0

A STI'DY OF RACIAI DISMIBUSI

T

IN IIIE m'l0f,M000, NE[f JERSET, PUBIIC SCHo0IS

i

qplEwooD LTBRARv
EN3l5il3h?,:J_TFi;,
.. ,,

Corunlssloner Fbederlek M. Raublnger
lbom:
1

George C. Boone

"-"'""

Robert fiLood Arclde ilay
Anne Hoppock
Errunett $purlock Robert Ward

Date:

October

!,

L962

C6{IESITS

ru
I
3 3

PMP6E
PART

AND !,TESICD OF' SN'DT
BACKGROIND OF' TTIE FROtsIE}I

I II

Tbe ComnunttY Settine

chronology
PANT

of Events concernlng segregatloa

10 16

IS $IENE SECNEOATTOi Nt DESIGN?
TheDevel.oprnentofElenentary$ohoolBttll.dl.uga

2L
23

Hlstorly of School Slta Acqulsltton
,+, :*

Hlsto4TofSctroolButldlrrgConetnrctlm
ElernentarySchoolAttendanceAreas
PANT

zlt
25 28

III

ARE EDUCATIOIIAT OPPCRTUNITIEII EQUAT?

Allooatlon of Fqnds; Requlsltlonlng, and llletdbutil'm
Profes

3o
33

slonal PerEonnel

Dlstdbutl0n of servlces of supervisors and $peclal Teaohera 36 ln t'tts 0bservatlone Concernlng the &tucatlonaL Fogranr
El,ementarY Schools

38

cbsernatlons concernlng Pr,rpll Achlevelrent Reactlons of a oroup of Hlgh school Plrplls

br

9t
.

Racial Dlgtd.butlon
a.

ttern and Sectlon
FM

ln the Hlgh Schoo1 by SubJeat, Clars,

53

Specla1 Servtces
PARS IIT

,5
NEDUCING THE CONCENM'ATIOII CF' NMRO

A

COI{PRETE}ISIVE PI.AN

fl'Plffi

AT IINCOTN SCHOOI AI{D FTIRTHERING INIEIONOUP
UNDERSTAND]NG

62

Englewood Board

of Education, - Determlnation of Borrowlng capaclty as ot ;anul"Y'rt-iiOf

58

APPDSIDIT

f4BtEs 1. le. 2. 3.
ELemetrt€rT $ohool hrcnranta by Race and (bado, Septel&en 19,

pAsE

Tf 1962 ELemente4r School ltrrpillnentd by Sex, Race and &nadee Soptenib* Lgt 1962 I8 ZO lbavel Dl.atancas ln &rgteriood
Comparison of Lincoln School Prof,essionaL Peneonnel School PsEonnel L962-63

ntth oth€r El€mcntarlr

3L
3h 35 35

lr. Raclal

hinclpals, Supervlsors, Directots L962-63 5. Racial Composltton of Teachero, 1960r L962 and L963 6. RaclaL Composition of Substitute Teachers 1960, 1:962 and 1963 7, Pupils Retatned, in Thtrd Grade L96L-62 8. RrpLLs Retained tur Sirth. Orade L96L-L962
Conrpositlon,
Drop Orts L95? -L962
Numbers

\z
bz

9. 10.
J.L.

Its
16

of

Drop Orts

Age

at

Drop Out

b6

L2. Grade at Drop Otrt 13. Elementary Schoo1 Attendance by Drop Out l.lr. Number of Iears ln Local Elenentary School of Drop 15. Stated Reasons for Leaving Schoo1 16. hpLL Mobt Ltty Grade g-Lz 1?. Speclal Ectucation Claeees 1957-62 LB. Percentage School Atterrdan ce Lg5?-62 19. Summary of Cases Recelving Intensive $tudy 20, Surnnary of Cases Refemed for Screenln g L957;62 21. Reasons for Referral 22. Reading Consrrltantg I Case Loads 1961 ana f96a

tfl tfi
LB

lp
50

55 56
57

5e

60
61

FIGURE$
PAOE

AAr

Elenrentary School. Emollmenta Septenrber 19p L962

.19
ldr

,

.

SerlEe

of flgurea fol-lm Page

A. Clasg Rsnlc L96L, Ilwtght trlorrogl lllgh School B' Class Rank Lg62t &d,ght Morrow High SchooL C. ACE Scores 1961r'Dnight Mortow High SchooL D. ACE Scores L962, Dnlght Morrorv Htgh School' E. Stanfcd Readlng Scores 1961, Dr,rtght Morrow Hlgh School F. Stanford Reading Scores L962, D'rleht Momow lllgh School, Serles' of flguree follow Page Go Raclal Conposltlon, Dlrlght Morrow ltlgh school hgllsh Cleggeg bY $ectlona
H

tlt

I Ractal Composttlon, Dl'rlght Morrow lllgh
Histcy
Classes bY Sections

$chool

I.

Recl-al ConposLtlonr, D'ltght Morrow Hlgh Sohool

Forelgn Ianguage Classes

rlo Raelal Composition, Dr'rlght Morrow lllgh Sctrool
Sctence Classes

Kr Reclal ConposLtlon, Dtrlght Merow Etgh SchooJMathematlce Classes

t.

Raelal Proportlon of Nogroea and WttLter Enfolled

ln Attt

ltusla and Industrlal Arts
Home Economlcs

Classee, Drlght Morrow H tgh Sohool

Hr Raclal

Composition, Jrrnlor Hlgh Sehool Classes by Sectlcr

-1-

PUNPOSE AND METIIOD OF SNDY

Ttre sxrrdy $as dealgned

to seeur€ anaw€rn to the foJ-lorilng

queBti.on3 t

1. 2,

Is there

segregatlon bY destgtt?

sehools? 4re edueatlonal opporhurltLes equal. {n thc pnoblem of 3. lfhat plano can be advanced to resolve the raolal eoncentratton and create a eound educatl0nal
exper"!,ence

for aI[

chLldren?
atrady naa

to anstrer thege queottone an lntenslve
$bate Departnrent
conferenees

calrled out by the

of Educatlon cornnittee. Ttrtg etudy lncluded:

rrlth the $upertntendent of schools, Ttre Board of gtaff Educatton, prtnelpals .and supervlgory

vtgltg to all elenentary school classes spect aL etudy of al-L second and fljth gradee
Analyses Study
StudY

of test data and guldance
and

recorrls

of resouraes

tngtnrctlonal mater{a}s
nLnuteg, records end

of

each school PJ-ant

Analtrpea

of Boad of Educatlon

flscel

deta

study

of aehool dlstrLct Ilnss, hlatorleg of

gchool alte

acqulottton, arrd gchool- bulLdlng constructton
Interrrlews

wlth selected lndlvtdual-s representtng neJor organl-

"

zatlons tn t*re citY

aLL flndlngs

reflect the concensus of the entlre

Qormlttee.

-2-

ThG

ComttLec, eppotntod by Com1cslqner Raubinger to

raclal distribut,ion in the Snglewood'Publlc Schools, g;cpress€s glncere appreciatlon for the uhol-ehearted cooper&stud.f
+
i+'

*

tion of the Superintendent of Schools arnd his professlonal staff, to the Board of Education, the l'Iayor, and to the
many

indivlduals repres€n!** public opilion whose contri-

butions nade this report posalble.

-3E*J.lq.

,1 B$$ryBQgl{D,- ,9I..., p-tg.*JE@ry
The CorunrnitY Setttng

An lristorleal.. overrriew

is

inchrded,

to plo'rld€ a setting for

thie report, It ineludes per'li,inent itformatlon dravan from the rrEnglewood', Its People Stearnst study of Febrraryr Lg62, entitled
and

lts

Schools.rl

PoptrlatS-on

rn1glewoocllo growbh

rate,

sj-nce 1910r has been glower
New Jersey aa

thT that of

Bergen county,

but fagtet. than that of

a r'ltrole' Factors

influencing this rate arei

-theliguitedareasofundeve}opedland - retard,ing effect of L93O depression

conservative poJ-icy of developrlent etcpr€ssecl through zoning
ordinances

A residential cornrunity, Englewoodl s heterogsneou8 popnlation
orlgSnated with three
clescendants farn:iJ.ies
New mai'rn

gi€ups:

of early Dutch settlers
considerable wealth whoee members colwtuted to

of

York CitY

-

Negroes, main\y enployed as domestics, who

settled in the

Fourth ward wj.th white neighbors, composing a
neighborhood

racially

mixed

of n:lddle and low i.ncome faniu'es definite\y
toward' htgh income, whlte

The population tends

collar
and

mrkefs, brrt the pr:oportion of

Lcw incoroe,

blue co}Iar workers

of over laborers has increa,sed* Aver 3Afi of the households have J'ncomee the $Zr5OO bracket' $tOrCOO whj-J.e less than y6 are below
would sholt $o aecura,te religlous census exi.sts, but a rough estfunate

-h-

{ fro'testant, about equallydlvttied between Negro and wtrttei about * ,lewfsn; ana * Ronan CathoLio. hglehroodts nonwhite populatlon, at 27.3ft, ts the'flfth hlghest percentage tn the state. N€w Jerseyrs percentage ie 8.7% of the total'
epproxlmately

t.

wlth urban

Neu Jersey l.Lfir.New

Jerey central clttes

22.1fr and Bergen

Corrntv 2,2f...

to A el,asstftcatlon of occupatlons ranges from 2o.2fr professtonals of 2.1fi domegtlcs. The data augg,est an increage ln the proportlon
.}'

b

tn clericat, sales workerg, profosstonal workers and a decrease
domegttcs.

ild
county

The average age

of the populatlon is
pqulatton ie

ol-der than

that of the

and etate. The nonwtrtte
shorrs an exceedlngly low

younger than the whtte

.

Englewood

birth rate .- 15.0 per thorrsand compared wlth populatton with a natlqral rate of 22.6. rnte ls a conslderably nrcrblle

a

steady out-mtgration of nlddle cl-ass familles.
Erglewoodf g Larrd Uee

tradltlonally a restdentlaL cornnuntty, Englewood has Fourth hrard where prior to encouraged the developnent of tndustry ln tts
Although

lghg constderable vacant Land,

.lll,

adapted

to

good

restdential

developmen'

exlgted.lnllth63.t$ofthectty|glandugeclforhouotng,Sh,9%,eaaused for etngle famlly dwolllngs, S.r% for two faml1y dwelllngs and 3.by',

for

lp r11 the multt,-fanily dwell,lngs tn rg5g. Houslng unlts hsve tncreased double that of any of the Wards wtth the tncrease in the Forrrbh ward
other three.
There

ts a heavter concentration of

elementarSr chtLdren

ln deterio-

ratlng areas. partrcular attentron

ghourd be cal,led

to the intense

*5-

oonsrntrat$"on

of posr h$rst$g nrnn!.ng betr^reen

?5F and 100t tn the

at6s BurrCIundtxrg *tre ttncoLn Saheol"

In denstty of populatlonn Sng!-e+roodrg 5rlLh grer square mlle ts reLattvely i,aw ancng urban colrmu:nltlee. . Ths htghest denstty ln New
.Ierea3
5.s ltabolcen

wtth

IJB

rblri

poralon$

per squere m!,le and the loweet that

fs

Harnrusnton Ta'$nshi.p

wlth 232,

Llrrol,Lment proj ectlons tndtaate

895 puptls na:ir be arided 'bo

the sc!:*nl. systen under p'resent,

zonl.rtg.

Fntuye use
rnl,nant

of land tn the ctty of Snglewoocl !.s an lmport,an! ceten
charactertst'fi"ce.

of the cttvls future

Industrla:!" and Brxlness Characterlstice
Erng;.ewood

ranks welL ss an tndustri.sl, eommunLty, deaptte

tts

€98€t1-

ttal
tn

resg.dentlal characber, !{cnrever, tt

ts na& a *ptcal tndustrta} tmn

-the nunber

of enrployees,
shor,r

pa.r;roLLr o? valua added by the manufaoturtng

arocess

.

fhe data

a plcture of a reelCentlal eonvnuntty whtch has

lrutlt tnto tts

eeoRomtc

llfe

a

suhs-tantJ.al"

but not over?owertng lndus-

trlal

comp?.ex,

hgler,rood,rs

retail

econony conets'bently runs ahead
Ns!il

of tts propor-

tlonste populatlon share in Bergen eounty and ln
eetabllshnftltn provlrded 18 .?.5f, af
provlded hy
woorJ 1.959

Jereey. Commerclal

valuatlore

r compared to 8.23fr
Breas

lnclustry.

An analyrsl.e

of tirts study may tndtcate that Ergletn

should encourege developnrent of 'land use

of retatl

and

ccmnex"ctal outlste

"

Thi.s has a dlrect, rel.atlonshtp

to the sc!:ool

probl.en,

f:rqn the standpotnt
.

of

economy,
anC

frqn the mt ddl,e and upgreillncome

enployaea

attracted to r,ha clty,

the genoral upgradtng envlronrnent of reta!.l
There aay also be sone polnt ln:

altas as compared

w$.th

industrlal.

conslderation of errtenslrre retail- renewal. areas on and surroundlng the

-6-.

Llncoln School glt'e.
Finance

ln good orderl both tn the rnuntcipaL and the publlc school seettons of the cltyls pubL1c affalrs. In L955, Englewood was ltsted as ong of the ten htghest ln per eaplta
Englewog:tr publlc flnances

aT

sorrnd and

rnpnicipal operatllg expenditmres among 6lr mfaafe sized New Jersey

cormunities. Analysis of ratingo

show

g high income per househpld

and

a high effecttve builng lncome. The stablltty of Englanoodts publlc
flnances hag been sufficLent to maintaln a bond ratlng of A.

['r

Ttre schools are supported, LocaL

larg"fy f"om funds collected as taxes on

property.

ApproximateLy 907 of the firnds

for cument operation

ans

from this source. With the retirement
Lg62, Engl-ewood

of school bonds scheduLed for school dLstrict will be within lts statutory linlt by the
calendar f€oro
shows a conmrulity wtttr a weJ-I ordered flnanclal'

end

of the cument
Itrls analysis

stnrctrrre, capable of spendlng reasonable fluns to protect ttselP from

deterloratlon.
,-

olty le in a poottton ftnanctally to make chotcee concerning gchool and mrrnlclpa} pollcy alned at control of forces of
The

deterloratl,on.
Tho Impact

of

MetropoJ,le Characteristlcs

of the Reglon
ttre
New

Englewood,

a

subu!'ban communlty

in the lnner rlng of

York

metropoLltan regton,

ig

influenced soctally and economLcally by forces

generated from outslde the

cityrs boundari-es. It Ls part of the Easterrr

i? '.
Megalopolis, wlrose pswer and pull

. Soaboard

ls

expeeted

to lncrease at

an

aruural

rate far greater then ever before, and which boaste E conc€nr

tration of declglon-naldng cent€rs - ful businessr' goverrurrent and educatLorl -- whleh cannot be forrnd anXwhere el.se ln the world.
CLooe

to the rntddle of thls

e:ryandlng region J.s &rglewood, flrrnly.

located hrtthJ.n the inner belt of suburbsn

It

has no$t reached the stage

of development which

econom:lsts terrn

|ttransitiontt, the second of five
have evolved.

stages, throtrgh wtrLch conrnunitd.es

in the region naturally

It

stands between the stage

of

new developnent

ard the stage of slow

downgradingo

lfhiLe

Engler.rood would

be cl.assifled as rttntlnerabletr to ctranglng

population composLtion and changtng patterns of Land use,

stlll

the

cltytg hlstory of carefbl attention to
Dcternal pressrrre

zonJ.ng and pLannlng

place

lt ln
uaxisan

the fortunate posltion of harrlng a set of options lnto the future.

for grorth ts

upon E)rglewood and

the

e,EtJ-aatecl.

populatlon nay be exceeded retarded

if the forces and trbnds which hatp heretofore
to a prospect of Jobs for
1Oe3?0

lts

growth are changed.

The Labor force predLctlons poLnt &rglewood residents

in

L965 and 12r01fi Jobs Ln

1975. Present regional

proJectLone suggest

that a process of homogenlzation ls golng on through
rrldely scatteredr

the area, That Ls, each subsection tends to rtlook aliketr as tndustry,
comnerce and resJ.dences becone more

bcternaL pressures are

of two tlpeeo filrst, to J.ncreaee the total
distrlbutlon of
occupationsr

population beyond the capacity of avaiLable land under existi.ng zoningo
SecondLy, the pressure
One

to

ohange Englevrood,rs

thtng is clearly evldent - change ls inevitabler

Brglewood

ean respond

to the change and lt

can

direct

sone

of it, but it

cannot

--8-

*tttl..+ltemettu
*,rro"u of actlon appe*
1

," ber
to polarlze tomrd

-

.Cmtlnuattqr of thc preeent, pabtern of develsptgrt of wtused land.
Here qre wouLd ocpreet the reatdentiaL popul,atton

two qulte different, onders of tncone, ociupatlon and

ltfe style.
a

? - Usg of any un&velop"a areaa in wale wtrlch Ce-errphagtze future tn'dqstrtaL devel.opnent. Here one would expect the en€rgence of
maturing reetdentlal sl.ow growth eharacteristtc
suburb,
3.

of the tnner-belt

-

d
iF

for renewal of blighted areas that wouLd tmprove hotrstng statdards and aim at redeslgn of the bu.siness
Comprehensive prrbl.tc poLicy

dtgtrtct.
Projectron of School Ecroll.rnents
.The r6te, death
popul.atton. Th€ forecast

factors

eo;rn tt,u grorth of the t,otaL populatlon are blrth rate, the bulldtng of nell dwelltng rrrtts and denstty of
w?rtch

for school. enrollnent

cteveloped

a'pattern sholrtng that

the elemmtar.y and Jrnlor htgh schooL enrol-lrnent ts at an approxtrnate
plateau, sd that orw haLf of thp puplls predtcted for
1g?O over srnaLL lncreaoe

of

approxfunate}:'r 200

the L96l-62 enrollment ls dtstrtbuted tn

th€ classes of eenlor hlgh Echool. The expected increase at senior high sehool lerrel does not exceed the firnctlonal operating capacitv of Dwight llorrcr Htgh SchooL. For the el-ementary schools, a maJor
prebLem

for

declsion ls rdlether the Engle ;jbreet school butldlngs shalL be soldr or
retalnecl as a hedge against sudden enrollment growth. The result of the

forecagt appears to be that the exlsting school plant
gervtng the errpected enroll'ment untl1
Ag,atnst
19?O.

ls

capable of

thts predlctton

many cautions must be

ralsed.

