Pioneer review

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A Publication of Ravellette Publications, Inc., Philip, South Dakota 57567. The Official Newspaper of Haakon County, South Dakota. Copyright 1981.
Number 3
Volume 107
September 13, 2012
continued on page 15
Market Report
Winter Wheat, 12 Pro...........$8.19
Any Pro .............................$7.39
Spring Wheat, 14 Pro...........$8.10
Milo........................................$7.13
Corn.......................................$7.28
Millet ...................................$24.75
Sunflowers .........................$29.50
Fridge Door Page 16
by Nancy Haigh
Issues with proposed railroad
upgrades, a locked gate and 4-H
were discussed by the Haakon
County Commission at their Sep-
tember 4 meeting.
Highway department assistant
Val Williams updatec the board on
the ongoing issue between an out of
state landowner and a Pierre area
hunter.
The hunter has appealed to the
board throughout the summer for
help dealing with the landowner so
that he can access Corps of Engi-
neering for hunting purposes.
A no maintenance county road
lies within a fenced portion of the
landowner’s land. The road which
goes throughlandowner’s land does
not stretch all the way to Corps
land. The latest request was for the
landowner to remove a lock on a
gate that crosses the road.
Williams noted that it is illegal, ac-
cording to South Dakota Codified
Law, to have the gate locked since
it crosses a county road.
The commissioners noted they
could not do much as it is a matter
between the two parties. They did
approve for State’s Attorney Gay
Tollefson to mail a letter to the
landowner for him to remove the
lock.
The out of state landowner uses
his land for hunting purposes as
well as raising deer.
Mike Seager discussed the pro-
posed Dakota Mill and Grain up-
grade project and its possible ef-
fects on flooding near his home.
Seager showed the board footage
from a flood in 1996 and photos
from the 2008 flood. Seager said be-
tween those years the Dakota, Min-
nesota and Eastern Railroad had
worked on a trestle bridge. He said
part of the trestle was filled in with
dirt with the other end being left
open for water flow. He noted that
now water cannot flow through the
area fast enough.
Seager believes that if DM&G
goes through with their plan, that
the flood plain will lose even more
reservoir area. He said he doesn’t
want to stop DM&G’s progress, just
for them to look hard at what will
happen. “I think there are too
many people involved to gamble on
it,” he said.
The commission is unsure at this
time what, if any authority, they
would have over the project. The
recently reorganized Haakon
County Regional Railroad Author-
ity would probably be the entity to
have any say, along with the city as
most of the land is within city lim-
its.
A review of the current 4-H pro-
gram agreement with Jones, Jack-
son, Mellette and Haakon counties
was discussed. A year ago the
county’s submitted an agreement
to South Dakota State University
for the four county program. The
agreement was for a one year term.
Sheryl Hansen, administrative Ex-
tension assistant, stated that there
was a possibility that Jones County
may not renew the agreement.
Clements said he would like to
meet with the other counties to get
their opinions. Options discussed
were a three county co-op or possi-
bly just Haakon and Jackson coun-
ties tied together. Hansen stated
she had spoken with the 4-H advi-
sor in Bennett County, who only
serves that county, to see how
everything has worked for them
the past year.
Linda Edel, Western South
Dakota Community Action, Rapid
City, outlined her organization for
the commission. She said the pro-
gram encompasses most of western
South Dakota. It aids low income
and elderly with financial mat-
ters – everything from school sup-
plies to heating and air cond- ition-
ing. She said she believes Haakon
County is getting short changed for
support since they do not have a
person on the WSDCA board. The
commission approved Steve
Clements as Haakon County’s rep-
resentative.
The board approved the 2013
provisional budget, warrants and
meeting minutes with corrections
for August 7 and 21.
The board will meet in regular
session Tuesday, October 2, at 1:00
p.m.
Commission hears residents’ concerns
by Del Bartels
“The opportunity knocks; I
opened. This is still the United
States of America, after all,” said
Beverly “Donna” Paraiso about
coming to Philip from her home-
land of the Philippines.
Paraiso is a trained laboratory
technician, who is now a full time
permanent employee with Philip
Health Services, Inc. She arrived in
town August 13 and began work
August 15. Everything is still tak-
ing some adjustment, but not con-
cerning one of her co-workers. Lab-
oratory technician Melanie Berdin
is also from the Philipines and has
been working for PHSI for several
years.
“I used to work with her there,
she was my senior,” said Paraiso.
Otherwise, “Nothing is the same
here as back home ... except maybe
English.” English is one of the
main languages in the Philippines.
Kent Olson, chief executive offi-
cer for PHSI, commented about
Paraiso and Berdin, “We are so
happy that Donna is here. We can’t
say enough about their work ethic,
they are great workers.” Due to a
shortage of lab techs in the United
States it has been difficult to find
lab techs for Philip. Lab techs col-
lect samples and perform tests to
analyze body fluids and tissues.
“I got here by accident,” said
Paraiso, referring not only of Philip
but of her medical profession. “I
wanted to be a journalist, as a
preparation for law; maybe because
I was young and still didn’t have
the direction. My mother is a nurse
and she is good.” Paraiso later got
into medical technology because
she believed it was the best prepa-
ration for medical school, “but in
my third year I decided that would
be a bit much.”
Paraiso completed her bachelor
of science degree in medical tech-
nology, then added over seven
years experience in the profession
before coming to America. “Every-
body wants to come here. This is
one of my lifelong dreams, to fulfill
the American dream,” said Paraiso.
Connie Sandstrom, manager of
the PHSI lab, said, “She’s a very
eager worker, very friendly. She’s
just friendly! And, she does a good
job. It’s fun to work with people like
that. It makes the day go by bet-
ter.”
One reason for Paraiso’s outlook
on work is the tremendous popula-
tion of the Philippines. “Back
where I come from, it’s more hectic,
busier, really busy actually. A
month here is our day there,” said
Paraiso.” Matter-of-fact, she said
that the quiet will take some get-
ting used to.
“I’m into American movies and
American novels. I know the drill.
There are Americans back home;
no big change for me.” said Paraiso.
“I like it here. Everybody’s friendly,
accommodating. Way before, I
thought Americans were friendly.
They didn’t disappoint me at all.”
She misses the food, and family
from home, of course. Her culture
holds on to extended families;
where her grandmother’s house,
uncle’s house, brother’s family’s
house are all nearby in what she
referred to as a compound. “... big
thing for us ... extended family,”
said Paraiso. “Here, you move out
at 18, right?”
The food is different back home.
The spaghetti is sweeter. Her fa-
vorite is seafood, especially fresh
shrimp. “I love the beach, but I
can’t find a beach here. Back home
we have a beach in walking dis-
tance,” said Paraiso. She enjoys
watching movies, surfing the Inter-
net, lawn tennis, and “track and
field is my way, way back sport.”
She already knows how to ride
horses, “When I tried it for the first
time, the trainer thought I was a
pro,” said Paraiso.
Paraiso joins PHSI as lab tech
Golden West Telecommunica-
tions Cooperative members will
elect four representatives to the
board of directors at the coopera-
tive’s 60th annual meeting, Satur-
day, September 22, in Wall.
All attending members will re-
ceive a free noon meal, a registra-
tion gift, the opportunity to win
door prizes and a chance to win a
$500 grand prize.
This year, four of Golden West’s
15 board seats are up for election.
Three incumbents are running un-
opposed, while District V has four
challengers vying for the open seat.
The District V incumbent,
Harold Wyatt, is not running for
re-election. Lyle Jensen, Stewart
(Stu) Marty, David Mayer and
Lance Russell are running for the
open seat in District V for a four-
year term. Rodney Renner runs un-
opposed to represent District II for
a four-year term. Lee Briggs runs
unopposed to represent District III
for a four-year term. Jeff Nielsen
runs unopposed to represent Dis-
trict IX for a four-year term.
Co-op members may vote in all of
the board elections regardless of
their district of residence.
For the third year, co-op mem-
bers will receive their capital credit
return checks in the mail prior to
the annual meeting.
“Due to the cooperative’s strong
performance, Golden West’s board
of directors approved the return of
$4,208,145 in capital credit checks
to its members this year,” said
Denny Law, general manager and
chief of operations. This capital
credit retirement consists of the re-
maining 1998 allocations,
$1,500,000 for allocations gener-
ated in 2011, and an additional
$1,000,000 for allocations gener-
ated between 1999 and 2010.
The annual meeting schedule be-
gins with registration at 10:30
a.m., with the official business
meeting following at 1:00 p.m.
10:30 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. Registra-
tion at Wall Community Center.
Members will receive a gift and a
meal ticket
11:00 a.m. – 12:45 p.m. Free ham
or hot beef dinner at local restau-
rants.
1:00 p.m. Business meeting, to
include election of directors and re-
ports by Law and Board President
Rod Renner. Entertainment by the
Itty Bitty Opry Band.
Golden West meeting
by Del Bartels
A congressional town hall meet-
ing was held in Philip, Wednesday,
September 5. It was lead by South
Dakota’s lone House of Representa-
tives member, Kristi Noem.
Area citizens, gathered in the
Haakon County Courthouse com-
munity room, were first presented
information about current hot top-
ics. These topics included the de-
layed Farm Bill and the current
drought conditions with its con-
nected disaster programs. The floor
was then opened to any questions
from the 40 plus member audience.
Noem said she and her peers are
trying to get the latest Farm Bill
passed, but are concerned about
what happens if they bring a Farm
Bill onto the floor and it fails. “I
have found that every senator has
some type of ag in their districts.
The house isn’t like that,” said
Noem. She related that some rep-
resentatives are from districts that
have no agricultural concerns by
their constituents.
Noem related that the national
budget and debt are top issues on
which all others depend. “We don’t
have a plan for our future. We don’t
have a plan to balance our budget.
We have 10,000 people every day
retiring,” said Noem. Those 10,000
are no longer part of the work force,
and they are also becoming part of
the population using Medicare and
Medicaid. “Our entire state budget
here in South Dakota is $4 billion,
and that is how much the Ameri-
can government is going in debt,”
explained Noem. According to cur-
rent figures, the United States is
spending approximately $3.88 bil-
lion per day.
Noem said that when she asks
groups of people, “How many of you
truly believe your grandkids will be
better off than you are,” not too
many of those people raise their
hands.
Later in the meeting, she said,
“What some people don’t under-
stand is two-thirds of our spending
is on auto pilot,” said Noem. “Obvi-
ously Republicans and Democrats
are both to blame.” She said that
the United States has accumulated
more debt in the last three years
than during the administrations of
the first 43 presidents. Barack
Hussein Obama is America’s 44th
president.
Audience member Philip Mayor
Mike Vetter, asked the rhetorical
question of how can the deficit be
reduced if one political party will
not raise taxes and the other party
will not reduce spending?
Noem explained that she is not
in favor of raising taxes, but loop-
holes, taxing exceptions and other
questionable tax issues must be ad-
dressed. “We have the highest cor-
porate income tax rate in the
world,” said Noem. She said that
America needs those corporate in-
terests, which have looked to head-
quartering in and hiring workers
in other countries. They need to
come back to America and need to
get people back to work here.
Jim Stangle used a veterinarian
based example to show that the ad-
ministration has been creating reg-
ulations to go around the congress-
ional bill process. He said that
when a veterinarian organization
lobbied the Food and Drug Admin-
istration, they and their efforts
were irrelevant.
Noem agreed and used her own
example. Environmental Protec-
tion Agency standards must be
made to not include dust produced
from farming operations. “These
regulations can change your lives
overnight,” said Noem. “This EPA
is the most anti-business and anti-
farmer EPA we’ve ever had.”
Still illustrating unnecessary
and constricting regulations, Noem
stated that a study showed that
businesses pay about $10,000 per
employee just to fulfill all the reg-
ulations involved in having that
employee.
She said that the administration
vetoed the Keystone XL pipeline
applications, and the administra-
tion is determined to kill any legis-
lation that has the pipeline at-
tached to it.
Current health care initiatives,
referred to as “Obamacare,” was
also brought up by the audience.
“We’ve got to change people to
change the vote,” said Noem. She
used an example of a young adult
in a different state trying to save
money by remaining on her par-
ents’ health plan in South Dakota,
thus raising their premiums. Many
such considerations arise under the
heading of “Obamacare.” “All these
things are going to completely
change the future of health care.
“Now we’ll have a non-elected
board of 15 bureaucrats who will
decide who gets Medicare. Just be-
cause more and more people get on
Medicare programs, doesn’t mean
they will get care,” said Noem.
With such programs designed to
pay less than other patients’ rates,
doctor after doctor might have to
say they cannot afford to treat peo-
ple on these programs.
Audience member Jerry Rhodes
related such board power as eu-
thanasia. Noem saw the connec-
tion, and said, “Any time we don’t
get to make our own decisions on
our own health care, I think it’s
alarming.” She said that if the new
health care were voted out, replac-
ing it would have to be done in
steps, not a complete take over.
Audience member Roger Porch
Congressional town hall
South Dakota’s lone United States Representative, Kristi Noem, visited in Philip,
September 5. Photos by Del Bartels
Discussing concerns toward the end of the of the congressional town hall, from
left: Bill Sandal, Jim Stangle, Representative Kristi Noem and Duke Westerberg.
by Del Bartels
“Because I can,” said Boyd
Waara at his retirement celebra-
tion at the First National Bank in
Philip, Friday, September 7.
Waara said that he first came to
Philip in his capacity with the of-
fice of comptroller of the currency,
which charters, regulates and su-
pervises national banks. “I liked
the town. I liked the kind of busi-
ness being done by this bank –
farmers and ranchers, which is
how I grew up in Buffalo,” said
Waara.
“I told Charlie Ekstrum if there
was ever an opening, call me.
About a year he called me, and I’ve
been here ever since. They’ve been
good to me here. It’s been a great
place to work,” he said.
“The first advice I got was it can
sometimes be tough doing business
with your friends. But, I can’t
imagine ever doing different,” said
Waara.
“I never thought I ever wanted to
live where other jobs were. And, I
liked being only a couple of steps
from the boss. If I ever had a ques-
tion, I could walk over and get the
answer,” said Waara.
Ray Smith, president of FNB in
Philip, said, “We appreciate the 40
years of his being a loan officer,
vice president, being part of the
community such as chamber of
commerce, Soil Conservation Serv-
ice, Republican Party, and I can’t
name them all. He will be greatly
missed, and we wish him and
Jeanie well in his reirement.”
Waara said that he’s been semi-
retired for about a year now, and
has less time than ever. He plans
on continuing his “messing around
with” a campground near Sturgis
which he is a co-owner.
Waara said that it has been a
great place to live and work. He
does not plan on going anywhere.
“If someone thought they’d get rid
of me because I’m retiring, they’re
out of luck,” said Waara.
Waara retires after 40 years
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Thursday, September 13, 2012 • The Pioneer Review • Page 2
Pioneer review
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I think hummingbirds must
have ADHD (Attention Deficit Hy-
peractivity Disorder.) They are
such extremely busy little critters
that they’re apt to give you the jit-
ters just watching them.
As you might guess, a humming-
bird visited us the other day. It
was so tiny that I might have
passed it off as a moth if wife
Corinne hadn’t pointed it out to
me. There it was zipping from one
morning-glory blossom to another
in rapid succession. Then it might
blast off over east a bit or up over
the roof and back. Next it would re-
visit all the blossoms. It was some-
what of a relief when it finally flew
off and didn’t return.
Actually, to the best of my recol-
lection, this is only the second
hummingbird I’ve ever seen in my
life. The first time was so long ago
that it might now be classed as
fairly ancient history. Corinne had
been telling me she’d seen this pe-
tite bird a couple times this sum-
mer, but yesterday was my first
time. It was too small, too far
away, and much too busy to get a
good look at so positive identifica-
tion has been delayed – possibly
forever. Odds are it was of the
ruby-throated variety since those
are the most common.
As you may know, these birds
are unique in that they are sort of
the helicopters of the bird world.
They move their wings so quickly
that they are a blur, and they can
hover as well as move in any direc-
tion – up, down, left, right, for-
wards and backwards. They may
be the only bird that can fly back-
wards. Since they are so unique, it
was kind of fun to actually see one,
but, due to their nervousness, I
was satisfied with just a brief look.
All this hyperactivity reminded
me strongly of son Chance’s early
years. He was one busy kid. We
might think he was quietly watch-
ing TV in the living room until we
looked out the window and saw
him dancing down the ridgepole of
the barn. Keeping up with that boy
was often a challenge. Now since
Chance has developed myasthenia
gravis, the tables have turned and
some days he barely moves. I’m not
sure which condition is harder to
deal with. Something in the middle
might be easier for all involved.
Thinking of hyperactivity also
reminds me of a fellow named Rich
who used to come hunting on our
place. He was actually an aide to
U. S. Senator Tom Daschle, and we
got acquainted with him when
Senator Daschle was helping us
fight off having a 6,000-acre dump
built on our east border complete
with railroad spurs and other un-
desirable features.
Rich, though, was definitely hy-
peractive which went well with his
somewhat reddish hair. I recall the
day he came hunting with several
friends who all ate dinner with us
at our invitation. It had rained
overnight so the guys had slogged
around in mud that morning and
been led by Rich all over including
up hill and down dale. They were
pretty tired by noon. Right after
eating, Rich was all ready to head
out again, but the other guys
weren’t. Instead, they went out-
side, laid flat out in the sun in the
yard, and fell into exhausted sleep.
You could tell Rich thought this a
great waste of time although he
tried to join them. That didn’t work
out, though, and before long he had
everybody up and going again. I
suspect those fellows slept really
well that night.
One day I noticed a contraption
on the dash of Rich’s vehicle and
asked what it was. He said it was
a “fuzz buster” or radar detector. I
imagine going the speed limit
seemed painfully slow to someone
who was always in high gear. This
fellow also went through several
wives which I rather assume was
because he was exhausting to live
with despite the fact that he was
pleasant and likeable. Unfortu-
nately, Rich died at a relatively
young age from cancer, but it is
fairly possible that he packed as
much living into his few years as
some of us have accomplished in
more time.
Today I didn’t see any humming-
birds. Instead, a large turtle ap-
peared in the bird’s flower patch.
Talk about a contrast. The turtle
sat perfectly still on the retaining
wall for quite a long time so I could
easily tell his shell was dark green
above and many bright shades of
red, orange and yellow below. He
was quite a pretty fellow and didn’t
appear to have a nervous bone in
his body. He did inspect the area
by moving his head back and forth
a few times, but that’s about all he
did. After awhile, I guess he de-
cided he should go east for some
reason, after which he ambled off
that way until eventually he was
out of sight. He certainly didn’t
jangle my nerves, obviously, but he
was maybe just a little boring to
watch. Okay, a lot boring.
My observations of wildlife this
week have therefore shown that
apparently there is room in this
world for both the speedy and the
slow and all points in between.
That’s probably a good thing, don’t
you imagine?
Make your opinion known … write a letter to the editor!
Fax signed copy to 859-2410 or e-mail with your
phone number to: newsdesk@pioneer-review.com
Guest Editorial
The Dignity of Life … by Bill Kunkle
America is one of the few remaining countries that allows its states
to use the death penalty. And South Dakota is one of those states.
For a state to kill people to demonstrate that killing is wrong is
crazy.
Human life is a gift from God, sacred from conception to natural
death. More and more people are calling for the end to this barbaric
practice. That for a country, or a state, to assert its values such as dig-
nity, justice and peace, and yet allow human life to be devalued by ex-
ecution makes no sense. The death penalty not only demeans life of
the one executed, but erodes our national dignity.
States with executions do not generally have lower murder or crime
rates.
Can we hope that one day we can see headlines that say, “Capital
punishment banned in United States”?
Everyday wonders ... by Del Bartels
My son called from his bedroom as he was toweling off his hair and
jumping into a pair of cutoffs. What was for breakfast? He had toast
and jam yesterday. Could he have hot oatmeal today?
I am always amazed by his attacking of everything as if it were new.
I am also often winded by his almost frantic search for new things,
which constantly illustrates the adage that younger people seem to
have a shorter attention span. He points out that something on televi-
sion sounds like one of my old LP records, and I begin to recognize a
Sinatra tune in the background of some video game commercial. By
then, though, he has noticed that our dog’s face is now grayer than it
is in a photo on the shelf. I start to digest this unsettling realization,
only to be told that it is still my turn on the chess board.
He uses every sense that he can every second he can. He touches,
listens, smells, tastes and watches all the time. Didn’t I once do that?
Outside, I have to move quickly in situating the sprinkler before he
has the well pump turned on. I point out that a turtle is crossing our
yard. My son studies the turtle, climbs the apple tree, snarfs down a
crab apple, swings out of the tree, reinvestigates the turtle, and re-
peats everything – all while I’m still marveling over the turtle. I feel
like that turtle. Perhaps my son isn’t noticing the details? No; he
knows what kind of turtle it is, that its back legs are thicker than its
front legs, that its claws are curved, that our old dog is no longer sniff-
ing at the turtle’s half-submerged head. Perhaps my son doesn’t really
care? No; he wonders aloud if the turtle is heading toward the almost
dry river south of our house, how it got to our yard, and if it liked the
sprinkler.
Why does my son’s constant searching for new sights, sounds,
touches and everything else irritate me? I sag my shoulders because I
think I know. I don’t want the new. I want to listen to Sinatra. I want
to take my time in remembering the first time I found a turtle, or
climbed an apple tree, or played with a not-old puppy. I want the old.
But, why? The new is good. Old friends should be cherished, but why
not find new ones as well? Why can’t a Sinatra tune be in a modern
commercial? Why can’t I climb the apple tree even though I’ve just
eaten a crab apple? Does an apple reached from the ground taste less
good? Actually, yes. The thrill of you climbing higher to get them does
make apples taste better. Even oatmeal tastes better if you didn’t have
it yesterday and if you won’t have it tomorrow.
He wants to ride his bike to somewhere. I want to sit down. When
he does sit, it is usually with one eye on the TV, one eye in a book, one
ear listening for friends outside, one hand petting the dog, both shoes
off so he can scrunch his toes in the carpet, and a cup of a different fla-
vored drink beside him. I am supposed to be the father and teacher,
but I pray that what he experiences is a contagious way of living.
