-2553
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Faces in the News
I
WWW.TEAMBARSE.COM
Ordered and Paid for by Vineland Campaign 2012, John Barretta Treasurer
PLEASE VISIT OUR WEBSITE FOR WEEKLY UPDATES
ANGELA CALAKOS, ANTHONY FANUCCI,
DIAMARIS RIOS, PAUL SPINELLI AND CARLOS VILLAR
W
P , OS RI S I AMAR I D
ed and Paid for by Vineland Campaign der Or
A B M A E T . W W W
ND A LLI E IN P S UL A PPA
,
er easur r etta TTr n 2012, John Barr
M O C . E S R A
AR ILL V OS L AR C
,
In Remembrance
For Linda Ellen Morrell
Carter, February 3, 1948 -
September 17, 2001.
Honoring you on the 11th
anniversary of your death.
I look at my daughter, I
watch her. I wish that she is
thinking the kindest of
thoughts. I see you in her and
it makes me smile.
I sat and watched my little
girl consider whether her
thoughts meant anything to
those around her. What if she
couldn't express them; what if
her heart was too torn apart;
what if her soul had danced
the proverbial dance and
couldn’t do it again? What if
her heart learned a grave lesson, as mine did all those years ago? What if?
My mind keeps thinking that as long as I keep my daughter's needs on the forefront,
why should my losing you have anything to do with what her heart feels? Why? Because I
am her Mother and I miss you dearly.
So, I breathe. I inhale/exhale and I glance down at the tiny footprints and I think of you,
Momma.
Sadly Missed by Your Daughter, Marcy and your namesake, Mia Ellen.
Grapevine 3-11 091212-de:Layout 1 9/10/12 7:50 PM Page 3
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Note contest rules at the top of this page.
Readers can deposit their puzzles 24/7
in the drop-slot located in the vestibule of
South Jersey Federal Credit Union,
106 West Landis Ave., Vineland, NJ 08360.
Note: Use a debit card from any financial institution
to gain access to the vestibule drop box after hours.
Entries must be deposited by 8:30 am on Monday.
Or, completed puzzles can mailed to:
South Jersey Federal Credit Union
Prizeweek Puzzle
PO Box 5429
Deptford, NJ 08096-0429
Mailed entries must be received by 10 am on Monday.
HOW TO ENTER:
$ PRIZEWEEK PUZZLE $
ACROSS:
3. If a child appears to be in
trouble while swimming,
having _ nearby would be
desirable.
7. For a tyrant to _ would
certainly be surprising.
9. Move head in agreement.
12. _ have such extensive
use that they are a common
feature in countries around
the world.
14. Dried grape.
15. Producers like to use
the true identity of the _ in
reality TV show that features
lifesaving dramas.
19. “Be careful. Con artists
will assume you’re rich,”
warns mother to son, who
may soon _ a lot of money.
20. The neighbors in an
exclusive community proba-
bly disapproved of anyone
who _ excessively.
21. Normal child wouldn’t
turn down opportunities to
play in _ with lots of friends.
DOWN:
1. “Representatives of this
company have to be pre-
pared to use _ power a lot,”
warns recruiter.
2. Climbers might need _,
especially since it’s a lengthy
trek up steep mountain.
4. _ soil is not where grain
farmer expects to see any-
thing grow extensively.
5. There may be some point
to a man insisting his_ be
on the small side.
6. A _ is, generally speak-
ing, where it pays for a
novice athlete to be espe-
cially careful.
8. Father is suspicious of son
tampering with sound sys-
tem since _ are suddenly
sounding odd to him.
10. Mumbled compliments
from her friend are dis-
missed as_ by unsentimen-
tal woman.
11. Tired of using a razor,
girl tries a new hair-removal
cream on her _ and anx-
iously awaits results.
12. The _ in a ship’s hold
might rouse the suspicions
of an alert official on the
lookout for smuggling.
13. Animal’s den.
16. Nobleman.
17. Lump of earth.
18. In World War II,
retreating armies used land
mines to _ up advancing
enemy.
THIS LIST INCLUDES, AMONG OTHERS,
THE CORRECT WORDS FOR THIS PUZZLE.
ACID
ARID
BATHER
BELLS
BELTS
BET
BILGE
BLOW
BRAIN
BULGE
CLOD
EARL
FATHER
GABBLED
GAMBLED
GET
HATS
HUTS
LAIR
NOD
RAISIN
RELENT
REPENT
RESCUED
RESCUER
REST
RING
RINK
SHIN
SHOW
SKIN
SLOW
SNOW
TONES
TRAIN
TRIPE
TRITE
TUNES
ZEST
PRIZEWEEK 090812
Jackpot increases by $25 each week if
no winning entry is received!
$425
1. Solve the puzzle just as you would in
any crossword puzzle. Choose from each
printed clue the word that best fits the
definition. Write the answers in the blank
space provided in each puzzle until all
spaces have been filled in.
2. There is no limit to the number of times
you may enter, however no facsimiles or
reproductions will be accepted. Only original
newspaper entry forms will be accepted.
3. Anyone is eligible to enter except
employees/directors of South Jersey
Federal Credit Union (SJFCU) and the
Grapevine and their immediate families.
4. A basic prize of $50.00 will be awarded
to the winner(s) of each weekly Prizeweek
Puzzle. In the case of multiple winners, the
prize money will be shared. If no correct
puzzle entries are received, $25.00 will
be added the following week. Winners
agree to permit use of their names and
photos by SJFCU and/or the Grapevine.
5. Entries can be mailed to South Jersey
Federal Credit Union, Attn: Prizeweek
Puzzle, PO Box 5429, Deptford, NJ
08096, or dropped off 24 hours a day, 7
days a week in the vestibule of SJFCU,
106 W. Landis Avenue, Vineland. Mailed
entries must be received by SJFCU no later
than 10 am on the Monday following the
Wednesday publication of the Prizeweek
Puzzle. Entries dropped off at the SJFCU
Vineland branch must be received no
later than 8:30 am on the Monday fol-
lowing the Wednesday publication of the
Prizeweek Puzzle. SJFCU assumes no
responsibility for late or lost entries.
6. South Jersey Federal Credit Union
reserves the right to issue additional
instructions in connection with the
Prizeweek Puzzle. All such instructions
are to become part of the official rules.
Visit www.SouthJerseyFCU.com for list
of additional rules.
SOLUTION TO LAST WEEK’S
PRIZEWEEK PUZZLE
The answers to last week’s puzzle
are below. For a detailed explanation
of the answers to last week’s puzzle
and additional rules, visit
www.SouthJerseyFCU.com
This week’s jackpot
Grapevine 3-11 091212-de:Layout 1 9/10/12 7:50 PM Page 4
GOING OUT OF BUSINESS
Dear Friend and Customer,
For 110 years, Brody’s Furniture has proudly served the Delaware Valley by providing top
quality, high end home furnishings to our beloved clients. Due to a recent family tragedy,
we have decided it is best to GO OUT OF BUSINESS and close our doors forever.
The heart breaking decision has been made, and now the thankless task has begun.
We are LIQUIDATING our ENTIRE INVENTORY in a matter of weeks! EVERY PIECE of
FINE FURNITURE has been MARKED DOWN for FINAL SALE!
This will be the BIGGEST SALE in our 110-YEAR HISTORY! The BEST SAVINGS and
BIGGEST SELECTION are available NOW, so we urge you to JOIN US and take
advantage of this OPPORTUNITY of a LIFETIME!
Sincerely,
Brody’s Furniture
MASSIVE SAVINGS STOREWIDE!
50% to 70% OFF
EVERYTHING
*OFF ORIG. PRICE
SELLING FAMOUS NAME
BRANDS LIKE DREXEL
HERITAGE, STANLEY,
HIGHLAND HOUSE,
CRAFTMASTER, VAUGHAN
BASSET AND MORE AT
SACRFICIAL PRICES!
585 N. Delsea Drive, Vineland • 856-691-0300 • ACCEPTS CHECKS,
CASH, MC, VISA, AMEX, DISC • SPECIAL SALE HOURS:
MON-FRI 10-8, SAT 10-6, SUN 11-5 • WWW.BRODYSFURNITURE.COM
CLOSING
FOREVER
after
110YEARS
WAYSIDE
FURNITURE
50%
OFF
ALL BEDDING
*OFF ORIG. PRICE
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Low Appears on Dr. Oz
Tune into The Dr. Oz Show on Thursday,
September 13, and you’ll see The Grapevine’s
own Michele Low being interviewed by the
show’s host. The topic: Suntanning. It airs 11
a.m. and 4 p.m. on Fox 29.
GriefShare Offered in Millville
The Millville Church of the Nazarene is
sponsoring GriefShare, a 13-week seminar /
support group for those who havee lost
loved ones. Each week is self contained, if
you miss one, you don’t miss out.
Where: The Millville Church of the
Nazarene, 2201 East Main St. (Rt 49),
Millville, N.J.
When: Wednesdays 7 to 9 p.m.
Registration Fee: $15 (workbook includ-
ed) scholarships available
Child care provided with advanced
notice. Call: 856-825-7544 for more details
Round Up to Build Hope
Cartridge World has partnered with the
National Breast Cancer Foundation on a
goal to raise $100,000. During September
and October, round up any Cartridge World
purchase to the next dollar for the NBCF.
Cartridge World will match the first
$25,000 raised.
Test Proctoring in Millville
As part of its public service and informa-
tion mission, the Millville Public Library,
210 Buck Street, Millville, provides proc-
tored testing services. Test proctoring is by
appointment and by application.
Generally a $25 fee (paid in cash) is
required at the time that the application for
a proctored exam is submitted. Higher fees
may be levied by the director for extremely
lengthy, complex examinations or unusual
organization requirements.
For more information, call the Reference
Desk at the Millville Public Library, 825-
7087 ext. 12, or come into the library.
Annual Irish Fall Festival
The largest Irish festival on the east
coast begins in North Wildwood on
Thursday, September 20, and concludes on
Sunday, September 23. The four-day event is
sponsored by James J. Reilly, Division 1,
Ancient Order of Hibernians (AOH). The
AOH is an organization that fosters and pre-
serves Irish culture and heritage.
On Friday, Saturday and Sunday the fes-
tivities will take place on Olde New Jersey
Avenue. Street vendors will display Irish
memorabilia, and food vendors will offer a
variety of Irish and non-Irish treats.
On Friday and Saturday, there will be
free live entertainment continuously from
12 noon until 10:30 p.m. As always, the con-
cert will begin with the National Anthem
sung by Dolly McGee, followed by the Irish
National Anthem sung by Mary Pat
Hastings. Other featured performers
include Timmy Kelly, Maura McKinney-
Mastro, Ballina, Broken Shillelaghs,
Birmingham 6, Celtic Pride, First Highland
Watch and many, many more.
Saturday begins with a 5K run. Runners
can sign up at 8 a.m. at the AOH tent
(between 1st and 2nd avenues) on Olde New
Jersey Avenue. Saturday also includes the
Brian Riley Pipe Exhibition and free Irish
Dance Lessons.
On Sunday at 12:30 p.m., the parade
begins at 24th and Surf avenues and will
continue to Spruce and Olde New Jersey
Avenues. Brendan Moore, National
President of the Ancient Order of
Hibernians in America, will serve as the
2012 Grand Marshal. In addition, Seamus
Boyle, Past National President of the
Ancient Order of Hibernians, will be a spe-
cial guest. All AOH organizations are wel-
come to be a part of this celebration of Irish
heritage. The parade also will feature Miss
North Wildwood, Brooke Elizabeth Iacono,
many fraternal organizations, bag pipe
bands, Irish dance groups and more.
The official Irish Music Tent, featuring
continuous Irish entertainment throughout
the weekend is located in the municipal
parking lot across from The Pointe at
Moore’s Inlet. The Irish Music Tent will fea-
ture non-stop entertainment by Broken
Shillelaghs, Celtic Connection, Sean Fleming
Band, Secret Service, Bogside Rogues,
Highland Rovers, 2U (the world’s second
best U2 show), Belfast Connection and
Derek Warfield and the Young Wolftones.
For discount weekend admission tickets, $20
for all three days, call 215-397-5909.
Irish food and entertainment will be
available at most of the clubs and pubs in
North Wildwood all weekend long.
For information contact the AOH at
1-800-IRISH-91 or www.cmcaoh.com.
Eye Associates Giveaway
Program Enters Third Year
South Jersey Eye Associates (SJEA) is
continuing its program of distributing com-
plimentary contact lens care kits to nurses
at 34 schools in Bridgeton and Salem coun-
ties for a third straight year. Overwhelmed
by the positive responses they received
since launching the program in 2010, SJEA’s
optometric physicians Dr. Robert M. Cole
and Dr. Michael A. Feinstein were pleased
to be able to include more schools in Salem
County in the giveway of free Alcon OPTI-
FREE® Pure Moist® care kits.
Gina Campanella and Bonnie Scull, nurs-
es at Bridgeton High School, offered their
praise and gratitude for the program. “It
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VOTE FOR STEPHEN PLEVINS
Independent Candidate running
for Vineland City Council.
Stephen Plevins was born and raised in Vineland
and has called it his home for nearly 50 years. A
graduate of Vineland High School, he has made
it his life’s work to improve the community
he grew up in. In 1971, he graduated from
the University of Maryland with his Bachelor’s
degree in Community Public Relations and
Government. He has done graduate coursework
at both the University of Maryland and the
University of Northern Colorado. That’s why he’s
your best choice for City Council.
ON NOVEMBER 6 VOTE FOR PLEVINS
See What Plevins Has Done For Vineland Already:
• Founder of Broaden Your Horizons, an after
school program which has since become the
Vineland Boys and Girls Club
• Member of the Vineland Planning Board
• Past member of the Vineland Sewage Authority
• Co-Founder of Project Thanksgiving, a
program that provides Thanksgiving meals to
over 750 area families in conjunction with the
Salvation Army
Past Honors:
• Recipient of the Jayces State of New Jersey
#1 Volunteer Citizen Award
• Recipient of the Vineland Chamber of Commerce
“Pride in Vineland” award.
• Recipient of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Award
• Recipient of the National Assault Prevention Award
• Presented a Citation from the United States
Congress by House Representative Frank LoBiondo
• 2005 recipient of the Governor’s Award for Best
Volunteer Group in New Jersey
• Honored in the past by five separate New Jersey
Governors
S A L O N F A B R O J A E
MADISON SQUARE
782 Brewster Rd. Vineland, NJ 08361
(856)794-9696 • salonfabrojae.com
Mon. 9-2, Tue., Wed., Thurs. 9-9, Fri. 9-5 & Sat. 8-4.
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News in Brief
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HOURS: MONDAY-FRIDAY 8:30AM TO 6:00PM
SATURDAY 8:00AM-5:00PM • SUNDAY 9AM-3PM • PHONE: 856-696-1644
482 Tuckahoe Rd. Buena Vista, NJ 08310
STORE CLOSING
60% OFF
EVERYTHING
ENTIRE STORE
EVERYTHING MUST GO!