Factorg

r,*rlch would af fesb the

stabllity and tndlcate change are t

-F
tt*5
*:'trl,.^..s.lth ,r-arch Mgtrcr btrth ratc for ![egros! than

f9r whltecn an lncreae€ or deereasa of the proportlon of Negro poplat{on rsIIL be reflected ln the blrth rate for the city,
and rrnl.ess houslng patternE are changed the
n
:i .

effect rvlll
Lrveg.

be

fert in ttre ar€a where the Negro populatlon Change ln rate of home constructionr
in nonpublic sclrool enrollment. Moveme,lrt to htgh deurelty poprrlation.
Change

ItigratLon rratlo - Thc ltl€ratlon ratlo for thc respcctl.ve gradcr

of thc actrool, syaten Le ttra noat sensiti\r€
authorltles have on the preeence of trends
errollnent.
These ennolLnent forecaste have an al,nee they leave

eheek

the gehool affeet

whi.eh wiLL

artificial quallty about then,

out of consLderation ttre influence vrhlch schools and

ln affecting the orlginal preszur'es for growbh and change. The problens of raclat balance tn ectrool systerns
educational poli-c;; can play

affeet nlgratLon and development trends.
The conclusLon

that school enrollnent has reached e plateau,
arne ana\rzed.

end

that prospects for

ecpansion are not great cannot be ffJtal-ty accepted

rurtll the present iszues of iclrool policy

-1O: Chronology

9f

Svents Concernlng $egregatlon
Snglewood

*

In

Ttre Board cif Educatlon and been engaged,

the

CorrarrnLty

of

$eglewood have

ln a eerles of aotlrrl-ties havtng to do wlttr the pnoblenr of segregatlon ln the hgLewood schooL syeten. A ehronologlcal armnarXr of events betryeen May L955 and September L962 fo]-lows. Ma+r 19, L955 - The deeJ.glon of the Corunissioner of Educat'lon tn the Wallcer Case lrtttt lnstnrctLons to change the borrndarT llne between the Li.berty and the Lj-ncoln SchooL distniets and to ellnrinate by Septernber L, tg56 li,}le Ltncoln Jrrnior lllgh School as a separate schooL for &mlor High SchooL puplls of the Llncoln School dJ.gtrict. The Board of Education ln Englewood, subseguently complied w1th the Connulssionerl s reguest ln both
these instances.

Agrtl 10,

1961

-

The Board of Education cowdssloned the Superd.ntendent of Schools, Dr. Harry t. Stearns, to conduct a depth study of problems exlsttng ln ttre Clty which n:iIL affect the grornth of student poprflation and of the desnands whlch the changlng character of'the Ciby w111 make upon the hrglewood SchooL system. The stat'ement W Mrs. John T. Spruill at the publlc ne'etlng of the Board of Education ral,slng the question of segregatlon at the Lincoln School. EducatLon added to the lnstructLons to the Superlntendent of Schools regardlng the depth study the questlon of racial imbalance ln the Cityrs elementarT schools. The Board

Jrrne L2, 1961

-

of

Septenbet

g, 1961 -

The Board

rropposition

aIL its foms.
Nweurber

of Educatlon stated publlcly its to segregatj.on and dlscrtnination ln
rf

lt, 1961 -

Dan Dodson, Professor

of &lucation at New York Iftriversityr was retained as a consLltant ln the depth study at the suggestj.on of t'he N.A.A.C.P. (Robert Gutrnan, Sociologist and Robert Wood, Political Scientist,
The request on the

had already been retained. )

Febnrarlr

1, L962 -

part of several Negro chLldren

:;'tfr'8"*l';.'ffir*,TH:lrllstrlct
{r

to enro'-l

Ttrls etatennent descrlbing the chronology of events and posltion of the Drglewood Board of EducatLon is from the Office of the Srrperlntendent of Schools, hglewood, New Jereelfr Septernber J.2, L962.

-l l-

Fetrnrary

P, 7962

A sutt lneiltuted ln the Untted Sbates Dlatrtct Court on behalf of Alan Sheppard and obhere agatnst the Board of Edueatlqr of thi Ctty of Snglewood, Harrf L. Stearns as Supertntendent of Schools, And Frede::tck Raubinger ao Conmlssloner of Sducatton of the $tate of New Jersey, seeking to enjotn the Boarr the Superintenglent anci the Conmissioner from qPeratlng and maintalning a raetaLly segregated elemen' tary gchool system tn the Oity of Englelrood.

.

Febnrar

y ltz, L962

A gtatexnent to the publtc b;y the Board of Educatlon reernphasizlng the poltcy statement of September t, 196]r: "rThe lilrglewood Boarcl of Education !e opposed to segregation and discrlninatlon tn all tts foms . r' The Board aleo lndicated that the Sbearns l?.eport r^ras in progress anC rvould be presented ciuring the month of'February, when proryised' and tndlcated ite lntent not, to sacriflce thorrghtfuLness for haste.

Febnrary 28, L962

!

Publleat!.on of the Deoth Study by Dr. Harry L. Stearns, entitl.ed |IUI{GI,[1.ICCD ITS P5OPLE /:l{D fTS SCHO0LS.II The pubLlcation of this report uras followed by rnuch studli, publtc diseusslon and debat, by the Board of Education, by tnciividual.s, and by r rrony organized groups in the community over a period of several. weel.;9.
The Board of Educatton announeed lts pl,ans for a pilot proj e eb of dernonstrat i.on classes to be estab iishect- at the forrner junior htgh school at 11 Engle Street in Septernber of 1962 as a step toward the solutlon of racial !:nbaLanee in the Citvts elementary schools, The purposes of these clasges were ( 1) !o demonstrate that a supertor ortalttv of educatironal progrem could be carrieci out wlth a group of chilclren, heteroqeneous ae to racial. cultural ancl ethnie bacligrounds, ( 2) to demon.strate that new ne'bhods of teaehing and .ner'r equiprnent are effective ln meeting the problen of lndividual- Ctfferences anri in provid ing indtvicluaL]y for eaeh child, sti:nulation and opportrtnities fo grorbh up to the ful1 I init of hls innate capacity. ( 3) to provi:de opportunit;r for gatning experlence in soLrring the problc+m of racial imbalance on a Limited scale as a basls for formulating and irnplemerrting the ne:<t and the succegsive steps in a pLalr for ul-tirnate long range soittti-on of the problen tn
Engler.iood.

Mey

1!r L962 i

llay

Li

t

L962

the Bosrd of Educatton conferred wlth D,r. Rober-b Anderson of the Harvard Unlverslty Cracluate Schoolof Educatton ln connection wtth the organization of the demonstration school. Dr. Andergon garre the Board of Educatlon assurance that he feLt their plan ruould provtde a ouperior ouality of educa'bion

-12-

for ehtldren of all abllttleg and assured then of hlg lnteregt tn aeting as a consultant tn the organtzsttcn ' and operatlon of the sehool.
Jrnp b, 1962

of Educatlon rqgtled to the parents of sone twenty-two hundred elenrentary ochool Srcwrgsters, a deecrlptton of the denmstrattsrr school plan ani a post eErd questlonnalre deslgned to pol?. parent attltude towerd the dernonstratlqr school plan and nore lnportantly to detrrrntne the number of potenttal etudents that might. be enrolled ln the denonstration s ehool.
The Eoard

.Irnc ?E, f96e

the Board announced that tts proposal, for a demonstratlm school wlth voluntary enrollnent had been found to be unfeasible because of an lnsufflcient nunber of potenttaL students. This actton was based

,"f

r

.$i

upon €utswers given on about 5OO responses to the questtons on the posteard which indtc,e'ir: I'that fewer than the required nunber of chlldren eould be expected to enroll in the proposed schoo].

The
1,7

to dela.y announcement of any further proposals that mlght be for"bhcomtng unttl after the declslon of Judge Augelli of the Unlted States Distrlct Court

Ctty Council urged the Board of Educatlon pubLlc-

had been announced.

iluly 9,

1962

Judge Augellt rul.ed that the United Stales Dlstrict Courb should not entertain the actlon requested by pLatntlffs until platntiffs have exhausted the State The notton

administratlve renedies as provlded by State Law. to disniss the cornplatnt was granted.

JuIy 12,

1962 -

of Edueation announced its plans to establish a Central fntermediate School at 11 Engle Sbreet, beginning in September of L962 wlth the fifth grade - thls program to involve a fifth and sixth grade tn the fall of 1963. The Board publicly stated that lt did not tntend thts progran to develop tnto a eentraltzed kindergarten through fourth grade but that nueh of the e:cperlence gained ln the Central Intermediate Sehool would have useful appllcatlon tn the earlier grades.
The Board
-,

Pcrl,od L962

July 12-30r

Governor Hughes and Commissioner Raubinger in Letters to Counctlman Tibbs of figlewood stated their positton tn regard to a netghborhood schooL policy and racial lnbalance in the public gchools. The

Intermediate School wlthout stattng further 'i:'}at steps lt lntends to take to deal wtth raclal tmbaLance in alL grades of the eLementary schools.

their general opposition to gradualism as r€pr€s€Bted tn the Boardts plan to estabLish a Central

pro-integration groups of the corunrurity state

-13-

s ' -

thorrsand subscribers .

A corunlttge 9f Englgrilood ctttzensr was organt?edr ca1L1ng ltseLf the sAvE OuR NErGltBonHooD scH0ots corunitt'ee. Thts committee clalns upwarde of a

A

petltlon was etreulated. and gatnecl upwards of 2rC00 signatures requestin$ that a referendum ltem be lncluded on the ballot at the norb electlon regardtng the nelghborhood .qchool. polioy.

.' Several, organtzed groups repreqentlng the pnotntegrationigt polnt of vtew announced thetr support, in some tnstanees with quarlfications, of the lloard of Ilducatlonrs plan for the 0entril rnterrnediate school. a'nong these groups are the
Assoei abion .

League of l,.Iomen Voters , the N, A .A. C .p . r C. 0.A.8 , the central council of the locar parent reaeher

1

'

'

of Education fomarded its request for an exnergency appropriati.on of !3q,000 to the tsoard of sehooL llstinrate to cover the costs of preparing for and irnpLenenting the central rnterrnedlite' sehoot Plan during the 1962-63 school. year. The botal. cost'of the first yearrs operatio:r of the schooL rr?s estimated to be in the'netgtrborhood of ftlLOrc,.l0 wlth approxlmateLy !75 1000 to eone from the current operating budget.
The tsoard

July 30, L962

'- At an !-nformal meeting of the Boarcl of school Estinnte, the reouest for funds ' operate the central rntermediateto prepare for and scirooi was deniec
by a 3-2 vote ., the l{ayor antl two Couneil.men voting against, the two Boarci of Eclucation members votlng for. 'bhe emergency appropriatlcn,

July 31r

Lg6?

c .

?he i{ayor and two courictl mernbers on the Board of school Estfunate lssued a publlc statement indl.catlng thetr i.ntentlons not to provlde funcls ,for th, renovatton and operation of a central rnternediate Fifth Grade school for the forlowing reasons:

8.

inaclequate and below standard I because added expense to taxpayers of transportine students to and fron school; because the sehool ts lccated on a etreef, whlch serves ss a major brafflc ar.tertr through the City.

The slte Ls not deslrable because the bullding i.s obsoLete, the faetlitles

of the

-lL-

b. c.
Au,ltrst

The cos{i involved tn renovattng the 'operatlng the progran. bullctlng and
The plan

ts wtdely

oPposeC.

This i.s a hasttLy concelvecl

program.

3, 1;962

[*

The Boqrd of gducatlon reafftrrned tts convlctlon that, the pLans for a Central Intermedlate School beglnnlng wtth the flfth grade is an educattonally sound ftrst step ln d.eaLing with the prcblem of ractal i.nbalance in the 0ltyts 'Iementary schools. The onnouncement by the }larror and the two Counctl menbers of the Board of SchooL :lstinate of thetr deelsion nof to provide funds for the renovation and operatton of a CentraL lntermediate School preventeC the Board of Educatton frorn proceedlng at thts tl me with its plsn. The'Boarcl t'ent on to restate certatn f'acts about the plan rvhich tt feeLs have been confusecl and obscured: ( 1) the pLrn is econonlcaLly pruclent, ( 2) the pl.an. was conceived onl-y after Long study anc, thoughtful cons icleratt.on with the he).p of sound profess tona'l advice fron a nunb er of consultants and two supertntencrents, ( 3) the buildtng at Engle ,3treet is safe, healthful and adaptable to the ty'pe pro:;ram envisaged for the 'entra-'l- fnterroediate SchooL , ( tr) the Board has been promiseci the full eooperation of the poliee offieirl-s in assuring safe travel oi ehlldren to and frorn the school, (5) several cl.assrocns rnade vacant ln the otherr elementarv school.s $r-re to have bec,n sehecluLecl for use for re,neciial read.ing, t?re reduction of overloac's ln the first gracie at the Dona1d l. ouarles School ancl the aceornmoclation oif two sirecia'!- education cLasses fcr retarclecr and brain_injurec'! chi.lclren.

Sentember 5 ,617 , L962 September

- The bo;rcott at the Lineoln anr.| Llberty

SehooLs.

7,

L962

- The petitLon of appeal on behaLf of Deborah 5]rru11] by iir. and ltlrs . John T. olrulll, against the BoarrJ
of Education of the City of Eng1er.rood, New Jerse,y, asking that the Comnisstoner of Educatlon ,rrder the Boarcl of Educatton to take lrnnedlate steps to e'f irntnate all aspects of segregation tn the EnglePubllc School
s.'lstem"

t^rood

September

9

r

L962

.-

l{ayor VoIk annonncecr the resuLts of the public opi.ni.on survey conriucted by htm in re3ard to the
nertghbarhood schooL

proposed

of ractal

in the
lmi:a

oollcy anc: the several. plans ibeerns Report for the el.L'nination l.'lnce in the Cltytg eJenentap--;r school

-LS-

Seg0erber 101 1962

Recetpt of a lertter from Mr. Horard lloloombe regardlng the reft*btshLng and alterationg necessary for. an aeceptable safety and comfort strtuatlon in the Engre strieb school.
The Board of Education announced thab tt ts rnaking amangements to rneet with the Commigstoner of Education at an earl'r date to present lts vLews and plans for his further attentton and review. The Board reaffirmed its belief in the Central fnterrnedlate School as ' educationally sound first step tovrard being an elinlnating racial imbalance. The Board stateC its awareness that many inctlvlduals have not reali zed that the Central Intermecilate SchooL Pl.an is not in basic confllct wlth the nelghborhood concept, md that thls plan offers nan-,r educationaL advantages. Because of Drglewoodts snal.l geographlc slze and beeause of the

SEpterrber 10

, 1962

location of the varlous elenentary schools, the plan for a Central Intermediate School BCCollt.plishes the alLeviat ion of racial funbaLance rsith the least dislocstion of the eLemsrtary ichool nopulation. The Board further stated that long ago it recogni zed the grea'b difficulty and vlr{ual. lnrpossibilit:r of devlsing a plan for dealing with this problen that wcuLcl meet with uriversal acceptance. It has been unable to conceive a plan which will deaL constructively with racl-al imbalance and yet leave compl.etely intact the present s;rsbem of assigning children to the.schooL noarest their homes.

-16PAffI

II: IS TI{ER}) SECTUSATION BY DESIGN?
doeq

TheJ:wittee, in aese€slne available dEta and infornatLon

not ftnd gupportable

evidenee

that the

school

authoritles

havg

rnainlain?3 s.esr€eation bldesisn. Although desisned segregation was not fou;rd, the Connittee believes
l
i

that

prompt measures are needed to reduce the concentration

of

Negro

I

pupils ln the Lincoln School.

[*

The

following evidence is sutmitted to support these conclusiong:
Elenentary school enrollments by race and gnade as of
Septenber

l. 2. 3?

19, L962. (taUte 1)
L9r L962. (Table 1.A)

Elementary school enrolLnents by se)t, race and grade

as

of

Septeurber

Elementa4p school enroll]mentgr Septenber 19r 1962.

(r'ieure Al)

h. The development of elementary school- buildings. 5. Hi.story of schor;I site acquisition. 6. History of sdlool building constnrction. ?, I,
See

Travel distances in Englewood. (Tabl-e 2) Elenentary gchool attendance areas.

also Map #f, submitted separately.

$t

o fr-l

o

IN o a a

8

r{ a

o\ .l afl 8l r{l

.l

H

g a a
frl c)

Otr tr-C

E H
ID

d o
r{ tr \o \o

t-l

-. C'
d tr (u r{ o

o

tr}

o o g
(t
GT)

FI

F{

o s o

o

a
ts

\p

T\CT\
14 F4

IF,
r-l

Ic4l tet 14l

I

I

al

sl ()I

fn\O F f\.

sl ()l

>l

o p

F h

r{ o
o oi
ot
OI

{J

O\O

H

EI

oo Fl

0s {Fl

HI

6l
EI rE]l

()\O

$t c!