“In three seconds it will be over – either way it will be over,” said Aaron Cross as
he prepared to draw back the bowstring with his teeth, then shoot a clay pigeon
from the fingers of Philip High School senior Thomas Doolittle. Actually, Cross, a
paralympic bronze medalist, had Doolittle sit by him as the placed target was
shot. In the Olympics, it is a 229 foot shot to a target the size of a coffee can.
by Del Bartels
An assembly at the Philip school
gymnasium called Motivation on
Wheels was held Monday, Septem-
ber 10, at 9:00 a.m.
Philip senior Thomas Doolittle
volunteered to hold a small clay pi-
geon to be shot from his fingers by
an arrow shot from a wheelchair-
bound paraplegic who had to draw
back the bow with his teeth.
As part of the Dakota Assemblies
program, Aaron Cross gave a mo-
tivational presentation about stay-
ing positive and going after one’s
dreams. Cross is a three-time par-
alympian in archery. According to
his Dakota Assemblies program
promotional, he has visited schools
in many states, giving a down-to-
earth message that is meant for all
ages.
Cross first told of the bicycle race
in which a support van stopped di-
rectly in front of him. At a speed of
approximately 38 miles per hour,
he struck the van and snapped his
neck in several places. A medivac
helicopter ride, an emergency
room, a surgeon, his father ... all
blended together. On that day in
1991, the doctors told Aaron and
his family, “The best thing you can
do for him is get him a good color
television and a good remote.” He
was a 15-year-old Olympian bicy-
clist hopeful who could run a mile
in 4:50. “Just like that it was all
gone.”
“You cannot feel your best
friend’s hug, you cannot feel any
hug ever again,” said Cross. Admit-
ting that he was probably depress-
ing the audience, he related that
his friend reported back to his
school, “Don’t worry. Aaron is a lit-
tle shorter and gets better parking,
but he’s just fine.” Upon returning
to a reconditioned home, he found
out that his own school wasn’t
going to have him back and he
would be going to a rival school.
His friends got 375 signatures of
fellow students who would transfer
as well if Cross had to. His school
allowed him to stay. Later his
friend stated during a school con-
cert that honored Cross, “You’ve
brought us together. We are closer
as a class than we have ever been.”
After the accident Cross began
working on getting his arms to
function. Back then, it took him
three hours to get undressed, show-
ered and redressed. Now, it takes
him 28 minutes to do that and get
in his vehicle to drive somewhere.
“Twenty-one years of focusing on
your target; twenty-one years of be-
lieving in yourself,” said Cross.
Using humor, Cross told of his
learning to swim, “It’s pretty sim-
ple; sink and swim.” Because of his
friends, he has learned to para-
chute, scuba dive, hunt and do
other activities. He told the audi-
ence, “Leading the pack or coming
in last – it’s about finishing.” He
also stated, “Remember, someone
always cares about you.” One day
his friend even thought it was a
good idea to put a weapon is his
hands. Cross has been shooting the
bow and arrow since.
As well as the Olympics, he
dreamed of being a Navy Seal. A
while back, the Seals invited him
for a visit. “The Seals brought me
into a training course. Beat the liv-
ing snot out of me! It was beauti-
ful!” said Cross.
According to his website; Aaron
Cross, born in Waterloo, Iowa, in
1975, graduated from Augsburg
College in 1997. He competed in
the 1996 Summer Paralympics and
in the 2000 Summer Paralympics,
but did not medal either time. He
went on to compete in the 2002
wheelchair archery world champi-
onships in Nymburk, Czech Repub-
lic. Finally, as a member of the
American team he won bronze in
archery at the 2004 Summer Para-
lympics.
Cross told the Philip students of
his FOCUS – friendships, obsta-
cles, caring, unity and self-esteem..
His website states, “Always sitting,
but never not in motion” and “Be-
cause life is about living, not won-
dering.”
School hosts Motivation on Wheels
by Del Bartels
The Philip City Council, in its
meeting, Tuesday, September 4,
approved the first reading of Ordi-
nance 2012-16, appropriations for
2013. The general fund budget is
$2,595,971, capital poject budget is
$1,998,300.00 and enterprise fund
budgets total $1,317,670.
The council approved paying the
month’s bills, which totaled
$120,375.99.
The council authorized Finance
Officer Monna Van Lint to utilize
$8,000 of sewer assigned cash for
the unanticipated expenses in-
curred with the installation of the
north lift station, east of the bowl-
ing alley.
The council approved the com-
puter and external drive quote
from Hometown Computer Serv-
ices in the amount of $1469.92. The
city offices have budgeted to switch
out its office computers on a rota-
tion basis.
The lowest monthly bid for
propane was by Fitzgerald Oil
Company at $1.20 per gallon.
A public hearing was held con-
cerning the proposed street im-
provement projects. Some land-
owners who have property affected
by the curb and gutter work were
in attendance. The estimates of
how much each landowner would
have to pay were questioned.
Mayor Mike Vetter said, “An esti-
mate is an estimate. If the bids
come in too high, we can’t do the
project at all.” Finance Officer
Monna Van Lint reassured the au-
dience that only curb, gutter and
approaches would be affected.
There is no ordinance that states
landowners have to put in side-
walks if none were preexisting in
that location.
The curb and gutter assessments
will be for a 10 year period of time.
The charges will not be assessed
until the work has been completed.
Landowners will have the option of
paying the full amount immedi-
ately.
The Haakon County Commis-
sioner’s met with the city council to
discuss Dakota Mill and Grain’s
proposed expansion plans, the
Haakon County Regional Railroad
Authority and the county’s lease
agreement of city-used offices.
Dakota Mill and Grain had ear-
lier addressed the council with its
basic plans to build a railroad sid-
ing on the north side of the track
just west of the current Dakota
Mill and Grain buildings. The con-
struction would be for four, eventu-
ally six, grain bins to be erected so
approximately 28 rail cars can be
loaded at a time, rather than the
current three. The side rail would
be close to the same elevation as
the current railroad track.
Van Lint said that she did not
think anyone wanted to restrict
construction of the grain bins by
Dakota Mill. But, the main concern
was of what the land work would
do in restricting future flood wa-
ters. Discussion included investi-
gating if the Corps of Engineers
had given permission for the rail-
road, then the Dakota, Minnesota
and Eastern Railroad, to have re-
stricted water flow underneath its
trestles. If that could be corrected,
then the grain bin and railroad sid-
ing construction would be less of a
problem. Van Lint said, “I realize
Dakota Mill’s expansion would be a
great boon. I’m sure there’s a way
they can do this, but this is a proj-
ect that behooves us all in cooper-
ating. Economic impact wise, it’s a
good thing.”
The newly re-instituted HCRRA
will have seven members; two from
the county, two from Philip, two
from Midland and one other.
When the office rent topic came
up, city attorney Gay Tollefson re-
minded the council that she is also
the state’s attorney for the county,
and she would understand if the
city felt uncomfortable with any
conflict of interest. The written
rental agreement is a fairly generic
document, but the council wanted
to double check that the verbiage
truly covered the various spaces
used by the city. This would in-
clude the offices and storage spaces
on the fourth floor and the police
department offices on the third
floor.
The council approved building
permits. These include Dustin Lurz
representing Gene Rock to repair
or replace a sewer line. Robert Mc-
Daniel plans on putting in a 10’x8’
shed. Kevin and Cindy Pfeifle were
approved to do some boulevard
landscaping. Branden West for
DBH Company plans to put deck-
ing over already existing concrete
steps. West River/Lyman-Jones
Rural Water will be putting in a
8’x14’ concrete pad to hold a gener-
ator.
Last month the street depart-
ment chip sealed N. Center Av-
enue, W. Elm Street and blacktop
on the east side of the church, W.
Pine Street and part of Philip Av-
enue and the swimming pool park-
ing lot.
The water report showed that
6,513,700 gallons of water were
billed out for a month’s time. The
2012 cumulative water loss is so far
at 9.11 percent.
The swimming pool had over
7,000 attendees, almost 600 more
than last summer. Work has
started on needed exterior repairs
to the pool bathhouse.
A meeting is scheduled with
Colleen Skinner of the South
Dakota Department of Revenue for
Tuesday, September 25, at 1:00
p.m. in the Philip Ambulance meet-
ing room.
The annual conference of the
South Dakota Municipal League
will be October 2-5, in Pierre. Fi-
nance Officer Monna Van Lint and
Deputy Finance Officer Brittany
Smith will be out of the office Octo-
ber 3-5 for the conference. Council
members Trish Larson and Marion
Matt will attend October 4.
The next regular Philip City
Council meeting will be Monday,
October 1, at 7:00 p.m. in the
Haakon County Courthouse com-
munity room.
Street project taxpayers and county
commissioners meet with city council
Make your opinion known … write a letter to the editor!
Fax signed copy to 859-2410
or e-mail with your phone number to:
newsdesk@pioneer-review.com
Certified Winter Wheat Seed
The benefits of planting certi-
fied seed are many. Certified seed
provides correct variety identity
and assures varietal purity. Vari-
etal purity is the first considera-
tion in seed certification, but other
factors such as weeds, diseases, vi-
ability, mechanical purity, and
grading are also important.
Many producers save some of
their winter wheat crop for seed,
and if they do so for a limited num-
ber of years, and have it cleaned
and treated with a fungicide seed
treatment, can get along fine.
Every so often, winter wheat pro-
ducers have a problem with loose
smut, common bunt or other seed-
borne disease, and nearly always,
the seed was bin-run, and not
treated. Applying a fungicide seed
treatment is always recom-
mended, and considered cheap in-
surance, but planting certified
seed is a good practice to increase
the odds of a sustainable crop.
Certified seed certainly costs
more than bin-run seed, but at
today’s input costs and market
prices, spending a little more on
quality, disease-free seed can pay
big dividends. If you are looking
for certified seed, the “2012 Winter
Wheat Grower Directory” is online
at: http://www.sdstate.edu/ps/
sdcia/upload/2012-WinterWheat-
Directory.pdf, or can be obtained
at Regional Extension Centers. If
you are looking for the yield or
other information on the various
winter wheat varieties, is now
available online in the “Resource
Library” on iGrow Wheat: http://
igrow.org/agronomy/wheat/.
Sampling Standing Crops for
Nitrates
Many of the corn and other
crops are rapidly drying up and/or
maturing, but questions are still
coming in about sampling and
testing for Nitrates. A number of
producers are interested in testing
standing crops, and for good rea-
sons.
It would be very disappointing
to go to the time, trouble and ex-
pense of cutting and harvesting a
crop, only to test and learn that it
contains too much nitrate to feed
as you want, or feed at all. Ensil-
ing a forage crop will significantly
reduce the nitrate level, but if fea-
sible, many producers would like
to harvest the crop as hay, or graze
it. In either case, it is critical to
know if the nitrate levels will allow
that use.
As a recent caller was advised,
there is no “right” way to sample
standing crops. The laboratory
testing process is quite accurate,
but the results are only as good as
the sample the lab receives. How
well a sample represents the field
depends on the sampling process.
Some key things to consider: 1.
When a testing lab receives a sam-
ple, the entire sample will be
dried, ground, and well mixed be-
fore testing. 2. The lower portion of
the stalk will contain the highest
level of nitrates. 3. Areas of the
field may vary in nitrate levels.
If you are willing to incur the
testing fees, you may want to sam-
ple “good” and “poor” areas of the
field separately, and you may want
to sample upper and lower por-
tions of individual plants sepa-
rately. This information might en-
able you to raise the cutting height
when harvesting to lower the ni-
trate levels in the harvested crop,
or graze the crop with some level
of confidence as long as you re-
move the cattle before they graze
the lower portion of the stalks.
If harvesting a crop as hay, we
recommend sampling the bales
after harvest so you know how to
mix with other feeds. Also know
that grazing potentially toxic for-
ages can be risky.
Extension News
by Bob Fanning
Field Specialist, Winner
Regional Extension Center
Jones’
Saddlery, Bottle & Vet
Locally owned & operated
859-2482 • Philip
FLY CONTROL
–Dust Bags
–Sprays
–Pour ons
–Golden Malrin Fly Bait
COLD
BEER
Sunbody
Straw
Hats
www.pioneer-
review.com
One Year Free
Delayed Price Storage on Millet
Midwest Cooperatives is offering free
DP on millet until September 2013 in
Pierre ~ PhiliP ~ KaDoKa
Please call for details:
Philip: 859-2501
Philip Toll-Free: 877-307-5505
Kadoka: 837-2235
Pierre: 224-5935
Pierre Toll-free: 800-658-5535
Rural Living
Thursday, September 13, 2012 • The Pioneer Review • Page 3
All Your Crop Insurance Needs
Sales Close Date for 2013 Fall Crops is September 30, 2012.
This is the deadline to purchase, change or cancel multi-peril crop insurance on wheat, hayland and pasture.
Crew Agency, Ltd.
Crop Insurance Specialists Since 1984.
Office: (605) 433-5411 or Toll-free: (888) 433-8750
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We’d be happy to discuss …
Courtney Bartlett: Visual Arts:
purple, blue
Bailey Bierle: Horticulture: blue,
blue, blue; Rabbits: blue; Foods &
Nutrition: purple; First Aid: purple
Kruse Bierle: Wildlife: blue;
Wood Science: blue; Shooting
Sports, blue
Sage Bierle: Photography: pur-
ple, purple, blue, blue; Foods & Nu-
trition: blue
Kaelan Block: Visual Arts: pur-
ple, purple; Horse & Pony: blue;
Wildlife & Fisheries: blue; Wood
Science: blue
Kash Block: Visual Arts: purple,
purple: Foods & Nutrition: purple;
Horse & Pony: blue; Wildlife &
Fisheries: blue, red
Myles Clements: Rodeo: purple,
purple
Peyton DeJong: Visual Arts:
purple, purple, blue; Photography:
blue, blue; Foods & Nutrition: pur-
ple, purple, blue; Home Environ-
ment: purple, purple; Place Setting
Contest: purple
Tate DeJong: Photography: red,
red; Foods & Nutrition: purple,
purple, purple; Hobbies & Collec-
tions: purple; Place Setting Con-
test: purple
Trew DeJong: Visual Arts: pur-
ple, blue; Foods & Nutrition: pur-
ple, purple, blue; Hobbies & Collec-
tions: purple, purple; Photography:
purple, purple, blue; Place Setting
Contest: purple
Trey DeJong: Hobbies & Collec-
tions: purple, purple; Foods & Nu-
trition: purple, blue, blue; Place
Setting Contest: purple
Thomas Doolittle: Welding Sci-
ence: purple, purple; Visual Arts:
purple, purple, purple; Wildlife:
purple, purple; Rodeo: purple; Hob-
bies & Collections: purple, purple
Dustin Enders: Wood Science:
blue, blue; Visual Arts: purple, pur-
ple; Welding Science: blue, blue;
Photography: purple, purple, blue,
red; Electricity: purple
Wyatt Enders: Wood Science:
purple; Visual Arts: purple, purple,
purple, blue; Welding Science: pur-
ple
Abby Finn: Photography: pur-
ple, red; Clothing & Textiles: blue
Kahler Finn: Visual Arts: pur-
ple, blue; Photography: red
Elsie Fortune: Photography:
purple, blue; Welding Science:
blue, blue; Visual Arts: purple
Rolly Fortune: Welding Science:
blue
Clayton Fosheim: Wood Science:
blue, blue; Visual Arts: purple, pur-
ple: Wildlife: purple, blue; Hobbies
& Collections: blue, red
Kaitlyn Fosheim: Visual Arts:
purple, blue; Photography: purple,
purple, blue; Wood Science: purple,
blue
Cedar Gabriel: Shooting Sports:
purple, blue; Hobbies & Collec-
tions: purple, purple; Wood Sci-
ence: purple, blue; Horse & Pony:
purple, blue; Graphic Design: pur-
ple, purple
Ember Gabriel: Visual Arts: pur-
ple, purple
Sage Gabriel: Computer: purple,
purple; Community Service: pur-
ple, purple; Graphic Design: pur-
ple, purple; Horse & Pony: purple,
blue; Rodeo: purple, blue; Photog-
raphy: purple, purple, purple, pur-
ple, purple, purple
Lincoln Hagedorn: Wood Sci-
ence: purple
Zanee Hagedorn: Home Envi-
ronment: blue
Katie Haigh: Visual Arts: pur-
ple; Home Environment: purple;
Photography: purple, purple, pur-
ple, blue, blue, blue, red, red, red,
red
Sam Haigh: Photography: pur-
ple, purple, purple; Beef: blue;
Sheep: blue
Seth Haigh: Photography: pur-
ple, blue, blue, blue, blue, red, red,
red, red; Wood Science: purple,
blue; Beef: blue
Ashley Hand: Visual Arts: pur-
ple, purple; Shooting Sports: blue
Kelsey Hand: Hobbies & Collec-
tions: purple; Photography: blue
Rachel Parsons: Visual Arts:
purple, blue; Photography: purple,
purple, blue, blue; Beef: blue, blue
Sarah Parsons: Clothing & Tex-
tiles: purple; Visual Arts: purple,
purple, blue; Food Preservation:
blue; Foods & Nutrition: purple,
blue; Photography: purple, red, red,
red
Allison Pekron: Photography:
purple, purple, purple, blue, blue,
blue, blue; Home Environment:
purple, blue; Foods & Nutrition:
purple; Clothing & Textiles: pur-
ple, purple, purple
Grace Pekron: Visual Arts: pur-
ple, purple, purple, blue; Home En-
vironment: purple, blue; Clothing:
purple, purple, purple
Josie Rush: Clothing & Textiles:
purple, purple, blue; Visual Arts:
purple, purple, blue, blue; Home
Environment: purple, blue; Health
& Fitness: purple
Riley Schofield: Horse & Pony:
purple; Photography: blue; Range
& Pasture: blue
Alex Smiley: Welding Science:
purple, blue; Wood Science: purple,
purple, purple, purple
Paul Smiley: Welding Science:
purple, red; Wood Science: purple,
purple, purple, blue
Savannah Solon: Home Environ-
ment: purple, purple; Visual Arts:
purple, blue, blue
Shaina Solon: Horticulture:
blue, blue, blue, blue, blue, red;
Fish & Wildlife: red; Visual Arts:
purple, purple, blue
Ben Stangle: Foods & Nutrition:
purple, purple; Child Development:
blue; Home Environment: purple,
purple; Visual Arts: purple, blue
Mark Stangle: Hobbies & Collec-
tions: purple; Home Environment:
blue, red; Foods & Nutrition: pur-
ple, purple; Visual Arts: blue, blue
Sam Stangle: Foods & Nutrition:
purple, blue; Home Environment:
blue; Hobbies & Collections: pur-
ple; Photography: purple, red; Vi-
sual Arts: blue, blue
McKenzie Stilwell: Wood Sci-
ence: purple, purple; Foods & Nu-
trition: purple, blue, red; Child De-
velopment: purple, purple, purple;
Home Environment: purple, blue;
Photography: purple, purple, blue;
Visual Arts: purple, blue; Graphic
Design: purple, purple, blue; Cloth-
ing & Textiles: purple, purple
Gage Weller: Visual Arts: pur-
ple, purple, purple, blue; Graphic
Design: purple, blue; Wood Science:
purple, blue; Home Environment:
purple, purple, purple; Clothing &
Textiles: purple, purple; Foods &
Nutrition: purple, red; Community
Service: purple, blue; Beef: blue;
Photography: purple, purple, blue,
blue, blue, red, red, red; Horticul-
ture: purple, blue
Haakon/Jackson County Fair 4-H awards
First National
Bank in Philip
859-2525 • Philip, SD
Since 1906
www.fnbphilip.com Member FDIC
SIMPLIFY, SIMPLIFY, SIMPLIFY!
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Staff SpotligHt
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–Employed here 1 year
CHS MidweSt CooperativeS
859-2501 * philip, Sd
Be sure to watch every other week
for a new staff spotlight!
South Dakota Stockgrowers As-
sociation will hold their 121th an-
nual convention and trade show,
September 21 through 23. The
South Dakota Cattlewomen will
hold their annual meeting Friday,
September 21. Both events will be
held at the Ramkota Convention
Center in Rapid City.
Stockgrowers President Shane
Kolb said, “This is going to be a
great convention with a very inter-
esting lineup of speakers. Our con-
vention is open to the public and
we invite everyone to join us for
this event. I'm sure everyone will
find something interesting.”
The convention kicks off Friday,
with opening ceremonies and a
Washington, D.C, update from Bill
Bullard, R-CALF chief of opera-
tions. Throughout the day are
meetings and speakers regarding
recent changes at the South
Dakota Brand Board, animal ID is-
sues, impacts of oil and gas devel-
opment for landowners, discussions
of the beef check-off program, and
a presentation by the Wall FFA ag
issues team regarding prairie dog
management.
The Cattlewomen will hold their
meeting at 9:00 a.m. Friday morn-
ing. Anyone interested in the Cat-
tlewomen's work should plan to at-
tend this meeting and the Friday
luncheon.
The two featured speakers for
Friday’s agenda include Greg
Hanes of the United States Meat
Export Federation, who will talk
about changing markets in Asia
and Japan where USMEF is using
check-off dollars to market USA
beef. George Chambers, president
of R-CALF USA from Georgia, will
be the keynote speaker during Fri-
day night’s banquet.
On Saturday, the Stockgrowers
animal health committee will hear
from South Dakota State Univer-
sity’s Dr. Amanda Blair regarding
her fetal programming studies. The
federal lands committee will meet
to hear from speakers who have
been impacted by wilderness desig-
nations in counties in Montana.
Stockgrowers Lobbyist Jeremiah
Murphy and Executive Director
Silvia Christen will lead a discus-
sion about Stockgrowers legislative
work during the summer and into
the coming 2013 legislative session.
Saturday's luncheon will feature
U.S. congressional candidates to
answer questions from those in at-
tendance and discuss their plans
for Washington, D.C. Representa-
tive Kristi Noem and her chal-
lenger Matt Varilek have both been
invited to participate. The forum
will be followed with a SDSU ice
cream social sponsored by the
SDSU West River Ag Center.