AT THE GARDEN CENTER • EXCLUDES BULK
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ATURDAY 8:00 SSA
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G E H T T A
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UN S • M -5:00P M 0A
HOURS: MONDAY-F
E C N E D R A G
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• M -3P M NDAY 9A
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makes a difference having a kit on hand,”
says Campanella. “When a student comes to
me and has to take out their contacts for
whatever reason, I have what they need.”
“The kits come in handy for students
who wear contacts and play a sport,” says
Scull. “They love that we have them.”
Dr. Cole and Dr. Feinstein came up with
the idea of distributing the care kits to area
schools as part of a larger effort to help pre-
vent the kind of eye infections and injuries
that can result from improper contact lens
care.
“It’s about more than just convenience,”
says Dr. Cole. “Children and teens can be
lax about caring for their contact lenses, and
that can lead to some potentially serious
issues for their eyes down the road. The
more readily accessible these kits are, the
better the chance of preventing the problem
before it starts.”
“Most nurse offices just don’t have the
resources to deal with these kinds of prob-
lems,” adds Dr. Feinstein. “School budgets
are tight. This is something we can do.”
Pictured: Gina Campanella and Bonnie Scull,
nurses at Bridgeton High School, show off
their free contact lens care kits provided by
South Jersey Eye Associates in Bridgeton.
County College announces fall
FPAC schedule
The Frank Guaracini Jr. Fine and
Performing Arts Center at Cumberland
County College, Sherman Avenue and
College Drive, is pleased to announce its
Fall 2012 performance schedule.
Tickets are on sale now. A full schedule
can be viewed online at
www.cccnj.edu/fpac or call the box office at
856-692-8499 to be placed on the private
mailing list.
National Museum Day Live!
On September 29, WheatonArts will open
its doors free of charge along with over 1,400
other participating venues for the eighth
annual Museum Day Live! This immensely
successful program, in which WheatonArts
will emulate the free admission policy of the
Smithsonian Institution’s Washington, D.C.-
based facilities, encourages learning and the
spread of knowledge nationwide.
Inclusive by design, Museum Day Live!
fulfills Smithsonian Media’s mission to
make cultural education accessible to every-
one. For one day only, WheatonArts will
grant free access to visitors who download a
Museum Day Live! ticket at
www.Smithsonian.com/museumday.
Visitors who present the Museum Day
Live! Ticket will gain free entrance for two
at participating venues for one day only.
One ticket is permitted per household, per
email address. For more information about
Museum Day Live! 2012 and a list of partici-
pating museums and cultural institutions,
please visit Smithsonian.com/museumday.
Flu Shot Locations and Dates
The Cumberland County Health
Department has announced the 2012 Flu
Clinic Schedule. Flu shots are free for
Cumberland County residents.
September 14, 10 a.m.–12 noon, Maurice
River Township Senior Center, 590 Main
St., Leesburg, NJ 08327
September 17, 10:30 a.m.–11:45 a.m.,
Commercial Township Senior Center,
Haleyville-Mauricetown Rd, Port Norris,
NJ 08349
September 19, 10 a.m.–12 noon, Charlotte
Brago Senior Center, 736 Landis Ave.,
Rosenhayn, NJ 08352
September 20, 10 a.m.–1 p.m., Millville
Rescue Squad, 600 Cedar St, Millville, NJ
08332 (Vehicle drive through only)
September 25, 10 a.m.–12 noon,
Maranatha Baptist Church, 1524 Rte. 49,
Millville, NJ 08332
October 2, 10 a.m.–12 p.m., West Park
Methodist Church, 625 Shiloh Pike (Rte. 49 &
West Park Drive), Hopewell Twp., NJ 08302
October 12, 11 a.m.–12 noon, Bridgeton
Senior Center, Burt and Babe Ruth Drive
(Behind Bridgeton High School), Bridgeton,
NJ 08332
November 7, 10:30 a.m.–12 noon, Holly
City Senior Center, 130 South Second St.,
Millville, NJ 08332
November 9, 11 a.m.–1 p.m., American
Legion, 220 Buck Street, Millville, NJ 08332
November 15, 10 a.m.–12 noon, Center for
Human Services, 22 Washington Street,
Bridgeton, NJ 08302
Questions? Contact the Health
Department at 856-327-7602 ext. 1114.
Check www.cshealth.org for additional
dates and locations. I
Grapevine 3-11 091212-de:Layout 1 9/10/12 7:50 PM Page 7
Trinity Episcopal Holds Vacation Bible School
Trinity Episcopal Church recently held Vacation Bible School for a large and
enthusiastic group of youngsters. The Theme this year was “Avalanche Ranch –
A Wild Ride Through God’s Word.” The participants and counselors are pictured
above. Photo courtesy of Shanna Fulcher.
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SEND US YOUR FACES. IT’S FREE!
Get your photos published in The Grapevine... birthdays, engagements, weddings,
anniversaries, births, graduations, awards. Send them to the address listed on p. 2.
Faces in the News
I
Isekenegebe Chosen
Section Fellow
Theodora Isekenegbe, a gradu-
ate of Cumberland County College
and Rutgers University, was
recently selected as an American
Public Health Association (APHA)
Maternal and Child Health (MCH)
Section Fellow for 2012-2013. She
was awarded this academic fel-
lowship because of her outstand-
ing academic record and her
demonstration of an interest in
public health, and in maternal and
child health, in particular.
Isekenegbe, who is the daughter
of Thomas Isekenegbe, President
of Cumberland County College,
and Pat, is currently enrolled in
her second year of Public Health
graduate study at Drexel
University.
Through this fellowship program, Iskenegbe will receive an exciting and
unique opportunity to learn more about the MCH field and be actively
engaged in the activities of the MCH Section. She’ll have an opportunity to
learn more about APHA and the MCH Section by participating in business
meetings, serving on various Section committees, and working on Section
policy statements among other activities. Additionally, she will be matched
with a public health mentor in the MCH field who is serving in a leadership
role in the APHA MCH Section.
Through this work, she’ll be expected to attend several APHA and MCH
meetings in various locations throughout the year. Her travel expenses will be
paid for by Drexel University.
Grapevine 3-11 091212-de:Layout 1 9/10/12 7:50 PM Page 8
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Mia’s First Day of School
Mia, age 6, as she makes her way out to
the bus stop for her first day of first grade
at Petway Elementary in Vineland.
Waiting for the Bus
From left: Gage, age 5, Andrea, age 8, and Gavin, age 6, before their first day back to
school at D’Ippolito Elementary. Gage started kindergarten (so it really was his very first
day), Gavin started first grade, and Andrea is in third grade.
effort, by parents as well as children, can smooth the transition, according to the
Society for Research in Child Development and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health
Services Administration.
School is just one of many new situations your child will have to face in life. But
because small children don't come equipped with adult-size coping skills, it's up to you
to help your child see change as a challenge.
Here are some tips for parents:
Be sure to concentrate on all aspects of development-emotional, social, physical and
intellectual. Pay particular attention to the following list of good parenting skills:
* Provide a safe and healthy home environment;
* Make sure your child eats a balanced diet and gets enough physical activity;
* Take advantage of your child's natural curiosity to explore new situations and learn
new concepts;
* Praise your child and use positive reinforcement;
* Show your child affection and concern;
* Foster your child's self-worth;
* Coach your child on how to participate, cooperate and communicate;
* Demonstrate how to express kindness and appreciation;
* Teach your child to smile, make eye contact and listen to others;
* Spend time regularly with your child;
* Give your child some freedom, but provide security and support;
* Allow your child to be a child; and
* Say what you mean, mean what you say and follow through on your word.
SCHOOL DAYS
Continued from cover
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Cousins at Tiny Tots
Layla and Grace, best friends and
cousins, hug after their first day of school
at Tiny Tots Preschool in Vineland.
Middle School Angst?
Suzanne, 14, and Dana, 12, before their
first day this school year at Wallace Middle
School.
Grace Starts Preschool
Grace, I can't believe you are 3 years
old already! I wish you the best of luck and
tons of fun in P3 at Tiny Tots preschool.
Mommy loves you, sweetheart!
Grapevine 3-11 091212-de:Layout 1 9/10/12 7:50 PM Page 11
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2 North High Street
Millville, N1 08332
Telephone: 856-825-3700
www.ccia-net.com
&XPEHUODQG
&2817<
,03529(0(17
$XWKRULW\
Day
Household Hazardous Waste Day and Electronics Recycling Day
“Taking Steps To A Better Environment”
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Get rid of it all in one day!
Saturday, September 15, 2012
City of Vineland Public Works,
East Walnut Road
Sponsored By: Cumberland County Improvement Authority
Co-Sponsored By: City of Millville, Cumberland County Utilities Authority, and Landis Sewerage Authority
From the western side of the County, take Route 56 (Landis Avenue) to
Route 555 (Main Road). Turn right on Main Road and follow it to Walnut
Road. Turn right on Walnut Road to the City of Vineland Public Works.
Acceptable Items: Used Motor Oil, Hydraulic Oil,
Transmission Fluid, Kerosene, Diesel Fuel, and
Heating Oil. Please do not mix with Gasoline or
Chlorinated Solvents.
Also Acceptable are: Oil-Based Paints, Paint
Cleaners, Stains, Finishes, Batteries*, Cleaning
Compounds, Pesticides, Herbicides, Adhesives,
Garden Chemicals, Corrosives, Poisons,
Car Batteries, Anti-Freeze, Propane Tanks, and More!
Limited to 150 lbs or 20 Gallons Maximum Per Trip.
*Changes in federal regulation combined with less hazardous battery components
mean the typical household AAA, AA, C, D, and 9-volt batteries can be disposed as trash
Acceptable Items: Computers, Monitors,
VCRs, Keyboards, Servers, Terminals,
Telephones, Laptop Computers,
Televisions, Printers,
Stereos, Computer Wire,
and Mouse Controllers.
Limited to Six Computer Units.
**TIRES WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED!**
Grapevine 12-17 091212-de:Layout 1 9/10/12 8:07 PM Page 12
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At AMI-AtlantiCare, you will receive high quality,
state-of-the-art diagnostic imaging performed by
board-certified, sub-specialty trained radiologists
in a comfortable and relaxing environment.
We provide a full array of imaging services including
CT, MRI, Digital Mammography, Ultrasound, DEXA Scan,
Vein Services, Thyroid Biopsies and Digital X-ray.
Local residents and physicians alike will enjoy the
convenience and peace of mind from our local
radiologists and staff that they know and trust.
219 North White Horse Pike, Hammonton, NJ
www.amiatlanticare.com
To schedule an appointment, please call
(609) 878-XRAY (9729).
HOURS OF OPERATION
Monday - 8:00am - 6:00pm
Tuesday - 8:00am - 8:00pm
Wednesday - Friday - 8:00am - 5:00pm
Saturday - 8:00am -12:00 noon
Loves Learning
Centers
An After-School Skill Development Program Beyond
the Basics for Children Grades 3-6
K
aren Stone and John Muller,
each having 40 years experi-
ence in education, are opening
skill development centers in
southern New Jersey. This skill develop-
ment program is a new and proven
approach to after-school education. They
provided this program to the public school
children in nine counties of New Jersey
over a five-year period through a non-
profit organization. They both retired and
felt so strongly about the success of this
program that they decided to bring it to
the general public. This program proved
successful for children who struggle in
reading, writing and math even though
they have mastered the basics in these
subjects.
As parents and educators know, many
children still experience difficulties in
reading, writing and math even though
they can read, write and do math compu-
tation. However, once they begin third
grade, a critical year for all children, they
must use the basics to answer questions
that require higher thinking skills. The
frustration, anxiety and discouragement
children experience at this critical time in
their learning process is a result of their
inability to understand the skill funda-
mentals required of them to answer ques-
tions both in language arts and math.
Teachers are teaching these skills.
However, Loves Learning Centers teaches
children the 14 Essential Language Arts
skills and the 10 Mathematical Strategies
and 5-Step Problem Solving Plan individ-
ually, skill by skill. It is a different
approach to acquiring these fundamental
skills that has proven to give children a
better understanding of the process in
reading, writing and math. To watch that
lightbulb go on is so rewarding!
We are not a tutoring program. Each
child attends a 10-week session coming
twice a week either in language arts or
math. In 10 short weeks, children make
great progress and teachers in their class-
rooms begin to realize the results. When
children master these fundamental skills
that make up the foundation of all lan-
guage arts and math mastery, they experi-
ence academic success often after years of
struggling in their classrooms. Each child
is given a short pre-test that allows the
proper placement in their instructional
level. Though a child may be in 4th grade,
his skill development may be a grade level
below. We believe that children must be
taught at their instructional level in order
to learn new skills. Children are post-tested
at the completion of the program. Parents
attend two conferences and are encour-
aged to ask questions and be a part of the
program.
Karen Stone and John Muller also
learned something extraordinary through
this program. Children actually learn bet-
ter in a small group setting learning from
their peers, being challenged by the cre-
ative energy and having more fun. Though
there is a time and place for individual
tutoring, small group instruction has ben-
efits that reach beyond the tutor/student
relationship. There will be no bullying as a
positive program created by Karen Stone
will be demonstrated and incorporated
into this small group setting. Children will
learn to appreciate their peers and will
develop a positive sense of self.
All teachers are certified and are expe-
rienced in their subject area. The Director
of the program oversees the program and
attends classes and meets with teachers
regularly. There is an administrative assis-
tant present each day to assist the teach-
ers and children.
Do you know the skills that your child
is missing in reading, writing and math?
Free diagnostic testing is offered.
Call Loves Learning Centers to speak
with Karen Stone or John Muller at 856-
780-5989. Loves Learning Centers opens on
October 1 at Haven Of Vineland, 2725 N.
Delsea Dr. and Forest Grove Rd. For direc-
tions, call Nelda Wheat, 856-696-4380.
OPEN HOUSE: September 19, 7–9 p.m.
SCHOLARSHIP OFFERED
Loves Learning Centers is
delighted to offer a full scholarship
to one of the readers of The
Grapevine. Please email a 200-
word response to “Why My Child
Would Benefit from A Program
Beyond the Basics.” Visit our web-
site at www.loveslearning.com for a
full overview of the program and
email your responses to
karen@loveslearning.com
Grapevine 12-17 091212-de:Layout 1 9/10/12 8:07 PM Page 13
All three cities switched election dates from
spring to November to take advantage of a
change in state statutes (enacted prior to
and separate from the change affecting
school board election dates) allowing non-
partisan municipalities to do so.
The move to November, in addition to
the fact that several viable candidates have
put together competitive slates, will make
Vineland’s municipal election an historic
one. It’s very likely that the numerous
mayor/council slates will split the vote
enough so that no mayoral candidate and/or
no two council candidates receive more
than half of the vote, in which case a runoff
election will be held in December (see box
on opposite bage).