'Rg A
O OFI +l -d .r.{ ;{ 00+r
u0+r

tsrtF

O Orl {:t{CL .r{ h0$ .c!(l)0

.c!(l,0 FleFr

s gd .rl {J
h0

€gs

O OFI +r -sU .Fl fu {J b0

Fl6d

Or{

l:.$grg

€8

f;$E €s s

RACE AT.ID ORADE

Serc

Race

Grade

One Tlro three Four

filve

Stx

Boys trltrlto

1-ry
16

262

Boys

Whlte
f,Iccn n

lE

Cleveland

31 29 31 36 33 37 - nt't
1

SchooL

Neerc

9 NeEro _ ; Jr .

5 9

20 2I tT 20 tS 20 21, 16 25 . ,9 41 19 ,
CIrarles Schoo1

r:Z?

-13,?

-

2

Boyo hlhite
ro

L3

Roosevelt School,

138

25 20 Xr 17 LgW
Sctrools

_4ff nfenentary

-l?Tolal

505

LINCO

N SCh{OnL
lotul
+tg
Whtle

L/8,

TY5CHOCL
Tolal
3rys

Negro

tl
Tolal

3+3

SUARLE'S

",5CH'

? 475
T'ofo/ +77

CLEV€ AND -,CHOO!*
z,oo

5oo

I

Puetl-s

fl{f\f[AlTAfrY S CHOCL ENRnLL/!fEAlr,5 t,TfFl ElVlfiFfr /?, / 76 A
ENGL [//YCOP

-11Tolol

505

LINCO

N SCfil

'0L

I

I

t

i-

Llo
Tofal
3rys

r-{

I

I whtle

''''*J

[iffi

Nes,o

I
I

tl
Tolal

3+3

SUARLF$.$CH
\
'qfo/
H

475

+77

CLEVEI-AND

_il

ii

-5
'l

H00/*
5oo
I

z,oo

Puett-s Fte, AN nNGL [//yCAp [/{f\f[A|mftY S CHnCL ENR1LL/!fflAlr-5 r ,fiE4fTlVffiEfr /?, /76A

*
rRAvE[ r

,.1(J

r.
..q

nrsr@In Elqt@*
2.2
2a2
1n9

TABTE 2

Iirrcoln Clevel.sod LJbery Qrrarles Rooaenelt Englc
N.Eo acrrtlgr on ,Wpodland RLdgeland terrace .$.8 oornsr on

S

2.0

N.t{. Conrer on ITI7
9.Wr oornEr

I,anO

3.0 2.0
2',6

tleuen at
e

and tilebster
Teanee& LLnE

1.3

l,',5
2,,2

1.?

W. Paltsad€ Ave.

2rL
'2.O

W. Drgl,errood

Ave

at

teaneck IJ.ne

,Fl*

rs

NOTEg Slnco

the clty of Englslrod ts apprdrtrttely 2 W e rnllec tguanar Ststo
'a

alded tranaportetlon ia

negll.gtble lesue and ary devlat!.ons lihere fron

beocnne

nerely natters of Board pollcY.

*Adapted E{r#qoo.S!. I3g, Faople an4 &g Qchoo}9r Peger I08 and X09. (A11 nrsiberg iffiedTo thC nearatt tenth of a n11e.)

fru

'

-21-

SDt'

n*nt
Id.ncoln Schoolp

Englenood has

flve operattng elementary schools:
quadrant

Locat€d

of the 6ltyrE four $ard eganlzatlon; Ltberty School, ln the southern part of. the Jrd Wa3d, a*d

ln the [th tIard, and southwest

ln the northern part of the northwest guad.rant; Quarles Schoo1, 1n the northern sectlon of the Ist lalard, and, northeast ,gradrant; and Roosevelt, School, Located ln thc
northryest que.drant; Clevel.and School:
approcfune.te eenter

of the 2nd Ward,, or southeast quadrant.

&ro adCitimal bulldings on class:oon purposes. Ore

hgle Street are not ln curyent use for
School.
The

ls the building fornerly used as a junlor tr-tgh ls the abandoned lbanklin
Schoo1 wSich formerLy

eehool and lororm as the former Engle Street Junior Hlgh

other adjoining butlding
accorunodated
Donald,

puplls in mrch of the attendance area n6i,,,,r served by
Schooln

the

A. Quarles

juntor htgh sehooL bullding Ls currently used fq: the echool dlstrlctt s admintstratlve offLceso
Ttre forrner

Hlstorically, these two bulldJ-ngs together with the Llrrcoln and, Llberty Schools served as ttre orlginal schools of the City. Ttrey are

ln proxirnlty to the lntersection of Grand Avenue and Pallsades Avenue, the center of the City and the area of popul-ation concentratlon
loeated

before the growth begtnntng early

ln

the post World War

II

perlod,n

As population developed beyond the center

of the City the Cleve.!.anrl
2nd,

School and Roosevelt Schoo1 were prorrlded.

In the late
Wards Led

19[Or

s continued population gror,*h ln the
3nd

and 3r,rt

to addttionE to the CleveLand

Roosevelt Schools !^rhieh were

oeeupicd 1n Septenber, 1950"

Durlng thts perlod a sizable population movement occurred

ln whieh
Ward

resldents of the Llncoln SchooL area noved norttn^rard wlthln tfre hth

to that area ass{gned to the Llberty

SchooLo

-rr-_ tho Franftln School on Englc lltrcct rac repleoed by the ngr lron&ld
Qnarleg Schoot

l.

tn tlre let bfard Ln L959, A oanblnstton of ttrc llactors of lncrcaslng popldfon and obsoletqrese of, thc FranlclLn School lcd to thc
eetabllshment

of the ngr Quarleg

School,

-23_

ltlstory
The Engtewood Board
advance planplng SchooL

.of"

Sch,g*-r:ite Agqulg*ligg
conslderabLe

of Ed.ucatLon records lndlcate,

for acgursition of rand for

schoor put?oseso

property was acquired by the Board of Educatlon ln the
r

fotLowlng y€ars

Llncoln SchooL Addttlona.l Propcrty
Liberty, School
Engte Street School.

r870 L939 and 19h9
1901

, Addltional property
Addltional Property

rgo2

r9L5
1902 Lg27 1907

Franlclin School

Cleveland School AddltionaL Property, Roosevelt School Hlgh School Attrlettc Fleld Quarles
Schoo1

t922 and 1925
1912
1921

L926 L926 L926
1960
,

Lafayette Avenue Pruperty
Tryon Averme Property

Transferred to City

Council

Dctght liomo* School
Eng!.ewoood

L929 1950

Junlor High School

.

-?)+_

Hl s,t ow ol,S g,IrooLBrri+g,rg

-a:

.

Co4.B

t Iu gt loE

Tbe dateg

of

conetnrctiorr of school, bulldings and additlone

to bulLdlnga

talren from Board

of &lucatLon records ang as fo]-lowsl
1870 1916 r,g1? Lg25 Lg27

Llncoln Scttool Deetroyed by fire New constnrctlon West addltion East additlon Additional wtng

rg36
1902 1912 192? 1915
Lgo5 19L6

Llberty

School-

South Addition
Schoo1

k

North Addition

&rgle Street

Franklin Sehoo1 Alteration
Cleveland School
Gtrrnnasirrn added

1g0g

Addition
Roosevelt Schoo1 Addltion
fuar1e

r930 L9h9
Lg25

r949
L959
, 1g3r

s School
Junior Hi.gh SchooL

Drright Momow High Sdtool
Englewood

r960 r960

Englewood Jrurior and Ssrior

High School Auditorium

_ _2r.

Ttre

late

Xgh0rs has been ohosen as the per{.od fbonr wtrlch

to etudy ttre

reeent developnent of elenentary school attendance anoas:
Ttre rnap of ettendanoe

ereeg, (see Map I subndtt€d separately)

tnoludes ttre attendanoe zones tn effect prlor to l{ay

8,

L95Ot those propoced

ln 195L and those adopted ln

L955.

In 1.9h9 the preosures of populatlon lncrease tn the Roosevelt and
Cleveland SchooLe were rrret pr!.nrartly by trangfer adJustnents

of certaln

elaeses

or of lndivldual puplls of
Boerd

some

of

whom rdere

gtven an optlon of the

sahool wtrlch they nlght attendo
DcarnLnatton

of Educetlon mlnutes and recorde lndlcates that
of adninietrat!,ve

school attendance adJustrnentg were rnade on {l baels

negotlatlon rather than by poltcy belng estebU.ghed whlch offtclally
changed attendanct

breas. Tlrls wes conflrrned by Dr. thmy
of
&rglewood Schools

Stearne who

served as Superintendent

fron

19hb

to Lg62o
prlor to Dr. Ilne ls

Attendance areas wene determlned by the euperLntendent
Stearng

t adnlntotratlon; tlre Ll,nco.Ln-Llberty

School boundary

represented as antL-dating 19bb.

Durlng the perlod of Dr. Stearns

I adminlstratlon

up to the L95l+-55

periodr the Englewood Berd of &lucatlon conttnued to have the superlntendent

of eehools set baslc attendance areas and boundery Unes by admlnlstratLve
procedure.

In e few tnstances of poltey estabUshrnnt the follortng are noted as ocampLes of retahfng general attendanee area llnes but prorrldtng changes of
a tentattve nature as the need arose!

At a neetLng of

!,tay

8, L950, the Board rrassigned chlldren

residlng tn the

apartment know as LLnden lawn on East PaLJ.sade Arrenue

to Rooeevelt School, wlth

the'exaeptl.on

that children flon thls

apartmant who have been ettendlng the

trbanklln School may contlnue to do .co lf they wish, effectlve September, 1950.n

-26.

At ttre

!{ay

8,

L}SO

rreetlng the Board alao nasslgned ctrlldren llrrtng ln

the veteransr apartment on' Glenbrook Parllway and Honell Boad to Clevel.and
School; and optlon of attendance at, I,lberty
be granted

e at Cleveland School lg to

to parente residing in other resl.dences on Glenbrook Parlruay grd Holell Roadr and also on lryon Avenue west of L,J.berty Roadr Liberty
north of No" 2681 Oal(lend Street north of Tryon Avenue, Belnont Street

Road

north of Ilym Avenue, Miller Avenue and Felrfleld .Street, effectl.ve
September, I95O.o
The above resolutlons are noted
I

with the date of adoptlon as they
Boant

eppear

to repregent the earllest entry of offlcial
setttng deflnltlve attendance erea pollcyr

of &lucatlon actton ln

lflth
anC

respect

to the pertlnent

bowrdary

llneg betileen the Llncoln School

lJ.berty School attendance areas no referenoee to the }[ne or the

reopectl.ve attendanoe areas are found

ln the nlnutea of ths Eoard of &lucatlqr. Referencea to the borrndary llne are nade' ln adrnd,nletratlon nonoranda
for
rrany

and statenents ae belng ntradLtionalrf and nl.n exLstence copy

]r€ersrlr

A

of

one such nemoratrdurn
Stearne

wtLl be fonnd tn the appendlx.n

In the
ff

I

Report the foLt oring reference

ls

mde

to the LlncolnAvenue

IJ.berty School bormdary

llne

on page

2 of the Intnoductlons

hrJ.or lo Ig52 the }[ne establtshed by

traditlon

extended

fron Palisade

to lafayette Place at a polnt belou Thlrd Street and down Iafayette Place to the Teaneck Ilne, ltlth chltdren on
along Armory Street, acroas McKay Park
PaLlsade Avenue and

Iafayetti Place attending ILbefty
that the
change

School.rl
1:lne rrade

Reasong have been advanced 195h was brorrght

tn thLs borrndary

ln

abort by enrolJ.rnent lnereases

ln the Cleveland

School

necessltatlng an adJustrent tn ttris schoolt s attendance B!€8o This actton

affected
increase

tJre adJacent ld.berty School whtctr cmbined

with firttrer population

ln the ttetJen Avenue -

Forest Avenue section further crowded tlhe

Liberty

SchooJ.o

r+Memorandun

on Adrninl,etration of Boundary Ltnes Between Llncoln and Llberty Schqols south of 185 Iafayette placeo

$ra\smnts

oD

Dr, sleamg

,o"*;1f"

r€aso* ot crondrne r.n trre

ln the Llnooln School as t'tre gole realton f,or clrapgJng the tradltd.onal Uornaary l1ne in 1g5b. A aogf of tlre a&nLnlstnatl.onrs ilstaternent of a Detallia frrt rpnetati.on of Boundary Llnes for Sctrool Year L95b-55rt wlLL be found ln the Appendfuc.* Ihls change led to the conplatnts of Mary Walker and Suzanne Anderson vs.
Cl'evelend and l,fbesrby Schools and aval,lable clagsngorns
.

the &rglewood, Boarrl of Educatton f1led wtth the Corrrnlssloner of Educatlon
UFough the Dfirlslon Against Dlecrlmlnatlon on July

1n

ttrle

case

J0, L95l]. As ttre testlnory arrd the resultant declslon Lg a natter of record tt ig not relrated
Conrnnlsgloner

ln ttrls report.
the declglon of the

of Edrroati.on lssrred on Mry l9r

L955,

ordered the Englewood Boerd of Edueatlonr

Flrst\y, to redraw lts

pnopoeed

boundary LLne ctrange bebreen tlre Llncoln and

Llberty Sehooler end oecondl3r, to

dlscontlnue the then e:d.stent separate JrurJ.or lltgh School
School bulldlJle and

ln the ld.ncoln

to

accomlnodate

lts

prrpils wLth the other Jqnlor hteh sohool

prryLls

of ttre Clty.

The concentratlon

of the Negro prrptl popu.lation ln th€ Llncoln

elementary

echooL attendance area 1g

apparent. Howwere zuoh factors as patt6rns of

houslng and of lnereaslng prry!.t poprrlatlons

tn ottrer elementanlp gchools leadlng

to

attendanee area adJugtnents have been consid€red pertlnent.

In assesslng the lnforrnatlon lilrat t's avaLlable tlre Corunlttee finds there {e no eupportabl.e evtdence that ttre school auttroriti-es of Drylewood have
natrrtalned segregatlon
b5r desLgR.

Hotrever, ttre Cormtttee nust conolude

that the houslng patterns, land
have

acquisltlon for echool eites, elemsntartrr ochool dlstrlct bowrdarlr llnes
contrlbtrted

to the containment of Negro fanrllles tn the Ltfr Ward and a resultant raolal tmbalance ln the elementartrr schools. A f\uttrer resul,t of these eo4dttlone le ttre growlng degree of tnbalarrce ln ttre lilberty Schoo]. that nay soon counteract the achlevenents
#Staternent
made

by boundarry changes between LLneoLn and Ltbe6y

Schoolg reqrrired by tJre decislon

Le5l445.

of the Coruniestoner of Edrrcatton. of a Detafled Interpretatlon of Borrndary l^Lnes For School year

-28PANf,

III

ANE E}UCATIOI{AI OPPORN'NITIES EOUAI,?

flrda lt {nFossible to deat obJectively trith all factora re1ated to oquallty of edrcatlonal opportunttles. There are nulerous
Tbe Comlttee

tntarrgible social and psychological factors wlrich cannot be analyzed wlth precleion

ln thls lnquiry.

The edterlelve obsEry,atto.ns-.and date qqlfccled

lead ,the Cpryltlee-lo -colglqde
&rglewood ar€ equel.

that gvgt-all educatio,nal oeportgnltlgg_ {n

is neant groes si.'ni'l arity in resources ard i.nstnrctionaL uateriale provlded by the Board of &lucation, groes equal,ity in both ,the certlfication and nrrmbers of teachers, groes siniJarity in the guality of buildtngg and bullding nalntenance, and groee opporhrnity for pupils to
By equal
aehieve.
The Comittee doeg

is of ttre opinion tttat equallty in pr%ra^n

and faclllties

not necessar$r necessitate duplication of pnogran and faeilltles frpn

schooL

to gchool.
shc,nld be noted

It

that the Donald Qrrarleg School wlth lt,e nodetn

eonstnr,ltion and Jarge beautiful grourde (10 acres) obvious\y provideo a

physical eetting superior to ttre other elenentarly schools.
The

children in the Lincroln

Schoo1

are handicappd by the extrene\y
ser\re an enrollnent

inpdeqr:ate size

of the glte (2.1 acres to

of

5O5

rith lts locatlon in a deteriorated neighborhood wtrich seeme generally conceded to be an rrnfit. envLronnent for chlldrcn ' Aeaunptlons could be nede regardtng the lLl ef,feetg upon the Ltncoln School children cauaed by honqgenelty as to racial and soclo-econonic backgroruds. The tfuae available to ttre tean nade it irnpossible to test these eserrnptione in sufficient depth to reach valid conclusiona.
chi-Idr.en) cotrpld

'P;9-

Aa

ths Cmnftts ref,leata

upon narsr

gttrlattsns obserned ln the ergbrood

achools tlrer6

rel a strong

f.eeU.ng

tnet the Negro ohlld ls et e psychol,oglcal

dbadvantage. Aa yorgrg Nc8ro ahlldren recognlse thst ttose arogrd lilrem are also Negro, ea Negro btgh selrool students are freqrrentJy secti.onod, in groupo

rftlch are

obnrtorraly

not

nhlghtr groups, ee negetlve rrbelng

soelal forces ene dranrati.o

tn thelr llves, -r a feeltng of
cnrldent rhen l$dlvlduel.s

dlfferenttf

€Do1.geeo

lhls

feell11g Ls

thlxk abqrt ctttzenehlp.

rt

arso

lriu

becme a

kry

,

fact'or

ln thelr

decLelon naldng about vocatlons, colleger arrd

firture

p1anc.