Saturday at 2:30 p.m. will begin
the Stockgrowers annual member-
ship meeting to elect officers and
board members, vote on policy
changes and discuss any other
business.
“Stockgrowers has always been a
member-driven organization and
this membership meeting is your
chance to participate,” Kolb said,
“Each of our members has an op-
portunity to be a part of directing
Stockgrowers work in the year
ahead.”
The convention will wrap up on
Saturday evening with an awards
banquet, scholarship presentation
and a keynote address by South
Dakota Secretary of Agriculture,
Walt Bones. The banquet will be
followed by a live auction fund-
raiser to support the work of the
Stockgrowers throughout the year.
“I'm very proud of the convention
agenda for this year. I think we’ve
got some great speakers coming to
share their information with us,
and I’m really looking forward to
seeing all of our members and
friends in Rapid City for our 121st
convention,” said Kolb.
For a full agenda and details of
the convention, visit www.south-
dakotastockgrowers.org or call 605-
342-0429.
Stockgrowers convention
September 21-23
FOR SALE:
3 bedrooms, 1
1
⁄2 baths, attached garage.
Located at 101 N. Dakota Ave., Philip
Tom Foley • Foley Real Estate • 859-2975 or 685-8856
Hit & Miss
Thursday, September 13, 2012 • The Pioneer Review • Page 4
by Vivian Hansen • vivivi224@yahoo.com
or betty@pioneer-review.com
Elderly Meals
Thursday, Sept. 13: Swedish
Meatballs, Au Gratin Potatoes,
Key West Veggies, Roll, Chocolate
Peanut Butter Bar.
Friday, Sept. 14: Dilled
Salmon, Wild Rice Pilaf, Garden
Veggies, Roll, Raspberry Crumble
Bar.
Monday, Sept. 17: Honey Fried
Chicken, Scalloped Potatoes, Peas,
Biscuit, Apricot Halves.
Tuesday, Sept. 18: Pork Loin,
Butternut Squash, Roasted Nan-
tucket Veggies, Roll, Peach Polka
Dot Gelatin.
Wednesday, Sept. 19: Cookout
Day with Hot Dogs and Burgers!
***
Sunday, September 2, I met our
new resident, Marjorie Gaffin, Del-
mont or Armour, actually a farm
somewhere in between. Her daugh-
ter, Linda, was with her.
Sunday, Sherman Ellerton’s
family held a birthday party for
Sherman on the third floor here at
Somerset Court. One of the gifts
that I saw he had received was a
huge Hershey chocolate bar. Happy
birthday, Sherman!
Maxine Kilmer had a visit from
her son, Jeff.
The whist bunch, Margaret J.,
Irene A., Ina O., and Eleanor
Holmes, had a game and Violet,
Irene Cox, and Vivian played
rummi-cube.
Sunday at lunch, Vivian had
guests in the Somerset Court guest
dining room. Todd and Darlene
Allen and daughter Amber and fos-
ter son, Kleb, age four, who arrived
from Bellevue, Neb. They had been
to Ft. Pierre to visit Todd’s uncle,
David Hansen. The visit included a
trip to Houck buffalo ranch north
of Pierre to see the large herd of
wild horses. They had visited in
Philip at the home of Todd’s dad,
Chuck Allen and Etta Erdmann.
Chuck gave Kaleb a boy’s necklace
that was made of stone beads that
Chuck and Etta made from local
petrified wood. Kaleb wanted me to
know that they were “boy” beads!
Todd and family also toured Mt.
Rushmore and the Black Hills.
While they were here visiting,
Sheridan Hansen and children
came over. Tiger, Cecelia and
Kaleb drew pictures for me to post
on the wall. Thank you all for your
visit. Lucky for me to have com-
pany because Elaine Backes had
given me a bag of donuts hole and
I would have had to eat them all!
At our church service, we had a
speaker, known only as Mr. Mike.
Thanks, Steve, Jack Humke and
Mr. Mike.
Monday after exercises, Agnes
Tastad, Sara Lee Stark, Susan and
Vivian played a little bananagrams
Monday the activity directors
took the bus with a bunch of Som-
erset Court residents to Crazy
Horse. Wilma Gabrielson, Rapid
City, Floy Olson’s cousin and friend
of Marge Self, visited at Somerset
Court.
At Somerset Court we had our
Labor Day picnic in the dining
room. Pork shanks served plain,
barbecued or teriyaki flavored were
the specialty. There was an inter-
esting dessert of a half of a banana
covered with chocolate crowns and
mini marshmallows wrapped in
tinfoil and heated.
We had the whole afternoon for
cards. Becky set up another display
in the first floor glass case. It is all
about Disneyland where she used
to work. She had a good bunch of
awards and memorabilia about
Disneyland. One item was a big,
moving Goofy.
My daughter, Vinnie, and hus-
band, Danny, sent a colorful bunch
of photos via email. Thank you,
kids. The photos were of the bego-
nia festival. It is like a miniature
Rose Parade with the floats cov-
ered with flower petals. The floats
float on the river at Capitola-by-
the-Sea. Danny’s daughter was
there with her float, which was
about natural foods. Melissa is a di-
etician, summa cum laude from
University of California Berkeley.
Melissa is promoting Proposition
37 which asks for genetically al-
tered foods to be labeled.
September 8, Gaydell Collier had
a book signing of her new book,
“Just Beyond Harmony,” at the
local book store. It is about her
family who in the 1960s went to
live in a primitive log cabin west of
Laramie, Wyo. They hoped to in-
still basic values and self-reliance
in their four children. It is based on
diaries and letters.
I plan to ask the Rapid City li-
brary for the book “Just Beyond
Harmony.”
M.R. Hansen came for scrabble
and we used the word vox which
means voice. It came in handy, as I
was stuck with a V, and there was
an OX on the board.
September 4, Sandy and Susan
gave us a fun activity out in the
Somerset courtyard. It was nice
out, and there were generous Som-
erset bucks. Thanks.
At Somerset Court on September
4, in the afternoon, we were enter-
tained by Mila Belakova. She is an
accomplished pianist. We were im-
pressed with her professionalism.
She is strong and graceful. She
played most of her program from
memory. Thank you to our activity
directors, Sandy, Susan, Shawn
and Amy, for bringing Mila to play
for us, for arranging seating, and
for providing a social hour after the
program. A good share of the resi-
dents at Somerset Court attended
the concert.
My grandson, Andrew Klassen,
San Jose, Calif., sent photos of him
and his family, wife Yiqing and
Pearl, eight, and Marie, six. Pearl
and Marie wrote notes on their
photos. Thank to you all. The pho-
tos are a joy to Great-grandma Vi-
vian.
The Philip Pioneer Review ar-
rived Thursday and had some fine
front page articles with one about
backpacks given to some 20 pupils
at Philip elementary and one about
the Philip Garden Club’s excursion
to the Central States Fair and a
side trip to Cathie Draine’s delight-
ful garden at her home near Pied-
mont.
Wednesday, September 5, we
had a good crowd for resident coun-
cil. Staff was represented by Ryan
Love, director, nurse Becky, Libby,
our new coordinator, Jeri from the
front office, John head kitchen
staff, Jason head maintenance,
Shawn and Sandy, activity direc-
tors and Shawn presided.
Shawn presented a few high-
lights of September activities such
as cooking with Sandy, grandpar-
ent’s day where we can invite our
grandchildren and we will have ice
cream. There is a trip to a donut
shop, foot care clinic with Dr. Con-
rad, lunch at Wall Drug, senior
games in the courtyard if the
weather is good, Halley Sisters
here and you are to wear a tie to
get Somerset bucks, Women Who
Care, we will play a new game,
phase 10, picnic in the park, ice
cream trip, fall festival where there
will be snacks.
There were several compliments
of various menu foods and thanks
for having Mila Belakova here to
entertain us. Jeri thanked resi-
dents for helping new residents
find their way around Somerset
Court.
You should see the new Somerset
Court commercial. It is ever so de-
lightful. John Buurma, Charlie
Hathaway and Ray Kraemer are
three card players and Shawn is
the dealer.
I went to Berniece Christianson’s
apartment to see her beautiful cro-
cheted pieces. Her apartment is
decorated with doilies, table cloths
and afghans that she has cro-
cheted.
Thursday, September 6, 2012, at
Somerset Court, we had fun at
goofy golf. All players received gen-
erous Somerset bucks. Thank you,
Shawn and Susan, for picking up
balls for us.
Bingo was another activity
played on Thursday and for snack
and chat we had assorted crackers
and meat and cheese.
The Philip Pioneer Review ar-
rived with a fine feature story
about Scotchman Industries man-
ufacturing the hydraulic iron
worker for 45 years. The 1967
model is still a highly usable ver-
sion. The 2012 models show many
changes for different aspects of iron
working and in different sizes.
Another front page article shows
West Central Electric’s sign down
by Pierre. That has a picture of
Theresa Deuchar with the head-
line: “Rural School Teachers are a
Part of Our Electric Cooperative.”
Theresa teaches at Deep Creek, a
rural school which had been closed
for seven years and has re-opened
this fall.
Somerset Court resident Pat Sta-
ley sometimes works at her limer-
icks. A new one is – “There was this
man called Tim, All the girls were
nuts about him. He wore slick
pants and could really dance. That
kept him handsome and slim!” Pat
has a few starters. See what you
can make with them. “There was
this girl called Judy, At times she
was really quite moody” … “I knew
a cowboy called Bert, Who always
wore a red shirt.”
Friday, September 7, at Somer-
set Court, we had the activity of
cooking with Sandy. Susan and
Shawn were there to help, too. The
recipe was grandma’s pumpkin
bread. Fred ran the mixer, and also
knocked the bubbles out of the
dough in the pans. Others who at-
tended were Addie, Eileen, Anne,
and Mary Lou. Here is the recipe:
cream together 2/3 cup shortening,
two and 2/3 cups sugar, four eggs,
one 15 ounce can of pumpkin, 2/3
cup water, three and 1/2 cups all
purpose flour, one teaspoon baking
powder, 1/2 teaspoon salt, one tea-
spoon ground nutmeg, and 2/3 cup
of chopped walnuts or pecans
which are optional. I has to bake
for about an hour.
Thank you to Eileen Tenold who
invited me to come to her apart-
ment and take a photo of her pretty
fall decorations. Sunflowers are the
basis of her motif.
M.R. Hansen came for scrabble
and he put up my fall deco, which
is a sprig of colorful plastic fall
leaves. Thank you, M.R. He also
brought some pears from their tree.
Very sweet and juicy. Thank you,
Barbara. Thanks to Midwest Coop-
eratives for sending a circular re-
minding propane users to fill their
tanks.
My daughter, Vinnie Hansen,
emailed and announced the official
launch/ reading of her sixth Carol
Sabala Mystery, “Art, Wine, and
Bullets.”
Thank you to my nephew,
Leonard Meyer, Greenfield, Ind.,
(where by the way, it has rained
generously recently) sent email
photos about some rare orchids
that grow at very high elevations
and have monkey faces.
I loved Cathie Draine’s garden-
ing column in the September 7,
2012, Rapid City Journal. She says
to savor each slight change in the
seasons, the temperature, the color
changes in the grass and leaves,
the maturing of vegetables and
grains. She refers to James Whit-
comb Riley’s Hoosier vernacular
style used in his old favorite poem,
“When the Frost is on the Punkin
and the Fodders in the Shock.”
If you have a news item for the
Philip Socials
column that you would like to
submit and can’t
get ahold of Vivian, please
e-mail it to:
betty@pioneer-review.com
or call 859-2516.
We will be more than
happy to take your
news over the phone!
Marie Addison
will be 90 years young
on September 10th!
Her family is requesting a
Card Shower in honor
of this milestone.
Happy birthday, Mom!
Cards may be sent to:
718 E. 5th St., Apt. 16
Murdo, SD 57559
Please join us
in celebrating the marriage of
Sarah Foland & Joseph Kennedy
at their reception & wedding dance!
Saturday, September 22nd • 9 p.m.
American Legion Hall, Philip
The children of
William R. & Sylvia Davis Stone
are pleased to announce the celebration of the
couple's 70th wedding anniversary this fall.
They were married on September 9, 1942 in Rapid City, S.D.,
and are the proud parents of five children: William Jr. (Louise),
John (Linda), Susan (Paul), Guy (Peggy), and David (Virginia);
the proud grandparents of 10 grandchildren
and 12 great-grandchildren. After many years of
ranching on the Cheyenne River at Pedro, S.D.,
the couple now resides in Rapid City, S.D.
A card party is planned.
Please send cards to:
3855 S. Cambell St. Lot 67,
Rapid City, SD 57701.
You’re invited to a
90th Birthday Celebration
for Keith Emerson
Saturday, Sept. 15 • 2-4 p.m.
Bad River Senior Citizen’s Center, Philip
Let your prescence be your gift
Cards may be sent to:
PO Box 345, Philip, SD 57567
September 14-15-16-17:
The Campaign(R)
Fri: 8:00 p.m. Sat: 8:00 p.m.
Sun: 1:30 p.m. Mon: 7:00 p.m.
Gem Theatre
859-2000 • Philip
September 21-22-23-24:
Hit & Run (R)
September 28-29-30-October 1:
Hope Springs (PG-13)
As a fundraiser to help pay for medical research in the fight against cancer, par-
ticularly breast cancer, the local group calling themselves Helping the Headlights
held a walking taco and root beer float meal in the Fire Hall Park in Philip, Friday,
September 7. “We had a great turn out,” said coordinator Val Schulz. All proceeds
will benefit the Komen South Dakota Race for the Cure. Pictured, from left, are
Mitzi Boyd, Twila Hook, Schulz and Stephanie Rossouw. Photo by Del Bartels
Helping the Headlights
84 Years Ago
September 13, 1928
Showing of oil was discovered at
Standing Butte. The circumstances
are these. The well has been idle
for a year on the account of funds.
The cap was taken off the well one
day last week and baling com-
menced to rid the well of accumu-
lated water. The bales brought up
from a depth of seventy-five feet, as
we understand, what was thought
to be crude oil. The oil was sent to
the state chemist at Vermillion and
he made a report by telegram that
the sample classified the product
with that found in Louisiana, a
high grade oil that commands a
premium of seventy-five cents per
barrel at the present time.
***
Last week, Sheriff John Curing-
ton journeyed to the northern part
of the county, uncovered a quantity
of intoxicating liquors, a still and
other products in the course of
manufacture. He brought to town
with him, Julius Tavernier, who re-
sides about five miles northeast of
Mileville, and on arrival a liquor
charge was placed against Tav-
ernier by the state’s attorney.
Grindstone News … Mr. and
Mrs. Fay Coleman, Mrs. Coleman
and a sister and a niece of Mrs.
Coleman attended the Alfalfa
Palace in Rapid City.
Mrs. Palmer took twenty-one
prizes at the fair this fall. That
would be an excellent record at any
time, but is simply astonishing
when it is remembered that
Palmers were hailed out this sum-
mer, which would, of course greatly
diminished their chances for ex-
hibits. Cecil also took several
prizes.
Local News … Mrs. Myrtle
Church, chief operator of the
Northwestern Bell Telephone com-
pany here, is in Rapid City this
week attending the special instruc-
tion school offered telephone em-
ployees of this district.
Mrs. Alice Dawson is clerking at
the R.M. Williams store during the
absence of Mrs. Farnsworth.
A son was born to Mr. and Mrs.
Lyle Wood at the Einan hospital on
September 6. The little one lived
but a very short time.
Clarence Van Elsbark, Midland,
and Tressa Young, Murdo, were
united in marriage by Justice W.L.
Church on Sunday, September 9.
75 Years Ago
September 9, 1937
This week saw the opening of all
remaining rural schools in Haakon
County, making a total of 51 in op-
eration.
***
A slow all-day drizzle Saturday,
September 4, brought the immedi-
ate vicinity of Philip its first mois-
ture since July 27. It likewise
brought what promises to be per-
manent heat relief for the present
season.
***
Mike Brady, charged with grand
larceny in connection with the theft
of some wheat, was bound over to
the circuit court after a preliminary
hearing Tuesday morning. Brady
was released under $2,000 bond.
Betwixt Places … Mr. and Mrs.
Guy Morrison and Clark and Mrs.
Freda Morrison Cole journeyed to
Ash Creek last Sunday. Mrs. Mor-
rison started to teach there Mon-
day morning.
Elbon Chaff … Mr. and Mrs. Jas.
Reedy, John, Bernice, Pattie and
Barbara attended church at Top
Bar and ate fried chicken at Harry
Harts. They all went to Rundells
and got some garden produce.
Grindstone News … Fred
Ochsner, who lived on the place
now occupied by Hank Sieler before
moving to Isabel, was trampled to
death by a team a week or so ago.
Local Briefs … Rev. Thomas Car-
roll returned last Thursday to re-
sume his duties as priest of the
Philip Catholic church after a trip
to New York. Hugh Walsh and
Bernard Fennell accompanied him
on his trip.
Blast from the Past
From the archives of the Pioneer Review
Church & Community Thursday, September 13, 2012 • The Pioneer Review • Page 5
WE DON’T CHARGE
for obituaries, wedding
or engagement
write-ups!
Send to:
ads@pioneer-
review.com
SACRED HEART CATHOLIC CHURCH
Philip – 859-2664 – sacred@gwtc.net
Fr. Kevin Achbach
Saturdays: Confession from 3 to 4 p.m.
Saturday Mass: 5:00 p.m.
Sunday Mass: 8:30 a.m.
9:30 a.m. (August)
Tues-Wed-Fri. Mass: 8:30 a.m.
Thurs. Mass:
10:30 a.m. at Philip Nursing Home
* * * * * *
ST. WILLIAM CATHOLIC CHURCH
Midland – 859-2664 or 843-2544
Fr. Kevin Achbach
Saturday Mass: 7:00 p.m.
(Feb., April, June, Aug., Oct., Dec.)
Sun day Mass: 11:00 a.m.
(Jan., Mar., May, July, Sept., Nov.)
Confession: Before Mass
* * * * * *
ST. MARY CATHOLIC CHURCH
Milesville – 859-2664
Fr. Kevin Achbach
Sunday Mass: 11:00 a.m.
(Feb-April-June-Oct-Dec)
Sunday Mass: 7:30 a.m. (August)
Saturday Mass: 7:30 p.m.
(Jan-March-May-July-Sept-Nov)
Confession: Before Mass
Monday Release Time: 2:15 p.m.
* * * * * *
FIRST LUTHERAN CHURCH
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
859-2336 • Philip
E-MAIL: prfrezil@gmail.com
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 8:30 a.m.
1st Sunday: Coffee & Rolls after worship
First Lutheran Ladies Bible study.
There are two Bible study groups: each meeting
monthly. One meets on the second Tuesday at
12:00 p.m. at First Lutheran Church and the
other meets on the second Wednesday at
1:00 p.m. at the Senechal Apts. lobby.
* * * * * * *
TRINITY LUTHERAN
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
Midland – 843-2538
SATURDAY WORSHIP: 10:30 p.m.
Ruth Circle: 3rd Tues. at 2 p.m.
Nowlin Circle: Last Wed. at 9 a.m.
Rebecca Circle: Last Wed. at 7 p.m. (Nov. thru Feb.);
6:30 p.m. (Mar. - Oct.)
* * * * * *
DEEP CREEK LUTHERAN
Moenville – 843-2538
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
SUNDAY WORSHIP:
1:30 p.m. (CT)
ALCW: 3rd Thursday, 1:30 p.m.
* * * * * *
OUR SAVIOR’S LUTHERAN
Long Valley
Pastor Frezil Westerlund
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 5:00 p.m.
* * * * * *
DOWLING COMMUNITY CHURCH
Every Sunday in July
Services at 10:00 a.m.
followed by potluck dinner
CONCORDIA LUTHERAN CHURCH
Pastor Art Weitschat
Kadoka – 837-2390
SUNDAY WORSHIP: 10:00 a.m.
* * * * * *
OUR REDEEMER
LUTHERAN CHURCH, Philip
(605) 669-2406 • Murdo
Pastor Ray Greenseth
Sunday Worship Services: 1:00 p.m.
* * * * * *
OPEN BIBLE CHURCH • MIDLAND
Pastor Andy Blye
843-2143 • facebook.com/midlandobc
Sunday School: 9:30 a.m.
Worship Service: 10:30 a.m.
Bible Study: Wed. at 7:30 p.m.
Women’s Ministries: 2nd Thurs., 1:30
ST. PETER LUTHERAN CHURCH
10 miles SE of Midland
Pastor Glenn Denke • 462-6169
Sunday Worship: 10:00 a.m. (CT)
Sunday School: 11:00 a.m. CT
* * * * * *
PHILIP COMMUNITY
EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH
Pastor Gary Wahl – Philip – 859-2841
Sunday School – 9:15 a.m.
Sunday Services – 10:30 a.m.
Last Sunday of the month –
potluck dinner following church services
Last Monday of the month –
Evang. Ladies Service/Bible Study - 7:00 p.m.
Wed. Night Prayer & Bible Study: 7 p.m.
Everyone Welcome!!
* * * * * *
HARDINGROVE COMMUNITY
EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH
Pastor Gary Wahl – Philip
859-2841 • garyaw@aol.com
Worship Service: 8:00 a.m. • Children's Church:
8:30 a.m.
Ladies’ Aid - 2nd Thurs. at 7:00 p.m.
Bible Study & Prayer, Mondays at 7 p.m.
* * * * * *
UNITED CHURCH OF PHILIP
Pastor Kathy Chesney • 859-2310
Home: 859-2192 • E-mail: chez@gwtc.net
Sunday Worship: 10:00 a.m.
UCW meets 2nd Friday at 9:30 a.m.
* * * * * *
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH OF INTERIOR
Pastor Kathy Chesney • 859-2310
E-mail: chez@gwtc.net
Sunday Worship: 8:00 a.m.