In addition to its three cities (Vineland,
Millville and Bridgeton), Cumberland
County is home to 11 townships. All 11
townships run partisan elections where
candidates can declare their affiliation with
a political party. All 11 will be on the
November general election ballots, as they
always have.
Both the school board election date
change for the 13 municipalities and the
municipal election date change in Vineland,
Millville and Bridgeton were put into effect
to save taxpayers money and also to encour-
age greater participation in the elections.
Normally more voters show up at the polls
during general elections than in the spring-
time elections, especially if the general elec-
tion coincides with a presidential election
as it does this year. Each of these springtime
elections can cost the municipality tens of
thousands of dollars. Having municipal and
school board elections coincide with the
general elections eliminates that cost for
municipalities, while only costing the county
a nominal amount more.
According to Vineland’s City Clerk Keith
Petrosky, the fact that Vineland’s municipal
election is non-partisan created a challenge
in the presentation of the ballot. “It’s tougher
to have neat, orderly rows on the ballot,” he
says, explaining that voters can still expect to
see contested elected offices listed from
highest office down (U.S. President at the top,
then U.S. Senate, followed by any state, coun-
ty and local offices). “What will happen is,
the main part of the ballot will be in the
upper part of the ballot. And the municipal
[races] will be in the lower left and school
board in the lower right,” says Petrosky. This
presentation will help avoid confusion for
voters by keeping the names of candidates
for these non-partisan offices from appearing
to be aligned by political party affiliation, as
is the case on the top of the ballot.
For better or worse, voters can expect to
see ballots presented in this manner for a long
time. Voters in Vineland voted last November
to move the municipal elections from May to
the November general election. City council
and the Mayor subsequently approved the
change. According to state law, this decision
cannot be reversed until 10 years have passed.
Three seats on the nine-person school
board in Vineland will be decided in the
November 6 election. All three are for terms
of three years. Those whose terms are
expiring are Frank DiGiorgio, Anthony
Fanucci, and Patricia Phillips. Phillips is
retiring and Fanucci is running for city
council and not another term on the school
board. Diamaris Rios is running for city
council, but her term is not up until 2014.
Should she win a city council seat, she will
have to vacate her school board seat.
The other board members include Tom
Ulrich, President; Diamaris Rios, Vice
President; Scott English, Eugene Medio,
Carlos Mercado, and Dr. Alan Mounier.
According to a press release issued by F.
John Sbrana, Communications Coordinator
for Vineland Public Schools, “Legislation
signed into law on Jan. 17 by Gov. Chris
Christie (A4394/S3148, P.L.2011, chapter
202) permitted school elections, which fea-
ture the annual vote on board of education
members and portions of the school budget,
to be moved to coincide with the general
election in November.
“If a district moves its election to
November, however, voters are no longer able
to vote on a school base budget or proposed
tax levy that does not exceed the 2-percent
cap. For a proposed levy exceeding a 2-per-
cent increase, voters can approve or reject an
override referendum in November, regard-
ing the amount over the 2-percent mark.”
The 13 Cumberland County school dis-
tricts that have opted for November elec-
tions—Cumberland Regional, Commercial,
Deerfield, Downe, Fairfield, Greenwich,
Lawrence, Maurice River, Millville, Stow
Creek, Upper Deerfield, Vineland and
Hopewell/Shiloh—are among 468 school
boards in New Jersey to do so, according to
the New Jersey School Boards Association.
As if area voters won’t have enough to
consider in the voting booth this year, there
will be two public questions on the ballot
statewide, plus Upper Deerfield voters will be
asked whether the school board there should
be reduced from nine members to seven.
With so many candidates running for office
and so much at stake, The Grapevine is com-
mitted to voter education. Look to this news-
paper for candidate profiles and their posi-
tions on various issues in the coming weeks.
On Wednesday, September 26, Vineland
mayoral candidates will gather at the Landis
Theater for a debate hosted by the Greater
Vineland Chamber of Commerce and The
Daily Journal. The debate will be moderated
by The League of Women Voters. It will be a
good forum for voters to learn about the can-
didates and their stances on important issues
affecting Vineland residents. The event is
free and open to the public. The debate starts
at 6 p.m. and no registration is required. I {
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THE SOUP KITCHEN OF
VINELAND AUXILIARY
The Soup Kitchen of Vineland Auxiliary is a non-prot 501 (c) (3): contributions: tax deductible 170 (b) (1) (A) (vi).
YOUR DONATIONS, HELP AND KINDNESSES
GIVE PEACE, JOY AND LOVE TO MANY OTHERS.
...FOR HELPING TO LEAD
OUR KIDS OUT OF POVERTY.
A NEW CONCEPT IN AFTER SCHOOL EDUCATION
A Skill Development Program Beyond the Basics
Serving Children Grades 3rd - 6th
Do you know
what skills your child
is missing? Call now for a
FREE Diagnosis
856.780.5989
Would you like your child to become a master reader?
This can happen with the learning of the 14 essential language arts skills.
Would you like your child to be proficient in
mathematical problem solving strategies?
The 5 step problem solving plan with the 10 problem
solving strategies is the key!
www.loveslearning.com
OPEN HOUSE
Wed. Sept. 19th 7-9pm • Haven of Vineland
2725 North Delsea Dr. and Forest Grove Rd.
For Directions Call Nelda Sweet, 856.696.4380
ELECTION
Continued from cover
We Accept
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3460 Oak Rd. Vineland • 691-2497
(Between Lincoln & Brewster) • Fresh Picked Vegetables
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Everyday 8AM to 6PM
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Grapevine 12-17 091212-de:Layout 1 9/10/12 8:07 PM Page 14
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856.453.1555
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1450 E. Chestnut Ave.
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856.794.1700
Most insurances accepted
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our oce for more information.
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General Election Ballot Choices
President of the United States
DEMOCRAT REPUBLICAN THIRD PARTY/INDEPENDENT
Barack Obama* Mitt Romney eight third-party candidates
United States Senator
DEMOCRAT REPUBLICAN THIRD PARTY/INDEPENDENT
Robert Menendez* Joseph Kyrillos nine third-party candidates
United States House of Representatives, 2nd District
DEMOCRAT REPUBLICAN THIRD PARTY/INDEPENDENT
Cassandra Shober Frank A. LoBiondo* four third-party candidates
Cumberland County Freeholders (2 Seats)
DEMOCRAT REPUBLICAN THIRD PARTY/INDEPENDENT
Joseph Derella, Jr. Mary Gruccio*
Doug Long Thomas Sheppard*
Vineland Mayor and City Council
(The ballot position drawing is scheduled for 3:00 p.m., Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012 in
the City Hall, Second Floor Council Chambers.)
SLOGAN MAYOR CITY COUNCIL (FIVE SEATS)
Independent Thinking
Independent Decisions (No Mayor Candidate) Louis F. Cresci, Jr.*
Proven Progress Robert Romano* Mayra Arroyo*
Peter F. Coccaro, III*
Maria Laboy
Antonio F. Romero
Nelson Thompson
Association of Concerned
Taxpayers of Vineland David W. Mazur (No Council Candidates)
Vineland Taxpayers First Perry D. Barse Angela Calakos
Paul F. Spinelli
Diamaris Rios
Anthony R. Fanucci
Carlos E. Villar
The Independent Candidate (No Mayor Candidate) Stephen I. Plevins
For the People, Douglas A. Albrecht Delfin Cuevas, Jr.
With the People Gina Randazzo-Thompson
Moving Forward… Ruben Bermudez John A. Procopio
Together Maritza Gonzalez
Terra L. Dower
Edwin Cintron
Vineland School Board (Three Seats)
Frank DiGiorgio*
Susanne Morello
Christopher E. Jennings
Rigoberto Onofre
Frank J. Bongiovanni *Incumbents
• Register to Vote Deadline: October 16, 2012
For a voter registration form, contact:
County Board of Elections, 555 Shiloh Pike, Route 49, Bridgeton, NJ 08302
Administrator Lizbeth Hernandez, (856) 453-5801
Forms also available and may be turned in at your local municipal clerk’s office.
• Mail-In Ballot by Mail Deadline: October 30, 2012
Ballots available through the County Clerk’s office or online at
http://www.njelections.org/form_pdf/vote-mail-ballot-012712-cum.pdf
Office of the County Clerk, Court House, 60 W. Broad Street, Bridgeton, NJ 08302
County Clerk Gloria Noto, (856) 453-4860
• General Election — November 6, 2012
• Vineland Run-off Election — December 4, 2012
A city council run-off election is required if two or more of the candidates for council
do not receive a majority of the votes cast (50 percent plus one vote). A mayoral
run-off election is required if one candidate does not receive 50 percent plus one
vote out of all the votes cast. In either or both cases, the run-off election will be
conducted on Tuesday, December 4 (the fourth Tuesday following the municipal
election). The run-off provisions are mandated by state statute (N.J.S.A. 40: 45-19).
Grapevine 12-17 091212-de:Layout 1 9/10/12 8:08 PM Page 15
SPORTS HAPPENINGS
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12
Annual Golf & Tennis/Volleyball
Tournament. Stockton Resort & Spa, 401
South New York Rd., Galloway. $250 per
person for golf, $125 per person for tennis
or volleyball. Golf starts at 10:30 a.m. and
11 a.m., depending on course; All other
activities begin at noon. Sponsored partial-
ly by Nike, all proceeds from this event
benefit the SJH Foundation and SJH
HospiceCare. There will also be an open
bar, dinner and award ceremony. For more
info., email SJHFoundation@sjhs.com
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 15
Third Annual Bill Bottino Mud Run.
New Jersey Motorsports Park, Thunderbolt
Raceway, 8000 Dividing Creek Rd.,
Millville. Opening ceremony starts at 4
p.m. $63-85 for adults to register, which
includes a t-shirt and a BBQ. Sponsored
by the Barbara Cook Cancer Foundation,
all proceeds from this event will go toward
cancer research. The four-mile muddy
course will have over 20 obstacles, ending
in a mud pit. There will also be a separate
run for kids, auctions, prizes and an award
ceremony during the BBQ. There will also
be live music and a remembrance walk.
For more info. or to register, visit
www.NJmudrun.com.
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 18
11th Annual WheatonArts Golf
Classic. Running Deer Golf Club, 1111
Parvin Mill Rd., Pittsgrove Township. $100
per golfers registered in the morning; $185
per golfer registered in the afternoon; $675
per foursome. Registration for stroke play
begins at 6:30 a.m. 7:30 a.m., stroke play
shotgun. Registration for traditional scram-
ble begins at 11 a.m. Event features a con-
tinental breakfast, a lunch, cocktail hour
Hors d’oeuvres and an awards reception.
Presented by Wheaton Industries, all pro-
ceeds benefit the WheatonArts’ arts edu-
cation initiatives known as the “Glasstown
Collective.” For more info., call Katherine
at 856-825-6800 x114.
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 22
Walk To End alzheimer’s. Vineland High
School South, 2880 East Chestnut Ave.,
Vineland. Registration starts at 9:30 a.m.,
walk begins at 11 a.m. Proceeds benefit the
Alzheimer’s Association. For more info.,
visit alz.org/walk or call 1-800-272-3900.
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25
Second Annual New Jersey State
Advisory Board Golf Tournament.
Forsgate Country Club, 375 Forsgate Dr.,
Monroe Township. 11 a.m. registration,
11:30 a.m. lunch, 1:30 p.m. shotgun start.
$350 per person, $1,300 per foursome.
Proceeds from this tournament benefit the
Salvation Army. For more info. or to regis-
ter, visit www.salvationarmynj.org/golf or
call 908-851-8227
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29
Parish of All Saints Heart Healthy
Walk And Roll. St. John Bosco, 2
Hillcrest Ave., Millville. 9 a.m. registration.
All money collected will benefit religious
education programs. Pledge forms are
available at the Parish of All Saints
Rectory at 621 Dock Street in Millville.
Everyone is invited to participate: Young,
old, in-between and even pets. All children
who bring in $25 and all adults who col-
lect $50 or more will receive a Parish of All
Saints T-Shirt, along with a free lunch. For
more info., call 825-0021.
Vineland Public Library 5K and 1-
Mile Fun Run/Walk. South Vineland
Park, 429 W. Elmer Rd., Vineland. 9
a.m. Registration/Check-In begins at
7:30 a.m. Entry fees for early registra-
tion (until 9/26 online and 5 p.m. on
9/28 at the library) are $20 for the 5K
and $15 for the Fun Run/Walk. Entry
fees the day of the race will be $25 for
the 5K and $15 for the Fun Run/Walk.
Registration is available online at
www.southjerseymultisport.com/events
or forms may be picked up in the
library. 856-794-4244, ext. 4246 or
ngardner@vinelandlibrary.org
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 4
11th Annual Friends Village at
Woodstown Golf Outing. Centerton
Country Club, 1022 Almond Rd.,
Pittsgrove. Registration begins at 11 a.m.
with a shotgun start at noon. Deadline for
registration is September 12. Event fea-
tures a lunch, dinner and an award cere-
mony, as well a silent auction. Proceeds
benefit Friends Village, a non-profit, retire-
ment community based in Southern New
Jersey for 115 years. For more info., call
856-823-0778 or visit
www.friendsvillage.org.
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LEAFY GREEN COUPON
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OFF
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Valid for full yard, or $50 off for non full yard.
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not to be combined with any offer. Exp: 9/22/12
LEAFY GREEN COUPON
SLICE
SEEDING
Only 3 cents per square foot
*New Customers Only
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not to be combined with any offer. Exp: 9/22/12
LEAFY GREEN COUPON
FREE
CORE AERATION
With Full Year FertilizationContract
*New Customers Only
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not to be combined with any offer. Exp: 9/22/12
YOGA FOR ALL
BODY-TYPES
Yoga for Strength, Flexibility,
Relaxation and Peace will take place
at SJHS Fitness Connection, corner
of Sherman Ave. and Orchard Rd.
This six-week session is open to the
public and begins Sunday,
September 16 at 10 a.m.; Monday,
September 24 at 6:30 p.m.; and
Tuesday, September 18 at 6:30 p.m.
Prenatal classes are held on
Sundays at 11:30 a.m. Any six class-
es are $36 for members and $46
for non members. To register, call
The Fitness Connection at 856-696-
3924 or sign up at the front desk.
Class instructor is Linda Schimmel.
COMMUNITY CALENDAR

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very fall my dad would come home with
bushels of sweet potatoes, sometimes
orange, sometimes yellow—or both. He
would put themon a shelf in the coolest part of
the cellar and when supper time came around,
it was my job to go downstairs to pick out a
few. He loved themand no matter what mom
made for dinner, a sweet potato was on his
plate with a chunk of butter melting into the
creamy center. My sister and I both inherited
the sweet potato gene—my sister, Linda, likes
hers with butter and a sprinkle of dried
oregano, and I like mine with a dollop of non-
fat sour cream. Nowis the time to stock up. I
just got mine fromRita at Muzzarelli’s Farm
Market on Oak Road in Buena Vista Township.