The

ruaterlals to follow

ln thla sectlon glve evldence of the valldlty

of ttrl's obsenratlon.

-30-

,(

I

Al*o.c,atlqn gf 4urdp,. Resgisllion hoce{trre.e., ?nd, SPtnlbuttog Bugtnegs'practices, records, budget worksheeto and otfrer pertil.nent

nateri.al of the Drglewood Board of &lucatd.on were rerriewed, and all records vertf1led otl a test check bas!.s, as to accurecJ regarrillng alloca6.on,
requl,sltlonlng and equlty of dlstrlbutLon.
CenefeLly, errldence shons

that ln the areas rerrlewed, the Boar1t of

to discrtmtnate ln favor of agalnot any achool 1n the system, Coat figures contained ln thls report nere
establtshed lbon Board records after verlflcati,on by test check.*

Educatlon hes not dellberately eought

Indlrrldual school budgets were rerrLewed as well as the adninlstnatlve
stepa ln thetr preparatlon. The budgettng pnocess lnvolves teachere,

prlnclpals, adnlnletratore and th€ Board of Educatlon.
Interrrl'ews wtttr prlncipale establtghed that schools ner€ recetrrlng

in an equttable .and consistent nanner. AIl prtnclpalo felt that tlrel'r eqtrlplnent needs lrere falrly net on an lmpartd.al bas1e. When
cqulpment
egulpment wae denied there was no errldence

that it
I

wae dme

wlth an

lntent to dlscrtnlnate

betneen the uarlorrs selroolsr

A[osatlo? p{ nngs: Erdeqt prelarari$
Classroom teachers evalrrate

lndivldrral classroon needs and prepare

a requeet whlah ls forwarded to ttre office of the school pnlnclpaLr
Indtrrldual teacher requeats are evaluated by school prlnclpal.s and in turrr fonrarded to ttre 0fflce of the Asslstanrt Superlntendent who pre-

for Board considerati,on. School pnlncl.pals apparently rneet as a unlt and deterrnlne the amorrnt per pupll whlch in thelr oplnlon, ts necessary to prorlde adequate srrpplles, r1aterlals and textbooks for ttre school [€arr
*See appendlx.

pares a tentatfiie budget

'JrTtre

yeart ln folloring- anntrnta renc nll ssst€d ,',, the years
1?,69*1

rnevt",ned r

.lEle-

tg6r-6e
s3.50 3,50 2.50
9 r25

T€rctbooksrr

$6.50

tflndergarUea Art

3.50
2.50 6.25

1-6Art
Suppllea

Llbrary Booko
Based on

li.oo

h.@

thc foregolng procedrres

and pollc!.es, fturda were

catEd to tlre var!.orrs actroole as shordn under

alloApproprlatlons ori g*riUlt

A.

Prl.nclpals tntervlewed. appeared satisfted that all.ocated f,rurds tn an equitable nanner.

thelr schoola

were

Og rev:iew dld not J.ndJ.cate lnequalitfes ln the

method enpl.oyeci

by the Board ln allocattng f\mds. Arnounts allowed .ea1h school appeared ln corryLlance wlth ttre accepted pol.lcyo
Bequlstttonlng Procedrrres :
Te:ctlooks

-

BequisLtloned, and ordered through the
cyeLe.

prlncipallg

office on e flve year replacerrcnt
the arurual, budget'
SunrrFee

Pe{tod.l$rl,s and Audto-V*su4 M?terjf+s

- Llsts are subttiltted wlth

.

Requtsttioned ag requlred to malnteLn tndtvidual

school stockroollllto
Equ.+Fnent

-

Listed at tirne of budget.

In addttlon to prepartng requlsttlons, $re school offtces pnepers pnrrchase orders for thelr needg and fon'vard them to the Assl.stant
Srperintendent

for

apgroval aa

part of

purchase order

prqparatlgn. fhe

gchool lndlcatee. the account

or

accounts

to be charged as per the unlforrn
on.

chart of accounts.
r.Board

pollcfr and fr:ndg .avallable provlde for replacement year cycle.

a five

42No evldence sas fomd -to 'lndlcate dellberate "tmproper charglng

of

purchase otderc

to the verloua school aecswttgr ALI schools appear
and books :

to have rEeelved eqrrlpment, oupplles partlel
rtatul€h

tn a consi.gtent

and

ln-

Equltv of Dlstrlbutlonl
The

responslbtllty of reqrrlsitloning has been placed on'school
Sinee requicltbnd vrere treated

principals.

l.Warttally by adnlntstratlve

offlclals of the Board, we cor:ld ftnd

no evldence

of deLlberate lneqqltlea
-a

!n the dtgtrtbutd.on of eupplleol naterlals, booksl anVor eqrriprentr

l.
r.

bchlbLt A tndteates ectual amounts budgeted. and charged

to

the

l,I

varloug echoolc as well

eg"

avallabl,e balanceg. Based on thls e:clttblt,

conparatlve eosts were aevefopeb on a school basis (Exhfblt
ernldent

B). It

tg

fron our study that indltj.dua]. school costs have rernatned falrly

equal rhen corq)ared two 3rearc

to

each

otherr

Apparent tnconsistencies between t'lre

in anourte ecpended per pupll are due to changes in the nethod

of drarglng supplieo'

43'
.
The strrdy data

Protessional Persormel

lrdleate that teaclrers at thg Ltncoln $ehool have a

Iarger pereentage at ttre .higfrer levels of certiflcation ard degree statrre

fu conparlsor with the teachers of the five elenentary distrlct,
The ocperience

echools

of t;re

of teacherg througlrout all ttre e,Ienentarlp sdtools ls greater than that of tlre Lincoln Sehool faculty.
Interviews with the superintendent, and agsigtar$ superinterdent
and

ntllh eactr of the princtpaLs revealed that princi-pa1g take ttre tnitigtlve tn recntttlng and selectlng teachers for their respective schoole. Flhen a
vecancy occursr

the princtpat lnterv:iews candldates in uhon he is interegtcd.

Tho

principal

srakes

hlg reconnendation to the zuperlntendent

wtro then

lntervlews the teaeher selected by the principal and nalces reconmendations

to the board of

education.

Teachers are

not transferred to a

schooL

wlthout the agreenent of the

prlncipal of the recel,ving school.
The

princlpal of the Llncoln

SctrooL

reports that he has been active in
and

reenrltlng ad chooslng teacherg for the school
and

feels that tlre
sourd

afuintgtrative policy regarding teacher choice and assignnent is

fair.

-3bTABTE 3
CO},IPARISON

Or LilCOtN

PERSoT'JNEI, WrTH

IN ENGL.EIT,TOOD Lq62-63
No. of
PersonneL

SCHOOL FROFSSSIOMIT _oTflER_ELryiENT4Ry -SCHO0L PERS0NNEI

CertiJicate
I

Degree

Total

Englerood

A].l PrlnelFals

Perm. EL. Prln.
3

2 i'i. A. 2 lui. A.

Lg'.5

L6.5

Limited BL. Prin.

,

28,

t2'.
20.5

I B. S.

20.5 12.
]',2,.

L2.

I.

p

Ltncoln Principal
Perrn. EL. PrLn.

i{.

A.

?O.5

6.

All

Teac4ers

9I

66 Perrn. EL. l,g Llmtted E[. 6 Prov. E[.

29 A. B. A. ba 20 I'lon Degree

!i.

Average

16 years

Average

LZ yaers

LlncoLn Teachers
2L

L5 Penn. EL. 6 Limited EL.

L2
9

lI.

B. A.

A.

Average

l0 years

Average

? years

TABrE h
RACIAL CO}iPOSITION FRINCIPAIS, SUFjIRVISuRS AilD
DIRECTORS

1963-,€3-,...
LJhite

,. Ne

Princtpale Supenrlsors and Dlrectors

tt
2

1*
2

*Lincoln

SchooL

+i

It

.

-35'
BrE

I
IJ.ncoln School

RACIAI COMPOSITION OF' IEACHERS 1962 and 196? , -..1960?

All ElementarTr
Xear

Whlte Negro

Whlte

Negro
12n

L96243
Lg6L-62

Lgrg-&

7L 72 76
****
TABIE 6

20 19 L5

9 12 12

12* 10*

*Ole shared elenpntary nuole teacher

RACI.AL COUPGITIOI'I OF SUBSTTflNE TEACHERS

1960.. 1962 and_1963 Year

,

, ,.

,

Total
27

t96243
1961.-62

t959-60

30 hh

L 9 L5

28

39 5e

-36;

DlFl#tpq4sn . ;{. ls$ilrt.,?€q . of*flWgtrrtsora and

SpqcXeI ; Tgegtr?fr

A etufrr'of scheduleg epeclflrLng ttm to be spent

ln each echool by spectaLists in 4rtr mrsle, physlcal educa'tlon, llbraryr and eehool health, lndtcates that "eaoh school
has

lts fatr

share

of these servicee.

The schedule

tq

L962-63 aocurlentlng

this conclueton
.

follows I

Mondav
l, ?.
'r+'

Tuesday Wednesdav Thursdav Frldav

Dr. Bobbins

Art ---Roosevelt llberty . C],eveland Roosev€lt $rarlos ItArt Off. {TJr. High *Art
($orretirnes) Off . Clerrcland llncoln liberty Clevoland Llncoln Quarlee

Miss Farlna

AIt. wks
Art Off.

Muslc

lliss

Couc

llberty
*Mrrsic Sutte

$rarles
Music

l&. Kropezynski
l{r.
Meyers

Cleveland Lincoln
Suite
+rJr.High

6"level-and ltncoln

tlberty Qurleo ltberty Quarles lluslc Muslc Sutte Sulte Liberty Qrarles
nJr.
High

Roosevelt Roosevelt
Music

Sulte
Roosevetrt

Irliss tr^nlliane

Cleveland LincoLn

Cleveland Lincoln

*CleveLand

Ltneoln

Fhvrslcal Educatdm

!tr. Toomer
tt
P.M.

llberty

Rooseve].t Ll.ncoLn

Clevelard

Quarlee

'37'
Mondav .-*

Tuesd,av lrle&resday

Thursdav

d

Ibidav

tibranr
Mtgs Beck

Llncojln and Quarleg Schoo1 --

-alternate weeks

-

A.M. dally

.

llncoln Sohoo]. - P.M. - datly

Mra" Hansen

Idberty and RooBe\tBIt School - A.!1. daily alternatc ueeks Cleveland School - P'M. dally
Readine

ltlss Allen

A.M. p.M.

Roosevelt Roosevelt Qrrarl.es Clewland

Clevelsnd
Quarlea Quarlpg Cle veland

Qrrarles
Rooserrel,t

CleveLand *Workshop Roosevelt
Roosev€lt , Roosevelt Clerreland

![r€r Rosenthal
A,M. P.!1.

Qnrarles CleveLand

Quarles llorkshop

!Irs. lbgale
A.M.
P.M.

Llncoln

llncoln

ltflss

Talt

A.M, P.Mt

I,lberty

liberty
0ffice

f,incoln Linaoln Llncoln Lincoln Workshop Lincoln liberty llberty Llberby llberty l^Iorkshop Liberty

Lincoln

linco]n

llberty tiberty

*Reading Workshop

F_chool, Nqrsep

!{lgs Gnrber A.M.
P.M.

D.II.H.S. D.M.H.S. tlberty
Roosevel.t

llberby liberty

D,]!.H.S.

D.M.H.S, ll.berty D.lrI.H.S. D.M.H.S.
Cleveland

Tt'

tn*tT.r.
Orarles
P.11.

Cleveland Cleveland Cleveland Rooscvelt Booeevelt Quarles

@arles

!tng. Tanas-

korrlo

A.ltf.
P,!1.

Jr. H.S. Jr. H.S.
llnco]n

Jr. H.S. Jr. H.S.
Llncoln

I,tncoln

Jr. H.S,

Llncoln Lincoln

Jr.

H.S.

Jr. H.S. Jr. I.S.
Lincoln

Mrgr Holn'

lBlJ.

A.M.

linco]n

Sehool Phvgleiang DF. Johnson A.M'

Dr. Robertg P.Mt

tlberty Llncoln Jr. H.S. D.M.E.S. Roogewlt
-

Cleveland

.

Quarlee

lri.th

.Llt.

Jr. H

and D.DI.H.S.

-38Observat

lons Goncertrine-The
.

Educatlonal ProEra4*,rn Tbe E1enelrta:rvJFchco:!.E

A strrdv-of the nethods of eupervlelon and teacher evahratLon. of
crrrulgu]+g .dey.g]gurneat pfgce4r{$r *.and.
f?orn-p1mer1?nceq-and eqrvJro{Freltg-}ea4s

of lbeJlnd ,an{ RuaLltvJf claasto t&Lconglg$lon tha$ }he.schgoL

authorlties have ln these areas soueht to qreato equaL opportrrnltles
amone

the five elementarv sehools.
nethods

In srrch areas as toacher - chlld relationshlps,
approprlateness and use
i

of teachlngr

of naterlals

and cbtLdrent

I

responses a utrde

6x

range

of differences

was obserrred. Tbeee were dlfferenc€s among tbe

ffi"
|
I
..'

teacblng and the learnlng eituatlone ltlthln every ochool, rather than
anong echoo1s. The teacbing and
SchooL was Judged by

the educatl.onal. progfan tn the ltncoln

the team to be equal ln qualtty to that of any of

tbe other elenenta4r sehools in the dtstrict.
SuperT rLs

ion

Prlncipals have noet of the responslblllty for the aupenrlslon of

lnstruetlon.

There ar€ no general supervlsors

or dlrectorg of lnstmrctlon

worklng out of the superlntendentt s offlce. The entent and qnallty of the supenrlsory help avallable to teaohere for the lmprovenent of teacblng and teachlng condlttons terest of the prlnclpal ln
classroon
depend

largely upon thc

competenee and

ln-

each

butldtng. Principala report tbat they

uork wltb tbe Inetnrctlonal.

etaff ln teachersr neetlnga and through sueh vlsltlng aa tbey beve ttne to do. No organl.aed progran of inln any scbool.

eenrice edueatlon tas reported
Evaluation
No

formal progran of teacher evaluatlon le used. In tbe caoe of

the teaeher not rrnder tenure, the prlnclpal ls reoponslble for vlsltlng

-39'tlbe oLaaaroa. arffta*sat'ly-ofbcrto -otluat,e

the

teaeherr g oonpotenoe,

and f,or Eeklng nocomodatlons regardlng reappolntuent

to tbc

strper-

lntendent. Ihe prlnclpal.t a rePort
CurrLculrn Devel-mment
and,

1g read aqd otgned by t&e teacher bo-

fore tt ls fonarded to the superlntendent.
Praetiees Slnoe about Lg55, teacber connltteea, rcpres€nttng nl l slss6ntary

guldcr. For tbe noet parb, tbese guides havo act up broad framerprke of poltcy, goalc1
gchools, have been at r*ork on eyeten-trlde currlsulrn
approaebee, and

aotlvltles. Indlvldual
of tbelr
chLldren.

gabooLg bave so

far

had qulte

ulde latltudc ln developtng the speetflog of the ounlou}n to

ftt

tbe

partlctrlar

needs

In practlce, however, lt rar

obaenred

that

tJte uork golng on

ln noat

of the cl.asaroona
case

uas ve4f atrnllar

at e gtven grade level,

d,eternl.ned

largely by tbe oontent of the tertbooks and r.rorkbooks ln uec or, tn tbo

of frapeclall

subJeota

(art,
wbo

mrs!.c, physleal educatton),

bI the dl-

reotton of tbe speclallets

vlglt the cl,assroolltse Cl,esero-on qmerlp$ees an4. EnylFonpent for I.€aFFlntt To aaeesa tbe relative quallty of edreatlonal opportunlty anong
and,

tbe sohoole as evldenced by clasaroom enperiences
nenberg torrred

ewlronnent, tean

aLl

elassroome and other areao

ln

eacb sehoolr and

syetenatle obsenratlons were nade ln aIL seeond and flftb grade cJagsroons tbroughorrt the eyaten. lnong tbe elenents
and, envlrorunent obsenred wero
3

of olagsroon praettee

tbe reLatlonsbip of teaeherE and cblldren tbe exbent of interest end parttotpation anong tbe cbtldren the ertent to whlch teaebers lrere adapting the curricu}n to tbe readlness ard, aehLevement level of lndlvi&lal chlldren

*ho'-

"displayed

the qualtty of tbinking, creablvenssol corrcept ard aklll dwelopnent ag evldeueed by reeponees of cttlJdren, errd tprk products

varlety ln the use of approprlate naterlal,s of learnlng enrch as naps and globes, reeordlngs, fllms and filn strlps, flannel boards, nanipu-lative naterl.als in arlthnetlcl etc.
,:
.

the use of fl*st hand experlences such as trlps the arrangement of the classroom and lts furnlehlngs to facllltate cortmunieation, ready access to rnaterlals, etc. tbe extent to which thE physical settlng contrlbuted to reagonable eonfort, and to the childrent s health and safety

i

F

It ls not the purposs of thls report to assess ttre quaLlty of the edueationaL progran ln the Engl.ewood elementarlr schools, but rather to deterrnl.ne if the children ln the Lincoln School- have educatlona3. opportunitles egual to those of the children of the other elenentarlr
sehools.