Rush Funeral Home
Chapels in Philip, Wall & Kadoka
Jack, Gayle & D.J. Rush
www.rushfuneralhome.com
Scotchman
Industries
859-2542 • Philip, SD
www.scotchman.com
Ronald G. Mann, DDS
Dentist
Philip, SD
859-2491
Pass through the halls of a nursing home, and you might find yourself
hoping God takes you sooner than later. Why do some people linger when
they would so clearly be better off in Heaven? Because they have a
purpose, even if it is to stir compassion in others. We all have a purpose,
and we should pray for the strength to fulfill it.
But if I
live in the
flesh, this is
the fruit of my
labour. yet what
I shall choose I wot
not. For I am in a strait
betwixt two, having a desire to
depart, and to be with Christ, which is
far better. Nevertheless to abide in the flesh
is more needful for you.
Philippians 1.22-24 (KJJ)
Obituaries
This space for rent! Call
859-2516 to have your
message placed here!
Please join us in wishing
this special lady a
Happy 75th Birthday
on September 12th.
Happy birthday, Mom!
We love you!
Debbie & Mike, Dianne & Glenn,
Janelle & Bruce, Jeanine & Darian & families
Cards may be sent to:
Donna Newman
PO Box 429
Philip, SD 57567
Gary’s Greenhouse
is ordering seeds now!
To get a specific variety of seed or
any type of vegetable or flower
seed, call Gary
859-2057 or 515-0675
Leila Dithmer___________________
Leila Dithmer, age 92 of
Spearfish, S.D., formerly of Wan-
blee and Kadoka, died Sunday,
September 9, 2012, at the David M.
Dorsett Healthcare Center in
Spearfish.
Leila Mae Collins was born June
17, 1920, in Mellette County, the
daughter of Claude and Minnie
(Hennings) Collins. She grew up
and received her education in rural
schools in Mellette County, gradu-
ating from Belvidere High School
in 1937. After graduation, Leila at-
tended college at Southern Normal
in Springfield, where she earned
her teacher’s certificate. She
taught school in Mellette County
for seven years.
Leila was united in marriage to
William H. Dithmer on February 4,
1944, in Kadoka. After their mar-
riage, they lived for a few years in
Mellette County assisting Leila’s
parents on their ranch while Leila’s
brother was serving in the war.
After the war they moved to
Washabaugh County where they
made their home on the original
Dithmer home site. Leila resided
on the ranch until 2003 when she
moved into the Gateway Apart-
ments in Kadoka. Leila also built a
home in Kadoka where she lived
during the week when her children
were in high school. In 2005 she
moved to Spearfish where she has
since resided.
Grateful for having shared her
life are one son, Bill Dithmer and
his wife, Belinda, of Wanblee; two
daughters, Claudia Little and her
husband, Dave, of Spearfish, and
LaDonna Cope and her husband,
Bob, of Colstrip, Mont.; grandchil-
dren, Carsi Padrnos, Tavis Little,
BJ Cope, Bobby Cope, Amanda
Johnson, and Michael Watts;
great-grandchildren, Jira and Max
Padrnos, Cash and Clara Cope,
and Chase, Corbin and Noah John-
son; one sister, Fern Lindskov of
Doland; and a host of dear nieces
and nephews and other relatives
and friends.
Preceding her in death were her
husband, Bill; her parents, Claude
and Minnie Collins; and her
brother, Glen Collins.
Funeral services were held
Wednesday, September 12, at the
Presbyterian Church in Kadoka,
with Pastor Gary McCubbin offici-
ating.
Interment was at the Kadoka
Cemetery.
Arrangements were with the
Rush Funeral Chapel of Kadoka.
Her online guestbook is avail-
able at www.rushfuneralhome.com
Engaged
Dean and Janice Fitzgerald of
Philip are pleased to announce the
engagement of their daughter,
Amanda, to Rusty Bair, son of
Randy Bair of North Dakota and
Nancy Bair of Wyoming.
Amanda is a 2003 graduate of
Philip High School and a 2007
graduate of Dakota Wesleyan Uni-
versity, with a bachelor of arts in
elementary education and special
education.
Rusty is a 2001 graduate of New-
castle High School and a 2004
graduate of Sheridan College with
a degree in machining.
A December 29, 2012, wedding is
being planned in Philip.
Courtney Hunt and Cody McFarland are pleased to announce they
were married April 14, 2012, in Sturgis.
Courtney graduated from Midland High School in 2005. She went on
to study psychology and sociology at Black Hills State University and
graduated in 2008. She is a case manager for a non-profit organization.
Cody graduated from Newell High School in 2000 and attended Huron
University. He is an engine captain and wildland firefighter with the U.S.
Forest Service.
The couple resides in Kemmerer, Wyo.
c Hunt~McFarland c
Renowned low-stress horseman
and technical advisor for the movie
“The Horse Whisperer” Curt Pate
of Newell will be the featured
speaker during the Dakota Coun-
try Lifestyles Expo event co-spon-
sored by South Dakota State Uni-
versity Extension and Today’s
Horse magazine. The event is held
September 29 and 30 at the Cen-
tral States Fairgrounds in Rapid
City.
Admission to the Expo and sem-
inars is free.
Known for his horsemanship,
stockmanship, stewardship philos-
ophy, Pate will present a seminar
at 1:00 p.m Sunday, September 30
at the Fine Arts Building. Other
seminars being presented through-
out the weekend include horse
emergency care with Dr. John
Ismay – 2:00 p.m. Sunday, rural
safety courses for all ages – both
days, alternative feeds for live-
stock – 11a.m. Saturday, fencing –
both days, getting started with
chickens, meat goats and honey-
bees – Sunday 10:00 a.m. to 1:00
p.m., canning and freezing home
produce – 2:00 p.m. Saturday,
country real estate financing –
noon Saturday, and much more.
For a complete schedule, visit
DakotaCountryLifestyles.com or
call Mindy Hubert, SDSU Exten-
sion small acreage field specialist
at 605-394-1722.
Nearly 50 vendors offering coun-
try products and services including
feed, tack and water supplies will
be on site. A special Dakota-made
session will offer meat, produce
and other locally produced items to
the public. It runs from 9:00 a.m. to
7:00 p.m. September 29 and 10:00
a.m. to 4:00 p.m. September 30.
Curt Pate speaker at Dakota
Country Lifestyles, Sept. 30
Representative Kristi Noem has
issued the following statement on
the anniversary of the September
11, 2001 terrorist attacks.
“September 11, 2001 is a day we
will never forget. Eleven years ago,
nearly 3,000 Americans were killed
in a devastating act of terror that
left thousands of children without
parents and countless Americans
without a son, daughter, sister,
brother, best friend or spouse.
“While the horror of that day re-
mains imprinted in our minds, so
too does America’s response. What
the terrorists didn’t count on was
the resilient spirit of the American
people. In South Dakota, communi-
ties and families banded together
to pray and offer support to our
fallen fellow Americans and their
loved ones. Brave men and women
from South Dakota and across the
country answered the call and de-
ployed thousands of miles away to
defend our way of life.
“Today is a day to honor the
memory of those who were lost on
that horrible day, and to pay a trib-
ute to all who have fallen fighting
for our country ever since. Septem-
ber 11 is a reminder of who we lost,
but also a reminder of all we have
to defend. I hope every South
Dakotan will take a moment to re-
flect and remember today.”
Noem statement on remembering
anniversary of September 11, 2001
Thursday, September 13, 2012 • The Pioneer Review • Page 6
Contact Sonia Nemec • 843-2564
e-mail: home_maker_sonia@hotmail.com
Midland News
MIDLAND MARKET - FRIDAY, 6
TO 8 P.M. - HANDCRAFTED
ITEMS - BAKED GOODS -
FARM FRESH EGGS - GARDEN
PRODUCE - MUCH MORE!
Getting up this Sunday morn-
ing and looking at the outdoor
temperature it showed 34˚. We
seem to be on a yo-yo ride of
changing temperatures lately.
That’s okay though don’t you
think? I do believe everyone is
ready for some cooler temp-era-
tures. My favorite temperatures
are those middle 70s. Perfect
weather. You can open the win-
dows and enjoy the outdoors.
There’s just something about hav-
ing the windows open to put a per-
son more in the mood to do house-
cleaning. Why would that be bet-
ter then cleaning with air condi-
tioning? I can’t answer that, all I
know is that for me personally, I
like having the windows open. I’ve
noticed the leaves on the trees are
slowly beginning to change color
and my sedums in my rock garden
are getting closer to their burnt
orange color of fall. At certain
times in the summer, they turn
yellow, but not this summer,
guess it was just too hot and too
dry. We desperately need rain.
The lands are crying for moisture.
Jerry started planting winter
wheat. He doesn’t remember ever
planting wheat in drier summer
fallow. But if you don’t get it
planted and fall showers come,
you may not be able to get in the
field. So, you do the best you can,
plant, in anticipation of moisture.
Release time begins at the three
churches in Midland September
12 from 2:30 to 3:40. Trinity
Lutheran Church and the Open
Bible Church are having theirs to-
gether at Trinity Lutheran educa-
tion room. St. William Catholic
Church holds their classes in the
basement of the church. School
has officially begun as activities
are a plenty.
Pre-school began at the Midland
school Wednesday, September 5,
with Diane Coller, Kadoka, as
their teacher. Those in pre-school
this year are Cole Finn, Ridge
Furnival, Evan Blye, Kalli Fos-
heim, Karlee Block, Ella Schofield
and Stetson Jones. Those little
ones are so fun and so excited
about school.
Mark your calendars as Mid-
land’s Merchants’ Appreciation
Day will be on September 22, so
watch for advertising of events
and times. This annual event has
been going on for many, many
years. From the sounds of things,
plans are being made for some
20th and 50th school reunions, as
well. There will be a 5K
walk/run/bike for the local 4-H
club with registration at 8:00 a.m.
Mountain Time at the city park
with the event to begin at 9:00
a.m. So plan on coming, enter in
some of the events, and have a
chance to visit with folks you don’t
often see. Kadoka Area School will
be having homecoming on Sep-
tember 21 so it is going to be a
very busy weekend for students
and parents.
Wednesday was a busy day at
the Midland Library. The front
door to the library was becoming
difficult to open. It is a solid old
door, as the building was the for-
mer Masonic Temple for many
years. I mentioned it to Jerry. He
had some free time so we headed
for the library. He took a file to it
and sprayed it with W-D 40,
works like a charm. Next project
was cutting down the dried up hol-
lyhocks and a Chinese elm grow-
ing to close to the building, then
fixing the library sign as it was
getting the leans. There are just
some projects that need a man’s
help. It’s always a good feeling to
get those fall jobs done. Jenna
Finn, Cass and Cole, and Angel
Nemec, Tukker and Emry,
stopped in at the library. While
the kids and librarian Karel
Reiman were busy with checking
out books and videos, Angel re-
placed burned out light bulbs and
Jenna, with phone help from Ron
Larson of Philip, got a glitch in the
computer fixed. So, it was a suc-
cessful day. We did have to
chuckle, as Cass, Cole and Tukker
were sitting at the little table at
the back of the library, when, not
wanting to be out done, little one-
year-old Emry Jo climbed up on a
chair and sat with the big boys. It
was a Kodak moment.
Roy and Carol Hunt spent
Labor Day weekend in Riverton,
Wyo., visiting cousins Dan and
Dorothy Root. They said they did-
n’t do anything special, just en-
joyed a relaxing time of visiting.
Mariah (Evans) Heaton arrived
at the home of her aunt and uncle,
Clint and Prerry Saucerman,
Wednesday evening. Mariah and
her husband, Jesse, live at Oak
Creek, Wis. For those who may
not know, Jesse is the son of
Sandy (Van Tassel) and Dennis
Heaton of the Ottumwa area.
Thursday, Mariah, her grand-
mother and Prerry’s mom, Marlin
Evans, Philip, and Prerry headed
for Rapid City where Marlin had
an appointment to have some skin
cancers removed. Mariah spent
Thursday night with her grand-
mother, Marlin. Friday, Mariah
had dinner with Sandy Heaton in
Philip and then went to Interior to
visit her mom, Clover. Clover is
Prerry’s sister and Marlin’s
daughter. Friday evening, Mariah
and Andrea Carley and her
daughter, Millie, Philip, left for
Salt Lake City, Utah, to celebrate
the wedding of Taylor Holman
who was a school classmate of
Mariah’s and was at Andrea’s hair
salon on a student school to work
program. Mariah, Andrea and
Millie returned to Philip Sunday
morning, Mariah visited her
grandmother, Marlin, before
heading back to Oak Creek.
Saturday, Wilma Saucerman,
Marlin Evans and Clint and Pre-
rry Saucerman went to Rapid City
to celebrate Sawyer Saucerman’s
eighth birthday. Sawyer is the son
of Tel and Ellie (Nemec) Saucer-
man, Wilma and Marlin are his
great-grandmothers and he is
Clint and Prerry’s grandson. The
group got to see a soccer game of
Sawyer’s and Calla Volhken, who
are each on separate teams, but
the games were side by side,
which made it nice. Calla is the
daughter of Noel (Weichman)
Volhken and Wilma is Calla’s
great-grandmother. Mark and
Glenda Nemec, Hill City, were
also at the birthday party. Sawyer
is their grandson. Noel, Devlon,
Bella and Calla joined everyone at
Tel and Ellie’s.
Ernie Nemec became ill Tues-
day, September 4, and was admit-
ted to Rapid City Regional Hospi-
tal where he was a patient for six
days. He was able to come home
this Monday, September 10. His
son, Randy and Holly Nemec
drove Ernie and Laurel to Rapid.
Family there to be with Ernie and
Laurel were Randy and Holly,
Barby Larson and Becky Thomp-
son, both of Sioux Falls. Laurel re-
ports it is good to be home and for
Ernie to recover in familiar sur-
roundings. Hospitals are a good
place to be when needed, but there
is nothing like home. We wish
Ernie God’s speed in healing.
Karel Reiman attended Em-
manuel Lutheran Church at
Creighton for Mission Festival
Day Sunday, September 9. It is a
special Sunday in which the im-
portance of mission work is
stressed. A young lady who had
been a banker at one time and
then felt called to do mission work
was the guest speaker. She had
just returned from two years of
mission work in Hong Kong. Her
plans are to remain in the states
and train others for mission work.
Karel reported that she was a very
interesting and motivational
speaker. Karl’s brother, Ed and
Linda Eisenbraun, her mom,
Goldie Eisenbraun, and her sister,
Paula Eisenbraun, all of Rapid
City, were also there. Emmanuel
Lutheran holds many memories
for the Eisenbraun family as it
was the church they attended
when living at Creighton. Every-
one was enjoying a noon meal in
the basement of the church when
four young girls came rushing in
telling of a fire. The church sits
high on a hill and as everyone
rushed outside. They could see
black smoke and flames from the
fire. The men headed out to get
pickups and water tanks and the
local fire department had been
called. David Eisenbraun and his
wife lived on the place where the
fire was and ran a dairy farm at
one time, being older and now liv-
ing in town, they still own the
land and come out there every
once in a while. They happened to
be doing some things in the house
on that particular day. Two barns
and two horses burned in the fire.
Mission Festival Sunday turned
out to be more then they expected.
The men and the fire department
were on a different sort of mission,
a mission of working together to
put out the fire.
Jenna Finn, Cass and Cole,
spent the weekend with her par-
ents, Gene and Theresa Deuchar,
Milesville, helping with chores in-
side and outside and attending
church Saturday evening at St.
Mary’s Catholic Church. Speaking
of Theresa, wasn’t that promo-
tional billboard by West Central
Electric, with Deep Creek school
teacher, Theresa Deuchar, sitting
on a desk next to the blackboard
with the motto, “Rural School
Teachers are a Part of Our Elec-
tric Cooperative,” just the neatest
billboard. For anyone having had
the privilege of going to a country
school, they hold a whole lot of
memories. The sign is one mile
south of Ft. Pierre along Highway
83. Congratulations, Theresa, and
thanks to West Central Electric
for making folks aware of country
schools.
Happy birthday wishes to Marie
Addison, Murdo, and Keith Emer-
son, Philip, who recently cele-
brated their 90th birthdays and to
Deloris Iversen, Murdo, who re-
cently turned 80 years old.
Nikki (Baeza) Smith and
Cooper, Tacoma, Wash., visited
Diana Baeza in Midland and Jim
and Betty Smith in Philip. They
also visited Nikki’s grandmother,
Ruby Huston, Doug and June
Houston and family, all of Mid-
land. Leandra Arthur and girls,
Philip, David Baeza, Angie and
Jordana, Gillette, Wyo., and Tony,
IV and Torrance Baeza, Wall, also
visited with Nikki and Cooper
while they were in Midland. Nikki
enjoyed the Midland Market Fri-
day having a chance to visit with
folks she knows and hasn’t seen
for some time. She was home vis-
iting family and friends for three
weeks.
Irene (Quatier) and John Hub-
bard, Gillette, Wyo., spent a cou-
ple of days at Chamberlain visit-
ing and fishing with Irene’s sister,
Jean (Quatier) and Don Hennies,
Sioux Falls. Irene and John were
at Midland Market Friday with
friends Jim and Jessie (Liver-
more) Root. Jessie and Irene go
back a long ways, they both had
worked for Lyle Hunt at his hard-
ware store, remembering the soda
fountain shop he had as well, they
graduated high school together
and also nursing school and have
been friends since sixth grade.
And, as the story goes, whenever
they see each other, it’s as if it was
yesterday. Irene and John spent
Friday night with Jim and Jessie
before heading back to Gillette.
Irene, Jean, Jessie and Jim all
graduated from Midland High
School.
Pat and Sophie Foley went to
the Black Hills Monday meeting
up with Larry Larson, Marcia,
Jean and Travis Larson, Leah
(Larson) and Drew McEleney who
all came for a get-together in
Spearfish Canyon. Ashley
Schofield, who is attending Black
Hills State University in
Spearfish, also joined them for a
picnic.
Barb Jones spent a few days
last week in Howard visiting her
daughter, Carrie, Cole, Logan and
Ava Mentele. She went to help
Carrie with the kids as Carrie was
working full time while her hus-
band, Wes, was gone on a week-
long elk hunting trip in Colorado.
Wes and a friend set up camp and
archery hunted. He called home
Wednesday and said he had shot
a bull elk. This was his first bow
and arrow hunt for an elk, so was
happy about his success.
Morris Jones joined friends of
Boyd Waara at the First National
Bank in Philip, Friday, to wish
Boyd a happy retirement from his
job in the bank.
Jen Jones wrote on update on
her dad, Jake Jacobsen, Hot
Springs, who was diagnosed with
esophageal cancer. He went in on
August 22 for the removal of his
cancerous tumor at Rapid City Re-
gional Hospital. The doctors had a
complication with a tear where
the hepatic vein and the vena cava
meet. They were able to repair it,
but had to reschedule the surgery
to August 27. That surgery went
well and dad was sent home on
September 7. He is home recover-
ing and is very grateful to be in
the comfort of his own home. We
will find out within the next 30
days if dad will have to have
chemo and radiation treatments.
Thank you for your prayers for my
dad. We wish Jake God’s healing.
Stetson Jones is the son of Jeff
and Jen Jones of Midland. Jen re-
ported that Stetson had his last
visit to Cincinnati Children's Hos-
pital on September 5. He had an
eye exam and his port removed.
Everything went well and now
Stetson has to have routine check
ups. He will have to have a MRI
and a visit with a pediatric oncol-
ogist every six months for two
years. We will be able to do this in
Sioux Falls. He will have to have
blood work every three months for
one year and we will do this in
Philip. He will have to have an eye
exam on his seeing eye every three
months for one year at Rapid City.
Our only long distance travel will
be to Denver for his prosthetic eye
if we have any issues.
It has been quite a journey for
Jeff, Jen, and Stetson. God has
walked this journey with them, to
be sure. Our prayers continue for
God’s healing touch on their jour-
ney. Thanks Jen for the update on
your dad and on Stetson.
Thursday, Gene and Audrey
Jones drove to Bernadette and
Dick Knox's home to spend the
night on their way to Madison
where Gene played softball in a 60
years and older tournament. The
team he played on won third
place. Niece, Vicki Bruce Erick-
son, daughter of Bill and Polly
Bruce, came to visit and watch the
games after she got off work.
Later, she joined her aunt and
uncle for supper. Friday morning,
the Joneses headed north to Wa-
tertown where Gene's Pierre team
of 50 and over played in the State
Senior Olympic games. They
played five games, winning first
place in their pool, on Saturday
and Sunday. Sunday, the Joneses
returned to Bernadette and Dick
Knox's home to again spend the
night before returning home Mon-
day.
It is time to close my news col-
umn for another week. Monday
turned out to be a very hot day
with temperatures of right at 100˚
and there are no rain clouds in
sight. Continue to pray for rain, be
safe and watchful as our parched
earth is a fire waiting to happen.
This day, September 11.
2012, is the 11th anniversary of a
day none of us will ever forget, the
day the Twin Towers were hit and
crumbled to the ground leaving
people with an unbelievable mem-
ory of that tragic day. That day
changed many things forever, but
that day did not defeat us, and
from that tragedy came many
heart-warming stories. I leave you
with a quote from Eleanor Roo-
sevelt, “The future belongs to
those who believe in the beauty of
their dreams.” And following the
tragedy of September 11th people
moved forward and dared to
dream and to believe. That quote
of Eleanor Roosevelt’s was
stamped on the envelope of one of
my birthday cards, I liked what it
had to say, and with the drought
we’ve experienced this summer,
and other things going on in our
world, we can find strength and
hope in that quote. Have a good
week and don’t lose sight of your
dreams.
NO TILL DRILL
Now planting grass, alfalfa,
falcata & clover!!
Call Tom Foley, Philip, SD:
(605) 859-2975
or cell: 685-8856
Midland
Merchants’
Appreciation Day
Saturday, September 22nd
5K “Fun” Run/Walk/Ride 8 a.m. – register at the park. 9 a.m.
start. Fundraiser for local 4-H club
BOOSTER CLUB will be serving lunch from
11:30 to 1:00 at the Fire Hall
PARADE will be at 1:30
p.m. – Theme “Weather.” Anyone or any entry is
invited! Line-up at 1:00 p.m. to be judged.