She told me not to wash thembefore storage
because not doing so would keep themfresh
throughout the winter. While I was there, I
bought a couple jars of her homemade jams. I
especially like the fig and the blackberry—what
a treat! Call Rita to reserve your bushel of
sweet potatoes for the winter: 856-691-2497.
I amusing her blackberry jamin this recipe.
It encompasses all of my favorite things—a pie
crust, jam, and a delicious filling. It is a pie
crust on the bottom, a layer of jamand then a
layer of a cakelike filling, topped off by a glaze.
This comes frommy newVictoria magazine
and it is an English pub recipe. Jolly good!
Bakewell Tart
**Use your favorite pie crust recipe for the
crust, make a 12 inch circle of the dough, fit it
into a 10-inch tart pan with a removable bot-
tom or a 10-inch spring-form pan, pushing
dough about 2 inches up the side. Blind bake it
in a 350ºF oven until golden, about 25 to 30
minutes, let cool completely.
INGREDIENTS FOR FILLING:
1 1/2 cups of your favorite jam - I am using
Rita's blackberry jam for my tart!
1 cup almonds
1 cup granulated sugar
2 tbsps baking powder
1/4 tsp salt
3/4 cup Fleishman's unsalted margarine,
softened
3 large eggs + 1 yolk
1 tsp vanilla extract
FOR GLAZE:
1 1/2 cups confectioner's sugar
1/2 tsp fine lemon zest
3 tbsp water
Spread jam evenly over bottom of
cooled crust. Set aside. In a food processor
combine almonds, granulated sugar, bak-
ing powder and pulse until fine. Add mar-
garine and pulse until combined. Add all
eggs, vanilla and pulse until smooth.
Spread mixture over jam and bake until
golden brown, about 45 minutes. Let cool
on wire rack.
For glaze, whisk confectioner’s sugar,
water, and zest and spread over tart and
allow to set for 1 hour before service.
It all may sound a little labor intensive,
but I think if I just follow the steps one by
one, I can manage it for this year’s birth-
day cake in October! I
Jean Hecker is a full-time travel agent at
Magic Carpet Travels and a part-time foodie.
She has a BA in Home Economics Education
from Rowan University and enjoys exploring
all facets of the food and restaurant industry.
Taters and Tarts
Food for Thought { JEAN HECKER }
Our columnist has fond memories of
sweet potatoes and shares a recipe for
a jam tart.
A
s we enter the fall season of Main
Street Vineland events, I will take
you behind the scenes and show
you how an event comes about.
Events just don’t happen and they don’t
instantly come together after someone pro-
poses and idea. A process takes place over a
period of time. Here, I want to take you here
through the various stages of the process.
The Idea Stage—Events are born in one of
the four standing Main Street committees.
The upcoming “A Taste of Vineland” fundrais-
er (scheduled for October 10) was first dis-
cussed in the Organization Committee (which
deals with volunteers and fundraising). The
upcoming BBQ ‘n Chili Cook-Off (September
22) came out of the Promotions Committee.
The Fall Planting Day (October 6) is a product
of the Design Committee.
Someone in one of the committee meetings
may come up with an idea for an event or proj-
ect—or they may suggest reviving an old event
or project fromprevious years. Preliminary
discussion takes place. If the idea really “catch-
es fire,” a subcommittee is formed for detailed
discussion. Committee members sign up for
the subcommittee and a meeting date is set.
The Subcommittee Stage—The subcom-
mittee meets, often more than once, and the
project is fleshed out—the date, time, and all
the details. It is a time for brainstorming.
This is usually done within the framework of
the budget for the committee. If the event
has already been done in previous years,
older event budgets are reviewed as points of
reference. Tasks are divided up among mem-
bers of the subcommittee. This is often the
most work-intensive stage of the event devel-
opment. Ideas are considered, adopted,
thrown out, and/or changed. An established
event may undergo changes to keep it fresh.
After all plans for the event or project are
discussed and agreed upon, they are put
down on paper in the form of a work plan.
The Work Plan Stage—The work plan is a
formalized event blueprint. It lists the various
components of the event, who is responsible
for their implementation, the timeline for
completion, the cost breakdown. It must be as
accurate as possible. The work plan is com-
piled in the subcommittee and is formally
drawn up by the committee chairperson, often
in conjunction with me. Sometimes, a late
change in plans may necessitate last-minute
changes in the work plan. Once the subcom-
mittee signs off on the work plan, it is brought
back to the committee for its approval. When
the final work plan gets the nod, it is ready for
its final stop—the Board of Directors.
The Board Stage—At the monthly meeting
of the Board of Directors (usually the month
before the event), the work plan for the event is
presented to the Board for consideration and
approval. The Board often receives the work
plan in advance of their meeting, in their meet-
ing agenda packets. Amotion is made and sec-
onded to consider the work plan. In discussion,
the event and work plan are explained to the
Board, either by the committee chair or by me.
After discussion, the Board votes on approving
the work plan. At this point, the event becomes
official and can be promoted as such.
You are welcome to be a part of this process
by becoming a part of Main Street Vineland.
We would be glad to have your input. I
For information on MainStreet Vineland, call
856-794-8653, visit www.mainstreetvineland.org.
Downtown Vineland
{ TODD NOON, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, VDID / MAINSTREET VINELAND }
I
Event Planning
Taking an event from the idea to the
implementation stage.
I
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Grapevine 18-23 091212-de:Layout 1 9/10/12 7:54 PM Page 18
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Grapevine 18-23 091212-de:Layout 1 9/10/12 7:54 PM Page 19
Dogs Make Great Reading
Partners
It turns out dogs are not only good for
our health; finding missing people; and
helping disabled people live independent
lives—they’re good for kids’ report cards,
too!
Canines have been found to improve the
immune system and reduce blood pressure,
among other health benefits. They help
rescuers and law officers, blind people and
those with limited use of their hands and
arms. Now we have another reason to cele-
brate man’s best friend.
“Dogs not only help children learn to
read, they help children learn to love read-
ing,” says Michael Amiri, coauthor with his
wife, Linda, of the children’s book, Shellie,
the Magical Dog (www.shelliethemagical-
dog.com. “And that’s true of for children
with and without learning disabilities.”
A Minnesota pilot project called
PAWSitive Readers finds that trained thera-
py dogs helped 10 of 14 grade-school par-
ticipants improve their reading skills by
one grade level. Additionally, a University
of California study showed that children
who read to the family dog improved their
ability by an average of 12 percent.
Amiri discusses five reasons why dogs
help kids learn to love reading:
• No embarrassment: “Most of us have
memories of reading out loud in class,” he
says. “Though we may have been profi-
cient readers, the fear of stumbling on a
word in front of everyone was a constant
source of anxiety.” Dogs are excellent for
unconditional, nonjudgmental love; they
won’t laugh if and when mistakes happen.
• Confidence boosters: “I never had a
dog while growing up, which is too bad
because I think I would have had an easier
time gaining self-confidence,” says Amiri.
As an adult, he discovered the many bene-
fits of dogs through he and his wife’s very
special Maltese, Shellie. She’s often the
center of attention in their community at
pet-friendly restaurants, where she laps her
water out of a martini glass. And she has a
full-time job as the greeter at Linda’s hair
and nail salon. “If a little dog can give me, a
grown man, more confidence, imagine
what it can do for kids,” he says.
• Polite listeners: Like humans, dogs are
social creatures and most enjoy the sound
of a calm voice speaking to them. Many—
except perhaps the most energetic breeds—
seem to enjoy curling up on a rug and lis-
tening to a story being read aloud. They
don’t interrupt (except for the occasional
ear scratch or to sniff a body part) and they
often show appreciation for the attention.
• A fun approach to schoolwork: Too
often, when children think of studying,
they think of time spent hunched over a
desk struggling alone to work out problems
and memorize lists. Interacting with a lov-
able, fuzzy friend for an hour of homework
is an appealing alternative.
• Win-win: A canine-student reading
program is a great way to help service
dogs-in-training learn patience and disci-
pline. Dogs are trained to help veterans suf-
fering post-traumatic stress disorder, the
blind, and people who use wheelchairs,
among others. These dogs in training help
children, while children improve a dog’s
service abilities.
Michael Amiri grew up in New York
City and became an actor in local theater
productions and television commercials.
Linda Amiri is an entrepreneur, the owner
of a successful hair and nail salon. Their
personality-plus Maltese, Shellie, is a popu-
lar community character, who puts in a full
day of work every day as a greeter at her
“mom’s” salon. She’s the inspiration for the
first in a series of children’s books that will
address topics and issues of concern to
children.
Pet Therapy at All Critters
Fido & Friends Assisted Therapy Group
started in August of 2012.
“I had been an assistant administrator
for another group located farther north for
nine years,” says Diane Murowany,
owner/operator of All Critters Sitting
Service, LLC. “I broke off to concentrate on
our area since I started getting requests left
and right. “
Fido & Friends contacts facilities, pro-
vides member’s paperwork according to
facilitiy requirements, schedules visits,
supervises the teams that show up, trains
new team members interested in becoming
certified Therapy Dogs and provides test-
ing for that certification. It also offers test-
ing for the AKC Canine Good Citizen pro-
gram. Murowany is a certified professional
dog trainer and is certified to test for
Therapy Dog Evaluations with Bright &
Beautiful Therapy Dogs, Inc. and the AKC
CGC Program.
Fido & Friends currently has 20 volun-
teers from Cumberland County to Cape
May County. They go to rehab facilities,
adult daycares and two local schools who
do reading programs with their kids. Their
goals are to bring people out of depression
and provide joy due to illness, mental dis-
abilities, surgery, etc.
“The results we have seen have at times
been amazing,” says Murowany. “It has
been proven that the simple act of petting a
dog releases serotonin and helps to relax
people. We hope to provide them with a
short respite from their pain. So many peo-
ple look forward to our group visiting and
Doggie Day, as it is called at HealthSouth
on Sherman Avenue.
“Depending on the facility we either go
room to room or have the patients/kids
brought to one room. We interact with the
people letting them pet and brush the
dogs. Some do tricks so we provide a bit of
entertainment also. Our dogs are all either
certified or in training with the end goal
being certification. First the dogs are put
through a temperament test and evaluated
to see how they interact with dogs and
people. Not all dogs are cut out for therapy
work and we have to ensure the patients
are safe. Members have three months from
the time of joining the group to take the
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EQUINE SCHOLARSHIP OFFERED TO 4-H AND FFA MEMBERS
The New Jersey Equine Advisory Board has announced a $1,000 scholar-
ship to help 4-H and FFA members pursue their equine activities. Members
of organizations represented on the New Jersey Equine Advisory Board are
also eligible. Applicants must be between the ages of 13 and 16 and reside
in the State of New Jersey.
The Sara Dubinin Scholarship, in memory of Sara Dubinin, who loved
horses, will be presented at the New Jersey Bred Equine Breeder Awards
Luncheon on January 27, 2013 At Charley’s Other Brother Restaurant in
Eastampton.
Sara, a Sayreville resident, graduated from Cardinal McCarrick High
School in South Amboy in 2006. The 19-year-old was attending Middlesex
County College when she succumbed to injuries suffered in a motor vehicle
accident in September of 2007.
Those interested in receiving the scholarship must submit an application
form including an essay on, “How horses have affected my life and how
horses figure into my future.” The application can be found at www.jerseye-
quine.nj.gov/dubininapplicationform.pdf. Consideration of applications will
be weighted upon the candidate’s financial need.
The deadline to submit the essay is January 2, 2013. It can be submitted
to Debra Moscatiello at 609-984-4389 or debra.moscatiello@ag.state.nj.us.
Find us on Facebook to learn more about the New Jersey Department of
Agriculture www.facebook.com/NJDeptofAgriculture.
PET
CARE
Grapevine 18-23 091212-de:Layout 1 9/10/12 7:54 PM Page 20
REGISTER FERAL CAT COLONIES—Millville Mayor Tim Shannon recently regis-
tered his feral cat colony with Animal Coordinator Donna Fox, a volunteer with
the Animal Friends Foundation (AFF). As a result of Millville's recently passed
Trap/Neuter/ Vaccinate/Return ordinance, all city residents feeding feral or stray
cats are encouraged to register their colonies and receive information on stabi-
lizing and maintaining them. AFF will
be holding walk-in registration on
Wednesday, September 12 from 6 to 8
p.m. and Saturday, October 13 from 10
a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Millville Library
and on Saturday, September 15 from 10
a.m. to 1 p.m. at the AFF office at 629
E. Wood Street, #302, Vineland. Also
available will be information on low-
cost spay/neuter, financial aid and
other services offered by AFF.
AFF is an all-volunteer animal wel-
fare organization founded in 2003 with
the mission to find solutions to the
overpopulation of unwanted companion animals through education and financial
support of low-cost spay/neuter programs. They have partnership agreements
with several area veterinarians to provided low cost spay/neuter services at
each of the veterinarian's offices. AFF also supports individuals and organiza-
tions that are doing good work with animals throughout southern New Jersey.
For more information on the programs and activities provided by AFF, visit
www.AnimalFriendsFoundation.com or call 856-503-5572.
Grand Opening at Adrienne’s
Adrienne Mathiesen, owner/operater of Adrienne’s Pet Grooming, located on
Main Street in Millville (the former Lollipop Tree), started off her 12-year grooming
career as a kennel worker for Golden Grove Kennels in Vineland. She worked there
for over six years and really loved grooming her animals. So she looked into it as an
occupation and attended Dogs N’ Cats Grooming School in Barnegat in early 2004.
Every year prior to graduating from Dogs N’ Cats she attended expos in Hershey, PA,
where she took additional classes, including Pet CPR and creative cutting classes.
Over the years, she has groomed in various locations, including Petsmart where she
met many amazing pet stylists. After grooming on the side for a few years, it was
time to open her own salon, thus Adrienne’s Pet Grooming was born!
certification test.
“We also like to encourage family partic-
ipation so we are unique in that we offer Jr.
Handler training also. The kids have to be
13 years of age and be able to handle and
train the family dog themselves.
“We are strictly a volunteer group. The
members pay a small membership fee to
cover the cost of the group and have to pay
a membership fee to Bright & Beautiful
Therapy Dogs, Inc. to maintain their liabili-
ty insurance and certification.” I
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Grapevine 18-23 091212-de:Layout 1 9/10/12 7:54 PM Page 21
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470 N. Union Rd. East Vineland
(between Oak Rd. & Landis Ave.)
856-691-7881
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Mon. - Sat. 8am-6pm Sun. 9am-5pm
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LL PLANTING A L F FA
FarmService Agency Now
Accepting Pollinator Habitats
Atlantic, Cape May and Cumberland
County USDA Farm Service Agency (FSA)
County Executive Director, Angela J
Andreoli, has announced that pollinator
habitats, which support a variety of pollina-
tor species, will now be accepted as a
Continuous Sign-up Conservation Reserve
Program (CCRP) practice. CCRP is a volun-
tary program that helps producers apply
conservation practices to safeguard envi-
ronmentally sensitive land.