A swunarlr and analysls

of the recordg nade of

elassroom obeenratlons
and

lndlcate that there are wlde dtfferences ln the quality of teachtng
learnlng with respect to the elenents obsenred.

It is,

houever, evldent

that the dlfferences Lte

g*+

eehooLs

rather than

eaeh sehool, praetloes and condltlona urer6 obgeryed uhtch

ry

gchoole, fn

ln the Judg-

nent of ttre obsenrer lrere of good

quality.

rD each

of the echools, also,

praetlces and conditions were obsernred whlsh tn the opinlon of the observers

left

nuch

to be deelred,.

-b1-

Qseryallons -Lmcerr.rl4e Ep#- $J,trlgve.npnt
As one means of assessJ,ng the extent

to wtrich edricational opportrrnity

1s eqtral tn the eLenrentary schools, the Corrmlttee nade bampli.ngs of puptl,
achievenent as shom by achlevement test. scores

of

elemeptary sehoolACE ecoreo, and

ehildren: retentlon jn
and a stuily

grades three and,

sixr class rank,

reading scores of high school puptls; a study

of drop-outs in
reveaLed

grades ?-L2,

of pupil assignnents to

groups

in the tr:lgh school.
that pupils from

fn summary, the studies of pupiL achievement

Llncoln Schoo1 tended to score l-ower than whlte pupils on achLevement testg.

It

was for.nd

that

Negro

pupils attending other schools tended to score as

It was also di,scovered that the Negro puptls tended to drop out of school, in greater numbers than did white pupils. Negro
pupils tended to recognize factors of racial tmbalance and hence feLt

high as other pupils.

that tt contributed to their feeLing of ttbejng djfferent.ft
14e. Conm{}tee wants

partlcularly to point o}t the hazards o{ malctnq

gross .Jgdg.nents reqar*ing eqqSllW

rel,atiourship

of elenentary pglogl_experlenee and lts to race. Almost gertainly tle data reflgcted disadval-rtagejl
llre acconpanflng
need

cultural

backgrounds and

for
U.

unique progran

Elenentary Sc,hoql Standard T,est

ScoTes.

At the sixth
scored arredlan

gpade

level ln L96l-62 the puplls at the Lincoln School
on the Stanford Achievement Intermediate Battery

of l+.br

while pupils tn the other elementary schools seored an average medtan of

6.5, Thls does not indicate tn any way that achieverent of pnrplls at Ltneoln Sehool ls due to unegual educational opportunlties sLnce socioeeononie and ottrer factors are lnown
neasured by tegts.

:l*
I li. S"l

t_

l-l

to be tnfluentlal tn

achievement as

ts il

.{*i r, "1,

.
Rrptl.a Retsined

-,LZ-

In Ttrlrd And Sfucth Crrad,eg, L96l-62 :

in 1961 -52t the nunber of chil.dren retatned tn the ttrird and sfucth grades totaled llr Negro chl,ldren and ? wtr{te chi,ldren,
Tab1ee 7 and

I

shor that

althouglr lrtegro children . nake up
These

only

39.27"

of the totaL enrollm€ntr
rrleroed

facts are not, necess€rrlJy mealringfirl tf
achievemento

ln isolatlon to

the nnrltiple forces related, to pupil

hrpiLs Retained in Thj.rd Grade
i I

T.A3LE ?

,

,

. Jf51, qn*

1962

_

F

Year

Group

Lincoln Cleveland Liberty Quarles RooseveLt School School School Sehool School Tot.

1960-61 No. RrplJ.s Retarned No. Negro Pupl.ls Retained
L951,-62 No. hrpiLs

o

o

0

1

5

Retalned No. Negro Pupils Retained

L0
o TJBTE

L7

o

10

Lincoln CleveLand liberty School SchooL School
No. hrplle No. Negro
Retained

, ., -L961

Putpils Retaj-ned

*-d

in

B

.195a

Si:cth Grado

- ,,..
Quarles
SchooL

Roosetelt

School

Tot.

ftrpile

lietained lg6L-62 I'lo. hrpila Retained No. Negro Pupils Retained

0
o

0 0 o

0 0 0

0

o

o

b

-tt3-

In an attempt to gather obJectfirc evidence regardlng the
Id.ncoln School

actrj.eveynent

of

prrplls, stuclles were nade of class rank,

ACE scores and readlng

sccres of htgh school pupiLs.
The graduating classes

of

1961 and 1962

of th€ Dnlght Morror Htgh School
.

provlded, the source

of datar Only those gradrrates of tho above classeg who

spent thelr entire school Ltfe

ln the EngS.ewood

$chool,s, grades L-12, wer€ uso$
yeergr Lg62t
9O

in ttrls study.
grades !4,

0n1;' those graduates who spent

thelr entlre elementary

in the same elsnentarXr school were used,. Of the class of
met

out of 198 graduates met the above crttorla while of the class of L96L, 96 out

of 2?3 graduates

the same crlterla.
achievement,

An lnopectton

of three areae of

of ttrese 90 and 96 (1S6)

gradnates lras then made
C1ass rank

ln the followirrg:
alL ful-l-tlms
oubJecte

Class rank

tg

computed on a weighted systen: uelng

on a cunulative basis.
ACE scores

The Amertcan CounclL

of Educatlon Psychological

ExanLnation

is

a meaeure

of learnlng ability or scholastie aptitrrde.
graduatest

These scores were talcen frorn the

recotrds, The tests

Trere adminlstered whil.e they were

ln the tenth

grade. Beadlng scoree The reading score mate grade

of the Stanford Achtevement Tost, lnc[aates the approxl'
was readlng halfnay through h{o Sttr grade

lavel at whlch the etudent

level,

-LL,-

ftryFrnes;
The graduates frcm the LLncoln School, ranked appreclably lol,rer than tha graduatee frorrr the other elernentary schools.
The Nogro graduatos

fron the lJ.berty SchooL (where Negro-whlte ratto of

enrollnent had been about fifby-flfty) ranked appreclably hlgher than the
graduates

fron the ld-ncoln School.
the liberty Schoo]. (5V5O Negro-White ) ranlced
ag

'

The whlte graduates frorn

hlgh, or higher, than the graduates frorn the predominantly whtte
Roosevelt SchooLs.rt

Cleveland, and

It
I i a

shoul-d be kept

ln

mlnd

that the

nurnber

of

Negro

chlldren lncJ.uded ln

,1
r

thls stu{y is reLatlvely small,'
gocio-economlc status and low duce und.er-ach:ievi-ng

Data gupport the conclusion

that underprlvlleged

cultural incentlve ln

hone envLronment

will

pro-

pupils,

however, there

ls

evidence fron the social

anthropologists that und.er-achtevement

is not a raclaL characterlstic.

r$ee ftlgureo A, B, C, D, E, F

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Study of 'Drop-outg

the percentage of drop-o[te for.
:

Englewood has been lower than the

average

for

Bergen

County. The flgures below show the pereentage of drop-outg
Englewood Juntor and Senior HiSh Schools
r

for a five year perLod ln

T,+BIE

P

pRoP-orrs 125?.T0.1?92

.

PuplLs
tgrl, -58 L958-59 L959J,0 1960-61
1.96L-62

Grades
742
9']''2 9-L2

Drop-outs

f, of

Drop-o_uts

1158 1538 '1516

990

fi
5z 56 bz 35

$9L
Slnce
1;959

?-Lz 7'LZ

3. 5,2 3.6 3.1 2rz

there has been a decrease

ln the percentage of drop-outg tn
out of the &rglet
ood.

the Englewood public school systern. See table 9.

lurtng the flve-year perlod
the totaL were Segr:oes. Cmpared

226 pup1ls dropped

.tunlor and gentor High Schools. See table 1O. 0f thls nwber, I@ or trlrF of the total nunber of ryegro puplls ln the echool populatlon thls lndlcates that a greate! percelttaqe of lleero puptls than
whlte pupils are dlopplng out of school,. Wtrlle the perc€ntage of drop-outa ln

rlti

the Lhglernod sctrools bas been decreaeing, the percentaqe of Segroeg Ln
drop-out Eroup.has increaeed

the

,

fables 11 and 12, Age and Grade at Drop-est, refl.ect fLgures that are
conslstent wlth other drop-out studies conducted in the State; that' the greatcst
ntunber

of drop-out depart fron school at
tables 13 and

age 16 and

U

and

that

theJr tend to

leave, ln greatest ntnbers, in the IOth and 1lth grades.

ilr lllustrate the elenentatT school hlstotxt of the 226

drop-6ugg. Elght'y-nine of the drop-outs had no otperience ln the elanrentery
achoolc

of Englewood. When lncludln8 only those chlldren who tlavo attcnded the
of
Englenood 1t2.fr

elernenlary schoole

of the drop-outs ettended tbs Ll,ncoln School.

-L'6-

table 16 shows that

Ne-

a noblle tha,g tFe, wlrtle eE$4reJr

ln

the Dngls,rood publlo gchools. Ths ltegro drorr-outs have had a qreater nunber of yearsr.experlencc tn the 1ocal elementary sehoolg than the whlte drop-eu1s.
:

(See Table 20. )

Table 15r Reasons

for

Leaving School, showo

lhat

nany

of the reasons
tnfluerlcpsr

llsted for

Negro drop-outs

fall ln the category of envtrorunental
10
,

TABTE

NIJMBERS

qr.

DROP*U,TS

l{rmber of, Wrlte

Pupils
16
29

Nurrber

of l{egro hrptls
13 20 23

Tota1

I,fhite &
36

Ly57-58
F*

ry58-99

t95940
1g60-61

Lg6L-62

12b 209 308 13 $h

7

13 10 13 10

l0

5z
56
h? 35

38 11

I
1.0

18
23

2ll
1g

6

t6

Totals

$

L26
TABLE

53

lfi

100

226

11

'AoE AT DRoP-olll

rS{NT
L957-58
LgSg-59

ilr

1'INT

LS

WNT

16
-

t7
Ir,I

N t

18 l,tNT
9b
e

WNT

1g

}ilNT

20

-11

t95940
1960-61
1g6t -62

-11 639 6111? 123 Lzbr0101121 r-- L7922Lr 62]-ae L812LzLo22

L-1 -22
-J.L 22h

5 3I

T613

ab6 -11 37 r0

36 I 7

3 Lo

93I b3'l
26

L-l

1-1
1 -C.
tt

50 trL

91

-L?TABIE
-.

12

GRADU tirUEtr, A? DROP-OUr , !| i.F--rt t
'

-

Educetion T -----f frt N TTI N T w N
Lgt? -59 1958-59

T

}tr

?10 NT WNT WNr

W-fr

T

112.r
.r-r.r--22

r -

112

t95940
t g60-61 1961-62

1-1-raLl5 r a 13
h

---1 l, - 1

1

totaL

22h- t I
TABI,E

L h 5 5 27 5 813 5 L e 65 u 9 e 18 I2 11 3 h ? , -5 to 616 5 gt3ilr z t6 -22 35 g1081g g5 U 1L B 62g 6_6
13

18

28 3o

57

35

61

3?

5z

13

EI,EUEI\ITARY SCHOOI ATTEI{DED BT
DROP.OIJTS

Cl,eveland
Lg57

-58

L958-59

L95940
1960-6L

? -7

_q N T rd N f w N r 1- 1 1.. I 1.., I h Z 6 - 13 13 ? S 12 8 - I I ,- t lr 1 S g 3LZ - 13 13 g 5 t3

!. I

5 -5

3 L h - 2 2 - 7 71812 30 ISh92,,.. 6..--f .3.1 b,-J 2,3 -.-. r-.r., -.11_13, g .- g ._ Lotal, 45,, ,- a5 . 5 ._J .B lll ,, L LB_ L9 r[.?g .: 5g _lB 6]. zh g5 , ,

3 a 3 - l. I

639 -Lzuzzozzz

*

Note

Keyl

W-White PrIPiL, N-Negro

hrpll,

and T-Total White and Negro

TABIE

1l+

IIUMBER OF rCIAP'S IN IOCAI ELA'{ENTARY SCHOOIJI OF DROP-OTffS

Nono

63
9 5
3

26
7
3

89

1 year
2 yearo

16

I
?

J yeare
b years 5 yeara 6 years
t:. lt '. :i

b 10
2

h

u
6
38

h
18
20

20 28

? years
(

b8

includlng Klndergarten)
L26
100

Total

226

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I

Fl --'r+----{-t--

SLReaetione of a Group School Puqile

of

Hlqh

t
1

$en hlgh actrool pupile, noctl,y upp€r clasemen, selected by the
C,trldancs

Offlca and the Prd.nclpa.l were nade availablo to the Comalttcc
group lras egually divided between whtte and

for disqrsalon purposeS.. tt"
The whLte

Negrro. the follorntng represents a nrnnary of highHghts:

prpils were evidently not fuILy awar€ of the feelings of the Negrc prpils. One white pupil sald, ttl never knew.tt They reportad that provisions for frank exchanges lud not been nade ln ttre school currl-culum. One pupil couurented that gnouping in the social studies classes with top sectlons white and bottom sections Negro nade guch
discussions imposslble.
The Negro There was

puplls lntroduced the question of jnferlority. a consensus arrrong ttre Negroes that pupils conlng from the all llegro Lincoln School were not able to compete auccessfully with the wtrite pupils coming from the other
schools.

Several comrents, paraphrased follow:
Teachers

achievennent scores on

lile teaching in Lincoln School because it is easy. No one pushes them. The conmrrnity doesnrt care so why should they? This is the reason for low
tests
books

and poor reading perforrnance.

' triefir The contributions of Negroes are not mentioned. Negro pu1:11,s soon learn to know which race ls ffcomparatirrelytr superior when alL the lordest sections ar€ of Negroee and tho top onos white.
cot.tposed

AII the history

relate the adrievenents of whlte

a fr{.end of nine ws,e noved from a 304 sectlon ( slow learner) to a 3O2 sectlon (groupe secortd from the top) he rrfrozerr in hls new afurost r{hite envlrcnment. He said hie friend was afraid to say anything.
llhen
lrlhen a

whlte pupil scheduled open house for the senior class and learned that several of us Negro pupila were planning to cotte the party was cancelled,

the lnterrrtewer presetrted a heresay quotation , ttglve then an lnch and theytll take a mi.lerr, a Negro girl sald, rr0nce you taste educatton, steak, decent housingt you want nore! Ig that wrcr€?rr
l,lhen
t-

+

-52-

fhle€ of the Negru--chiJd,rwr-said that tJrey felt that tho segrcgated LincoLn Scfrdol was a rezuIt of planned action W the clty offlcials and.boards of education.

In general the wtrtte ahrdents were anazed and concerned by the e)cpressed feelings of the Negr.o pupi.ls. Both groupa t*anted nor.te opportwritles to study and discueo togettrer ttre issubE and concenxo.

It rould be dangerous to draw general conelusions from infg dlscu3slon data in view of the linlted nrrmber of puplls invoLved. The statementg
nade by

the ptrpiJ.s were expreselons of Seelinsp not nesessarily aupportabl.e
However,

tn .f*ct.

lt is

noteworthy

that these feeltngs exist.

-53Raolql &lstrrbufi.on

in hrrght ]b*ow l{lgh schoor

where a dtepropontlonate rttto of Negro and whtte puplLs entsts. probably the nost dranatlc ecrampleg of ttrls occur ln the Englteh and soclaL studteg crasseg. A number of selecttve crd.tertal are employed to faclrltate a ttr4pe of hgnogeneoult grouplng that tnvorves everlr pupll tn the eenlon hlgh sehool. 'Elg' 0' and H crpporb the obsenratLon that sgverer Eecttons

The data cr'earr.y

tdenttf) c'aases and programs

Engltsh end soctal studles classear oD each grade level, are arnoet occlustvely composed of wtrlte puptra and severar groqps are composed of a}nost all Negroes, Ttrls lllustrateg the effect of grorplng practtces tn wtrtch teet results and teachers r Judgment of potenttal and achtwement are the

tn

the

rnaJor

crtterla for grouplng.

The

reeult tn

Englewood

tend to fLnd themselves tn grcupe whtch follow thc ractal pattertrs
communlty.

ts that

many

puptls

ln

the

rntervtews wlth Ndgro and whtte prrpu.s tndteated that they were awaro of the gro'plng practlces and of the

partlcularly by Negro pupg.s aorrrd not but have a negattve inqpact on thetr self concept. It seens lnconststant to essume that teachers cen deal effecttvel.y wlth
some

tletions'

resurtant ractal dtfferen-

These obgerwatl.ons,

tssues and obJecttves of a soclal studtes program Negro or alr wtrtte prrprts tn the same schoor.

of the vttal of arl

ln

clesses

lP""""nttle

score{t

tn

Reedtng and

iffi:'i"ft'J3"-*ff H1il:iil:ntiio"-"'"'

hpreasion; D.A.T. verbal scores, rQ -&'io ehi;o i" .' . ii"Ji

"

-5hAnother dtnenslon

of dlsproporttonate ratlo ls noted when the
A predontnance

raclal digtrit'utlon tg vlened from progran enrollnent.
the Negro pr4pile ar6 enrolled

of wtrtte pr.rptlc are tn ths college preparatory pnogran, th9 madorlty of

in classes of a general educatlon nature. Slnce rrnderachleryement ls not a ractal oharacterlgtlc tt would eppear that other factors are responstble for the dtsproportlonate ntmber of Negnoeo found tn the general pnogram"
The grotrytng practloes

ln the Juntor Htgh School vary frorn grade

to grade and have thelr greatest general lnpaet on racLal dtgtrlbutlon ln the seventh grade. Desptte an effort to tntegrate thege seventh
grade classes a dteprqorttonate ratl.o

of

Negro and whtte

puptlg doeg
and nlnth

oclst
gradeo

end a concentratlon

of racos Lncreages tn the etghth

olagsee,

See Slgure M.

tn the Senlor Htgh SchooL the number of whLte chtldren tn eash gectton decreaseg from eesttone one to sectlons forrr wtth nearl.y equaL
Ae

tn sectione three. Stnce the prnobl,em under rwtery ln EngLewood has lte rooto tn Amerl,cats polltloal, economto and soctal hlstoryr tt seems appropr{.ate
retio of whlte
and Negro puplls

that grotplng orlterta be broadened to
backgrounde together

encourage

puptla of vartous raclal,

to ocplore the probleng ln a r"ealtstlo way tn a

cllnate of mutual undergtandLng, apprectatlon and tnret.