GAMES FOR ALL AGES will start
immediately after the parade on Main Street
(money scramble will be first).
MIDLAND COMMERCIAL CLUB will serve free roast beef
supper from 5:30 to 7:00 p.m. at the Fire Hall
PRIZES will be given out starting at 7:00 p.m.
DANCE to Westbound from 9:00 p.m. to 1:00
a.m. Sponsored by the Midland Commercial
Club and the Midland Fire Department
Sponsored by members of the
Midland Commercial Club
Cell: 605-441-2859 • Res: 605-859-2875 • Fax: 605-859-3278
520 E. Hwy. 14 PO Box 38
Philip, SD 57567 • www.all-starauto.net
“I can find
WHATEVER
you’re
looking for!”
–David Burnett,
Owner
2007 Chevy HHR
4cyl. Auto. Remote Start, Economical
Low Low Miles
Thursday, September 13, 2012 • The Pioneer Review •Page 7
Community
Gayla Piroutek
is retiring from the
Milesville Post Office.
Let’s thank her for her 33 years of service on
Wednesday, September 26th.
Stop by the post office between 11:00 & 12:00
and then come to the Milesville Hall
anytime from 12:00 to 2:00!
Gayla’s last day will be Sept. 29, 2012.
A reminder to those who would
like a part or help in any way with
the Milesville play, come to the
meeting Thursday evening, Sep-
tember 13, at 7:30 p.m. at the
Milesville Hall. "The Royal Bache-
lor " will be presented in mid Jan-
uary. If you can't be at the meeting,
call Jodi Parsons, Nina Pekron or
Marlis Doud.
All are invited to a cake recep-
tion and dance September 21 at the
Milesville Hall honoring Hugh
Harty and his bride-to-be, Ann
Breuklander. Hugh and Ann will
have a family wedding earlier that
evening. The reception begins at
8:00 p.m.
Fifty-eight folks attended the an-
nual Hardingrove Church's service
and picnic at Bill and Connie Par-
sons' Sunday. Dr. Greg Fell, dis-
trict superintendent, gave the mes-
sage, followed by a picnic dinner.
The first weekend of September,
Hugh Harty and Ann Breuklander
watched the grandchildren, Molly
and Owen Harty, while their par-
ents, Jim and Adele, were away to
celebrate their anniversary.
On Labor Day, Bill and Karyl
Sandal had business at Union Cen-
ter. They took the cut-across from
there to New Underwood. They had
a good visit with Jim Moriarty at
the Good Samaritan Nursing
Home. His therapy is progressing
nicely as he can now feed himself
and stand up some. They enjoyed
the afternoon reminiscing about
cattle drives and shared other
memories. They spent the night at
their son, Monte's, and went on to
Rapid City Tuesday.
Supper and overnight guests last
Friday at Bill and Karyl Sandal's
were Karyl's niece and husband,
Jolene and Bob Spilde. They were
on their way to Wall for an annual
get-together with the electric com-
pany that Jolene works for and this
year it was in Wall. The group en-
joyed a motorcycle ride through the
Badlands.
Bill and Karyl Sandal and the
Tim Quinns stopped to visit at the
Phil Carley home after the church
picnic at Bill and Connie's.
Tuesday night, Karyl Sandal at-
tended the Womens Club meeting
at the Senechal, where Emily
Kroetch showed pictures of her and
Bob McDaniel's trip to Cuba. She
said it was very, very interesting.
Ashley Berry visited her grand-
parents, Kenneth and Doris Berry,
last Wednesday evening. Ashley is
an registered nurse and is working
in the intensive care unit at San-
ford Hospital in Sioux Falls.
Last Monday, Byron and Peggy
Parsons headed toward Denver,
visiting nieces in Longmont and
Broomfield, Colo., on the way.
Wednesday, Peggy had an appoint-
ment at the University of Colorado
Hospital in Denver for a follow-up
from her surgeries in 2008. They
returned home Thursday.
Donnie and Marcia Eymer at-
tended the retirement party for
Boyd Waara last Friday in Philip.
That afternoon, they visited at
Martin and Vera Nelson's. Then
later in the evening, they were at
the Paul and Joy Elshere home for
more visiting.
Pat Hanrahan and Glenn O'Con-
nell surprised their spouses, Mark
and Rita, with a birthday party in
Philip Saturday night. Many local
people attended. I won't say which
birthday they celebrated, but Pat
said Mark is 'much older' than she
is!
Home for their dad's party on
Saturday night were Kalie Hanra-
han, Rapid City, and Tracie Erd-
mann and friend, Chris, Sioux
Falls.
Milesville folks who helped Kieth
and Deb Smith celebrate their 30th
anniversary at their home Satur-
day evening were Bryan and
Sharon Olivier, Larry Smith and
Mark and Judith Radway.
Gayla Piroutek spent last week
visiting both of their daughters.
She was in St. Louis for three days
with Erin and Tim Logan and their
two and a half year old son, Daniel.
Then she flew to Muskegon, Mich.,
to spend five days with the Hogue
family. She was there for Jacob's
third birthday. A train ride, a visit
to the children's museum, and a
trip to "farm" zoo playground with
lots of children's activities made for
a memorable week.
Dan Piroutek and Billy Markwed
attended a horse sale last Friday
night at Mobridge.
Weekend guests at Chad and
Kathy Hanrahan's were her par-
ents, Don and Carol Petersen, her
brother, Donnie, and sister,
Melissa.
Jim and Lana Elshere were in
Wall Saturday afternoon to watch
grandson Trey Elshere play foot-
ball.
Thursday while in Pierre for ap-
pointments, Leo and Joan Patton
took Irene Patton out to lunch.
Happy birthday, Irene, on Septem-
ber 8!
Leo and Joan Patton attended
the graveside rites of Sister Agnes
Saturday in Philip. Coming to the
Pattons Sunday were Bob, April
and Kaitlyn Knight and April's
friend, Frank. They worked on a
shed for Joan's lawnmower.
Saturday, Keagan Fitch and
Hunter Peterson took the bow-
hunter safety course in Rapid City.
That afternoon, the rest of the
Fitches joined family at a camp-
ground near Hill City. They in-
cluded the Tanya and Michael Pe-
terson family, Tyneal and Justin
Thorp family, Tiana and Luke
Weber family and Tylissa and
Brock Geffre. Trevor, Christa and
boys returned home Saturday
night.
Erin Hovland, Connor and
Mackenzie, went to Erin's
grandma's house Saturday. Also
there were Peggy Garoutte, Boise,
Idaho, Debbie Prouty, Cecilia Kotil-
nek, Lawrence and Ronda
Schofield, and Vincent Schofield.
Sports kept the local kids busy
this week with a junior high foot-
ball game Tuesday night with
Jones County, varsity game
against White River Friday and the
cross country team was in Wall
Saturday.
Friday night supper guests at
Mike and Linda Gebes' were Court-
ney Gebes, Gina Neu and Roy
Warner. Gina worked at Golden
Vet a year ago as an intern, and
just recently completed her intern-
ship at Rockham.
Brad Gebes and friend, Kathy,
and her son, Devon, were Sunday
dinner guests at Mike and Linda’s.
Matt Arthur and his brother,
Murdock, spent the weekend near
Rapid City helping out their sister
and family, Brad and Amber Beer
and boys.
Happy belated birthday to Josh
Quinn who turned 18 last week!
The Haakon County Crooners
sang for a fundraiser for Our Re-
deemer Lutheran Church in Rapid
City last Saturday. Going along
with Paul Staben, a member of the
Crooners, were Donna and Tina
Staben.
Last weekend, Joan Hamill vis-
ited in the home of daughter Rac-
quel and Ron Johnson, Hendricks,
Minn. Joan's sons, Russell and
Matt, and families were also there
from St. Paul. They celebrated two
birthdays – Kaylee Johnson's on
the 10th, and Lucas Jasper's on the
first.
This Monday afternoon is a good
time to be indoors. Our thermome-
ter showed 101˚, but in places it is
hotter than that. Winter wheat
planting is in progress for some. It
won't come up until it rains, so we
need to keep praying for moisture!
Milesville News
by Janice Parsons • 544-3315
Pumpkins are beginning to show their orange appearance around gardens in Philip. The large one on the left is at Clark Morrison’s. The smaller one pictured
above is an escapee from Marion and Darlene Matt’s backyard. Photos by Nancy Haigh
A taste of autumn is in the air
Hello from Rochester, Minn. The
news will be pretty brief and I will
try to keep it as interesting as pos-
sible. Congratulations to Kennedy
Implement on the honor of being
an outstanding business. The
Rapid City Journal had a nice
write up as well as “Farm Journal.”
Time flies, Coyle's Super Valu hit a
decade (10 years) of being in busi-
ness and right along with that
Scotchman Industries hit a mile-
stone of 45 years.
Well, Labor Day started off
bright and early for Vi and Don
Moody as they had made plans to
do a lot of catch up work at their
Rapid Valley house.  They visited
with the man who had just finished
haying the valley property owned
by Don and Vi and both sides of
Rapid Creek yielded a second cut-
ting for the season. A nice horse
hay crop is about all the second cut-
ting produced.
Sandee Gittings was in Rapid
City Monday on business. She vis-
ited Shirley Buls on the way home.
Monday at our place, we had com-
pany of Dale O'Connell and Tony
Harty in the morning and Carol
Solon stopped after getting off
work. While I was working in the
front of the house, a car pulled in
and out jumped our “starving
artist” friend, Bernd Hillman, from
Minnesota and his uncle from Ger-
many. They were in the area sight-
seeing and Bernd came by to
stretch a painting done by my
grandma, Isabelle (Little) Weeks,
around 1889. It took three of us,
but when he got done, the canvas
was nice and tight. Next time, he
plans to do some restoration on it.
We saw them at breakfast Tuesday
morning, then they were gone back
to Minnesota.
Tony Harty made a trip to the
Herber ranch for a visit Monday,
arriving just after some cattle had
been worked. He enjoyed cribbage
with sister-in-law Barbara Herber.
Bernard Herber grabbed a fishing
pole and went fishing. He came
back with a nice mess of fish, but
Tony declined supper with them.
George and Kinsey Gittings took
the rake that George borrowed
back to Kelly Blair Monday
evening.
Tuesday morning, we were
pleasantly surprised to have John
Rentschler from Howard come by
for a visit. John and wife Lela have
been friends since in the 80s when
we both were master pork produc-
ers.
Tuesday, Tony Harty had break-
fast out and visited with Shirley
Hair later in the day.
Kinsey and Natalie Gittings had
supper in town Tuesday evening.
Kohen spent the time with Great-
grandpa and Great-grandma Git-
tings.
Tuesday and Wednesday, Don
and Vi Moody had their vehicles all
serviced for the pre-winter checks
and ran errands around Rapid to
fix and replace some plumbing
items.  They enjoyed the balmy
weather, but no moisture came to
the area so it’s getting pretty dry
there also. Water sprinklers came
out again and the wind did blow
hard enough to pop a pretty good
sized branch off a huge cottonwood
tree in Moody's front yard but
caused no damage.  It had to be
pulled off from part of the entry
road.
Wednesday found Tony Harty
out mowing weeds in and around
his yard as well as on some prop-
erty Wilma Stout has. He stirred
up enough pollen to have his eyes
give him a fit before he called it a
day. Dale Koehn visited with Tony
while out taking care of his dog.
Tony visited with Shirley Hair
later in the day.
Thursday, Don Moody made his
check at the ranch and everything
was all in fine order except for
being dry down that way as well.
Everyone is grateful for the WR/L-
J Rural Water to rely on for their
livestock this summer as the
drought seems to continue on in a
lots of areas in Haakon and Jack-
son counties.
Thursday, Tony Harty had
breakfast out, then visited with
Shirley Hair before heading off to
Wanblee to visit at the home of his
sister, Monica and Pat Weaver and
check on how Pat was getting along
after his surgery. Pat was getting
in his exercise and Tony enjoyed
some fresh apple pie Monica had
baked. A call came about a fire, so
everyone went looking for it, glad
to find that it had burned itself out.
When he got back to Kadoka, he
visited Russ Hattel as well as
Kathy Brown. His nephews, John
and Jim Herber, stopped for a visit
with Tony before they went to the
volleyball game that evening.
Bill mustered up enough energy
to spend a few afternoons in the
card room in Philip. Joining all his
friends is for sure going to help him
heal faster.
Sandee Gittings was in the
Kadoka area Thursday afternoon
and visited Bill and Marsha
Sumpter.
Friday at Rapid Valley, a vehicle
pulled into the yard at Don and Vi's
and tried to persuade them into
paving the rest of their road into
their house, but Don elected to get
more prices to compare, so put that
on hold for the time being. A letter
came to the Moody's in Rapid Val-
ley involving the new bike path
route following the aban-
doned  Chicago,  Milwaukee. St.
Paul  railroad track from Rapid
City to Kadoka.  This letter was
sent because they own land in the
Valley that abuts the state land
that the railroad corridor is
on. This feasibility study is by the
West River Trails Coalition and
will involve four public meetings
(two in Rapid City and two in
Kadoka). In the meantime, there
will be a 5K walk, run, bike, etc.,
walk September 29 in Kadoka,
starting at the Pearl Hotel.
Friday, I and Phyllis Word kept
appointments in Rapid City. Phyl-
lis stayed over in Rapid that
evening and I hurried home to get
some things done up for when
Carol Kroetch stopped by after
school.
George, Sandee, Kinsey, Natalie
and Kohen Gittings met Kelly
Blair and Tom and Margie Blair,
Ekalaka, Mont., in town for supper
Friday evening.
It rained in Kadoka, more than
nine inches. (That is nine inches
between drops!) Tony left his win-
dows down and discovered the seat
was at least a little damp when he
went to breakfast. He visited
Shirley Hair then took care of his
eyes, that were still bothering from
his day of mowing.
Friday afternoon, Ralph and
Cathy Fiedler headed for Philip ar-
riving at the Richard Stewart
home. They had supper downtown
together, then went back to the
house and called it a night so they
could get an early Saturday morn-
ing start for Beresford. Ralph,
Cathy, Richard and Diana stopped
in Kennebec at Kellie (Stewart)
Halverson’s to drop some things
off. Then on the road again. They
arrived at Beau and Jamie Stew-
art’s in time for lunch. Jeb and
Cassie Stewart, Brandon, also ar-
Betwixt Places News
by Marsha Sumpter • 837-2048 • bilmar@gwtc.net
continued on page 14
Help Philip Motor, in conjunction with Ford Motor
Company, raise $6,000 for Philip High School!!
Come in & test drive a Ford vehicle
(with no obligation to buy)
During Homecoming
Friday, September 14th
at Philip High School
With each test drive, $20.00 will be donated
to Philip High School!!!
Philip Motor, Inc.
859-2585 • Philip • www.philipmotor.com
Thursday, September 13, 2012 • The Pioneer Review •Page 8
Sports
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(5) 3rd Place Winners will be drawn during the
dance
7-Card Draw • 5-Card Hands • No Jokers
Free Camping & DDs Available
Dance from 8:00 to 12:30
to the
Twin Rivers Band
Need to get water to your cattle?
RubbeR wateR taNks foR sale
Need to get water to your cattle this fall?
We have different sizes of water
tanks available with or
without a drain hole in the
bottom of the tank. Also do
waterline installation and any kind of backhoe work!
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MOSES BLDG. CENTER
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Call today for your
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The Philip Scotties line aided the ball carriers during the team’s game in White River Friday, September 7. The Scotties pulled together and put 23 points on the
board in second half action.From left for the Scotties are Brayden Fitch, Brian Pfeifle, Jade Berry, Paul Guptill with the ball, quarterback #10 Gavin Brucklacher and
#71 Quade Slovek. Guptill scored 2 touchdowns for the Scotties, one for 65 yards and the other at 15 yards rushed. Photo by Nancy Haigh
Cassidy Schnabel pulled down this White River ball carrier last Friday night. Sch-
abel played tough with three solo and three assist tackles, one quarterback sack
and carried the ball 10 times a total of 65 yards. In the background is Scottie Tate
DeJong. Photo by Nancy Haigh
The Philip Scotties football team
began its 2012 season by challeng-
ing the Jones County Coyotes at
Murdo, Friday, August 31.
The Scotties held the Coyotes to
just eight points, but could them-
selves put only three points on the
scoreboard.
The first quarter saw a 56-yard
run by Jones County’s Philip Math-
ews to the Coyote’s end zone for six
points. The Scotties stopped the
conversion attempt. Later in the
quarter, Philip’s Chaney Burns
kicked a field goal to put three
points on the scoreboard for the
Scotties.
The second quarter contained
the last points to be scored during
the game. The Scotties had posses-
sion while backed in Jones County
territory. Philip’s snap of the ball
during a punt play went high and
into the end zone, thus being auto-
matically called a two-point safety
for Jones County.
The second half saw hard plays
and continual back and forth ac-
tion, but the 3-8 score did not
change.
The Scotties earned 14 first
down in the night’s action. They
were assessed five five-yard penal-
ties. Jones County had 15 first
downs and five five-yard, one 10-
yard and three 15-yard penalties.
Philip’s passing game was lead
by Tate DeJong, who threw one
pass attempt that recorded a 47
yard gain for the Scotties. Quarter-
back Gavin Brucklacher tried four
passes, but he and the receivers
were not able to connect.
The Philip rushing game had
four players lead the statistics. De-
Jong was given the ball to run 11
plays, in which he gained a total of
65 yards. Casey Reder also had 11
carries, for a total of 24 yards. Paul
Guptill used his two carries to gain
10 yards for the Scotties. Ryan Van
Tassel gained a total of six yards
with his two carries.
Defensively, the Scotties team
showed a large percentage of as-
sisted tackling. Cassidy Schnabel
racked up two solo tackles and 13
assists. Reed Johnson added two
solo tackles and 11 assists. Ben
Stangle contributed one solo and
11 assists. Jade Berry ended the
game with four solo tackles and
eight assists, while Quade Slovek
finished with three solo and eight
assist tackles and a quarterback
sack.
Philip holds Jones County to only 8
The Philip Scotties football team
traveled to White River, Friday,
September 7, to challenge the
Tigers. The game ended with a 26-
35 loss for Philip.
White River scored an unan-
swered 13 points in the first quar-
ter. They added 15 more in the sec-
ond quarter, while Philip’s Chaney
Burns put three points on the
scoreboard for the Scotties.
The third quarter saw White
River adding a 94-yard touchdown
and an extra point kick. That
ended the Tiger’s scoring for the
rest of the game.
The second half saw Philip’s Tate
DeJong rush in a 17-yard play for
six points, followed by a Burns’
kicked extra point. The fourth
quarter saw Paul Guptill run 65
yards for a touchdown, followed by
Casey Reder making good the con-
version play. Guptill was given the
ball again for a 15-yard touchdown,
and DeJong completed the conve-
rion from Brucklacher to end the
game for the Scotties with 26
points.
Philip’s passing game showed
Gavin Brucklacher throwing the
ball 12 times with six completions
for 118 yards and one touchdown.
Rushing for the Scotties was lead
by Guptill, who had 13 carries for a
total of 197 yards. Cassidy Schn-
abel went 65 yards in his 10 car-
ries. Reder had four carries for a
total of 22 yards, and Ryan Van
Tassel was given the ball four
times for a total of eight yards.
Defensive play was filled with
sacks made by the Scotties. Reder
racked up four solo tackles, five as-
sisted tackles and one sack. Jade
Berry added six assists and four
sacks. Schnabel earned three solos,
three assists and one sack. Quade
Philip Scotties fall to White River 26-35
Slovek finished the game with one
solo, four assists and one sack. Ben
Stangle earned three solos and two
assists.
Philip had 20 first downs. Philip
gave up four five-yard penalties
one 10-yard penalty and two 15-
yard penalties. White River had 22
first downs and one five-yard
penalty.
The next game for the Scotties
will be the Homecoming game Fri-
day, September 14, against the
New Underwood Tigers.
The annual HuntSAFE course in
Midland will be held Saturday,
September 29.
This free safety class (Hunt
Safety And Firearms Education) is
open to anyone 11 years old and up.
It will be at the Open Bible Fellow-
ship hall starting at 8:00 a.m. Any-
one taking the class will need a
sack lunch. Materials for the class
will be available to be picked up
from course instructor Tom Par-
quet after September 3. Preregis-
tration is not mandatory, but is en-
couraged and appreciated. For
more information, contact Parquet
at tep@gwtc.net or 843-2515 after
5:00 p.m.
South Dakota's HuntSAFE
courses are designed for youth age
12 through 15. Youth who are 11
may participate, but will not be is-
sued a hunter safety certification
card until their 12th birthday.
Adults are also welcome and in-
vited to attend. Other states re-
quire a hunter’s safety course to
have been taken by any adult
hunter who wishes to hunt in that
state.
There are three primary objec-
tives for courses. One is to teach
safe handling of firearms, in the
home as well as in the field. One is
to develop safe, responsible and
knowledgeable hunters who are
aware of our hunting heritage and
who understand the hunter's role
and relationship with the wildlife
and the land. The other is to certify
youth under the age of 16, making
them eligible to apply for hunting
licenses.
Students who successfully com-
plete a HuntSAFE course receive
an identification card containing
their name, date of certification, a
certification number and the signa-
ture of the instructor. Until the
student is 16, a parent or guardian
must present the HuntSAFE certi-
fication card to a licensed vendor
when purchasing the young per-
son's hunting license. The parent
or guardian agrees, by signing the
license application, to accompany
the student in the field while he or
she is hunting until they are 16.
HuntSAFE course Sept. 29
The Lady Scotties hosted their
own Philip Invitational Volleyball
Tournament, Saturday, September
8.
First facing the Jones County
Lady Coyotes, the Philip team lost
its games 19-25 and 14-25.
Philip vs. Jones County
Serving – 28 of 34 (3 aces). Leaders: Jor-
dyn Dekker – 7 of 8 (1 ace), Madison Hand –
7 of 7 (1 ace), Sam Johnson – 4 of 5 (2 aces).