Pollinator habitats are areas of perma-
nent vegetation located in an agricultural
landscape—field edges, field middles, odd
corners, or any agricultural location that is
suitable for establishing pollinator habitat.
Pollinators provide a very important
ecological service. Approximately three
quarters of all flowering plants rely upon
external assistance to pollinate their flow-
ers. In addition to agricultural crops such
as fruits and many vegetables, these plants
include seed producing wildflowers, fruit
producing shrubs and nut producing trees
which provide a source of food for many
wildlife species.
Studies indicate that birds, bees, bats,
and other pollinators are in significant
decline across the country and around the
world. Nearly 80 percent of the crops
grown in the world require pollination. In
the United States, insects pollinate crops
that produces $40 billion worh of products
annually.
Participants of newly enrolled pollinator
habitat practices are eligible to receive a
$150 CRP Sign-up Incentive Payment (SIP)
per acre. The SIP is a one-time payment
issued to CRP participants after the con-
tract is approved. The following practices
qualify for the $150 SIP:
• Pollinator Habitats;
• Wetland Restoration & Wetland
Restoration (non-floodplain) practice,
which restores the functions and values of
wetland ecosystems that have been devoted
to agricultural use and;
• Habitat Buffers for Upland Birds prac-
tice that provides food and cover for quail
and upland birds in cropland areas
The SIP for all other continuous sign-up
practices remains unchanged at $100 per
acre.
Continuous CRP sign-up allows partici-
pants to submit offers for selected CCRP
practices to enroll in CRP at anytime
instead of waiting for a General CRP sign-
up period. Participants and offered lands
must meet certain eligibility requirements
to be accepted into the program.
For more information about the contin-
uous conservation reserve program, contact
the Vineland USDA Service Center at 856-
205-1225 ext.2 or visit www.fsa.usda.gov.
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VV U D H 6 R W W
Strategies for Growing
Edibles into Fall Season
By Melinda Myers, nationally known horticul-
turist, TV/radio host, author and columnist
Don’t let fall or potentially frosty temper-
atures stop you fromenjoying garden- fresh
produce. Extend the nutritional value and
homegrown flavor into your fall and early
winter meals with the help of short season
crops and season extending strategies.
Lettuce, spinach, radishes, turnips, and
beets are quick to mature from seed to har-
vest. Plus, the cooler temperatures
enhance their flavor. Simply count the
number of frost-free days left in your
growing season and compare it with the
number of days from planting to harvest
listed on the seed packet.
Protect these late plantings and other
vegetables from chilly fall temperatures
with cloches, coldframes, and floating row
covers. Many of these devices have long
been used by gardeners to jump start the
season in spring and extend it much later
into fall. These devices trap heat around
the plants, protecting them from frosty
temperatures.
Convert gallon milk jugs into garden
cloches for individual plants. Remove the
bottom of the jug and slide it over the
plant. Use the cap to capture heat or
remove to ventilate your homemade cloche
on sunny days. Or purchase reusable
cloches with built in ventilation. Originally
made of glass many of the newer cloches
are plastic, making them more affordable,
easy to stack and portable.
You can make your own coldframes.
Many gardeners convert discarded win-
dows, a bit of lumber and nails into a
homemade shelter for their plants. The
window size usually determines the size of
your coldframe. Just make sure you can
reach all the plants inside. For best results
your frame should be higher in the back
then the front so water and melting snow
can drain off. And if possible, facing south
for better warming. The internet and gar-
den books are filled with plans.
I prefer the construction-free, all-pur-
pose garden fabrics. Simply drape these
floating row covers (season-extending fab-
rics) over your crops. Anchor the edges
with rocks, boards, or wire wickets. The
fabric traps heat around your plants, but
allows air, light and water through so there
is no need to uncover the plants during the
day or for watering.
Increase the ease of season-extending
fabrics with lowand tall frost pop-up covers
www.gardeners.com/Tall-Frost-Cover-Pop-
Ups/40-222RS,default,pd.html and plant
protection frost covers fromGardener’s
Supply. The frames are fitted with all-pur-
pose garden fabric to create protective tents.
You can protect newplantings and extend
your harvest by protecting plants down to
24 degrees Fahrenheit.
So with a little preparation you can keep
enjoying fresh-from-the-garden flavor long
past the traditional endto your harvest season.
For more gardening tips visit
www.melindamyers.com.
Fall Eco-Friendly Home
Landscape Series
Rutgers Cooperative Extension of
Cumberland County will present four
hour-long free classes this fall focusing on
practices that homeowners can use to make
their home landscapes more eco-friendly.
September 13 — Composting and Soil
Health.
What is soil “health”? And how can
you improve the health of your soil to
grow better lawns and gardens? Plus, how
to compost leaves and other organic mate-
rials to make your own soil amendments.
September 27 — Water Conservation
for Lawns and Gardens.
Beautiful landscapes that save money
and water can use native plants, mulches,
and smart irrigation system controls.
October 11 — Pond Maintenance to
Prevent Weeds and Algae.
What can be done to prevent the exces-
sive weeds and algae that are often peren-
nial problems in so many of our lakes and
ponds? Does barley straw really work?
And what can I do about Canada geese?
All classes are free, and will be held 6:30
to 7:30 p.m. at the Cooperative Extension of
Cumberland County, 291 Morton Ave.,
Millville, NJ 08332. Classes will be taught
by Extension Agent Sal Mangiafico and
Horticultural Program Assistant Viola
Carson. Call Viola at 451-2800 ext. 4 for
information or to reserve your place. I
Build-a-Rain-Barrel
Workshop
Rutgers Cooperative Extension
of Cumberland County will present
a workshop where attendees will
learn how to use rain barrels for
water conservation on their home
landscapes and construct their own
rain barrel to take home.
The class will be held
September 22, from 9 to 11 a.m. at
the Cooperative Extension of
Cumberland County Education
Center, 291 Morton Ave., Millville,
NJ 08332.
A $35 registration fee includes
instruction and materials for build-
ing one rain barrel. Checks should
be made payable to Extension
Services Program Account.
To register, call Viola at Rutgers
Cooperative Extension, 856-451-
2800, ext. 4.
Grapevine 18-23 091212-de:Layout 1 9/10/12 7:54 PM Page 23
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Featuring 3 Bed 2 1/2 Bath. Master bedroom has full bath-
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Buyer Credit for closing costs. Property also comes with a 10
year Builders Warranty!! 60 S.Myrtle St. Vineland $154,900
This property brought to you by: PHIL BLACK
Realtor Associate (856) 297-2349
NEW CONSTRUCTION!!!
Buy and Sell Homes in Vineland, NJ
Each Office independently owned & operated
Jane Jannarone - Broker of Record
Stephanie Verderose - Broker of Record
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towards Buyer’s closing costs. 3 N.9th Street Millville $142,500
This property brought to you by: TERRY HALLAUER
Realtor Associate (609) 665-0033
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856-696-CALL (2255)
1080 E. Landis Ave., Vineland, NJ 08360
www.MaturoRealty.com
5 Very Important Questions That You Should Ask A Real Estate
Agent, Prior To Listing Your Property With That Office…
1 - How many full time agents does other office’s have? Maturo Realty Has 16 Active full time
agents with 44 agents total.
2 - How do other office’s split the commissions with other cooperating Real Estate office’s??
Maturo Realty has the “SELLERS ADVANTAGE”, we split all of our commissions, with every
Real Estate Broker, in co-op sales, in a fair and equal manner: 50/50. Call us to find out
why a 50/50 split is a SELLERS ADVANTAGE.
3 - How does other offices compare in Sold Units for the past few years? Maturo Realty Has
been #1 in Sales**, for at least the past 3 years, with MORE EXCITING NEWS: Maturo Realty
has double the sales for the first ½ of “2012”, with 50% more sales** than any other Office*.
4 - How many years of sales experience does the other office have? Maturo Realty has over
623 years of combined sales experience.
5 - How much inventory of available listings does the other office’s currently have listed???
Maturo Realty has over 160 active listings. That is 40% more** than any other Real Estate Office*.
WITH OVER 34 YEARS IN THE BUSINESS
Nobody in Cumberland County has sold more
Real Estate than: The Office of
*Compared to All Cumberland County Real Estate Offices
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ffices
I
n an effort to leave the
unemployment line
behind them, many men
and women have decid-
ed they would relocate for
jobs if the opportunities pre-
sented themselves. According
to the Atlas Van Lines 2012
Corporate Relocation Survey,
52 percent of all relocations in
2011 were new hires. That’s
not only reflective of people’s
willingness to move for new
opportunities, but also compa-
nies’ willingness to help new
hires make smooth transitions.
Whereas many companies
were forced to reduce or elim-
inate their relocation budgets
during the depths of the
recession, more and more of
them now have more money
to help candidates relocate.
Finding a company that’s
willing to incur some, if not
all, of an employee’s relocation
costs is certainly one way to
make the process go smoothly.
But even those who can’t find
such a willing employer don’t
have to rule out relocation. The following
are a few ways to make relocating for your
career as successful as possible.
• Don’t be afraid to negotiate. The
Atlas relocation survey noted that 87 per-
cent of the firms surveyed had a formal
relocation policy. These policies can run
the gamut from very accommodating to
extremely limited.
But many policies leave room for
exceptions, so men and women should not
be afraid to negotiate. The company may
offer additional benefits to entice you to
relocate, but the applicant has to ask
about those benefits.
• Do your homework. Companies
often expect quick responses when they
offer out-of-towners a position. Applicants
likely won't have enough time between
receiving the offer and meeting their dead-
line to accept or deny the position to do all
of the research that needs to be done.
Before applying for positions within a
given city, learn about the city, including
the cost of housing, the reputation of the
city’s school districts, and anything else
that will ultimately have an impact on
your decision to move or stay put. If pos-
sible, visit the city before beginning your
job hunt. If you find the city fits your
lifestyle, then begin your pursuit of a
career.
• Don’t overlook temporary housing.
Many firms provide temporary housing
for new hires or existing employees who
relocate. This option should not be over-
looked. Firms expect quick answers when
asking an existing employee or a new hire
to relocate. In fact, the Atlas survey found
that 72 percent of firms give an employee
two weeks or less to accept an offer to
relocate. So you likely won’t have enough
time to find your next place to call home.
In such instances, consider temporary
housing, ideally offered by the company.
Real Estate
I
Tips for a Smooth
Relocation
Whatever the reason for relocating, these pointers
will keep you on track.
Grapevine 24-32 091212:Layout 1 9/10/12 8:01 PM Page 24
If the company does not provide tem-
porary housing, then stay with a friend or
family member or contact realtors and
explain your situation. A real estate agent
should be able to help you find temporary
housing and can then help you once the
relocation is complete and you’re ready to
find a permanent residence.
• Know the repayment provisions.
While many people consider their deci-
sion to relocate a success, others find their
new job and city are falling short of expec-
tations. That can be a sticky situation if
your new company helped pay for your
relocation. Before accepting the job offer
and relocating, ask to read the relocation
policy and make note of its repayment
provisions.
Some firms that help relocate new
hires or existing employees have the right
to ask for those costs back if the employee
leaves the company within a given time
frame. Know these provisions before you
decide to relocate. I
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Oak Valley
Townhouses & Apartments
www.oakvalleyapartments.com
Rental Office #711 • Mon. - Fri. 10am - 5pm
1301 S. Lincoln Ave.Vineland, NJ
CALL TODAY (856) 696-1929
DISCOUNTS FOR:
Police • Firemen • Military
Three Bedroom Townhomes
One & Two Bedroom Apartments
Pet Friendly Community
*For qualied applicants only
Submit an
application by
October 5, 2012 and
receive up to $500
toward moving
expenses
Submit an
application for a
Townhome by
October 5, 2012 and
your rst month’s
rent is FREE
A beautiful scenic, proud place to call home
LOOKING FOR A NEW HOME?
DON’T MISS THIS OPPORTUNITY!
Visit or Call Today!
Hiring a Moving Company
An estimated 1.5 million households relocate each year in America. Selecting a
moving company may seem a small matter compared to arranging for the sale of
your existing home, purchase of your new residence, employment issues, and the
other details involved in relocating. But hiring a dependable mover can mean the
difference between an uncomplicated or a stressful experience.
All companies conducting moves within New Jersey are required to be regis-
tered with the Regulated Business Unit of the Division of Consumer Affairs. There
are over 300 movers licensed by Consumer Affairs. Before hiring a moving com-
pany, you can check to see if a particular company is licensed and how many
consumer complaints have been filed against the company. Call the Regulated
Business Unit at 973-504-6442 or 973-504-6512.
In 2003, Consumer
Affairs received 98
consumer complaints
about moving and
storage companies.
By law, movers
must provide con-
sumers with written
estimates. For moves
within New Jersey,
state law requires that
the estimate be based
on a visual survey of
the items to be
moved, not a verbal
description of them. The moving company is required to give you a written esti-
mate that explains how the overall cost is calculated. The estimate is binding on
the mover only when it is written on the front of the document that it is binding.
We recommend soliciting three to five moving companies before making a final
decision.
You will be asked about purchasing insurance as part of the hiring process.
Without additional insurance, moving companies are required to compensate you
up to 60 cents per pound for any item that is damaged or destroyed during the
move. You may purchase insurance through the mover or on your own through a
broker. You should also check your homeowner’s insurance policy to see if moves
are covered.
After a moving company is selected, make sure the written contract matches
all terms of the written estimate. The contract, as well as all other important
papers and jewelry, should not be packed with your belongings but instead car-
ried separately during the move.
Once you arrive at your new residence, inspect for any damage that may have
occurred during the move. If any damage or loss of items has occurred, you can
file a claim with the mover within 90 days. If the claim is not resolved to your
satisfaction, contact Consumer Affairs at 973-504-6442 or 973-504-6512.
It is estimated that each of us will move and relocate about 12 times during
our lives. Knowing your rights and responsibilities will help make each move a
more pleasant journey.
Grapevine 24-32 091212:Layout 1 9/10/12 8:01 PM Page 25
HAPPENINGS
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12
Greater Millville Chamber of
Commerce General Membership
Luncheon. New Jersey Motorsports Park,
1000 Dividing Creek Rd., Millville. 11:30
a.m. Guest speaker Dr. David Gentile,
Superintendent of Millville Public Schools.
will discuss Education in 21st Century;
Millville Public Schools Journey to World
Class. $20 with reservation, $22 without
one. RSVP ASAP at 856-825-2600.
Bridal Show and Expo. Country Club
Lane, Buena. Bachelorette Party Grand
Prize Giveaway. 856-697-1200.
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13
After School Movie,. Millville Public
Library, 210 Buck St., Millville. 4:30 p.m.
Madagascar: Escape 2 Africa, an animated
feature film rated PG. Popcorn provided.
Other snacks and bottled water permitted.
RSVP 856-825-7087, ext. 12. Free.
Millville Woman's Club Meet and
Greet. 300 "E" St., Millville. 4–6 p.m. For
reservations and information, contact Carol
Dickson at 856-765-5372.