Section

1.

Sectinn 7,

WlIITE

Section 3.

Section 4.

Fre,G Racial Cowposi{ion, Dwlgft{ Morrow
il,grt ,fclrool tnnlrtft

Clarrcq by,Iectiont

Seition 1.

Section L.

Section 3.

Sec{ion

+,

fta. Racial &,upositiun, Daryhl lflonow l-liglt Sc/rncl ll istlr! Classet, hy,fecl iont,

H

-Toi

Sections

wlilTE

0ther Sections
r;j Fro, !"IG,

i, Pacial

Coprpoil{rot,

huEll Morroa

/lV/,fdool frrergr lagaXe Clases.

College Drep Seclions

YJH

ITE

"

leneral

" $ections
Dwigltt

fid,J Racial

Com,rori fion,

lilorrow Htgh ficfrutl

Sci eftce'Cla.t$e,r.

-

Top' Sect ions

}ther

Sections

fta K

Qaci al Cowwositt'oil,Dwglit

lfforrow ll,gfr Scfrool l{la{ftenntrcs ({ases

rft6q0

WHITF

AAT

MUSIC

I

NDU ST R,IAL

ARTS q

I,loME ECON.

FIG,

L Propor{r'un 0f l,/egroes q Whifes
lrl, rtfusic, and la/wtrial lr/s-

{nrolled in

ilor, [unomics Classet, D, lvlorcuw U,

t

$ection 1..

,isition

?.

$ection 3.

Section 5.

'Secticn 6.

fio. lvL Qacial &*patition,{hglewood rfnrior
t{igft fclpol

flaseq bg Sec{,ion-.

-55'

SPgclql,,flelqf,ceg

A Elgr.rey of the allocatJ.on of speclal servlces anong the
elernentary gchoole lrrlleates

that these serrrlces are eqrrl.tably disbased upon comparatlve oase
'

tt{hrted. t?rls sunrcy Ls, holever, ln
ttre varLous schools
on
-C.Las

Ioads, and other such obJectlve'data, rather ttran evldenceg of need

9Ec leL EdueEtl

seg

in Table t? below ghow no slgnlflcent errldence of ineqrrallty in the placement of pirpils in sleahl class€Er
ThE data shown
t. ".

rt I'

TABIE L7 SPECIAI ET'IICATION CI,A,SSES ]:g57 t962_

-

Trel,nabLe
Race

er

TraLn- Traln- Educe- Bduoe- Edtrca' Breln Inble ble able ble able (i"tar- (oraer) (Young- (Jrr. (st-.. Jured

Li+

' '
7

,- p"t-

,

Lg57-58 lthtto
Negro

to

-

at al

I
'1
9

!r

7 7

-

I

L95849 r,hlte
Negro

9
2

b 9

5
9

]:959-60 llhlts
Negro

10
rl

7

I
9 3

L

6 9
Ir

1960-51 t'lhtte
Negro

I
I
B

I
,-

9

L

h h
7

6

h
7

-

L96L-62 llhite
Negro

I

9 1

5 10

I

sghggl

Att?,qreepgg
The d,ata shonn

:56-

ln

Table 18 shol that therc

ls

no greater

ettendanee problem

tn the

LJrrcoln School than

!n other elementary sehools

i.n the

dtstrlet.

TAEIE T8
PEBCEI{IAC'E SCHOOL ATIENDAIICE

,,

,Lg.rJ..:]:g62

,

,,

,

Llncoln
Tear
Lg57-54 L958-59 SohooI

Cleveland
SchooL

Ilberty
99.75 92.10
92.1r0

Qgsrles

I

Roogevelt
Schoo1
89..93

89.66
93,55

90.69

90.IT
91.?b
9L'.99 9L,'65

tl.09
92'97

91.85 91.?1

LgSg-&
1960-61

n,98
92.oh 93.23

/2. n,o3

NJB
y2,gL

'ye.62

tg6i-62

n.\6

n,63

z.B7-

$qntqf pg

Qqeee BeJeTrp{. Serggr.rsd

anLSt$dl?{

Table L9 shorlng the nnber

of chtldren referrod urd studled
ctaL sernlces'1nd Table 20 shonlne

eases sereened, lndicate

that

Negro ctrl.ldren are rocelvtng

at leegt theh

proportlonate share of the professlonal eerrrlces offered by thls Departnent.
TABIJD 19
SUMMART

_gF CISEI

REC.EWTNG

,rrrTA{SilE grupT

Llncoln
K f':

Clerre-

land

IrLb-

erty
L2 6

Rooge-

velt
c

Quarles I[n
8

Frank-

L956-l57 Whlte
Negro Cbher
?

7

I

5

I

1

L957-58

Whlte l+ Negro 6
Other
?

?

7 7

3 2

2

Total L0 V5e-59 Wluite h
0ther
.7

? 6

Negro I

tt 3t2 83
T

6

L959-60 White Negro

0ther
?

u
, ,1
2
5
.

?ota1

1960-61 tlhlte
Negro Obher
?

I

Total

_59_

TABIJ
sur,lMARY

i9

(CorrtinucC)

oF cAs6 RW0rvINc ufTENSnna qupY

Lln,

feaq ,,,;, Bagc School School Sehool School Sghoo]. 1961,-62 Whlto LL 14 I 3

coln land srtJ
I

C[erre- Ltb-

ROoge=

velt
2

erarler lln
I

School

.

,

Othoa
13

Negro 3 Obher l__
Negro
Other
?

I

Tqtal- 3
10 h3

IUTAt
TUTAT

$Jhitc

rOTAI,
TOTAL
GRAND

11 --I1 54 4L -3g I 5rr 80

I L?
55

22 52 2

1g

17

22 3

ToTAL

(3

73

5[

19

25

''593
TABI,E 20

pl'Itq,l$ry

oFj4s$t

Rqffifl

qqe sTEn$E{9

Year

FrankRoogevelt 0uarles lln Race Sehool School Sehool School School Sehool

Ltttcoln

C],eve,- f,lb -

land

ertv
5
l,

Lg'6-57

l^lhlte
Negro

9
2

7

0ther
?
l.'

Lg57
,

-58

l,thtte
Negro

0ther
7

'..

I I

3

L0
2

F

rg58-59 r,Jhite

.

Other
?

Negro

l'3
57

g
1_!

1B

11

3

1

TdtEf'- 97.-*1959-60 tftrlte
2

1-B'

-'-'2,

1

-'.

'2I
20
7

-i1-'"'r
t.?
3

Negro
Other

t2
9B

3r

- "2T- -- .. ,26 1g60-61 hrhtte 6 19 1g 35 Negro ZLt 10 ,2 Other 1 ? rEtal -'-'dT, '.*E fg*'-''' -'I? '-. i-2['*---3F
-5fa1

--

-rg -

---.-6d---

-1-tJ- .'- -

--

-

-. i'--

--rg33

""'33 .. { '-

L96L.62

l.Ihite Negro
Other

L lro

r.5

Lrr

3l'

20

!

Lf
3

3

T-of ' Total
Cases

dRAl$.. lOTAL

' '228 '''

--' 'I5r* '-" TJ6' '-' -fJ6
Llr. ].#
]..2.Tfr

' -1!r

" ' -''
t23

22

-'. " '75 '

'

2r.316

L2.?fr

LL,5fi

7 .O7.fr

-60!d E el B o 5 !r: '.u q, 5; 9l €lo l9 l,tt .o, O* *rE g!l :o l.*t o, o. F 0r:5 F ip t- Ft! 0t o:o il r-t c{ o ;sr gr ut tq: s+ 5l$ OP. lra' v) isr oi l.r. gr H' o -rB 5;F At o ! gt;0rl

.

trI o: gll

la) icF

S.E'F

(f,,O Hr nt ,g: p''r-r! O:l O fti Or lH 0f qtl(a OtO, giB :0t E{E rB" Dol ;g
:.

€i

Criocai> Qirtl lt

I

{t o
'r'v

o. HI

ri o o
IJ
a

I
I
I

I
t

P

I

:

I t :
)

d 5 o. p: H a
a

c+io:< t3, o o io u.,;o l+I!f,:t. \tr. o :p .3 6i :o r-, 0r: F:F. joc ;g P. :rl o P . .o IF+ P.

i
.l

I

:

i a

io
a

ii
,

lr ,t

'{,

ct:
I

,l

i1 tl f\ rl

,f r!
i

,

, t
I

l'
I

.)

l. rl
lc

€ E P

tt N oo E,

tlo
.0t

o

.ts
I
t

!

i<>

lo 'o
t
I
i

I
I
I I

I

lo :*i* i.'
:t'l rl f,rl-

l-i= : t: i
lr-.

llrt t?r.r

'rri

ru

| ' e !t., lr-, lro lr. o

rrJ

l.'- !*;^
,.

o rI i,{ I tru -N.H ll.
i

t

r-l

,

,o ]o .o'r.^r lo
o

io
\Jt

i
I
I

io i.-,:o i. jil
rl.al I r I

.l.a

l'ri

i
.

I
I

.\, lo rllt .rrlru .l.l

;- ic i* iuiciE :j* : I r* l. i5 rH ls i* : I :b i;lsi$H N lr : ,* i:t! i* .t\) :lOlrO r€o : i* i*iri6'i tr\) .6 : . ir .(D .ts1-t .-{ iu, ip iu:a'g
i=

i., |
I

:;II

,. ir :s 'risiS i- i* i ,*i.; N lw ,lu i{. ;\r, lc)
I
;

lo 3 3 9:A 5' S it',

c!!r

o-

i.n

'?t 5 i! d 'tE tsH.P: (I
PAterFl 'o E o { ctrtN 5(DH .Ol'br' u'lln o 4Fi5
lJ ct u o { ,

rO

i*is :;

:till_i

;a

,:;d

9L Io tJ .5 o lst .P

.o .r+

!

fr

ooo, EA.o o:r't
r.,i

.l_

t'|t,i Itlr

J). ll o5(D ,oir !'P.
lfl lhd

CT

C' g

uo ooc' 3(D0.
o.olri ctll5 !''. o 3
0?

lB E 6'€
19o,ts.qlr @ lcdlf
lboQ,o lr-r ttt C
@

. : ro lo
lr!l,tl

o ,olo
. i I

r:

: loilru r: 'o,o ,o .o.
! '
I

lc5rt

'o :? :o o :? io l.lrl.rllrl

| t,

'r..o lo lu.r ;..r o.o

'oiro .q .1,
: ! :
I

'l

',...*lg
:\^,

IFtr' 8. o S l:uu r
lHt h:fi
lL

5

o

tr.

5
a)

H
ct
qt

io'* l* :.=l'ni$

: : l-:

IH lEo.ut

cl !r
tr.

SE,
O ttt
1-tt

'cr lo i- ',r,,* io :B io ioiF oi:,,.

iSi-'$

€'.' PO
!J

V,F o ' lr.

rd qct
t)# o'o
1Jg g'
35

ory
ov) !{Y
P.

ti

o.

' ' ! Ir-l.FJ.O. :b :F :o.tu lr.rirn ..r- i-l sV1' r-r o 'o\.Fr 'o lr- ;t^r : *-J-i--*;.- F- .i -."l-. I.-.+ .-.--{. '| ;.*.-.r --f . -* ':€' ':--. r . I . i | | t : i,-' | :H ; i I :tJ td . : .. fft ;6: o\. d. u,o o ts i(o,ur lo .= ';u :* :F ;H:S i5 iHi- & -liO.Ot, l:^P_ -+ . -1. : - --... *.1--.-;-;--, J- . - i | H.

'

io .o

t
1

'

I

I

l'

.

l

I

lr-l
l.t

Fr

-!

I

:

:

cr* !r H. (ocb
oqt gq BO,
rD
.4a

o
i5

8.r
.

oo
:a

a

c)

-4fshows

:

I"l{lge-c:gggtqglr-,--9fr-r--!gqdg,J9-6-}$ The caie load of the readlng congultants plctured tn TablE 22,

that over SOfi of

t.he

referrale were Negro chtldren. . ?he Negro

chlldren ?tere recelvlng mora than their proporttonate share of the
reading consultantre gervtces
.

TABIE 22 READINC CONSUITANTSI CASE I.OlD$i
1961. and L962

Year

l,lncoln
Race

School Sehool
l:,7

CLevelan<i

Llberty Cuarles

School School School

Roosevelt

!o0al
73

Ir

1960-61

wtrlte

Negro
Other

378t5

27 y

13
l:

987

-!-:.&:lt?t3:,!lt-t -:i.E

1961-62

Itlegro Other

To'tal .lilt?ai..: L'7 5al! ItC'-f t7 :.5€! l^ltrtte 3L7
!3

ta? :l: !=' r.a, t.f? 5.':t,Flr_-

19
17

CFt't aa ii i rfif.

?35
F -.--.--.

10

22 L2 778 33
22
-a . ta

160
59

L'11.

.--.lF. --' --4,.-a -i-

Total
d *-.-a. aa.

GFa!.---F.

l'6
.. !.. -,, -

17
---. tr-*.

33
. -.---. -8, -a

22
--,.a1

'

a ---.-. a--.r.-+.?

1[0

-

These numbers do not lncLude chtldren tested by the readtng consultsnts and hel,ped through work wlth the classroom teachers.

_62PANT

IV

A CS{PREHENSTVE PIAN FCn, NEDUbINO THE CO{CENTRATION

.

OF NH}RO
GR

SCHOOI AI{[D FI'RTTIERING

PUPI6 AT IINCOIN INITRI'NDERS TAIVDING

OtIP

Fotr

eeverel'yeere, the' Ctty of Englewood hae bee,n engeged ln an

lnc,reaslngly tntenelve conflLct over problens relatod to ttre coneentratLon

of

Negro prrplla

tn ttre Llncoln School.. If continued, the bltternesg erd

dlscord engendered can on].y hr:rt the
get{.ouely lnpal.r tJre echool

cltyls statug

and prugress and

syeten.

Thtnlctng people end gnoups

tn

ttre

cltyr uhlle not ln accord as to neans, agnee that sonts posltlve aetlon to allevlate tlre situatlon ln the L,lncoln School is necessary and orrerdue.
Based upon

ito

study, tlte Connlttee hae developed a plan for

poeltlve action, whl.ch tn
plan

lts

unar-rlmous Judgnent,

ls

educattonal-lye
The

admlnletratlvelyr and flnanclally sound, realtstLc, and feaslble.

ls strongly supported

because

it

represents not a tenponary

ocpedlent but a dl,rect, conprehenslve, and educational,ly destrable

attack on the problem.

Phase

I
to provlde for
fron klndergarten tbotrgh grade slx. BelLable estJ.nates lndicate

Build. an elenpntary achool Ln the MeKay Park area
claeeeg

the cost would approdmate $1r0OO;@0.*
PIan

to occupy this buildfng by September, 196h. Itds
of the dlstrtctts educational progranr

new elementary

echool can be a ati'en$thening

real lighthouse, ahorlng ttre way to a f\rndamental
The school could

enllst the whoLehearted tnterest of teachers ln bulldlng reLatlonstrlps
with and among children, deslgned to pronote eelf eonfldence, strong
*See appendlx ttEnglewood Board Capaclty of JanuarT 1r 1963.n

of Educatlon, Deterrnlnatlon of Borrodng

_63'_
:

effort and rnaxlnurn achlevsnerrrt. Irr each c ,assroon, teacherg cou].d demonstrate HI's of relattng the currLculun to todayt s weld erul so
nakd leamtng rneanlngfrrl and

laetLng.

The achool eorrld denonetrate hm

teachers shape procedures

to rralld purposes of educatlon.

Teachlng could be constantl.y strengthened through study

of dependable

research flndlngs, arrallable fron the fle1ds

of

hurnan

relatLonshl.pe,

lntercultural edueation,
Ttre ochooL,

group dlmamics, and hunan

grodh and developnent.

whtle weldng withln eystem-t{id€ purpose and stnrcture, could

ahape

the speciflca of the crnriculum to the needs and readlness of ltE

partlcrr-Lar chlLdren and nelghborhood.

vltal entenelons of the program as the procurement and use of a center fc ft ntght ploneer ln
euch

outdoor education ueed tweLrre nonthe a year as a place where children
can lLve and l-earn
how

together. It could denonstrate to the professlon
on developlng an occellent schoolr can become

a school s taff, bent
EstabLish Board

lncreastngLy creative and skl3-led

ln the art

and eclence

of teaching.

of

Educatlon

pollcy tlth'regard.tg gc$pl,borui$nl

llnes

on the basLs

of concentric clrgles

each elenentary schooL and adJusted

of t mtLe fbon to the nearest street and to the
drawn

at

fad,{*

for provtdtng lntegrated classee whenevgr feasible. EVery pupl3., klndergarten through sixr [ving $rithln a radlus of ]. mlLe would
necesgLty

attend hts neighborhood school. The concentr{.c circle plan, with the

flerclbllity described
Park area providesl

abover and lrith an elementary school

in

the

Mcl(ay

A neighborhood echool si.tuation

.