Receiving – 31 of 41. Leaders: Ellie Coyle –
12 of 12, Krista Wells – 11 of 17, Jordyn
Dekker – 6 of 7.
Setting – 40 of 50 (7 assists). Leaders:
Hand – 21 of 25 (4 assists), Hanna Hostut-
ler – 4 of 5 (2 assists).
Hitting – 39 of 49 (9 kills). Leaders: John-
son – 15 of 20 (6 kills), Dekker – 6 of 7 (1 kill),
Hand – 5 of 6 (2 kills).
Digging – 32 of 47. Leaders: Hand – 9 of
12, Wells – 8 of 10, Coyle – 5 of 6.
Philip next faced the Lead/Dead-
wood Golddiggers. The Lady Scot-
ties came away with two wins, with
final scores of 25-23 and 25-18.
Philip vs. Lead/Deadwood
Serving – 47 of 49 (8 aces). Leaders: Pey-
ton DeJong – 14 of 14 (2 aces), Katlin Knut-
son – 13 of 13 (6 aces), Hand – 8 of 9.
Receiving – 23 of 32. Leaders: Coyle – 9 of
11, Wells – 7 of 10, Dekker – 5 of 6.
Setting – 42 of 46 (15 assists). Leader:
Hand – 27 of 29 (14 assists).
Hitting – 43 of 49 (18 kills). Leaders:
Dekker – 9 of 10 (6 kills), Johnson – 13 of 15
(5 kills), DeJong – 6 of 6 (3 kills).
Blocking – 3 kills. Leader: Dekker – 3
solos.
Digging: 36 of 50. Leaders: Wells – 10 of
14, Dekker – 8 of 10, Coyle – 7 of 10.
The Lady Scotties currently
stand with a 3-3 season record.
The Scotties will compete next in
a Philip triangular, Saturday, Sep-
tember 15, beginning at 2:00 p.m.
against the Wall Eagles and the
White River Lady Tigers. Follow-
ing that, the Scotties will next host
the Faith Lady Longhorns, Tues-
day, September 20, starting at 5:00
p.m.
Philip
volleyball
tourney
The Lady Scotties competed in
the Presho triangular volleyball
tournament, Thursday, September
6, against Lyman and Stanley
County.
Against Lyman, Philip won the
first game, but could not quite
claim the next three. The final
scores were 25-20, 22-25, 19-25 and
19-25.
Philip vs. Lyman
Serving – 79 of 86 (7 aces). Leaders: Madi-
son Hand – 17 of 17 (1 ace), Sam Johnson –
14 of 15 (1 ace), Krista Wells – 6 of 7 (2 aces).
Receiving – 66 of 77. Leaders: Wells – 33
of 35, Jordyn Dekker – 12 of 14, Ellie Coyle –
6 of 7, Kaci Olivier – 6 of 7.
Setting – 114 of 122 (25 assists). Leader:
Hand – 81 of 81 (20 assists).
Hitting – 105 of 134 (31 kills). Leaders:
Johnson – 35 of 46 (13 kills), Dekker – 20 of
24 (8 kills), Hand – 6 of 8 (3 kills).
Blocking – 7 kills. Leaders: Dekker – 3
solos and 1 assist, Hanna Hostutler – 1 solo
and 1 assist.
Digging – 78 of 110. Leaders: Wells – 21 of
23, Dekker – 13 of 19, Coyle – 12 of 14.
Against Stanley County, Philip
dropped its second game, but won
the other three. The final scores
were 25-16, 19-25, 25-17 and 25-11.
Philip vs. Stanley County
Serving – 84 of 95 (13 aces). Leaders:
Hand – 20 of 21 (5 aces), Coyle – 11 of 13 (1
ace), Brett Carley – 10 of 11.
Receiving – 49 of 55. Leaders: Wells – 21
of 23, Dekker – 14 of 15, DeJong – 5 of 5.
Setting – 88 of 93 (25 assists). Leader:
Hand – 55 of 58 (17 assists).
Hitting – 66 of 87 (35 kills). Leaders: John-
son – 21 of 27 (11 kills), Dekker – 12 of 15 (9
kills), Hand – 10 of 13 (7 kills).
Blocking – 8 kills. Leaders: Dekker – 4
solos and 3 assists, Hostutler – 2 assists.
Digging – 65 of 82. Leaders: Wells – 16 of
18, Dekker – 14 of 15, Coyle – 11 of 12.
Scotties 1-1 in Presho triangular
The Philip Lady Scotties trav-
eled to Murdo, Tuesday, September
4, to challenge the Jones County
Lady Coyotes.
The varsity won three of its
games, losing the second one in
overtime play. The scores were 25-
14, 26-28, 25-18 and 25-23.
Varsity
Serving – 95 of 105 (13 aces). Leaders:
Madison Hand – 23 of 23 (4 aces), Krista
Wells – 12 of 13 (3 aces), Kaci Olivier – 13 of
14 (2 aces).
Receiving – 57 of 68. Leaders: Wells – 24
of 27. Olivier – 14 of 16, Jordyn Dekker – 11
of 14.
Setting – 100 of 110 (24 assists). Leaders:
Hand – 30 of 33 (10 assists), Katlin Knut-
son – 27 of 28 (5 assists), Kelsie Kroetch – 10
of 12 (2 assists).
Hitting – 95 of 118 (35 kills). Leaders:
Dekker – 23 of 28 (10 kills), Sam Johnson –
22 of 28 (9 kills), Hand – 16 of 21 (7 kills).
Blocking – 6 kills. Leaders: Dekker – 3
solo, Johnson – 1 solo and 1 assist, Hanna
Hostutler – 1 assist, Brett Carley – 1 solo.
Digging – 90 of 114. Leaders: Wells – 25 of
30, Hand – 17 of 19, Olivier – 16 of 19.
The junior varsity team swept all
three of its games. The final scores
were 25-18, 25-9 and 15-13.
Junior varsity
Serving – 44 of 58 (10 aces). Leaders: Car-
ley – 18 of 19 (3 aces), Peyton DeJong – 8 of 8
(1 ace), Hand – 6 of 6.
Receiving – 30 of 33. Leaders: Olivier – 10
of 11, Afton Burns – 4 of 5, Hostutler – 4 of 4,
Amanda McIlravy – 4 of 4.
Setting – 60 of 61 (14 assists). Leaders:
Knutson – 18 of 18 (6 assists), Hand – 24 of
24 (5 assists).
Hitting – 61 of 65 (17 kills). Leaders:
Olivier – 8 of 8 (3 kills), Hand – 11 of 11 (3
kills), Knutson – 8 of 9 (3 kills).
Digging – 36 of 52. Leaders: Olivier – 8 of
9, DeJong – 7 of 10, Knutson – 6 of 7.
Lady Scotties defeat Coyotes
Thursday, September 13, 2012 • The Pioneer Review •Page 9
Sports & Accomplishments
Supper
Supper will be served immediately following the
parade until 6:30 p.m.
Friday, September 14th at the
PHiLiP FiRE HALL
Menu includes: Sloppy Joe’s ~ Hot
Dogs ~ Baked Beans ~ Homemade
Pies ~ Beverages
The proceeds will be used for sending
youth to church camp and Christian Ed.
Checks may be made to the united Church
FREE
WiLL
OFFERiNG
Checks
may be
made to
the
united
Church
First Lutheran Church • Philip
Tuesday, Sept. 18 • 3-6 p.m.
Items donated.
Proceeds go to
Building Fund.
Bake Sale &
Lemonade too!
Rock ’N
Roll Lanes
859-2430 • Philip
WEEkLy SPECiAL:
Taco Salad
SuNDAy SPECiAL:
Chicken Alfredo
with Texas Toast
Salad Bar & Dessert
859-2211
2
1
/2 miles N.
& 1 mile W. of Philip
Lake Waggoner Golf Course
Club
Championship
Sunday, Sept. 16th
10:00 a.m.
$20 Entry
Pay-out for low
gross & low net
Club
Championship
Lake Waggoner Golf Course
MEMBERS
ONLY
MEMBERS
ONLY
Philip League Bowling
Rock ’N Roll Lanes
OPEN BOWLING:
Sunday-Friday, 12 to 6 p.m. • Saturday, 12 p.m. to closing
The kitchen is open – we have orders to go!!
859-2430 • Philip
Monday Night Mixed
Dakota Bar....................................3-1
Badland’s Auto..............................2-2
Rockers..........................................2-2
Petersen’s......................................2-2
Handrahan Const .........................2-2
Shad’s Towing...............................1-3
Wednesday Morning Coffee
State Farm Ins..............................4-0
Invisibles.......................................3-1
Cutting Edge Salon ......................2-2
Jolly Ranchers ..............................2-2
All Star Auto.................................1-3
Ghost Team...................................0-0
Highlights:
Charlene Kjerstad.................172/455
Karen Foland ........................159/392
Lila Whidby..................................142
Kay Williams................................388
Debbie Gartner...................3-10 split
Beth Stewart ......................5-10 split
Wednesday Nite Early
Morrison’s Haying ........................3-1
Dakota Bar....................................3-1
Chiefie’s Chicks ............................2-2
Dorothy’s Catering .......................2-2
First National Bank .....................1-3
Just Tammy’s................................1-3
99 Pins ..........................................NA
Wall Food Center .........................NA
Highlights:
Brenda Grenz ........5-7 split; 180/462
Annette Hand...............................406
Rachel Kjerstad..................5-10 split
Friday Nite Mixed
Cristi’s Crew.................................3-1
King Pins.................................2.5-1.5
Roy’s Amigo’s ..........................1.5-2.5
Randy’s Spray Service..................1-3
Highlights:
Alvin Pearson........................172/475
Bart Guptill..................................172
John Heltzel .......................2-10 split
Deanna Fees.......................5-10 split
Philip motor, Inc.
Philip, SD
859-2585
(800) 859-5557
2011 Dodge Ram 2500 HD
5.7L Hemi, Long Box, Heavy Duty Grill Guard
Give Tyler a call today!
www.philipmotor.com
Shown above, the
Philip Scotties girls
ran as a varsity
team for the first
time this season.
From left: Holly
Iwan who earned
first place, Shay
Hand who took
13th place, and Al-
lison Pekron who
took 12th place.
The Philip girls’
team took second
place. At right are
Tristen Rush in
front who finished
fifth place, and
Blake Martinez
who earned eighth
place. Philip’s Gar-
rett Snook fin-
ished in the 11th
spot, while Kee-
gan Burnett took
14th, for the boys’
team to earn the
second place
team position.
by Coach Ralph Kroetch
Sunny and cool on a spectater
friendly Wall Golf Course set the
stage for the first ever Wall Cross
Country Invitational meet, Satur-
day, September 8.
The boys’ varsity race opened
with Philip sophomores Tristen
Rush and Blake Martinez and
freshmen Keegan Burnett and
Garrett Snook racing for the Scot-
ties. They have learned that too
fast of a start makes for a miser-
able race. The final stages of this
race proved that, with Rush over-
taking White River’s Mathew
Beardt and Dupree’s Nate Widow
in the final 150 meters. Rush
sprinted past both to place fifth
with a time of 18:18. Martinez’s
time of 18:35 gave him eighth
place. Snook exchanged spots
throughout the race with Lyman
and White River runners to place
11th in a time of 20:03 in his sec-
ond ever varsity race. Burnett, also
running his second ever 5,000
meter race, outpaced Faith’s Jarius
Halligan for the 14th position. The
boys’ team accrued 17 points to
earn second place as a team to
Dupree’s 10 points.
The Scotties girls entered a var-
sity team for the first time this sea-
son. Holly Iwan lead them to a sec-
ond place finish with 12 points, be-
hind Lyman’s nine points. A
Kadoka runner charged into a com-
manding early lead. Iwan said to
Lyman’s Sara Herman, “We will
stay right here and wait for her to
come back.” At the one mile mark,
Iwan held the lead and Herman in
second. Iwan put up an unsur-
mountable 40 second lead. With a
time of 17:00, Iwan earned her first
win of 2012.
Junior Allison Pekron and eighth
grader Shay Hand worked together
to finish 12th and 13th, with times
of 20:01 and 20:16 respectively.
Scotties’ seventh grader Conner
Dekker and eighth grader Damian
Bartels ran the 4,000 meter boys’
junior varsity run. Both ran well,
with Bartels placing 11th, improv-
ing his course best by 24 seconds at
19:05. Dekker fought through a
sore hamstring to place 19th, cut-
ting an amazing 4:57 from his best
4,000 meter time, at 23:04.
The Scotties competed next on
Monday, September 10, on the
White River airport. Their follow-
ing meets will be September 19 at
the Wall’s Western Great Plains
Conference meet and September 21
at a meet in Rapid City.
Scotties runner up at Wall Invite
Philip again hosted the annual
South Dakota Civil Air Patrol
training weekend, August 3-4.
Despite the windy conditions this
year, 11 cadets and 23 adults from
across the state attended.
Major Lee Vaughan and 1st Lt.
Roberta Vaughan, Philip, and Mar-
sha Sumpter, Kadoka, represented
the Philip Flight. They joined four
members of the Pierre Squadron –
Jon Becker, cadets Hannah and
Evan Becker, and Lt. Col. Myra
Christensen. Other attending
squadrons were from Sioux Falls,
Rapid City, Custer and Spearfish.
Younger members were given
orientation rides in the Black Hills
Soaring Club’s Schweitzer 2-22
glider, piloted by Lt. Col. Gary
Hewett, Rapid City. 1st Lt. Marty
Larson towed the glider into the
sky with South Dakota CAP’s
Cessna 182.
As increasing winds began to
make glider flights impossible,
CAP members turned to search
and rescue training and orientation
rides in Cessna 172 and 182 air-
craft. Col. Mike Beason, mission in-
cident commander from Rapid
City, gave orders for the launching
of an aircraft for a training mis-
sion. It was piloted by Major. Craig
Goodrich, Rapid City, with J.
Becker and Andy Tate filling out
the crew. The assigned ground
team was lead by Capt. Brian
Sharp. The second mission, a photo
opportunity over the Conata Basin
south of the Badlands, was
launched with Christensen at the
controls.
L. Vaughan reported that during
the missions he was in his ele-
ment – on the flight line, ensuring
the safety of the cadets. Sumpter
supported the logistics for the
weekend activities. 1st Lt. William
Collister, Spearfish, was the wing
director of communications, while
Lt. Col. Dave Jeferies, Rapid City
and R. Vaughan upgraded the
squadron’s radios according to
needed frequencies.
The weekend summary stated
that, all in all, it was a very fun,
busy exercise with much accom-
plished and old acquaintances re-
newed.
Philip hosts annual S.D. Civil
Air Patrol aerospace weekend
Captain Brian Sharp, right, instructed cadet Hannah Becker on how to operate
directional finding equipment to locate a practice beacon. Courtesy photo
The Black Hills State University
Yellow Jacket Hall of Fame will in-
duct six individuals and two teams
during the 2012 Swarm Day festiv-
ities.
Philip’s Pat Guptill will be in-
ducted for his achievements in
track, football and basketball. He
was a four-year letter winner in all
three sports. Some of his accolades
include a third place finish in the
110 meter hurdles at the 1979
South Dakota Intercollegiate Con-
ference meet; a second place finish
in the SDIC 4x100 relay in 1979
and 1981; 1980 SDIC champion in
the 110 meter high hurdles with a
time of 15.34, and also took fifth
place in the 400 meter hurdles; and
in 1981, a first place in the 110
high hurdles with a time of 15.2,
second place in the high jump with
a height of 6’2” and fourth place in
the 400 meter hurdles.
Also being inducted into the hall
of fame is the 1983 football team,
led by Coach Carl “Duke” Iverson.
They were SDIC champions with a
5-0-2 record and a 5-2-2 overall
record. Todd Hemmingson was on
that team.
Other inductees are Monica
(Headlee) Dorn for cross country
and track, Steve Harshman for
football and wrestling, Eldon Mar-
shall for boys basketball coaching,
Dana and LaDawn Dykhouse for
philanthropy to BHSU, and the
2000 men’s cross country team.
BHSU, Spearfish, will hold its
annual homecoming celebration
Swarm Days, September 17-22.
This year’s theme is “Operation:
Swarm Days” to show support for
the deployed 842nd National
Guard Unit.
The parade Saturday morning
will have entries displaying a mili-
tary theme. Other homecoming
events include coronation, hike to
the “H,” disc golf tournament, tail-
gate social, and the homecoming
football game versus the Colorado
Mesa University Mavericks. BHSU
will host an all-athletic reunion fol-
lowing the football game.
All alumni are invited back to
campus to celebrate Swarm Week
and take part in the various events,
including the Alumni Awards
luncheon and the Hall of Fame
banquet. For these two events,
tickets must be purchased in ad-
vance. Call 642-6385 for more in-
formation. A complete Swarm Days
schedule is at www.BHSU.
edu/SwarmDays, or call the stu-
dent union information center at
642-6062.
Guptill - Yellow Jacket Hall of Fame
Local residents have the oppor-
tunity to celebrate life by joining in
the community blood drive spon-
sored by the Knights of Columbus
from 10:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Tues-
day, September 18, in the Fine Arts
Building at the Philip High School.
And now, not only will people
have a great feeling after donating
blood at the drive, but they will be
able to check their total cholesterol
level. United Blood services now of-
fers free cholesterol testing to blood
donors. United Blood Services does
a total cholesterol test that allows
donors to eat before the test – no
fasting is required.
“We use the total cholesterol test
because it is important for donors
to have a healthy meal before they
donate,” said Lori Liebman, United
Blood Services donor recruitment
director. It is recommended that
adults 20 years and older have a
different cholesterol test, called a
lipoprotien profile, every five years.
A lipoprotein profile requires a 12-
hour fast and is done at a physi-
cian’s office or lab.
Donors can check their confiden-
tial results at www.bloodhero.com
the week after their donation.
Blood donors must be 16 years or
older and in good health. Addi-
tional height/weight requirements
apply to donors 22 and younger,
and donors who are 16, or 17 in cer-
tain areas, must have signed per-
mission from a parent or guardian.
Donors are asked to bring a photo
ID and donor card every time they
donate. First time donors receive a
donor card with their blood type in
the mail shortly after the ir first
donaton.
People sho wish to donate at the
blood drive may schedule an ap-
pointment by calling Rick Palecek
in Philip at 859-2525, or call
United Blood Services in Rapid
City 342-8585, in Mitchell 996-
3688, or logging on to the website.
Philip area blood drive September 18
Make your opinion known … write a letter to the editor!
Fax signed copy to 859-2410
or e-mail with your phone number to:
newsdesk@pioneer-review.com
Scotties football team includes, back Row, left to right, Austin Davidson, Colten Triebwasser, Chase
Wright, Brian Pfeifle, Seth Haigh, Brayden Fitch, Blake Puhlman, Ben Stangle, Brad Pfeifle; third
row, Head Coach Keven Morehart, Gavin Brucklacher, Nick Hamill, Austin Pinney, Rance Johnson,
Jacob Kammerer, Brody Jones, Jace Giannonatti, Grady Carley, Jade Berry, Asst. Coach Mike Baer;
second row, Paul Guptill, Reed Johnson, Tate DeJong, Cassidy Schnabel, Quade Slovek, Chaney
Burns, Ryan Van Tassel, Casey Reder; front row, Student Mgr. Katie Hostutler, Stratton Morehart,
Student Mgr. Bailey Radway. Photo by Deb Smith
The Lady Scotties volleyball team includes, back row from left, Head
Coach Kim Bouman, Hanna Hostutler, Tyana Gottsleben, Katie Haigh,
Courtney Bartlett, Ashton Reedy, Justina Cvach; third row, Katlin Knut-
son, Brett Carley, Peyton DeJong, Tyshia Ferguson, Amanda McIlravy,
Libbi Koester, Asst. Coach Mary Lynn Crary; second row, Student Mgr.
Gavin Snook, Afton Burns, Madison Hand, Jordyn Dekker, Kaci Olivier,
Ellie Coyle, Student Mgrs. Deserae Williams and Catie Pinela; front row,
Kelsie Kroetch, Krista Wells, Sam Johnson. Photo by Deb Smith
Scotties Cross Country team, back row, left to
right, Coach Ralph Kroetch, Keegan Burnett, Gar-
rett Snook, Tristen Rush, Blake Martinez, Nelson
Holman, Student Mgr. Sam Stangle; front row,
Conner Dekker, Allison Pekron, Ellie Coyle, Holly
Iwan, Shay Hand, Damion Bartels.
Photo by Deb Smith
Thursday, September 13, 2012 • The Pioneer Review • Page 10
Brant’s
Electric
B&B
Sales
Coyle’s SuperValu
Dr. Ron & Laurie
Mann & Staff
Ernie’s Bldg. Cen-
ter, LLC
Farm Bureau Fi-
nancial
First National
Agency
First National
Bank in Philip
Fitgerald
Oil Company
Gibson
Concrete Const.
Golden Willow
Seeds
Haakon County
Abstract
G&G
Excavation
Ingram
Hardware
Jones’ Saddlery
Bottle & Vet
Kennedy
Impl. & Auto
Grossenburg
Implement
Midwest Co-op
Cenex
Modern Woodmen
of America
Philip Health
Services, Inc.
Philip Livestock
Auction
Ravellette
Publications
Rush Funeral
Home
State Farm Insur-
ance
The Steakhouse
& Lounge
Philip Motor,
Inc.
Morrison’s
Pit Stop
Moses’
Building Center
Coyle’s
Standard
9/13/2012: JH Volleyball @ Wall 6:00; 5th & 6th @ 5:00 p.m.