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 14
Designer Wraps Open House. 600
Columbia Ave., Millville. 12 noon–8 p.m.
Giveaways, DJ, live music, cash bar, food,
festivities, car show, demos, and vendors.
Second Friday by the Bay. Bayshore
Discovery Project, 2800 High St, Port
Norris. 5:30–8:30 p.m. In the Gallery: New
exhibit will feature oil and watercolor paint-
ings by Bill Ternay, who currently teaches at
the Barn Studio of Art in Millville. Reception
6 p.m. Vineland 's Steel Horizons Pan
Group will bring sounds of Caribbean steel
drums to the Maurice riverfront 6–8:30
p.m. Lecture (7 p.m.), Curator's Workshop
(7:45 p.m.), Make & Take Workshop.
Back to School Bonanza. Twice Loved
Treasures, 20 W. Park Ave., Vineland. 9:30
a.m–12 noon. All clothing 50 cents each
piece. Information on local food pantries
and making good choices on grocery trips.
Book Signing. Vineland Public Library,
1058 E. Landis Ave., Vineland. 2–4:30 p.m.
Author Antoinette De Poi signs copies of her
debut novel Love’s Release. Fellowship, trust,
fidelity and forgiveness are woven into this
Christian Romance novel. 856-794-4244.
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 15
Memorial Cemetery Service. Alliance
Cemetery, 970 Gershal Ave., Norma. 11 a.m.
Beth Israel Congregation will begin prepara-
tions to commemorate the High Holidays.
Rabbi Alfredo S. Winter, spiritual leader of
Beth Israel Congregation, will lead the serv-
ice. 856-691-0852.
Grand Opening Celebration. Ivy Chaya
Art Gallery, 106 E Pine St., Millville. 4-9
p.m.
Hammonton’s Town-Wide Yard Sale.
Throughout Hammonton. All day. Treasures
on every street, and join the town’s recy-
cling movement on Green Weekend.
Ballet Tea. Magnolia Hill, 1425 Magnolia
Rd., Vineland. 1 p.m. All ages. Decorate a
pointe shoe, enjoy tea and tea sandwiches.
A brief ballet class inspired by the art of
Edgar Degas is included. 856-692-7262
Wellness Workshop and American Red
Cross Blood Drive. Carl Arthur Center,
Third & Plum sts., Vineland. 9 a.m.–2 p.m.
The New Bethel A.M.E. Church of Vineland
will host. All blood donors eligible to win a
$25 gas card. Also, free medical screenings
and health and safety information. To make
an appointment to donate blood or to
request further information, call 691-1349.
George Manduke Memorial Dinner
Dance. Elks Lodge, 1815 E. Broad St.,
Millville. 6–11 p.m. Event features Polka Pete
and his Orchestra playing polkas, waltz and
obereks, as well as swing, oldies and modern
American music. Dinner buffet features home-
made Ukrainian and American foods. Tickets
$25 at door or $20 in advance by calling 856-
825-4042. Auction of items donated by local
businesses and families. Donations also
accepted. Proceeds will benefit The ALS
Association, Greater Philadelphia Chapter, in
memory of Millville native George Manduke,
who passed away in 2008 at age 42 from
ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig’s Disease.
SEPTEMBER 15 AND 16
Bellview Winery Harvest Party. Bellview
Winery, 150 Atlantic St., Landisville. 11
a.m.–5 p.m. Another harvest is being
brought in by New Jersey’s Winery of the
Year. Live music, grape stomping, tie dying,
and tasting different varieties of wine
grapes. Light fare and sangrias by the
carafe to enjoy indoors or out. $10 admis-
sion (kids free) includes parking, wine tast-
ing, tours, music and a souvenir wine
glass. 856-697-7172.
SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 16
Back to Church Service & Faith In
Action Kick-Off. Bethany Presbyterian
Church, 31 North Pearl St., Bridgeton. 11
a.m. Special guest vocalists and message
by Pastor Robin Weinstein. Followed by a
free Community Day Picnic & Carnival 3-6
p.m. at the Church.
Green Day Festival. St. Joseph’s High
School grounds, 328 Vine St., Hammonton.
Family fun, food, games, crafts, hosted by
the Hammonton Green Committee. At the
Arts Center on Bellview Avenue, up-cycled
furniture will be auctioned.
MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 17
Music Lecture. Vineland Public Library,
1058 E. Landis Ave., Vineland. 6–7:30 p.m.
Topic of free lecture, hosted by the Bay
Atlantic Symphony is “Music Under
Tyranny, 1: Nazism and Stalinism.”
NAMI Meeting. Chestnut Assembly of
God, 2554 E. Chestnut Ave., Vineland. 7–9
p.m. Cumberland County Chapter of the
National Alliance on Mental Illness holds its
business/support group meeting. 691-9234.
SEPTEMBER 17 AND 18
Rosh Hashanah. Alliance Synagogue, 9
Shiff Ave., Pittsgrove. 9 a.m. both days.
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 18
Reverse Mortgage Seminar. Millville
Public Library, 210 Buck St., Millville. 2 p.m.
Genworth Financial presents free seminar.
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19
Celebration and Procession. St. Padre
Pio Shrine, Route 40, Minotola. 6:30 p.m.
Healings and miracles said to have
occurred here through Intercession of St.
Padre Pio. If rain, event held at Our Lady of
Victory Church, SW Blvd., Landisville.
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 20
New Jersey Writer’s Society Meeting.
Vineland Public Library, 1058 E. Landis
Ave., Vineland. 5–7:30 p.m. If you are inter-
ested in writing, join this group for in-depth
discussion and writing critiques. 794-4244.
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COMMUNITY CALENDAR

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30
Chicken BBQ. Vineland Moose
Hall, 187 W. Wheat Rd., Vineland. 12
noon–5 p.m. $10 Tickets available:
North Vineland Fire Company #3,
Serene Custard, Manny & Vic’s
Pizzeria, Jamar Grocery, Phoenix
Printing, Limpert Bros., Inc.
VENDORS NEEDED!
• Crafters/vendors for Petway
Elementary School’s 6th Annual
Fall Fest. The event is scheduled
for Saturday, October 20 from 10
a.m. to 2 p.m. Rain or shine. You
will need to provide your own
table (no more than 6ft). Cost is
$15 per slot. Contact Petway
School at 856-362-8855 between
9 and 3 weekdays or email
(talexander@vineland.org ) for a
contract and reserve your spot.
With Coupon
Exp 9/26/12
$
21
50
V
A
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Lube, Oil, Filter
■ Change Oil Filter
■ Check All Fluid Levels
■ Lubricate Fittings
■ Up To 5 Qts.
Reg $26.95
Most Cars & Pick-Ups
(Excludes Diesels, Synthetic Oil)
With Coupon
Exp 9/26/12
Some Models
Slightly Higher
V
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Engine Tune-Up
■ SPECIAL ■
■ 4 Cylinder.......................................................
$
69.00
■ 6 Cylinder.......................................................
$
79.00
■ 8 Cylinder.......................................................
$
89.00
Replace Spark Plugs, Check Cap & Rotor
(if Equipped), Check Fuel and Air Filters,
Check PCV Valve
With Coupon
Exp 9/26/12
For more information
call manager for details
FREE
Oil Change
with Brake Job
$
10 OFF
V
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Reg $84.95
Your Choice with Coupon
Lifetime Warranty on Brake Pads
• Install new pads or shoes • Inspect brakes, rotors &
drums • Inspect calipers & wheel cylinders • Inspect wheel
bearings • Add brake uids if necessary • Road test car
OR
BRAKES
With Coupon • Exp 9/26/12
V
A
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$
64
95
■ Flush System
and Replace with
long-life coolant
■ All Cars
Anti-Freeze
Special
“Your Family Car and Pick-Up Truck Center”
■ Major Repairs
■ Front End Service
■ Custom Bending
■ Air Conditioning
■ Towing
B
u
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MUFFLER
& BRAKES
MUFFLER
& BRAKES
$
S
A
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S
4 NORTH 8TH STREET • VINELAND
(On 8th Between Wood & Landis)
507-0767 • 507-0732
FREE ESTIMATES • ALL MECHANICS STATE CERTIFIED
OPEN MONDAY-FRIDAY 8AM-5:30PM • SATURDAYS 8AM-4PM
Private Inspection & Repair Center
Performed Under the Authority Of
$
S
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• All Cars
■ Tires
■ Alignment
■ Exhaust Systems
■ Brakes
OPEN
SATURDAYS
8-4
Grapevine 24-32 091212:Layout 1 9/10/12 8:01 PM Page 26
Andrea Trattoria, 16 N. High St., Millville,
825-8588. Chef/owner Andrea Covino
serves up Italian specialties in an atmos-
phere of fine dining.
Annata Wine Bar, 216 Bellevue Ave,
Hammonton, 609-704-9797. Food served
tapas style, catering, private parties.
Extensive wine list. Live music Thurs.
night.
Babe's Village Inn, Martinelli Avenue,
Minotola, NJ 856-697-1727. Famous
crabs, seafood, Italian cuisine. Eat in or
Take out.
Bagel University, 1406 S. Main Rd.,
Vineland, 691-0909. Breakfast and lunch
spot offering sandwiches named for col-
leges near and far.
Barbera’s Chocolates on Occasion, 782
S. Brewster Rd., Vineland, 690-9998.
Homemade chocolates and candies, cus-
tom gift baskets.
Bennigan’s Restaurant, 2196 W. Landis
Ave., Vineland, 205-0010. Entrees,
desserts, drink specials. Take-out. Happy
Hour Mon-Fri 3pm-7pm, Sun-Thu 10pm-
close. All Sports packages available. NBA
League Pass, NHL Center Ice, & MLB
Extra Innings.
Big Apple, 528 N. Harding Hwy.,
Vineland, 697-5500. Steaks, veal, chicken
dishes. Meet friends at bar. Daily lunch
and dinner.
Big John’s Pizza Queen, 1383 S. Main
Rd., Vineland, 205-0012. Featuring
“Gutbuster” a 21-oz. burger, pizza, wings,
subs, dinners.
Black Olive Restaurant. 782 S. Brewster
Rd, Vineland. 457-7624. 7 a.m. - 10 p.m
daily. Entrees, desserts. Take out available.
Bojo’s Ale House, 222 N. High St.,
Millville, 327-8011. All food is homemade,
including the potato chips.
Bombay Bites, 112 W. Chestnut Ave.,
Vineland, 696-0036. Indian cuisine.
$8.95 lunch buffet ($5.99 on Mondays).
Bruni's Pizzeria. 2184 N. 2nd St.,
Millville (856) 825-2200. Award-winning
pizza since 1956. Open Mon-Sat. 11 a.m.-
10 p.m. Sun. 11 a.m.-9 p.m.
Bruno's Family Restaurant, Cape May
Ave. and Tuckahoe Rd., Dorothy, 609-
476-4739. Breakfast, lunch, dinner, pizza.
Open Mon-Sat. 7 a.m.-8:30 p.m.
Chow’s Garden 1101 N. 2nd St., Millville,
327-3259. Sushi Bar, All-you-can-eat
buffet.
Cosmopolitan Restaurant Lounge,
Bakery, 3513 S. Delsea Dr., Vineland,
765-5977. Happy hour everyday 11 a.m. -
6 p.m. half-priced appetizers, and
reduced drink specials.
Crust N Krumbs Bakery, Main/Magnolia
rds., 690-1200. Cakes, pies, cookies,
breads, doughnuts, custom wedding
cakes.
Dakota Steakhouse & Sushi Bar at
Ramada, W. Landis Ave. and Rt. 55,
Vineland, 692-8600. Stylish atmosphere
perfect for an upscale lunch or dinner.
Delicious steaks, seafood and sushi.
Closed Monday for dinner.
Deeks Deli & Kustard Kitchen, 1370 S.
Main Rd., Vineland, 691-5438. Call for
lunch and dinner specials. Soft ice cream
and cakes year-round. Mon.-Sat 9 a.m.–
8 p.m.
Denny’s, 1001 W. Landis Ave., Vineland,
696-1900. Breakfast, lunch, dinner. Take-
out, too. Happy Hour Mon.-Fri. 3-7 p.m.
Open 24 hours. Kids eat free Tues. & Sat.
Dominick’s Pizza, 1768 S. Lincoln Ave.,
Vineland, 691-5511. Family time-honored
recipes, fresh ingredients.
Double Eagle Saloon, 1477 Panther Rd.,
Vineland, 213-6176. Open for lunch and
dinner. Traditional tavern fair.
Elmer Diner, 41 Chestnut St., Elmer. 358-
3600. Diverse menu of large portions at
reasonable prices.
Esposito's Maplewood III, 200 N. Delsea
Dr., Vineland, 692-2011. Steaks, seafood
and pasta dishes at this Italian
restaurant.
Eric’s, 98 S. West Ave., Vineland, 205-
9800. Greek and American cuisine,
pizza.
Fat Jack's BBQ. Cumberland Mall, next
to Starbucks, 825-0014. Open 7 days a
week, 11 a.m.-9:30 p.m. Eat in or take
out. Serving ribs, wings, sandwiches, sal-
ads and sides.
Five Points Inn, E. Landis Ave. and
Tuckahoe Rd., Vineland, 691-6080.
Italian cuisine and dinner buffets to
savor. Family-owned.
Gardella’s Ravioli Co. & Italian Deli,
527 S. Brewster Rd., 697-3509. Name
says it all. Daily specials, catering.
Closed Sun.
Gina’s Ristorante & Outdoor Grill, Landis
and Lincoln Aves. in ShopRite Plaza,
Vineland. Serving dinner Tues.-Thurs., 4-
9 p.m.; Friday & Sat., 4-10 p.m.;
Reservations recommended. 205-0049.
Grill hours: Open 11 a.m. - 9 p.m.,
Tuesday through Saturday. Cheesesteaks.
Takeout available.
Golden Palace Diner Restaurant 2623 S
Delsea Dr, Vineland, 692-5424. Serving
breakfast, lunch and dinner daily.
The Greenview Inn at Eastlyn Golf
Course, 4049 Italia Avenue, Vineland,
691-5558. The golfers’ lounge and bar
serves lunch and snacks daily from 11
a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The Greenview Inn is a
fine dining restaurant open for dinner
Wed.-Sun. at 5 p.m.
Guiseppe's Italian Market, 528B N.
Harding Hwy, Buena. 856-213-6391. Hot
& Cold Take outs. Crabs Friday &
Saturdays.
Harry’s Pub at Ramada, W. Landis Ave.
and Rt. 55, Vineland, 696-8600. Lunch &
dinner 7 days a week. Happy hour daily
4-6pm with half price appetizers. Live
Entertainment Wednesday thru Saturday.
High Street Chinese Buffet, High St.,
Millville, 825-2288. All-you-can-eat buf-
fet.
Jersey Jerry's. 1362 S. Delsea Dr.,
Vineland, 362-5978. Serving subs, sand-
wiches, and take-out platters.