An educattonalLy sound 6-3-3
Ttre reLocatlon

pattern of organlzat$.on
few pupLls

of relatlveLy

An lntegrated program wlth the possiblo ercception of the Donald Quarles SchooL whlch Ls in a Loca.tion remote from the densely populated Negro center. There, the Pattern of raclal balance would be funproved throrrgh the transportation of a Hrnlted nr:mber of Negro pupils.

-t':hPhase 2
'r

Irbon

conpletlon of the new elementarJ'r ohool, abandon the present

Lincoln School

for elenentarXr

school puryoses. Rehabilitato the Llneo1n

qglgq=l-fgn uge as an e_4Ucat1qnel_gnd eu.ltural center'

for the Br€er

Use the present beautiJul klndergarten room as an integrated school

eenter for pre-school children to help them develop gpeater readlness for

later school ocpertence. Plan this brith the assistanee of State of Educatlon opeciarists in early childhood edueatl-on.
Ercpand

Departnent

the Board of Education sponsored adult educatton progran to

lnelude the llncoln School, based upon the needs of the residents of the
Fourth
lrtrard.

Use

the present Lineoln

SchooL

buildtng as a center for

handieapped

chtldren for the rfBergen Reglonal

Plann

, provldtng clagseg for:

bltnd and rrlsually
deaf and hard

handlcappcd

of hearlng

cerebral palsled orthopedlcally handtcapped neurologtcally inpatred

multiple

handicapoed

trainable nentally retarded 0 olaaoee)
Ten guch classes would be relnbrrraed by the Statc

at S2r0@ per clagg

or e total of $201000, and thle, along with tultton

payments flom sendtng

dlstricts,
Board

should

entirely oupport thle progran at no cost to the Englewood

of

Educatlon.

-69Locate the following

faclllties ln the bullding:
i

0fftces of A&nlntstration
Offlces of Special, Services--Direetor, Psychologists, Psychiatrd.st, Social Workers, Remed:la1 Instnrctors, Nurslng Senrices, Office of Chief lledlca1 Inspector, Attendance $enrice
Sehoo} Safety Patro1 Center.
Cuml,srrlum irtrorkshop Center.

Llbrary Dlstrih'rtion Center. Adrilt Llbrary Facillttes--Branch Library of ttre Englewood l\rb}lc Llbrary. Llbrary Facllitles for Elenentary and Junior Hlgh Sehool Rrpils of the Bf,€Br

for after-schooJ. recreation progrsrnsr Use the auditorium for conmunity educatl.on and gultural
Uge

the

g5rmnasium

programeo

Phase 3

0n l]ebnra4y 1.

.183 transter ,41

ftfth

qlpde pu,pil.s

tf

the

+ .ErlgJE

Ftrygt ?uiJ.dlge for a f\rlly integrated progrmr on an grcperlmentaL baels, wlth education of the tndivldual child according to his needs and

abillties
way

as paramount

in plannlng

and with a program providing groups

for the

understandlng

of cultures and contribution of all
Renovate

to the Anerican

of life,

the Engte Street School with the least e:cpenditure
usg.

of

noney

to carry on a pilot progran. Cogtlnue_the

gf the 9ngJe

Strget_bu,*$1ge_o*,y..tg-4ne. I96f

. In Septernber of 196b, these children

would enter the Junior High Schoolrs lntegrated elernentary schoolsr
Abandon

the Engle Street buildlng because of obvious obsolescence and

unfitness to house an elementary school progran. Dispose of this valuable property, along with the already
money abandoned

Franklln $chool, and apply this

to offset the cost of the new elementary school or deed the property

to the city.

-66.

Phege

l+

Begtnntng icUnrsry
Eng!.ermod teachera

I,

L963, conduct an

lD-t€ilrlcs pnogran for all

ln preparatton for

an expanded, fulJ,y lntegrated,

educationa[y sound progran lncorporattng the usef\il features of the pllot
atud5r, and

partlcular\y deetgned to hefi aLL chtldren gatn self-confldence

and to

treat one another wittr respect and urderstandi.ng.
str-ongly recorunended because

In concluglon, thlg plan ig
Regolve

it

would:

the probleras lnherent in the concentratton of Nogr! puplLs ln the Lincoln School.

Satlsf! the naJonlty nrrmber of parents in tJtat lt retaina children irr the neigfrborhood and pr"ovides for a high horizons progran and pilot stu{f. Provide new incentives for urban renenalr rederreloprnent and wholesone rejuvenation of the fourth watd. Cone within the financial ablllty of &rglewood to support an outgtandlng
educational prognam. Provide fan-reaching educational servtces that, could serve aa a pattetn for other school districts such as the propoeed nursery achool., experinental stu$r, and long-tern progran plaruring for kjndergarten through Senlor High Sctrciol.
Up-grade the educationaL progran Schools. rrnderstandtng which rnake up

for

ol

I

chi-ldren

in the Erngl,ewood

Furnish the future citizens of Eng1eurcod, with an appreciation and of the value of the contrihrtions of the diverge groups

a comuity.

The needs revealed by

thls etudy and the intense fuiteregt of the
.

Board

of EducatLon

and Englewood

citizens in school irnprovernent,
progra^m Eecond

open

the way for Englewood to develop an eduqational
The

to

none.

publtcity whlch Erngl,ewood schools has recetrtly reeeived cr"eites e
towarr:l marked

eetting wtrtch could now be directod lmproverent. Such a prograur could

enphasi

progran

make

the echool a powerfrrl force in

47_
developing posltlve lrrterorltur:aL relattonslrips and

ln heJ'plng alt
of
Educatl'on

children more near\y to r.each their potential as sldlU\rl, creative

thtnktng, contrlbrutllg,

peroone and

cltlzens.

Ore Departrent

offers ttg support and help tn the

developnent

of

strch a Progran.

F.

-68,

&rglewood Boad of Educatlon Detarrnirrg.t{.on of Borrowlng Capaclty

ru

as of Jenuary 1.

1963

lI

Sshool Debt

et July 1, L962

$3, glrSroqp

Statutory Dcdrrcttm (8f x

lv.

Assessed Valuatlon

of

$h3r7\9r75o',)

3.h97,5po

Drcegs

of

School. Debt Over Statutory
L962 1963

Ll,mltatlon - July 1,
Bmd

($ blr?rhao)
55.ooo

Uaturttles to Janualt lr
Net Eraess

-

January

1, 1963

($ 392rbao)

Calculetlon of AvalLabLe Munlcl.pal Borrowfutg Capacltyt
Net Mrrnlclpal Debt per Debt Steterrent

July 5,

L962

($956rotl)
3,77ALl$7

Statutory l,lunlclpal Borrowlng Capactty Avallable t{untclpal Borrowlng Capaclty
Net Borqrlng Capaclty

i$2,8l5rh26

-

Janrra.qy

I, is

L963 based

Thls avalleble capacitY

: on ttre premlse that

$z ,he3, 006

v

the

mrnicipalJ-ty does not conternplate any bororing fron July

1,

L962

to

January

l,

L963"

In order to make this capaclty avallablo for school ue€; a 2h afftrrnative vote of all members of the governing body

ls regulred, or an afftrmatlve vote of a nraJority of the
goverrrlng body and a subseqrrent adoptlon by

queltfled voters

by a maJorlty of ballots casto

4 P, gg-u!

rI

APPENDDT

Merneandtrm on

Adnlnf,sbratim

of

Borurdarly Lt-nes beb.reen

lJncotn and

-

Llberty Sohooloe Ssuth of 185 Iefayette Place
Bourdary Llres

Statenrent d a Detall,ed Interpretatlon of

for

School Year Jl95iu45

E chlbtt

A. Englalood Board of, Edrpatlon Per

Rrpil Analysis of

Selected

E:eendltuies fcn the $chool Iear

196M1

l

Dctdblt B.
Englewood Board

of Educatlon Ccist Per Prrpil of Selected

E:rpendltures

for ttre School Year Lg6L-62

EIHIBIT
hgteerood Boarrt

A

Per,

rrryxl

a""t"t:r:Lt*f.$rffi;nart'unee for ttie
Clere1and School

of

&hrcati.qr

lcctr No. Account 2n 3 Textbooks 2I a llbrary Books 23O b Periodicals 29 c Audlo Vlzual

Approprtatlon

Cmtract $ 2rh08.35
lr6113.82 11?.82 h05.0b 127.h9
8r

'Ba1&ce

i[r7oo.oo
I20.00
300.00 l,3o.oo 3r7oo.oo 150.00 125.00
til ,265.-W

$ (708.35)
(

900.00

c 2W 25O 250 U 250 c
2N

(ro5.ob) (hr6rg.h9) . 58.\6
L23.00 L20.6L 2.52

?b3.82) 2.18

Library Dcpense

l{isc.
Total.

Travel Dcpense Mlsc. Dcpense

Teaching Suppltee Supplles

th0.00

31g.lp gt,5b 2'00

19.36

Instructlonal

$13r13b.90
660.19
L12]-:0.?6 297.5b
67

b$ 186g.go)

650 a

Custodian Supplies

IrBoo. oo

Irr39.5t
(

?20 a ?20 b
72O c 730 a 7b0 a
TlrO
U

Building Contract
Fquipment Contract Fqul-pnent Repl ac ernent Grounds a ofher F.:rpense Building - Obher Drp. EguiP. - Obher SrPenee.

Orounds Contract

I,

lr

ooo. oo Boo. o0

aro.

g6 )

Lr5O2.U6

750.00 100.0o 1,200.00
317oO.oo

rt5. gh
L1325.Q2

.57 87'|Q

682.\3 12.58 1r083.06
2 r37u,g8
7

?h0 c

175.00 tt8r725.oo 100.00

L01.75
il3r 207 .21

3.2b

Total haintenance
I2bo c
Equipment

{l; 5r 5]-7 .79

- fngtruct.

21L.71

(ur.Tr)

.
hglewood Board of, Educat!.on Per Prptl &talyolt. o{Se_Ieeteg-ntggnalhree - School lear 196O-61
Cleveland School
ADE

ETHIBIT A

for

the

.2

22A

Tstbooks
Pertodlealg Audlo Vtsrral

23O a 230 b 23o c 230 e 2b0 25o a 25O b 25o c

Llbrary Llbrary

$ 31200.00

Books

Dcpense

ltigc. Stppliee
lrtLsc. Erpense

teactrlng Suppltes Travel &rpense

860.oo 100.00 100.00 ?5.00 3ro5o.0o

1rilr?.10
L22.Lg

393,82

$ 2r8o6.tg

-

297,w Llg,gg 1r390.21
L73.3? 1r0. ?8
36,O7

( 22.19) (19?.bb) ( 81.99) Lt659.?9 (L73.3?)
L\.22
zbB.g3

(28?.rc)

125.0O 295.O0

65o a

Custodlan Suprplles Grourdg Contract

2roh8.oO

2ro31.Ih
3?.62 3?9.60 L77,63
7].',1'_?9

16.86
?37.38 21035. ho

?20 e ?20 b 720 o 730 a ?lo a

Buttdbg Contraat
Equlpment Contnect Equlprnent Replacecnent Grounds - Other Expense BufLdlng - Other Fapense

775.@ 3rh15.oo 250.00

lt

lroo?.oo
180.00
2ro2O.O0

Irft3.lrl
zrQI$.gg 6.0L
$11r?ll1.19

(506.In)

72.37

$37.79,

?lp

b ?ho c

( 26.99)
93'.96

Equlp.

-

Other @enee

100.00
$1?r59o.OO

TOTAT

$ 5r8h9.51

&ffiIBIT
Englmood Boerd

A

Pe1

hrnil. Anallrs$3nlfrti:*T$rffiendltures for the

of

Edtreatton

llberty

School

ADE lr22

"I
$ tr
g32.8L 1, ?8?.16 96.95 369.33 12?.bB

2N
230 230 230 230
2b0

3

Textbooks

a b c
c

Llbrary

Books

Perlodlcal.g Audlo Vtgua1 Teaching $uppllcc

Irh5o.oo lro5o.oo I00.00
325',OO

$

(bge.81)

0lt.16)

( bh.33)
2,52(3'085.b?)
he.L3 .c6 120.6b
(br rB1.3?)

3.O5

library

F,:cpense

L3o.oo 3r 8oo.oo

6,885.b?

250 25a b 250 o

Mtsc. Suppller
TraveL !11sc, E:cpense
Eorpense

t5o.o0
1B5.oo Lho.oo

lgh.

LO?.57 gb ].;9.36

Tota1
610

Instntctlonal $ ?1330.00
lr600.oo
300,0o 313oo.oo 5oo.0o 21600.00 5oo.oo 3rooo.0o 175.00

,iillr51L.3?
665.55
232,OO

I

Cuetodian SupplLea
Grounds Contraot

93b.15
2

?20 a ?20 b
72O c ?30 a ?b0 a

Butldlng Contract

rro22.bb
97.92 31228.2t 115.65

?bo u

Equiprnent Contract Equtpment Replacernent Grounds - 0ther Ercp.

68.00 r2?7 ,56 Loz,18 (628.21)

?lp

c

Buildlng - Other E:cp. Equlp. - Other E:rP. Total
Maintenance

lrt35.gg
10h.51+

38[.3h
1, B5l+.01 ?0.L5

ifror3?5.00
5oo.o0

'&5

,936 ''66 211.71

t'brh3B.3h
288,29

12h0 s

Equlpment

- fnstmct.

EIHIBIT
Englorood Board of Educatlon Anal;rsts of SeLected &cpendttureg Sctrool lear 1960-61

A

Per

foptl

for

the

Itber.t
ADE

SchooL .O

Acct.
220

!lo..

Aoco\lrt
library
Terctbooks Bookg

Appropflattc! Contract
$
zrBSo.oo LroSo.oo Loo.00
L1cr.2',25 g6.bB 2rO.73

EeIancE-

230 e 230 b
23O c 230 e 2b0 ?50 a

Perlodlcals

$ 2' ?L? ,t3 ( ra .25)
L3.5? (15o.?3 )

Audlo Vlgtral

Teaching fiupplles Ml,sc. Supplles

llbrary F,:cpense

l,,100.00
75.0o
2, ?oo,oo
I

th.68

6o.;2

'L1335'28 L70.26

250 b 250 c 65a a
72O a

Travel Facpense Misc. ,$rpense
Custodlan Suppllee
Grounds

125.00 2B5.oo
1, 82h . OO

h6.o?

L136\,72 (rzo, a6 ) r25.00
239,93

tr?lfl.30
33.97 927.55

82.70

?20 b
72O c

?30 a ?ho a ?ho ir ?10 c

Contract lr5O.oO Contract 11760.00 25O.0O Equlpment Contract Equipnent Replacement 2r0h2.00 Grorurd.s - Other Focpense 5OO.O0 BuLIdinB - Other bqr' 5r6L+o.OO Eqrip. - Other Eacpense 250.00
Bullding

Lr6.13
832,1$ L5,gg 257 .87 33L. oo
(z

23b.ot 1r?Blr.t3
L65.9L
?

'905.39 29.\3

rz65.3o)
230:57

EITIIBIT A
EngtEwood Board

of Eduoatlqr

Per Prrplt Analysls of Seleoted-F.lryendittueo - Schoo1 Year 1961-62

-

for the

Lincoln Sehool ADE .1

Acct. No"
22O-3 230 a

Accorrnt

latlon
$ 2r0oo.oo
1r15o,oo
1,10.00

Contract

ial"ttc"
$

230 b 230 c 230 e zbo
250 250 b 250 c

Tertboolcs Llbrary books Periodlcal,E'

$ 3,350'.56

Lrgrl.3g
106.19
772.OL 127.b9
B

(r,350.56 )

(
(

Audlo Vtsual

Llbrary bcpenee Travel Eocpense ltllsc, Expense
TSSAI,

100.00 130.00
b rlrOO.0O

Teaching Supplles l,1lsc. Supplles

l,5o.oo L25. OO

.8hl,.l-g -l2g.Bh h2.oo 60.36

3.81 6?2.ot ) 2,5L (h,tdrl.19 ) 20.16 83.00
7g.6Lr

r0r '3,9)

.1L0.09

$ 8r3o5.oo
1r900.00

$15r3h1.03

$(?r035"03)

650 a ?20 a ?20 b
72O a

Crrstodtan SupplLes

666.70

l,233 .30
L66,-5O

?30 I ?ho a ?bo u 7lr0 c

200.00 Grqrnds Cmtract BuiJ.ding Contraet 5oo, oo ?50.0O Equipnent Contract Equipnent RePlacement 2,3oO.oo 5oo.oo Grounds - Othen E:cp. Bulldtng - Other ExP. 3r00g'00 Equlp. - O'bher E:cPense 175.00
TgTAL

33.50 13.bb 9b.19
2 1267.76
L55.,89

hB6,56 655.8L
32,.3l.t

f'376'7L

ttl,.Jq

3Lb.IL Lr623'29
53.7o
,

$ 'l ,l+25 "oo
-Ingtruction
800" 00

$ bro5a.69
211-,71

$ 3 r3?2.3L
5BB,29

L2bo o

Eq.uip.

AIHIBIT
Englewood Board

A

Per Prrpll AnalysLs of SeLected bq'enditrrres
School

of

Edrrcatlon

Iear

for

the

1960-51

Lincoln School
ADE 5b6"3

Aeet,
230 a 230 b
23O e 23O e 2h0 ?2o

No.