9/14/2012: 12:30 Pep Band Rally for Students & Community Mem-
bers
9/14/2012: 2 p.m. Homecoming Parade (1:30 line-up West of Philip
Motor)
9/14/2012: HS Football v. New Underwood 7:00 p.m. Homecoming
9/15/2012: HS Volleyball Philip Round Robin (Wall, White River)
2:00 p.m. Homecoming
9/15/2012: JH Football @ Kadoka Jamboree (Midland) TBA
Philip High School
H
O
M
E
C
O
M
I
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G
Legal Notlces
1hursday, 3eptember 13, 2012 · 1he Pioneer Review · Page 11
Notice to Creditors and
Notice of FormaI Probate
and Appointment of
PersonaI Representative
IN CIRCUIT COURT
SIXTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
Pro. 12-6
STATE OF SOUTH DAKOTA )
:SS
COUNTY OF HAAKON )
In the Matter of the Estate of )
DENNIS J. KENNEDY, Deceased. )
Notice is given that on August 15, 2012,
Paul Goldhammer, whose address is PO
Box 187, Wall, SD 57790, was appointed
as Personal Representative of the Estate
of Dennis J. Kennedy.
Creditors of decedent must file their
claims within four months after the date
of the first publication of this notice or
their claims may be barred.
Claims may be filed with the Personal
Representative or may be filed with the
Clerk, and a copy of the claim mailed to
the Personal Representative.
Dated: 8-16-2012.
/s/Paul Goldhammer
Paul Goldhammer
Personal Representative
PO Box 187
Wall, SD 57790
Haakon Co. Clerk of Courts
PO Box 70
Philip, SD 57567
605-859-2627
William M. Van Camp
Olinger, Lovald, McCahren & Reimers
PO Box 66
Pierre, SD 57501
605-224-8851
[Published August 30, September 6 & 13,
2012, at the total approximate cost of
$39.34]
Proceedings of the
City of PhiIip
REGULAR MEETING
SEPTEMBER 4, 2012
A regular meeting of the Philip City Coun-
cil was held on Tuesday, September 4,
2012, at 7:00 p.m. in the Community
Room of the Haakon Co. Courthouse.
Present were Mayor Michael Vetter, Fi-
nance Officer Monna Van Lint, Council
Members Marty Gartner, Jason Harry,
Jennifer Henrie, Trisha Larson, and Mar-
ion Matt. Also present were Deputy Fi-
nance Officer Brittany Smith, Public
Works Director Matt Reckling, Police Of-
ficer David Butler, Street/ Sewer Supt.
Rick Coyle, Del Bartels with the Pioneer
Review, Chuck Allen, Etta Erdmann, Au-
drey Neiffer, Sandra O'Connor, Gaye
Odom; and later, Tom Radway, Don & Jo-
lene Haynes, Kent Buchholz, Mark Buch-
holz, Pat Freeman, Attorney Gay
Tollefson, Marsha Sumpter, Jeanette Bur-
nett, Shirley O'Connor, Roy & Margaret
Pfeifer, Tony DeRunge, and Haakon
County Commissioners Gary Snook, Ed
Briggs, Nick Konst, Rita O'Connell and
Steve Clements.
Absent: Greg Arthur
Motion was made by Harry, seconded by
Henrie to approve the agenda as pre-
sented. Motion carried.
Motion was made by Matt, seconded by
Harry to approve the minutes of the last
meeting as published in the Pioneer Re-
view. Motion carried.
Council Member Matt questioned the fire
department supplies purchased from
West River Ìnternational. Council Member
Gartner advised that they purchased an
injector fuel pump for one of the fire trucks
and the fire dept. will be reimbursing the
City for this expense.
Motion was then made by Harry, sec-
onded by Matt to approve the payment of
the bills from the appropriated funds. Mo-
tion carried.
Gross SaIaries - Aug. 31, 2012: Adm. -
$4,920.93; Police - $5,908.92; Public
Works - $3,064.53; Street - $4,799.59;
Swimming Pool - $7,061.94; Water -
$2,263.73
AFLAC, Employee Supplemental Ìns.-
08/12 .......................................291.90
EFTPSS.S., Medicare, Withholding-
08/12 ....................................5,688.82
SDRS, Employee Retirement-
07/12 ....................................2,794.43
Airport Improv. Projects:
Kadrmas, Lee & Jackson, Ìnc., MÌRL
Bid/Neg Eng. thru 07/28/12..2,139.65
Wood/WaIden Ave. Improv. Project:
SPN & Assoc., Special Assess.
Prep......................................2,887.50
This Month's BiIIs:
A&B Welding Supply Co., MM252
Welder - 08/12......................2,256.81
AT&T, Cell Phone 07-08/12...........81.93
Coyle, Molly, Reimb. LG Recert. -
2012 ........................................100.00
Coyle's Super Valu, Pool Resale/
Supplies 07-08/12 ...................961.73
CRA Payment Center, Oil Drum -
08/12 .......................................813.31
Crescent Electric Supply Co., St. Light
Bulbs - 08/12...........................139.86
Dakotacare Health Ìns., Employee
Health Premium - 09/12 .....10,598.24
Dekker, Jordyn, Reimb. LG Cert. - 2012
165.00
Delta Dental Ìns., Employee Dental Pre-
mium - 09/12 ...........................660.10
1st Nat'l Bank - Philip, Utility Postage -
08/12........................................115.81
1st Nat'l Bank - S.F., SRF Loan #02 Pay
#166 - 09/12.........................2,163.90
SRF Loan #03 Pay #69 -
09/12 ....................................2,223.41
Fitzgerald, Erin, Reimb. ½ WSÌ Cert. -
2012 ..........................................80.00
Fitzgerald Oil Co., Fuel/LP
07-08/12...............................1,015.67
Golden West, Telephone/Ìnternet 07-
08/12 .......................................626.45
Haakon Co. Treasurer, Office Rent-
09/12 .........................................60.00
Teletype Share - 2012..........2,250.00
Hansen, Debbie, Reimb. LG Recert. -
2012 ........................................100.00
Hawkins, Ìnc., Pool Chemical -
08/12 .......................................787.50
Heartland Waste Mgmt, Ìnc., 376 Resi-
dential Collection - 08/12......4,098.40
Helleckson, Connie, Customer Dep. Re-
fund - 09/12.............................100.00
Holman, Nelson, Reimb. LG Cert. -
2012 ........................................165.00
Ìngram Hardware, Supplies -
08/12 .........................................91.77
Ìwan, Holly, Reimb. LG Cert. -
2012 ........................................165.00
Jebro, Ìnc., 6,207 gal. Road Oil -
08/12 ..................................20,950.83
Johnson, Misty, Reimb LG Recert; ½
WSÌ Cert. - 2012 .....................182.50
M.G. Oil Co., Supplies/Fuel
07-08/12..................................106.48
Morrison's Pit Stop, Fire Fuel -
08/12 .......................................164.82
Moses Building Center, Supplies - 07/12
35.98
Neve's Uniforms & Equipment, PD Body
Armor - 08/12 ..........................669.43
O'Connell Const., Ìnc., Sand -
08/12 .......................................136.85
Olivier, Kaci, Reimb. LG Cert. -
2012 ........................................165.00
Petty Cash, Postage/Copies/Supplies
06-08/12....................................38.02
Philip Standard, Fuel/Supplies -
08/12 ....................................1,900.35
Pioneer Review, Publishing -
08/12 ....................................1,049.18
Reedy, Ashton, Reimb. LG Cert. -
2012 ........................................165.00
Rush, Gayle, Swim Lessons Contract -
2012 ........................................375.00
Rush, Tristen, Reimb. LG Recert.; ½
WSÌ Cert.-2012 .......................182.50
SD Dept. of Revenue, Sales Tax
Payable - 08/12.......................372.84
Water Coliform/Pool Testing -
08/12 .........................................65.00
SD Municipal League, Annual Conf.
Reg. - 09/12 ............................330.00
Tollefson, Gay, Attorney Retainer - 09/12
200.00
USDA, RD Loan Pay #93 -
09/12 ....................................3,069.00
US Postal Service, Stamps -
09/12 .......................................180.00
United Systems Tech. (USTÌ), UB Soft-
ware/Backup/Support ...........1,967.20
VÌSA - UMB Bank, Postage/Norton
08/12 .........................................86.64
West Central Electric, Electric Services
07-08/12...............................3,796.56
West River Ìnternational, Ìnc., Fire Dept.
Supplies - 08/12 ...................2,101.23
WR/LJ Rural Water, 6,305,000 gals. -
08/12 ....................................7,881.25
Contract Min. - 08/12............2,500.00
Airport Water - 08/12.................40.00
South Shop Water - 08/12.........22.50
Total Expenditures -
09/04/12 .............................83,581.20
OId Business:
Motion was made by Harry, seconded by
Matt to approve the second reading of Or-
dinance #2012-12, as presented below.
Motion carried with all members voting
aye.
ORDINANCE #2012-12
2012 SUPPLEMENTAL
APPROPRIATIONS ORDI-
NANCE FOR SWIMMING
POOL BATHHOUSE
IMPROVEMENTS AND
FINAL GRANT PAYMENT
FOR GEO-THERMAL IM-
PROVEMENT PROJECT
WHEREAS, the City of Philip,
South Dakota has determined
that the Municipal Swimming
Pool Bathhouse is in need of
structural repairs to its outer
walls due to age, weather ex-
posure and normal wear and
tear; and,
WHEREAS, the City of Philip
has has been presented with
an opportunity to capitalize on
a means of repair to the Swim-
ming Pool Bathhouse facility
which will sufficiently repair and
extend the life of the structure
at a substantial cost savings to
the City and at an opportune
time to complete the necessary
repairs to said structure; and,
WHEREAS, the City of Philip
has received and disbursed to
Philip Health Services, Ìnc., its
final grant funds for the hospi-
tal's ARRA CDBG Geo-Ther-
mal heating upgrade
improvement project which
was completed in late 2011 but
not finalized until early 2012;
and,
WHEREAS, neither of the
above projects were antici-
pated nor budgeted for during
the Municipal Budgeting and
Appropriations process in
2012;
NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT
ORDAINED, that the following
Supplemental Appropriations
Ordinance be and hereby is
adopted to finance the pro-
posed Swimming Pool Bath-
house structural repairs and to
accurately account for the final
ARRA CDBG grant reimburse-
ment and disbursement.
GENERAL FUND
44700 HOSPITAL
44700 Hospital - Grant to
Others ...................$5,996.09
TOTAL
HOSPITAL ........... $5,996.09
45100 SWIMMING POOL
45100 Swimming
Pool ..................... $5,000.00
TOTAL SWIMMING
POOL................... $5,000.00
TOTAL APPROP. &
ACCUM. ............. $10,996.09
MEANS OF FINANCE
The foIIowing designates the
fund or funds that money de-
rived from the foIIowing
sources is appIied to.
GENERAL FUND
10440 ASSIGN. CASH
SWIM. POOL
10440 Assign. Cash -
Pool ...................... $5,000.00
TOTAL ASSIGN. CASH
SWIM POOL ........ $5,000.00
33100 FEDERAL GRANT
33132 ARRA CDBG
Grant .................... $5,996.09
TOTAL FEDERAL
GRANT ................ $5,996.09
TOTAL MEANS OF
FINANCE ........... $10,996.09
Dated this 4th day of Septem-
ber, 2012.
/s/Michael Vetter, Mayor
ATTEST:
/s/Monna Van Lint,
Finance Officer
Passed First Reading:
August 6, 2012
Passed Second Reading:
September 4, 2012
Yeas: 05 Nays: 00
(Published: August 16
& September 13, 2012)
New Business:
Airport:
Council reviewed project status updates
for the Land Acquisition and Environmen-
tal Assessment (LA/EA) and the Medium
Ìntensity Runway Lighting (MÌRL) Design
projects.
Motion was made by Henrie, seconded
by Harry to authorize Mayor Vetter's sig-
nature on the State of South Dakota's
grant agreement for the MÌRL project.
This covers the State's contribution of 8%
of the project costs. Motion carried.
Ìt was noted that a pre-construction meet-
ing for the MÌRL project will be held on
Thursday, Sept. 13, at 3:45 p.m. in the
Community Room. The proposed start
date for the project is Sept. 17, 2012.
Council then went on to review the follow-
ing building permits as presented: Dustin
Lurz for Gene Rock - repair/replace
sewer line; Robert McDaniel - 10'x8'
shed; Kevin & Cindy Pfeifle - boulevard
landscaping; Branden West for DBH
Company - decking over existing con-
crete steps; and, West River/Lyman
Jones (WR/L-J) Rural Water - 8'x14' con-
crete pad.
Street/Sewer Supt. Coyle advised that
WR/LJ's proposed concrete pad sight
may cover their sewer line. Ìn turn, they
may want to consider moving it to the
south, but it would be at their discretion.
Following review, motion was made by
Harry, seconded by Gartner to approve
the above building permits as presented.
Motion carried.
Motion was made by Matt, seconded by
Gartner to approve the 1st reading of
Ord. #2012-16, 2013 Municipal Appropri-
ations Ordinance. Motion carried with all
members voting aye. (SEE BELOW)
Council reviewed the following L/P
Propane bids received this month:
Aug. 8, 2012
Fitzgerald Oil Company..........$1.20/gal.
Midwest Cooperatives ............$1.25/gal.

FO Van Lint presented a quote from
Hometown Computer Service for a Dell
computer and external floppy disk drive in
the amount of $1,469.92. She noted that
every five years, computers in the finance
office are updated. Her current computer
was purchased in 2007 and will be trans-
ferred to PWD Reckling for his use. Ìt was
also noted that the purchase of the new
computer was appropriated for in 2012.
Following, motion was made by Harry,
seconded by Henrie to approve the com-
puter and external floppy disk drive quote
as presented. Motion carried.
Council was informed that the installation
of the north lift station, located in the alley
running east and west between Hoag
Ave. and SD Hwy 73, was not anticipated
nor appropriated for in 2012. This im-
provement was completed in order to cor-
rect the sewer flow as it was going
against the grade.
With that, motion was made by Gartner,
seconded by Matt to authorize FO to uti-
lize $8,000 of sewer assigned cash for
the unanticipated expenditures incurred
with the installation of the north lift station.
Motion carried.
Departmental Reports:
The monthly Police Dept. report was pre-
sented and reviewed with Officer Butler.
The quarterly Street Dept. report was pre-
sented and reviewed with Street/Sewer
Supt. Rick Coyle.
Mayor Vetter thanked the street person-
nel for painting the sidewalk curb at the
swimming pool.
PWD Reckling then updated the Council
on the street light pole replacements
along SD Highway 73 per the SD Dept. of
Transportation's (DOT) request. He noted
that the State has approved the City's re-
quest to install temporary wood poles
until the proposed SD Hwy 73 sidewalk
project slated for 2015 is underway. The
next step is for West Central Electric to
submit a building permit to the State for
the pole placement. Once this is ap-
proved, the replacement will begin.
Motion was made by Harry, seconded by
Matt to approve the surplus and sale of
the following street department inventory
items: 1986 Ìnternational Dump Truck
Plow - purchased with truck and sander
for $3,700.00 in Aug. 2001; and, 8' Chip
Spreader - purchased for $225.00. These
items will be offered for sale during the
next PLA Annual Machinery Auction. Mo-
tion carried.
The monthly Water Dept. report was re-
viewed.
Council was informed that Occupational
Health Network has merged with Black
Hills Occupational Medicine. The City
contracts with them for pre-employment
and random drug and alcohol testing.
The fiscal year 2011 audit field work was
completed on Aug. 30, 2012. A completed
audit report should be available in the
near future.
A meeting with Colleen Skinner with the
SD Dept. of Revenue has been sched-
uled for 1:00 p.m. on Tuesday, Sept. 25,
at the Philip Ambulance building. Ìnvita-
tions to this meeting have been extended
to the Cities of Wall, Kadoka, and Midland
as well as county officials from both
Haakon and Jackson Counties.
At 7:15 p.m., Mayor Vetter announced
that, as advertised, it was now time for
the public hearing on the Proposed Res-
olution of Necessity #2012-11, for the
Wood and Walden Ave. Ìmprovement
project special assessment estimates.
He then opened the floor for any com-
ments.
Jeanette Burnett questioned how a prop-
erty can be assessed for the costs on
their tax bill when their property taxes
have been frozen. Vetter stressed that the
assessment is a fee, not a tax. The
County adds the amount of the assess-
ment onto a property owner's tax bill in
addition to any property taxes owed.
Pat Freeman, Haakon Co. Auditor, reiter-
ated what Mayor Vetter had stated by
commenting that it is an assessment over
and above the property taxes.
Ms. Burnett then stated that her only
complaint is the concrete steps that will
be replaced in front of her property. She
noted that she is on a fixed income and
cannot afford to pay for their replacement.
She understands replacing those enter-
ing her rear property as her late husband
installed them with wood, but not the con-
crete ones. She noted that the current
concrete steps have been there for many
years, at least prior to 1967. She also
voiced concerns relative to her sidewalk;
if it is damaged during the removal of the
steps, she does not want to have to with-
stand the additional costs to repair it.
Vetter stated that the concrete steps have
to be removed for the project to be com-
pleted as they are located in an area
where storm sewer will be installed. He
stated that he would visit with the City's
engineer regarding an alternative re-
placement option, but voiced concern as
to the grade that will have to met in that
particular location.
Kent Buchholz questioned if the improve-
ment plans include a portion of Hone St.
between his property and Radway's
where the asphalt meets the gravel for
the dip. Ìt was noted that only the corner
radius on Wood Ave. and Hone St. will be
replaced. The project does not extend
down that portion of Hone St.
Mark Buchholz then questioned how
close the concrete estimate shown on the
proposed resolution of necessity is to the
actual costs that will be assessed. He
noted that the estimate is for $70 per
square yard whereas he paid over $100
per square yard this year for concrete. Ìn
his opinion, if the actual costs are 30-50%
higher than the estimate, an uprising from
the property owners could occur.
Vetter advised that the estimates are de-
termined by the City's engineer, who es-
tablishes them from recent improvement
contracts throughout the state. He also
noted that if the bids come in 30-50%
higher than the estimate, the City will not
be able to afford the project either. He
stressed that the City is on a budget just
like that of the property owners.
Seo11on °B"
oontinued on page 12
LegaI Advertising DeadIine:
Fridays at Noon
ORDINANCE #2012-13
2013 MUNICIPAL APPROPRIATIONS ORDINANCE
Be it ordained by the City of PhiIip, South Dakota that the foIIowing sums be and
hereby are appropriated to meet the obIigations of the municipaIity for fiscaI year
2013.
CAPITAL
GENERAL CONST.
FUND FUND
410 GENERAL GOVERNMENT
411 Legislative (Pub./Const./Ìns.)..........................160,650.00
412 Executive..........................................................18,175.00
413 Elections.............................................................1,350.00
414 Financial Adm. ................................................132,350.00
419 Public Works.....................................................43,150.00
Capital Building...............................................................14,750.00
TOTAL GENERAL GOVERNMENT..............................370,425.00
420 PUBLIC SAFETY
420 Police Department ..........................................149,600.00
422 Fire Department................................................13,850.00
423 Code Enforcement..............................................1,450.00
TOTAL PUBLIC SAFETY..............................................164,900.00
430 PUBLIC WORKS
431 Street Department ..........................................173,615.00
Street Lights ............................................................22,500.00
Street Ìmprov. 2nd Cent.........................................240,000.00........1,998,300.00
435 Airport .............................................................108,350.00
438 Rubble Site.........................................................5,750.00
TOTAL PUBLIC WORKS..............................................550,215.00........1,998,300.00
440 HEALTH & WELFARE
441 West Nile Virus ...................................................5,450.00
444 Dog Kennel ............................................................150.00
446 Ambulance..........................................................2,500.00
TOTAL HEALTH & WELFARE..........................................8,100.00
450 CULTURE & RECREATION
451 Swimming Pool .................................................70,195.00
452 Parks/Recreation................................................4,250.00
455 Library.................................................................1,200.00
TOTAL CULTURE & RECREATION...............................75,645.00
460 ECONOMIC DEVELOP.
460 Economic Development......................................5,300.00
TOTAL ECONOMIC DEVELOP.........................................5,300.00
470 DEBT SERVICE
471 Principal ...........................................................45,050.00
472 Ìnterest..............................................................21,636.00
TOTAL DEBT SERVICE..................................................66,686.00
511 OPER. TRANSFER OUT
511 Operating Transfer.......................................1,208,300.00
TOTAL OPER. TRANSFER OUT...............................1,208,300.00
CAPITAL OUTLAY ACCUMULATION
Resolution #97-10 Street .................................................25,000.00
Resolution #97-20 Police...................................................4,000.00
Resolution #01-09 Rubble Site..........................................1,000.00
Resolution #04-08 Swimming Pool....................................5,000.00
Resolution #06-20 Capital Building Res........................................--
Resolution #10-05 - St. Rehab./Sidewalk ......................111,400.00
TOTAL CAP. OUTLAY ACCUM. ...................................146,400.00
TOTAL APPROP. & ACCUM......................................2,595,971.00........1,998,300.00
2013 MEANS OF FINANCE
The foIIowing designates the fund or funds that money derived from the foIIow-
ing sources are appIied.
CAPITAL
GENERAL CONST.