Joe's Poultry. 440 S. Delsea Dr.,
Vineland, 692-8860. Barbecue and
Kosher chickens, homemade sides,
catering.
Kawa Thai & Sushi, 2196 N. Second St.
(Rt.47), Millville, 825-9939. Thai and
Japanese cuisine. BYOB.
Lake House Restaurant. 611 Taylor Rd.,
Franklinville, 694-5700. American grill
cuisine, daily happy hour specials, great
selection of wine and cigars. Open-air
deck bar and patio.
Larry's II Restaurant, 907 N. Main Rd.,
Vineland, 692-9001. Three meals daily.
Sunday breakfast buffet, early-bird din-
ners.
La Locanda Pizzeria & Ristorante, 1406
S. Main Rd., Vineland, 794-3332. Pasta,
veal, chicken. Lunch and dinner. Closed
Sun.
Luciano’s New Orleans Seafood Kitchen,
Landis Marketplace, 631 E. Landis Ave.,
Vineland, 609-970-7653. Authentic Cajun
and Creole. Catering daily by appointment.
Marciano’s Restaurant, 947 N. Delsea
Dr., Vineland, 563-0030. Italian-American
cuisine, seafood and veal. Open daily for
lunch and dinner, Sunday breakfast buffet.
Martino’s Trattoria & Pizzeria, 2614 E.
Chestnut Ave., Vineland, 692-4448. Brick
oven pizza, risotto, polenta. Three meals
daily.
Merighi's Savoy Inn, E. Landis Ave. and
Union Rd., Vineland, 691-8051. Banquet/
wedding facility and intimate restaurant.
Dungeness Crabs Night on Tuesdays in
the Bistro. Gourmet Pizza Nite on Wed.
Outdoor dining in adjacent Luna’s
Outdoor Bar & Grille.
Millville Queen Diner, 109 E. Broad St.,
Millville. 327-0900. Open 24 hours daily.
Milmay Tavern, Tuckahoe and Bear’s
Head rds., Milmay, 476-3611. Gourmet
lunches and dinners, casual setting.
Moe’s Southwest Grill, 2188 N. 2nd St.,
Millville, 825-3525. Tex-Mex, burritos.
Mori’s, E. Landis Ave., Vineland. 690-
0300. Adjacent to the Landis Theater.
Includes a “casual, upscale” restaurant
with a banquet facility and lounge on
site. Lunch and dinner.
MVP Bar, 408 Wheat Road, Vineland,
697-9825. Full bar menu, drink specials.
Old Oar House Irish Pub, 123 N. High
Street Millville, 293-1200. Year round
Fresh seafood daily, slow roasted prime
rib specials, everyday lunch & dinner
specials, homemade corn beef, kitchen
open until 1 a.m., outdoor beer garden.
Olympia Restaurant, 739 S. Delsea Dr.,
Vineland, 691-6095. Authentic Greek cui-
sine—lamb dishes and salads.
Pegasus, Rts. 40 and 47, Vineland, 694-
0500. Breakfast, lunch, dinner specials;
convenient drive-thru, mini-meal specials.
Peking Gourmet, 907 N. Main Rd.,
(Larry’s II Plaza), Vineland, 691-0088.
Chinese. Takeout only. All major credit
cards accepted.
The Rail, 1252 Harding Hwy., Richland,
697-1440. Bar and restaurant with daily
drink specials and lunch specials.
Saigon, 2180 N. Second St., Millville,
327-8878. Authentic Vietnamese—noodle
soups, curry, hotpot, Buddhist vegetarian.
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SHOP RITE LIQUORS OF VINELAND • PRICES VALID SEPTEMBER 12 - SEPTEMBER 18, 2012
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Like “ShopRite Liquors, Wine & Spirits” on to receive extra savings and coupons
3666 E. Landis Ave Vineland, NJ 08361 Located at the ShopRite Shopping Center, Landis & Lincoln • 696-5555
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696-5555 • andis & Lincoln
s n o p u o c d n a s g n i v a s a r
DINING OUT
From fine dining to lunch spots to bak-
eries, the area has choices to
satisfy any appetite. Call for hours.
Continued on page 29
Grapevine 24-32 091212:Layout 1 9/10/12 8:01 PM Page 27
Sitting here in Avalon, looking at the pour-
ing rain
Summertime has come and gone, every-
body’s home again
D
id you hear that sound? Stop and
listen again. It was the collective
sighs of tens of thousands of visi-
tors sadly departing the Jersey
shore for a final time in the summer of 2012.
Their stifled cries still softly resonate
throughout our entire region.
Amazingly, it seems only a few short days
ago that I composed a Memorial Day col-
umn, writing about the edible treasures I
regularly travel westward toward Vineland to
obtain.
And now it’s over, despite the peculiar,
short-term promises whispered by
September and October.
Sure, the ocean remains bathtub-warm,
Ben Simone, at his farm market on East Oak Road (just west of Lincoln Avenue) sells
apples and other fruit. Fresh-pressed apple cider will be available starting next week.
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1853 Vine Rd. Vineland
691-4848
Fax: 856-691-2294
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856-213-6176 • Wed - Mon. 11 - 12am
SUMMER ISN’T OVER AT DOUBLE
EAGLE SALOON AND DECK BAR

Jeff Giuliani of Eleven Eleven performing
an acoustic set every Thurs. 7 pm - 10 pm

LIVE MUSIC EVERY FRIDAY
NFL SUNDAY TICKET PACKAGE

Turtlestone Brewing Co. on draft, along
with 16 other imported & domestic beers.

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 23:
Double Eagle’s Second Annual Football
Tailgate Party and Pig Roast.
“Like Us” on Facebook for
specials and entertainment updates
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Gabriel’s Horn { BY FRANK GABRIEL }
I
Famous Last Words
Reflections of a summer gone by—and a peek at the
fall cornucopia of local produce.
Grapevine 24-32 091212:Layout 1 9/10/12 8:01 PM Page 28
Speedway Cafe at Ramada, W. Landis
Ave. and Rt. 55, Vineland, 696-8600.
Open Daily, 6 a.m.-11 p.m. Breakfast
served all day. Daily specials Monday
thru Friday. Over 30 dinner selections at
2 for $19.99 and also 7 for $7 available 7
days a week starting at 3 pm.
Sweet Life Bakery, 601 E. Landis Ave.,
Vineland, 692-5353. Neighborhood bak-
ery. Homemade pastries, cakes, coffee.
Ten22 Bar & Grill at Centerton Country
Club, 1022 Almond Rd., Pittsgrove, 358-
3325. Lunch and dinner. New tavern
menu features soups, salads, burgers,
sandwiches, wraps and entree selections.
Sunday Brunch extravaganza.
Tre Belleze, 363 E. Wheat Rd., Buena,
697-8500. Serving lunch and dinner daily
with complimentary buffet Thurs., Fri.
and Sat. from 3-5 p.m. Serving gluten-
free pizza, pasta and beer.
Uncle Ricky’s Outdoor Bar, 470 E. Wheat
Rd., Vineland, 691-4454. Ribs, chicken,
fish, steaks. Always clams, eat in or take
out. Live music Saturday & Sunday night.
Dungeness Crab All You Can Eat.
Villa Fazzolari, 821 Harding Hwy., Buena
Vista, 697-7107. Dinner combos, grilled
meats, fish. Lunch and dinner daily.
Wild Wings, 1843 E. Wheat Rd., Vineland,
691-8899. Dinners, sandwiches, wings.
Winfield’s. 106 N. High St., Millville, 327-
0909. Continental cuisine and spirits
served in a casually upscale setting.
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Where Elmer Rd. meets Delsea Dr.
Vineland • 692-7900
Hours: Monday and Wednesday 9-8,
Tuesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday 9-5:30
LIV
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BBQ’n-Chili Cook-off
FREE – PARK & RIDE: Trolley loops
from Walmart to Kidston Towers. Pick up
onWood St or Elmer St in Festival Area.
supported by
To be a Wine Contestant, contact:
Main Street Vineland
603 E Landis Ave · 856/794-8653
MainStreetVineland.org
Homemade Wine Competition
featuring professional judges
sponsored by
Be a Judge or just enjoy tasting the
many varieties of BBQ and Chili our
contestants have to oer.
Kits to be a Taster/Judge are $5
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· Peeµle´s cheice veres musr be cnsr by 7 µm.
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Full servings also available
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DINING OUT
Continued from page 27
and there will be plenty of lovely late sum-
mer/early autumn weather still to come.
But let’s not kid ourselves for once; sum-
mer is pretty much a done deal.
What remains is at best, a pleasant coda,
the bittersweet denouement.
I do however have another deeply person-
al milestone to preoccupy myself with this
month; as my lovely wife and I celebrate our
20th wedding anniversary on September 19.
It’s a monumental feat no doubt, but also
downright scary when one stops to fully con-
sider and absorb the enormity of time passed
since our marvelous Parisian honeymoon.
Closing down for the season, I found the
last of the souvenirs
I can still taste the wedding cake and it’s
sweet after all these years
My other great consolation is that we now
enter into the undisputed finest time of year
for local farmer’s produce.
Tomatoes, peppers, eggplant, melons and
all their associated brethren still remain,
although, just like the weather, only for a few
brief weeks.
What gets added is the plentiful bounty of
this harvest season; squash—in all their
sundry colors and shapes—plus hearty
greens, cabbage, potatoes, pears, and of
course, apples.
A recent trip to my favorite stone fruit
farm, Simone’s on East Oak Avenue, revealed
multiple pommes already available.
Along with their final summery selection
of peaches, nectarines and plums.
Apples included a pretty yellowy-red vari-
ety called “Mollies,” which we’ve never
before encountered.
Described to us as an early-season cousin
of Golden Delicious, we enjoyed their crisp,
mildly sweet nature, more like a cross
between Granny Smiths and the aforemen-
tioned G.D’s.
There’s comfort in my coffee cup and
apples in the early fall
They’re pulling all the moorings up and
gathering at the Legion Hall
They swept away all the streamers after
the Labor Day parade
Nothing left for a dreamer now, only one
final serenade
Like many children born into the darkest
depths of winter—a true Capricorn, January
14 here—summer is my absolute favorite
time of the year.
It’s no wonder to me that even
Shakespeare chose to articulately acknowl-
edge this most powerful, intoxicating season.
After all, only midsummer nights could
ever hope to produce the weird, wonderful,
magical dreams of which The Bard penned.
So it is with some degree of trepidation
that I face this imminent transition, strug-
gling mightily to make the best of circum-
stances utterly beyond my control.
Frankly, my dear, it kinda sucks.
In the warm, quiet days still to come, I’ll
make subtle preparations for the bleak
months lying in wait ahead.
I plan to try my hand at creating fruit pre-
serves, a skill set nicely imparted to me by my
Sasdelli grandparents some 40-odd years ago.
I may even do some pickling, another
artisanal food preparation technique favored
by our farmer family that has now managed
to find its way back into the popular zeit-
geist.
Soups or stews will soon replace salads
and salsas on my table.
The essential flavors of autumn—cinna-
mon, fennel and rosemary—will be rotated
in, swapped out for warm season basil, dill
and mint.
This however, was a summer which I will
recall for many years to come.
Like a great recipe touching all four pri-
mary tastes—sweet, salty, sour and bitter—it
was filled with hope, disappointment, satisfac-
tion and yearning, all in nearly equal portions.
And these are the last words I have to say
It's always hard to say goodbye
But now it’s time to put this book away
Ain’t that the story of my life
—Billy Joel, Famous Last Words I
Grapevine 24-32 091212:Layout 1 9/10/12 8:01 PM Page 29
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SEPTEMBER 11 THROUGH 15
Nightlife at Bennigan’s. 2196 W.
Landis Ave., Vineland, 205-0010. Karaoke
Thursdays with Bob Morgan, 9 p.m.-
close, $3 Heinekens, DJ/Dance Party
Fridays 9 p.m.-Close, $3 Coronas. All
Sports Packages: MLB Extra Innings, NBA
League Pass, NHL Center Ice, and NFL
Sunday Ticket. $3 12-oz. Coors Light &
$5 23-oz. Call for RSVP and details.
EVERY TUESDAY
Karaoke. The Cosmopolitan. 3513 S. Delsea
Dr,, Vineland. Come sing your heart out. 765-
5977.
EVERY WEDNESDAY
Salsa Night. The Cosmopolitan. 3513 S.
Delsea Dr., Vineland. Latin-inspired dance
party. 765-5977.
Country Dancing. The Centerton Country
Club & Event Center, 1022 Almond Rd.,
Pittsgrove. 7–11 p.m.
EVERY THURSDAY
Jazz Duos. Annata Wine Bar, Bellevue
Ave., Hammonton, 609-704-9797. Live Jazz
featuring area's best jazz duos. 6:30 -
9:30 p.m. No cover. RSVP recommended.
Magician Kevin Bethea. Centerton
Country Club & Event Center, Ten22 Bar &
Grill, 1022 Almond Rd., Pittsgrove, 358-
3325. 6–8 p.m. Magician and sleight of
hand illusionist.
SEPTEMBER 13 THROUGH 16
Nightlife at Ten22. Centerton Country
Club & Event Center, The Patio Bar at
Ten22, 1022 Almond Rd., Pittsgrove, 358-
3325. Wed.: Country Night with DJ Bob
Morgan, 7-11 p.m. Lessons and non-stop
dancing (song requests all night) on one
of the largest dance floors in region. $5
admission. Thurs: DJ Tommy B 8 p.m., Fri:
TBA 9 p.m., Sat: DJ Tommy B 9 p.m.
Nightlife at Mori’s. Lou Ferretti's Mori's
on Landis, 830 E. Landis Ave., Vineland,
690-0300. Thurs.: Juicy 8 p.m.. Fri.: Barfly
8 p.m. Sat.: High Noone Express 8 p.m.
Nightlife at Ramada. Harry's Pub at
Ramada, W. Landis Ave. and Rt. 55,
Vineland, 696-3800. Wed.: Ladies Night,
1/2 price appetizers all night. Happy Hour
Mon.-Sat, 4-6 p.m. $1 off alcoholic drinks.
Wed.–Sat., live entertainment.
Nightlife at Double Eagle. Double Eagle
Saloon, 1477 Panther Rd., Vineland. Live
music every Friday night. NFL Sunday
Ticket Package Turtlestone Brewing Co.
on draft, along with 16 other imported
and domestic beers. Happy Hour daily
3–6 p.m.
SEPTEMBER 14, 15, AND 16
Nightlife at The Rail. The Rail, 1252
Harding Hwy, Richland. 697-7245. Fri.: TBA.
Sat. In High Gear,
Nightlife at Bojo’s. 222 N. High St.,
Millville, 327-8011. Tues.: Bike Nite with
live entertainment. Thurs.: Karaoke. Fri.:
Mike Bryan Band. Sat.: DJ/band. Daily drink
and food specials.