Aecsttttt Toctbooks

Appropriation
$3rboo.oo
11 33O. oO

Contaract

Balance

25o a. 250 b 250 c 65o a
72O a ?20 b 72A e ?30 a ?b0 a ?bo u ?ho c

Id.brary Books Periodi,cals Audio Vlsual Id.brarly Expense Teaehing Supplles Misc. Suppltes Trave1 Exp.

$

L00.00 100.00 75.oo 3, 2oo. oo
I

b7b.62 1ro6h. g2 101.73 196.98 3L2.90 21239.6L 2L6.6L
80. eh ?1'O?

$ 2,925.38

(

265,o8

( 85.98)
9crt39 (216.61) W,76
2L3.93

t,?3 )

(nl.90)

l{isc.

125.00
285. oo

brpense

Custodian SuppJJ.es
Grorxrd Contract

2,L56,oO

2rL57 '25

(
(
(

1.25)
re.12 )

Buildtng Contract
Equipnent Contract Eqnpment Replacement Orounds - 0ther Eqtrip. Br.rllding a Other Equlp. Eguip. - Other I'ttqp.

:
25o. oo 116lrlr.00 280.00 3,17o. oO L5o. oo

trbl6"52

12,L2 2r:1"o5 17,3 .h3

( 7L..57 )
( h8 ,9L)
Lr256"gB

251.05 )

L6?.LB'

328.91 lr9]-3.O2 bL.5g

L08.bt

E'UI]8IT

A

.of Educatlon Per FrrpJt Analysls of Selected lbcperdltures Sehool Year L96L-62
Qusrles
SehooL ADE 3t61.2

Englewood 'Board

of the

20
z)o a ?T b
230 e

Tertbookg Llbrar"5r Bookg

$ 1,3oo.oo

l

Periodlcal,s Audio Vleual
Dcpcruc Teachlng Su1ryIles !11sc. Supp3;lee Travel Srpenee

rroo.oo l-10.00
L00 " 00

$ t,90?,94 r r8l2.8l
]':04'.6?

( e07,91

( Vz.at)

z)o

4n 29 29 29

e

Library

130.00 ,000.00 3

15o. oo

b
c

Mlsc. E:rpense
TOTAL

125.00 14p:oo

L92.97 L2?,49 5r52t+86 L23''07 281.15 , L?.72

(

5.?3 92,9?)

(z,szt+ ,36) 26.93

Zrfl

( Lfir5)
L?2,!U.

$ 6,t55"oo I ,220 . Co
400.00 300.0o 500.00 600.oo roo0.oo
, 75.00.

$to,o9t.8ll
669,42

(3,936"s4)

65o e

Custodian Suppllee
Grounds Contract

53t.fr
395 "AO

?Na

?nb 7nc
T)O a
7t+o a

5.00
2t+5,4L

BuiLdlng Contract Dqulprnnt Contract
Equlprnent Replaaement Grounds - OLher &(P. BuJldtng - Other bcp.

l

trW-j'36 I2:', ?9
979. fl. L0?- q0

85'67

(t,u5.36)

t+]'lt.i3

54.59

?40 u ?40 c

21394'-00

Equlp.
TOIAI,

-

Other Ecpense

lrl[l].49 ( q2. qo\
$
zroo4.Z6

974.n

$ sr26g.oo

$ 3 a264,2t+

1zl0

0

Equip.

- Ingtruction

500.00

zLL,T

388,29

EXHIBIT A'

of B&eatlon Per hrpll Analysls of Selert_"9-Fqendltures School Year 19@6f
Quarles School

Englarvood *Boarrl

for

the

Acct.
220
239. a
ZJO;

No. Te:stbooks Llbrary Books

Contract

$ 2r29A.@
l,r32o.oo 100.00 100.00

$

ggg.30
108. 88 1.31.L5

tizoo
tb.59

$

b

23O.c 23O e 2h0

Perlodl.cala Audlo Vlsua1

2r}g?,7O 330.?0 a.8g )

(

Llbrary

E:rpense

250 I 250 b

Teaching Supplleo ; Misc. Supplies

75'-@ 2rL5o. oo
I

( tr.h5)
50.31
399. Bo
9''- 'a6 ?j.3"O3

25oc.
6to a

Travel Expense l,tlsc. E4pense
Custodian Supplles
Grounds Contract

125.00 285.00

1,750.20 L62,@ 33.9b 7L.97
11727.63 69b.37

(toz.60)

Irb6B. oo

(zilg.sl)

72Q a ?20 b

Buildlng Contract

72Q c 730 a 710 a ?Lo u 7L0 c

Equip. Other

Equipnent Gontraet Equlpment Replacement Grounds Other E:qpense Buildlng Other llcp.
Scpense

250.00

-

blh.63 lrbo:.; lrl Lr12i.,;:1
15

(bu,6i)
(1,295.1r

(6eb'.J?)
1-76.76

lr

21579.9 L[0.00
23o.oo 60.oo

lt

?3,2L
3?3 " BB

Lrz}r.l2

)

.1!

LO?.5g bL. 86

EI(HIBIT Xnglewood Board

A

Per hrplt Analysln of Selocted-ftqgodttures .Sctroo.L Iear L96L42
Roosevelt School
ADE
a

of Educatlcn

for the

Acct.
l{o.

rlatlon
Toctbooks

Contr.

Balance

2n
230 e 230 b 234 c 230 e
2L0 250 250 b 250 c

Llbrary

Boolcs

$lr2oo.oo L,0oo.c0
L20,00 15O.oo l-30.0o
3r2OO.oo 150,0O

$

2,52? ,72 Lr792.b2 206.q2

Audlo{lsual Materlals Libraqy Focpense
Travel Srpense
IlLs

PeriodicaLa

llL.61
r27.1$

( (

($rr3e? .72) lgz.be )
8.'39

Sd.or )

Teachlng Suppltee Mls cellaneous Srry-o lles

5, B1o.5L

( 21610,j1)
\i:,,1'5 110.00

2.rL

125.00
bcpens e

Lor.ob 15.00
L7.36

cellaneous

ilo.oo

L22.6\

TotaL lnstructLonal
650 e
72O e 720 b 7ZO o 730 a 7h0 a ?bo u ?bo c

$€l]5.09
$rr1oo.oo
3OO.'00

$to. Tog.t?
672 "32

($lrJ2!rI3,)

Custodial Supplles Buildtngs-Contract
Grounds-Contract

$

l+27.68

Equtpment Contract Equlp . Repl.-IDstilctlmal Grorrnds-Other EDCP. Buildings-Other &(P. Equip . -Other Dcp .

900.00 5oo"oo 70o.co 1100o.00 2,7oo"oo
175.OO

227 "Cn 518 "2h h', 58 67't ,'13
336,,',.rJ

T3,oo 38L.76
h5B
27 "l+2

"77 663,'50

Lr275.92 L35.32
3

1rhzh.o8 39.68

Total
12lr0c

Maintenance

$S-il5,"09
b5o.oo

,2N).79

$f&e"21
239.29

Equlp.

-Iretruction

'2r1.71

B:UTIBIT A

Fr

Prrpu AnsLisis of_ SJeoted TN:penditures School Year 1960-6L
Roosevelt School AXE 31h.5

Englerood Board,

of Edttcation

for the

Appropriatlon
220 23O e 23O b 23O c 23O e 2b0 250 a 250 b 25A e

Contract

lextbooks Ltbrar:F Books Perlodicals Audio Visual

i| 2rloo.oo
b30.00 100.00 L00.00
75,0O
2r

h?6.6

93.6h

$

Library E:pense
Teachlng Supplieo

86.2' 63.bt th.6g

2,006"36 ( b5.60) 13. ?5 36"59

oco.oo
_

Lr 310.29

Misc. Supplies

Iravel Enpense !!lsc. Ercpense
Custod:ian $rPplles
Grounds Contract

125.00 285.00 1,36h. oo hoo.0o 1,610.00
25O.OO

L52.59 33,9b

60.3r 68g.7r (r5z
253,93

"r9) ' 9L,,06

3r"07
1, BBB.g7

650 a

$zt+.97)

??o a 720 b
72O c

Lr999,87

(tr'gg

Equipnent Contract
Equlprrrcnt Replacement Grounds - Other Elcp. Brrilding - Other bcp.

Building Contract

th?.12
93O.7O

998;J
(
(

730 a ?lr0 a ?bo u
?l+0 c

1,21o.oo 150,00
1, Boo.oo 90;00

930.38

6Lt'_65 102. BB 279.62

"

B?

)

2r'ia.28

Equip.

-

Qther

EnP.

t2.79

tzo. zo ) t3o. z8 ) 77.2r

Elfiibit
Cogt Per

B

,-- '

hrptl of

&rglernrod Board

of lkhrcation
&cpendLtures

, SgLgqtJgtlr 1o6.1-6-L.--.r--+

Se"Lectecl

fr,r the
Fopseyg&

Cle_r#bn4

Libertv
b.?3 '?3 .88 .30 16"3L .?5 $26,?g

Lincoln

Quarlglr

tertbookg

Librarg

$ 4.gg
3.33
,-21+

q, 4" 58

$ 6.t6
3.5L L,h2 .23. L6.25 .2b
le28.OI

$

5,.28

Booke

Periodia'alg Ardio-Visus,I MaterJaLs

.&

5.O2

Library

Focpenee

Teaching Supplies Xiscellan€ous Supplles

.82 2.52 16.8? .19 t28.85

.

.29 . .54 ,35 L5,29 ..34

{r 6. ga 4.85 .30 .56 ,35 L5.72 .2?
1528.89

Total
Custodlal Supplies
Aryipuent-Contract
Eqn ipne nt -Rep lac ement

-

-

-

$e7.tl

-

$ 1.34

$ t.58

fi t.z3

l' 1.85

$ r.81

$

.r4
.18 .20

$ .zj

Eoripcrent-Other Eop.

'l '65
.25

$ .rT
4.1?

i

.2L
b.7 5

e .ljl

I"82
.37

'?J

,30

r96o:gl

Terctbooks Llbrary Eooks

$

,7? 2,25
,21+

$

.30
2.AO

t'

,87 L.g5

$

,39
2.
r19

4, .30

Porioclicalg

Audlo-llisual Uatc d.als Library Expenee

,58

.3I
tt)

Teaehing Supplles IvtiscelLaneoue $uppl:les

' 2,73 .31+ -- 7,?2 t,

.20 '57 '03 3.01
.n?8

.rg
,.31*

l.5l

'2?
.33
.0/+

.57 4,10
. AIJ

jtl --, '
$ 9.32

4.40

4.U
.)t

.27 ,20 .05
cn

Total
Equipluent-Contract
lJquipmen t-BepJ,a
c

6.89

!r

,3,
2.9? .01

$

--

$ 8,42

**

enent

,5." . l+.03

!i

,33 2.?O

{r,

Equipnent-Other Fap.
Custodial" SuppJ;le s

'0?

.08

.18 3.b5 .04

$

.47 2.96
,r04

$ 3.99

$ 3.93

$ 3.95

lo b.3tt

$ 5.or

}TE{ONANDU{ ON AI!{INISTNATIOII 0If BC[[\rDAflf LINES

f,rl{corN AlrD IJBEffTY SC}loOtS The tnterpretatlon

BE["rtEEN SCI'?H OF

r85

LNFAYEITE PI,ACE

of the boundary llne ls that snJtone ltvtng on Iafayette Place eouth of number 185 nay harrc the optlon of attendance
lntertr )erty at etther Ltncoln or l.lberty School. The tnterpretatlon lg e:rtended to nean that aly dwelltng adjacent to the gtdewalk on Laf,ayette Pl.. nay
have

thts optton even though entrance to the dwelling may be around the corner on one of the slde streets Thero ehould be no dtrfflculty on Ftrst and Second Streetg sfpr-;t .,.
eortler lotg are either nacant lo+,s or are occupied by houseg opentng

dlrectly

on

Lafaptte Place wtth Lafayette Place addresgeg. 0n the

south cortletr of Thtrd $breet and Lafa;rctte Place
whleh uges the address 19? tafaSrette

ls

en apartrnent bulldtng

for the resldence
seens
and

dweL).1ng

Place. Ther entr'ance to thts apartment 1g arorrnd the corner on Third Street. There

to be no residence

the usual resldence

to thls apartment for Thtrd Street number glven for thts apartment ts 19? tafaJrette
number glven

Place. 0n the south corn€r of ttrarren $treet and Lafayette Place
aparbnent wtth stores factng
Warren

tg an
on

lefayette Plaoe and regldence entranceg
on Warren

S:treet. The entrance

Sfreet ts destgnated as 255.

Chtldren entertng fron thtg sddress nay have the optton of attendance
between

the two schooLs. Just east of thLs apartnent on Wanren Street

ls

a house wtth the address

zfi,

ThLs house

ls

separated frorn the
between

apartment by an

alley

and

thLs all.ey must represent the dtvlsion

the two schoo1s. In other wordg, chlldren r€stdtng at 236 Warren Street are regulred to attend the Llncoln School. chlldren restdtng at 255
hramen $breet have

the optlon of Llncoln gshool or liberty

Schoo].

Children re6idtng Forest

ln hones located east of Lafayette Hlace' on chiJ-dren Avenue are requlred to attend the Llncorn school.
homeg on

resldlng tn

Foregt Avenue west of Lafayette Place are !€-

quired to attend the Llberty School ' date The above are regulatlons 1n operatiori as of' the i:resent
January

20, ]:95\ and have been conttnuously in operatton for

nan;r

years precedlng

this date.

snAfs{ENt

0F A DSIAIIED IlnEffRErATroN

OF'

B([lNDAnr ilNE$ FtR scHOoI, IE.AR tgSL-Sl

Ilrrlng the eehool I'ear

L95l+-55

the boundary ltnee for ktndergarten
and

and

flrst

grade chtldren between Cleveland School

Ltberty School ntll be as

follolw: ttberty
Roed and the Teaneck

llne,

southeast

to Trpn

Avenue along

to Central Avenue, eouth on Central Avenue to SLocum Avenue and east on Slocum Avenue to the rallroad. The llne w111 nrn baek of the properttee on the northeast etde of liberty
ltberty
Road, eaet on Tryon Avenue and Jane $breet Road,

wt}} run ln the mtddle of the road fron Ltberby Boad along Tryon Arrenue to the lntergectlon wtth Jane Street east of l(ntckeribocker Road t
wg.l run back of the properties on the eouth stde of Jane $treet tc CentraL Avenue, back of the propertles on the wegt stde of Central Avenua

to the rallroad. Children south and west of thle ltne w111 attencl klndergarten and flrst grade in the Llberty Schoo1. Ghlldren north ,3nd east of the ltne w111 attend Klndergarten
and on the south gtde

of

Slocum Avenue

and

the ftrgt grade tn the

Clevel,and School.

A more opeolfle tntebpretatlon along any

the course of the llne ts that

chltd for klndergar.ten or flrst grade whoge residenee is Qn Jane .Sbree0t Sl.ocum Avenue or CentraL Avenue wlth nunbers 190 or above t'tLl attend
Clevelancl School. Anrl
rrrhose

chlld

who

ls to attend klndergarten or ftrst
of

grade

address

ls

on Ltberty Road or Tryon Avenue weEt

Jane $breet or

Central Avenue wlth numbers 186 and lower, w111 attend l tberty School.. Boundary ltnec for chtlrlren attendi.ng achool grades two throrgh etx

wtll

remeln eE they haw operated
The boundary

for the gchool y€er 1953'51.
Llberty School for

llne

between Ltncoln School and

chtldren uho wlll enter klndergarten tn Septewrber 195L w111 run west to eaet from the Teaneck ltnq to the rallroacl on the rear of the property

llnea factng north on Pallaadc Arrqruc. Chll4re,n llvlng gouth of thl'g ttng
end r,iect

of thc Epte Ra1[road ]rIIt attcnd thp Ltncoln Sctrool klndergetten. Thc sinple tnterpretatlon of thlg rtrlg td ttrat anY chlld wtrose addrcas i'e on palieade Avenue urtll attend kindergarten ln the Llber{y Schoo1 and alt
chlldren aorth of thla gtreet and west of the raiJ.road wlll attend l,lncoln
School lcfudergarben.

Chi.].drenattendinggradesonethrcugirgixinLibertySchoolandl.trrcoln by a bourdarlp SchooL wtll continue tn thelr respectlve schoolg establighed
property ]j[ne whlch beglns at thc Erie Railroad and rrrrrs rrBst along the rear Ilnes on pallsade Avenue to Armory Street eouttr along the rear of the proper"by l!.nes on
Armor'5r

Street on the nest gide of ttre street to Brgtrerrcod

Avetrrue,

across the Park, east

of the houeeg on E'Lnore Avenue, to a point on Iafayette place at Fmnklln Road, south in the niddle of Iafayette Place to the Teaneck line. ChlJdren livtng north and west of this llne are to
attend the Llberty School grades oae tbrough six and chlJdren
and eaet

living

eouth

of this Iine are to attend the Llnoln School grradea one through slxr wlth the excepu.on tlrat chiJ.dr.en llving lri houses faclng on Lafayettc place or on corn€r lota whlch abut Lafayette Place eay have the option of atterdlng either school. The eastem bounda4T of the l;jncoln School dlstd,ct ls the Erae Rallroad nrrurlng fnon the point at the rear of
properby

llnes on Palisade

Avenue along

the raifuoad to

Van Nostrand

Aventre and fnon

tlrere, uest to the

Temeclc

llne.

of Llrden Avenue will attend ktndorgartqr a'd first grade tn Frankltn Schoo1 and tJre boundary llne wjjtt remain ae ig between Franl&tn and Roose\relt Schoola for all chlldren above firgt
Chlldren 1lvtng on the north
grade

for the year L954-r5.'
I

Jnrre 28, L95l+,

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