Nightlife at Old Oar House. Old Oar
House Irish Pub. 123 N. High St., Millville,
293-1200. Wed.: Karaoke 9 p.m., Fri.: Main
Street Band 9 p.m., Sat.: Glen Eric 9 p.m.
Sun.: Danny Eyer, 5–9 p.m.
EVERY FRIDAY AND SATURDAY
Top 40 Dance Party w/ DJ Tony Morris.
The Cosmopolitan. 3513 S. Delsea Dr,,
Vineland. All of the most popular main-
stream dance music. 765-5977.
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 14
Jay and Tessa. Bogart’s Bookstore. 210
N. High St., Millville. Free admission. Live
from Tampa, Florida 7–9 p.m.
SEPTEMBER 14, 15, AND 16
Disney’s Little Mermaid, Jr..
Cumberland Players Theatre, Sherman
Ave., Vineland. 7 p.m. except 9/16 at 2
p.m. Kids at CP production of the classic
children’s tale. Replaces Getting to
Know...Cinderella in the schedule. Tickets
for Cinderella will be honored at this show.
Tickets $10. www.cumberlandplayers.com.
SEPTEMBER 7 THROUGH 22
Completely Hollywood. Eagle Theatre,
208 Vine St., Hammonton. 8 p.m. A hilari-
ous mash-up of over 200 famous block-
buster hits and flops..Tickets $22 and can
be purchased at TheEagleTheatre.com.
609-704-5012.
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 15
Gordon Vincent. Bogart’s Bookstore. 210
N. High St., Millville. Free admission.
Soulful sounds 7–9 p.m.
Doug Church ”The True Voice of Elvis”
with Dave Michaels. Landis Theater, 830
E. Landis Ave., Vineland. 8 p.m. Doug
Church recreates Elvis Presley’s 1972
Madison Square Garden Concert, Las
Vegas comedian Dave Michaels, opens
the show. Tickets $35. Available at
www.landistheater.com or 856-691-1121.
The Grascals. Levoy Theatre, 126-130 N.
High St., Millville. 8 p.m. Vocally, the trio
of Terry Eldredge, Jamie Johnson and Terry
Smith are tighter than ever, cutting loose on
driving solo vocals and soaring trios with
equal fire and passion. As an instrumental
unit, The Grascals have never sounded
sharper, with mandolin ace Danny Roberts,
fiddler Jeremy Abshire and banjo player
Kristin Scott Benson leading the charge. As
a result, their cutting-edge modern blue-
grass is delivered with a deep knowledge of,
and admiration for, the work of the music’s
founding fathers. Tickets $27 $23, $19.
http://www.levoy.net
SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 16
Second City for President. Levoy
Theatre, 126-130 N. High St., Millville. 8
p.m. Chicago’s legendary sketch comedy
theatre takes on the election. Tickets
$27–$35 and can be purchased at the Box
Office or online. 856-327-6400.
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 18
The Art Spirit: Pat
Witt and the Barn
Studio of Art. Levoy
Theatre, 126-130 N.
High St., Millville. 7
p.m. Pat Witt has devot-
ed her life to inspiring
artists in southern New
Jersey. An accomplished oil painter, Witt’s
greatest contribution has been her life’s
work—The Barn Studio in Millville. Produced
and directed by ArtC’s Bill Horin and Frank
Weiss, this 25-minute documentary features
Witt as well as friends, family, and past and
present students. Proceeds benefit the Barn
Studio of Art and ArtC. 856-327-6400.
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19
Art of Two Palettes. Elwyn New Jersey
campus, 1667 E. Landis Ave., Vineland, 6
p.m. A palate-pleasing menu of delicacies
from the area’s pre-eminent restaurants and
gourmet caterers, complemented by a Wine
& Vodka Bar and fabulous finger foods, all
artfully blended with the palette creations
from exhibiting artists throughout the
region. Event features a live and silent auc-
tion and the evening is accompanied by the
soothing orchestral sounds of the
Cumberland County College Jazz Band.
Proceeds from previous events were utilized
to purchase handicapped accessible vehi-
cles to transport individuals with disabilities
to their daily programs and community
activities. The public is invited to attend and
participate. Advance tickets available by
calling 856-794-5300.
THROUGH SEPTEMBER
Beach, Bay and Sand. A
Photographic Exhibit called,
“Beach, Bay and Sand” is being
featured during September at
Vineland Public Library, 1058 E.
Landis Avenue. The natural
light photographs were taken by
Shelee R. McIlvaine. As
McIlvaine progressed from
using a Kodak 126 camera as a
child to her current Canon EOS
Digital XSi she says, “What
began as a quiet journey has
now become a vision for anyone to see with
me.” Most shots were taken in the South
Jersey area without using a flash resulting in
refreshingly natural images. Whenever possible
the photos are processed and mounted in an
environmentally friendly fashion.
The display is located in the exhibit cases
on the first floor of the library. Viewing is avail-
able during regular library hours: M– T (10-8),
Friday (10-5) and Saturday (11-4). All areas of
the library are handicap accessible. Call the
library at 794-4244 for more information. Visit
http://www.vinelandlibrary.org to learn more
about library exhibits and programs.
ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY, LEVOY AND LANDIS
HAPPENINGS, AND NIGHTLIFE AROUND THE REGION.
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Call 9 a.m - 5 p.m daily, Deadline for paid ads: Friday, 3 p.m.
To order your classified call, 856-457-7815 or visit
www.grapevinenewspaper.com/classifieds
Call 9 a.m - 5 p.m daily, Deadline for paid ads: Friday, 3 p.m. To order your classified, call 856-457-7815 or
visit www.grapevinenewspaper.com/classifieds. See box below for additional ordering information.
Only $10 per ad, per week, up to 20 words; over 20 words,
$0.50 per word. $0.30 for bold—per word/per issue, $3 for a
Border/per issue. Add a photo for $15. Mail Ad & payment or go
online to www.grapevinenewspaper.com/classifieds.
Not responsible for typographical errors. • Once an ad is placed, it cannot be cancelled or changed. The Grapevine does not in any way
imply approval or endorsement. Those interested in goods or services always use good judgment and take appropriate precautions.
Acct. No. ___________________________________Exp. Date________ 3 Digit # on back
of card__________
Signature:__________________________________________
Printed Name:______________________________________
Name ___________________________________
Address__________________________________
City__________________________Zip_________
Phone #: ________________________________
email____________________________________
The Grapevine
907 N. Main Rd., Suite 205
Vineland, NJ 08360
www.grapevinenewspaper.com
Mail Ad
Form with
Payment TO:
Classifieds
Call for more information
856-457-7815
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Check if needed.
Refer to prices above.
JBold
J Border
CLASSIFIEDS
Credit Cards
Accepted:
Having a Yard Sale or Garage Sale?
It’s time to make room in that attic, garage or
basement, and there’s no better way to get the
word out than to advertise your yard sale in
The Grapevine’s Classifieds.
Use the form below, or visit
www.grapevinenewspaper.com/classifieds
Deadline is Friday for the following Wednesday’s paper.
Micro Electric LLC.
Residential repair, addi-
tions, and services.
Bonded and insured.
“no job is too small.”
NJ LIC #14256.
Call 609-501-7777.
WANTED: An experienced
hair stylist with a good
following. Earn up to
60%, plus bonuses: paid
vacation and AFLAC.
Please call Glamazon at
856-213-5316.
Protocall Staffing is seek-
ing 100+ people for
Production, Packaging
etc.: - Competitive pay -
Many shifts available -
Must have 2 Valid forms
of ID. Apply in Person M-
TR, 9am-Noon, at 106
Landis Ave, Vineland NJ
or call 856-848-2196.
Upstairs apartment for
rent: 1 bedroom, living
room, eat-in kitchen,
bath. $750/mo. Tenant
pays utilities. Call 856-
405-6500.
Yard Sale: Saturday, 9/15
at 8 a.m. 808 Becker Dr.,
Vineland, NJ 08361. For
more info., call Ruby at
609-805-0840
GIANT YARD SALE: 7am
9/22 to benefit SJH. SJH
Medical Center Parking Lot,
1505 W Sherman, Vineland.
Call 856-641-8290.
Moving Sale! Sunday 9/16,
10am. 2001 Arrowhead
Trail, Vineland. Toys,
clothes, books, linens,
decorations, etc. $ donat-
ed to National Ovarian
Cancer Coalition.
Have a bike taking up space
in your home? Please con-
sider donating it. The
Vineland Rotary Club has
partnered with Pedals for
Progress to export bikes to
third-world countries where
they are needed for trans-
portation. Also collecting
treadle and portable sewing
machines. Contact Henry
Hansen at 856-696-0643
for drop-off or pick-up.
WANTED! Slightly used chil-
drens books (donated) to
the Coats for Kids event at
the NJMP, Call Brian 856-
364-6011 to arrange pick up.
Wanted Dead or alive.
Junk or running cars.
Quick removal. Cash paid.
856-649-2732.
Licensed Childcare–TotLot
providing quality childcare
ages 0 and up. Accepting
NJCK/TANF CPR/First-aid
certified. Mon-Fri, 7am-
5pm. 856-641-7407 Kim.
Visit us on Facebook.
All American Plumbing
and Drain Cleaning.
Specialing in all plumb-
ing services and repairs,
all at very reasonable
rates. We always answer
the phone. Just give us a
call! 856-696-3052
REAL Painting:
Reasonable Prices–High
Quality Residential &
Commercial Painting
Interior/Exterior/Custon
Staining–South Jersey
Areas. (302) 444-2396
General House Cleaning.
20 years experience.
Reasonable, honest & reli-
able. Call 856-697-1338.
Leave message.
Steelman's Drywall.
Drywall installation and
repairing nailpops, cracks,
water damage, unfinished
drywall. Big or small! Call
Joe for a free estimate at
609-381-3814.
Turk's Pressure Clean.
Property maintenance.
Vinyl and aluminum sid-
ing, concrete, brick, roof
cleaning, gutter clean-
out. Over 25 years in
business, fully insured.
(856) 692-7470.
AJB III Construction.
Licensed and fully insured.
Windows, doors, remodel-
ing, and more. Call us
today at 856-332-7865.
FLUTE, PICCOLO, PAN
FLUTE, RECORDER,
FLUTE ENSEMBLE,
Lessons by Renowned
Flutist, BEVERLY PUGH,
(Member, Bay-Atlantic
Symphony). ALL AGES-
ALL LEVELS, REASON-
ABLE RATES & MUSIC
FOR ALL OCCASIONS.
Phone: (Machine) 856-
455-1098. Email:
BevsPanFlutes@aol.com
Electrical
Contractor
Pete Construction
Specializing in decks,
roofs and home
remodeling. State
licensed and insured.
Call for a free esti-
mate. 856-507-1456.
MOWING, EDGING,
TREE & STUMP
REMOVAL, CLEAN-
UPS, BUSH & TREE
TRIMMING, MULCH,
RIVER-ROCK, GUT-
TER CLEANING,
VINELAND/
MILLVILLE AREA,
856-691-2017
Pizzazz Dance Center
is seeking an enthu-
siastic part-time
dance instructor for
the upcoming sea-
son. Looking for
someone who is a
well-rounded instruc-
tor and very knowl-
edgeable. Pay based
on experience.
Please send resumes
to pizzazzdc@aol.com.
VHS Class of 2002 will
be celebrating our 10
year reunion on
November 23, 2012 at
Merighi’s Savoy Inn
beginning at 7pm. The
cost is $45 per person
and includes hors
d'oeuvres, dinner buf-
fet, and dessert. (Cash
bar available). One
guest per classmate.
Payments accepted by
check made payable
to VHS Class of 2002
& mailed to: Becky
Tobolski, 2831 East
Oak Rd., Vineland, NJ
08361 or credit card.
Contact tobolskir@
gmail.com or
kyle.cerana@gmail.com
with questions.
BEACHBODY COACH—
Finally get results, via
your program or mine,
nutrition guidance &
closed Facebook moti-
vation group of over
60 members.
Support, accountabil-
ity, success.
Thinkbig_getsmall@
ymail.com. Tell me
your goals (whether
it’s losing weight or
gaining bulk), and I'll
get you there.
Help Wanted
Home
Improvement
Yard Sales
Employment
Services
Bikes Wanted
Announcements
Landscaping
For Rent
Do you have a car or boat that is
taking up space in your drive-
way? Are you hoping to sell your
vehicle for some extra cash?
Publicize the sale of your vehicle
by advertising in The Grapevine’s
Classifieds section. Make your
junk someone else’s treasures.
LANDSCAPING & PAVERS
Professional Installations...Over 10 Years
SPECIALIZING IN:
Lawn Maintenance
Landscape Design • Walks,
Driveways • Retaining Walls
Fire Pits • Restoration of Pavers
Call 856-982-7701
or 856-498-7571
lewbowhunter@gmail.com
See our work on

See our w
whunter@gmail.com lewbo
or 85
Call 856-982-7701
e Pits • R Fir
ays • Retaining Drivew
Landscape Design •
Lawn Maintenance
SPECIALIZING IN:
ork on ur w
unter@gmail.com
56-498-7571
856-982-7701
vers ation of Pa Restor
alls W s • Retaining
alks, W pe Design •
Maintenance
ALIZING IN:
We Buy
Used Vehicles!
See Lenny Campbell See Lenny Campbell
808 N. Pearl St., Bridgeton NJ
(856) 451-0095
Items Wanted
Flute Lessons
Need work? Have a business and need more
customers? Why not get the word out through
The Grapevine’s Classifieds?
Advertize your skills and business in the Classifieds by
calling 856-457-7815.
Grapevine 24-32 091212:Layout 1 9/10/12 8:01 PM Page 31
175 S. Main Road & 1234 W. Landis Avenue, Vineland, NJ • 856.690.1234
Our Focus Is You.
All winners have the option of starring in one of our
newspaper ads or on one of our billboards.
Enter to win Capital Bank’s You’re The Star Sweepstakes this summer and
you could also win one of three big prizes fit for a star:
First Place — 42” LCD HDTV
Second Place — A Deluxe Spa Package
Third Place — Dinner for Two
Just stop at your nearest Capital Bank branch to enter. You could be our next
Capital Bank Star!
Vineland Chooses Capital Bank.
Capital Bank is rated 5
Stars by Bauer Financial.
See your bank’s rating at
BauerFinancial.com
You Can Be
Capital Bank’s
Next Star!
No purchase necessary. Sweepstakes drawing November 1, 2012. Three winners will be chosen from entries at each Capital Bank branch for the three prizes. All winners will have the option to be featured in future Capital Bank advertising
programs. You need not be present at the time of the drawing to win. All federal, state and local tax liabilities and gratuities are winner’s responsibility. Capital Bank employees and their immediate family are not eligible to enter or win
prizes. Rates guaranteed, as a minimum, through 1/1/2013; interest rate may vary thereafter. Offer may be withdrawn at any time without previous notice. Fees may reduce earnings. *Annual Percentage Yield (APY).
You’ll Be A Fan Of
Our Starring Rates!
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