FUND FUND
UNDESIGN. RETAINED EARNINGS............................113,157.00
DESIGN. FROM LAST YR. APPROP...........................109,000.00
DESIGN. CASH - CAP. OUTLAY..................................241,900.00
310 TAXES
General Property Tax.....................................................379,110.00
All Prior Property Taxes .....................................................2,500.00
Sales Tax .......................................................................380,000.00
Amusement Machine Tax .....................................................300.00
Penalty & Ìnterest - Del. Tax .................................................500.00
762,410.00
320 LICENSES & PERMITS
Licenses & Permits............................................................7,500.00
330 INTERGOVERNMENTAL REV.
Ìntergovernmental Revenues.........................................115,100.00
340 CHARGES FOR GOODS & SERVICES
Charges for Goods & Services........................................29,200.00
350 FINES & FORFEITURES
Fines & Forfeitures ...............................................................800.00
360 MISCELLANEOUS REVENUE
Miscellaneous Revenues.................................................79,734.00
380 AIRPORT REVENUE
Airport Revenues.............................................................21,870.00
390 OTHER SOURCES
Operating Transfer Ìn - GO Bond Loan Proceeds....................................1,073,300.00
Operating Transfer Ìn - 2nd Cent Sales Tax................................................135,000.00
Operating Transfer Ìn - Water .......................................................................40,000.00
Operating Transfer Ìn - Sewer.....................................................................750,000.00
Operating Transfer Ìn - Garbage .....................................40,000.00
GO Bond Loan Proceeds ...........................................1,073,300.00
Sale of Fixed Assets ..........................................................1,000.00
Ìnsurance Proceeds...........................................................1,000.00
TOTAL OTHER SOURCES........................................1,115,300.00........1,998,300.00
TOTAL MEANS OF FINANCE...................................2,595,971.00........1,998,300.00
2013 PROPRIETARY FUNDS
*WATER*
WATER REVENUE
Assigned Cash Cap. Outlay ............................................40,000.00
Estimated Water Revenues...........................................259,700.00
TOTAL EST. WATER REVENUE ..................................299,700.00
WATER APPROPRIATIONS
Water .............................................................................229,270.00
RD Loan Principal Pay.......................................................9,525.00
Capital Outlay Res. #98-09 .............................................20,000.00
Operating Transfer Out - Cap. Project Const. .................40,000.00
TOTAL WATER APPROPRIATIONS ............................298,795.00
ESTIMATED WATER SURPLUS.........................................905.00
*SEWER*
SEWER REVENUE
Res. Cash - Sewer Surcharge.........................................63,200.00
Assigned Cash Cap. Outlay ............................................34,500.00
Estimated Sewer Revenues ............................................72,000.00
SRF Loan Proceeds ......................................................750,000.00
TOTAL EST. SEWER REVENUE..................................919,700.00
SEWER APPROPRIATIONS
Sewer.............................................................................118,625.00
SRF Loan Principal............................................................7,500.00
Capital Outlay Res. #98-10......................................................... - -
Restricted Cash - Surcharge ...........................................43,200.00
Operating Transfer Out - Cap. Construction..................750,000.00
TOTAL SEWER APPROPRIATIONS............................919,325.00
ESTIMATED SEWER SURPLUS.........................................375.00
*GARBAGE*
GARBAGE REVENUE
Unrestricted Cash............................................................40,000.00
Estimated Garbage Revenues ........................................59,670.00
TOTAL EST. GARBAGE REVENUE...............................99,670.00
GARBAGE APPROPRIATIONS
Garbage............................................................................ 6,550.00
Garbage Contract ............................................................52,000.00
Capital Outlay Res. #01-09 ...............................................1,000.00
Operating Transfer - Gen. Fund 2nd Penny ....................40,000.00
TOTAL GARBAGE APPROPRIATION...........................99,550.00
TOTAL EST. GARBAGE SURPLUS....................................120.00
TOTAL ENT. FUND REVENUE..................................1,319,070.00
TOTAL ENT. FUND APPROP.....................................1,317,670.00
TOTAL EST. ENTERPRISE SURPLUS ............................1,400.00
The Finance Officer is hereby directed and authorized to certify the following dollar
amount of tax levies in this Ordinance to the Haakon County Auditor.
Dated this _____ day of September, 2012.
/s/John F. Hart
John F. Hart, Mayor
ATTEST:
/s/Monna Van Lint
Monna Van Lint, Finance Officer
Passed First Reading: September 04, 2012
Yeas: 05 Nays: 0
(PUBLÌSHED: Sept. 13, 2012)
Audrey Neiffer questioned if there is any
consideration made for driveway ap-
proaches and sidewalks that have been
recently replaced. Ìt was noted that only
those sidewalks located in the boulevard
areas will be replaced. As for the drive-
way approaches, no concessions will be
made as they will have to be replaced in
order to meet the new grade of the street
surface.
Chuck Allen spoke on behalf of his prop-
erty located on Lot 2, Block 8, Highland
Addition, questioning how the proposed
improvements planned for his property,
benefit his property. He noted that this
area is the draw located north of his
home. The plans include installing a re-
taining wall that will only benefit the City,
not his property. He also mentioned that
the City is planning to remove 30 feet of
fill dirt from this area and thus will be en-
croaching on his property during the in-
stallation of said retaining wall and
drainage. Ìn addition, he provided an aer-
ial photo of his property showing how the
street veers to the east, absorbing some
of his property.
Vetter advised Allen that he will visit with
the City's engineer regarding his con-
cerns and report back to him. He also re-
minded Allen that the new curb, gutter
and street would be a benefit to his prop-
erty. (For the record, the retaining wall
and drainage will not be assessed against
Allen's property--only the curb, gutter, and
driveway approach.)
Allen then questioned if, once the street
is redone, will the "no thru trucks¨ law on
Wood Ave. be enforced. Vetter confirmed
and stressed that the property owners
need to assist with this effort as the police
department personnel cannot be every-
where at once. When someone sees a
truck driving through a "no thru truck¨
area, they need to call the police depart-
ment immediately.
Marsha Sumpter then inquired if her as-
sessment includes the installation of a
sidewalk as her estimate seems quite
high, especially compared to her neigh-
bor's to the north. She also questioned
the reasoning behind the project and
what it entailed.
Ìt was stressed that sidewalk will not be
installed÷only those properties with a
sidewalk currently installed in the boule-
vard area will be replaced. For instance -
those properties with concrete walkways
between the curb that lead to the side-
walk. The plans for the project indicate
that Sumpter's property has 150 feet of
curb and gutter while her neighbor to the
north has 50 feet less, approximately 100
feet.
FO Van Lint also noted that Division
Street extends to the east off N. Wood
Ave., between Kroetch and Haynes. This
is an undeveloped street which makes
the City responsible for the costs of the
curb and gutter in that area.
Gaye Odom then questioned about her
neighbor's property not having sidewalk,
will it be installed during this project?
Also, what happens if sidewalk is dam-
aged during the construction?
Van Lint stated the City does not have an
ordinance that requires sidewalks, only
one that requires sidewalks to be main-
tained and replaced if there is an existing
one on the property. She also noted that
if the contractor damages the sidewalk
not due for replacement during the proj-
ect, they will be responsible for repairing
and/or replacing it at their cost.
Vetter then reviewed the project with the
main focus being the replacement of the
sewer mains and installation of storm
sewer for drainage purposes. Both of
these items require the replacement of
the curb, gutter, driveway approaches,
and street surfacing.
The sewer and water infrastructure as
well as the asphalt, curb & gutter history
on N. Wood Ave. was questioned.
Street/Sewer Supt. Coyle noted that the
sewer mains have not been replaced
since he started with the City in 1976,
suggesting that they are more than likely
the original sewer mains installed. As for
the asphalt, curb and gutter, it dates back
to the 1970's while the water mains were
replaced during 2001-2002 with the water
improvement project.
Ìt was also questioned when the assess-
ment payments will be due? Vetter noted
that the final assessment amounts will not
be known until the construction bid is
awarded and the final assessment costs
are determined. At which time, the City
will contact the property owners again
with the final costs which will more than
likely be next summer. He stressed that
they plan to bid the project for construc-
tion to begin in the spring of 2013.
FO Van Lint confirmed that once the final
costs are determined, the City will notify
the property owners with their amounts.
They will have the option to pay the City
within thirty days of receiving the notice.
Ìf the property owner fails to pay the
amount in full within those thirty days, the
final cost plus interest will be assessed
against their property and collected over
a ten year period with their tax bill.
Don Haynes questioned this as it relates
to the First Lutheran Church, which is a
tax exempt organization and does not re-
ceive a tax bill. He questioned FO Van
Lint as to whether or not she had received
any more information on how their as-
sessment would be billed to them.
Van Lint stated that she is still in the
process of determining if an assessment
bill can be generated at the County level
or if it will have to be done through the
City. Once more information is available,
she will contact Mr. Haynes.
Gaye Odom then questioned about the
width of Wood Ave., inquiring if it will be
widened going up the hill, matching with
the street width in front of her property. Ìt
was noted that during the project design,
the majority of the property owners along
Wood Ave. were not in favor of widening
the street back to its platted 70 foot width.
There was mention at that time of possi-
bly limiting the parking going up the hill as
well as on top of the hill due to its narrow
width. This was discussed as a possible
solution due to the safety issues with the
narrow width of the street in that area.
Discussion about limiting the parking as
mentioned ensued and FO Van Lint ad-
vised that she would review her notes
from the previous meetings and report
back to the Council.
Several members questioned what the in-
terest rate would be if the costs of the
concrete are assessed against the prop-
erty. FO Van Lint noted that the rate,
along with the final costs, will not be de-
termined until the project is complete.
Mark Buchholz stated that the City should
be able to determine the actual costs
once the bids for the project are awarded,
not when it is complete. He also ques-
tioned how the City plans to control any
potential erosion problems on the west
side of his property at 313 N. Wood Ave.,
down to Walden Ave.
(For the record, the City waits until the
project is complete to determine the final
assessment costs. This is due to the fact
that there may be change orders between
the awarding of the bid and the comple-
tion of the project.)
FO Van Lint stated that the drainage from
north of the Walden Ave. and Hone St. in-
tersection has been addressed in the
plans and they are available for the pub-
lic's viewing in the Finance Office.
Mayor Vetter then asked for any other
questions. With none forthcoming, he
thanked those in attendance and
stressed that if there are any future ques-
tions; the public is encouraged to ask as
we will work to see that the questions get
answered.
Vetter then closed the public hearing and
the Wood and Walden Ave. property own-
ers in attendance left at this time.
Motion was made by Matt, seconded by
Larson to approve Resolution #2012-05,
Resolution of Necessity. Motion carried
with all members voting aye.
RESOLUTION #2012-15
RESOLUTION OF
NECESSITY
WHEREAS, the City of Philip,
South Dakota, has proposed a
resolution of necessity; and,
WHEREAS, the City of Philip,
South Dakota, has published
and mailed said notices as re-
quired by South Dakota Codi-
fied Laws; and,
WHEREAS, the City is ready
to proceed with the project and
again declares the necessity to
make the improvements.
NOW THEREFORE, BE IT
RESOLVED, by the City Coun-
cil of the City of Philip, South
Dakota, at a regular meeting
thereof, held in the Community
Room, located on first floor of
the Haakon County Court-
house in the City of Philip at
7:15 p.m. on the 4th day of
September, 2012, that the con-
venience and necessity has
arisen to improve substantially
the following in the City of
Philip, Haakon County, South
Dakota, by the addition of curb,
gutter, and sidewalk improve-
ments where needed in the
Wood and Walden Avenue Ìm-
provement Project. Such prop-
erties affected being
hereinafter named on the at-
tached list marked "Exhibit A¨
with the projected location
being as follows:
City of Philip encompassing
Wood Avenue (north from Pine
Street to SD Highway 14), High
Street (west from Wood Av-
enue to Walden Avenue),
Walden Avenue, and a portion
of Division Street that inter-
sects with Walden Avenue.
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED,
that the material to be used in
the project shall be according
to the plans and specifications
as prepared by the City's engi-
neering firm, Schmucker, Paul,
Nohr and Associates, in and for
the City of Philip, South
Dakota, and are on file in the
office of the City Finance Offi-
cer and open for the public's in-
spection and incorporated
hereby.
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED,
that the cost of the curb, gutter,
and sidewalk improvements
shall be assessed against all
assessable lots and tracts of
land fronting or abutting
thereon, according to the pro-
visions of SDCL 9-43-76 as to
each of such lots and tracts
above stated. The total cost of
the improvements shall include
the total contract price and
shall be assessed according to
SDCL 9-43-78. This includes,
on a lineal foot basis, Curb
and Gutter installation at an
construction cost
of $15.00 per lineal foot; on a
square yard foot basis, for VaI-
Iey Gutter installation at an
construction cost
of $70.00 per square yard; on
a square yard basis, for Con-
crete installation at an
construction cost of
$70.00 per square yard; on a
tonnage basis, for AsphaIt
Surfacing installation at an
construction cost
of $70.00 per ton; on a square
yard basis, for Driveway Ap-
proach installation at an
construction cost of
$60.00 per square yard; and,
on a square footage basis, for
SidewaIk installation at an
construction cost of
$4.00 per square foot.
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED,
that the City of Philip has es-
tablished policy to cover 60%
of the eligible assessment
costs in order to be consistent
with past projects wherein the
City was the recipient of grant
funds that covered 60% of the
eligible costs. Since grant
funds were not made available
for this project, the City has de-
termined it will extend the 60%
discount to those property
owners in the project area in an
effort to assist them with the
improvements to their proper-
ties.
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED,
that the assessments less the
established 60% discount, will
be divided into ten (10) equal
annual installments, which
shall be payable under Plan
One, collection by the County
Treasurer, as set forth in SDCL
9-43-102, and that all deferred
installments shall bear interest
at such rate as shall be deter-
mined by the City Council.
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED,
that the Resolution of Neces-
sity is hereby adopted.
THE GOVERNÌNG BODY OF
THE CÌTY OF PHÌLÌP,
SOUTH DAKOTA
/s/ Michael Vetter, Mayor
ATTEST:
/s/ Monna Van Lint, City Fi-
nance Officer
(Published:
September 13, 2012)
(SEE BOX AT RIGHT)
Motion was then made by Harry, sec-
onded by Larson to approve Resolution
#2012-14, Approval of the Sanitary Sewer
Surcharge Bond as presented below. Mo-
tion carried with all members voting aye.
RESOLUTION NO. 2012-14
RESOLUTION GIVING AP-
PROVAL TO CERTAIN
SEWER FACILITIES IM-
PROVEMENTS; GIVING AP-
PROVAL TO THE ISSUANCE
AND SALE OF A REVENUE
BOND TO FINANCE, DI-
RECTLY OR INDIRECTLY,
THE IMPROVEMENTS TO
THE FACILITIES; APPROV-
ING THE FORM OF THE
LOAN AGREEMENT AND
THE REVENUE BOND AND
PLEDGING PROJECT REV-
ENUES AND COLLATERAL
TO SECURE THE PAYMENT
OF THE REVENUE BOND;
AND CREATING SPECIAL
FUNDS AND ACCOUNTS
FOR THE ADMINISTRATION
OF FUNDS FOR OPERA-
TION OF THE SYSTEM AND
RETIREMENT OF THE REV-
ENUE BOND AND PROVID-
ING FOR A SEGREGATED
SPECIAL CHARGE OR SUR-
CHARGE FOR THE PAY-
MENT OF THE BONDS.

WHEREAS, one of the pur-
poses of SDCL Chapter 9-40
(the "Act¨) as found and deter-
mined by the Legislature is to
provide for financing the acqui-
sition, maintenance, operation,
extension or improvement of
any system or part of any sys-
tem for the collection, treat-
ment and disposal of sewage
and other domestic, commer-
cial and industrial wastes; or
any system for the control of
floods and drainage; or any
combination thereof, together
with extensions, additions, and
necessary appurtenances;
and,

WHEREAS, a municipality is
authorized by Section 6 of the
Act to issue revenue bonds to
defray the cost of extensions,
additions and improvements to
any utility previously owned
without pledging its credit and
is authorized to pledge the net
income or revenues from the
improvements in accordance
with Section 15 of the Act; and,

WHEREAS, the City of Philip
(the "City¨) currently operates a
sewer system for the collec-
tion, treatment and disposal of
sewage and other domestic,
commercial and industrial
wastes; and for the control of
floods and drainage and has
determined that improvements
to the sewer facilities are nec-
essary for the conduct of its
governmental programs and
qualifies as an improvement,
extension or addition to its
sewer system; and,

WHEREAS, the City has deter-
mined to issue its revenue
bonds to finance the improve-
ments to its sewer system for
the purpose of collecting, treat-
ing and disposing of sewage
and other domestic, commer-
cial and industrial wastes (the
"System¨) and has applied to
the South Dakota Conservancy
District (the "District¨) for a
Clean Water State Revolving
Fund Loan to finance the im-
provements;

WHEREAS, the City shall
adopt special rates or sur-
charges for the improvements
to be pledged, segregated and
used for the payment of the
Bonds.

NOW THEREFORE BE IT RE-
SOLVED by the City as fol-
lows:
SECTION 1. Definitions. The
terms when used in this Reso-
lution shall have the following
meanings set forth in this sec-
tion unless the context clearly
requires otherwise. All terms
used in this Resolution which
are not defined herein shall
have the meanings assigned to
them in the Loan Agreement
unless the context clearly oth-
erwise requires.
"Act" means South Dakota
Codified Laws Chapter 9-40.
"Loan" means the Loan made
by the South Dakota Conser-
vancy District to the City pur-
suant to the terms of the Loan
Agreement and as evidenced
by the Revenue Bond.
"Project" means the City of
Philip Wastewater Collection
System Ìmprovements.
"Revenue Bond" means the
revenue bond or bonds issued
the date of the Loan Agree-
ment by the City to the South
Dakota Conservancy District to
evidence the City's obligation
to repay the principal of and
pay interest and Administrative
Expense Surcharge on the
Loan.
"System" means the City's
system of collecting, treating
and disposing of sewage and
other domestic, commercial
and industrial wastes.
SECTION 2. DecIaration of
Necessity and Findings.
2.1.1. DecIaration of Neces-
sity. The City hereby deter-
mines and declares it is
necessary to construct and fi-
nance improvements to its
System described as the Proj-
ect.
2.2. Findings. The City does
hereby find as follows:
2.2.1. The City hereby ex-
pressly finds that if the Project
is not undertaken, the System
will pose a health hazard to the
City and its inhabitants, and will
make the City unable to com-
ply with state and federal law.
2.2.2. Because of the func-
tional interdependence of the
various portions of the System,
the fact that the System may
not lawfully operate unless it
complies with State and federal
laws, including SDCL Chapter
34A-2, and the federal Clean
Water Act, and the nature of
the improvements financed,
the City hereby finds and deter-
mines that the Project will sub-
stantially benefit the entire
System and all of its users
within the meaning of Sections
15 and 17 of the Act.
2.2.3. The City hereby deter-
mines and finds that for the
purposes of the Act, including,
in particular, Sections 15 and
17 of the Act, only the net in-
come from the Project financed
by the Revenue Bond be
pledged for its payment.
SECTION 3. Authorization of
Loan, PIedge of Revenue
and Security.
3.1. Authorization of Loan.
The City hereby determines
and declares it necessary to fi-
nance up to $750,000 of the
costs of the Project through the
issuance of bonds payable
from the revenue of the Project
and other funds secured by the
City. The City hereby deter-
mines that because the Rev-
enue Bond is issued in
connection with a financing
agreement described in SDCL
46A-1-49, pursuant to Section
15 of the Act no election is re-
quired to issue the Revenue
Bond.
3.2. Approval of Loan Agree-
ment. The execution and deliv-
ery of the Revenue Obligation
Loan Agreement (the "Loan
Agreement¨), the form of which
is on file with the City Finance
Officer (the "Finance Officer¨)
and open to public inspection,
between the City as Borrower
and the District, is hereby in all
respects authorized, approved
and confirmed, and the Mayor
and Finance Officer are hereby
authorized and directed to ex-
ecute and deliver the Loan
Agreement in the form and
content attached hereto, with
such changes as the Attorney
for the City deems appropriate
and approves, for and on be-
half of the City. The Mayor and
Finance Officer are hereby fur-
ther authorized and directed to
implement and perform the
covenants and obligations of
the City set forth in or required
by the Loan Agreement. The
Loan Agreement herein re-
ferred to and made a part of
this Resolution is on file in the
office of the Finance Officer
and is available for inspection
by any interested party.
3.3. ApprovaI of Revenue
Bond. The issuance of a rev-
enue bond in a principal
amount not to exceed
$750,000 as determined ac-
cording to the Loan Agreement
in the form and content set
forth in Appendix B attached to
the form of Loan Agreement
(the "Revenue Bond¨) shall be
and the same is, in all respects,
hereby authorized, approved,
and confirmed and the Mayor,
Finance Officer, and other ap-
propriate officials shall be and
are hereby authorized and di-
rected to execute and seal the
Revenue Bond and deliver the
Revenue Bond to the District,
for and on behalf of the City,
upon receipt of the purchase
price, and to use the proceeds
thereof in the manner set forth
in the Loan Agreement. The
Mayor and Finance Officer are
hereby authorized to approve
the final terms of the Revenue
Bond and their execution and
delivery thereof shall evidence
that approval. The Revenue
Bond shall be issued under the
authority of SDCL Chapter 9-
40 and SDCL Chapter 6-8B,
and the provisions of the Act
are hereby expressly incorpo-
rated herein as provided in
Section 19 of the Act.
3.4. PIedge of Revenues. The
Revenue Bond together with
the interest thereon, shall not
constitute a charge against the
City's general credit or taxing
power, but shall be a limited
obligation of the City payable
solely out of the Project Debt
Service Account, which pay-
ments, revenues and receipts
are hereby and in the Loan
Agreement pledged and as-
signed for the equal and rat-
able payments of the Revenue
Bond and shall be used for no
other purpose than to pay the
principal of, interest and Ad-
Legal Notlces
1hursday, 3eptember 13, 2012 · 1he Pioneer Review · Page 12
oontinued from page 11
oontinued on page 13
ministrative Surcharge on the
Revenue Bond, except as may
be otherwise expressly author-
ized in the Loan Agreement (in-
cluding the purpose of securing
Additional Bonds issued as
permitted by the terms
thereof). The City covenants
and agrees to charge rates for
all services from the Project or
establish special charges or
surcharges which will be suffi-
cient to provide for the pay-
ments upon the Revenue Bond
issued hereunder as and when
the same become due, and as
may be necessary to provide
for the operation and mainte-
nance and repairs of the Proj-
ect, and depreciation, and the
Rate Resolution shall be re-
vised from time to time so as to
produce these amounts. The
City hereby reserves the right
to determine on a periodic
basis the appropriate allocation
of operation and maintenance
expenses, depreciation, repair
and reserves associated with
the facilities financed with the
Revenue Bond, provided that
such determination of allocable
operation and maintenance ex-
penses shall in no event abro-
gate, abridge or otherwise
contravene the covenant of the
City set forth in this Section 3
or any other covenant or
agreement in the Loan Agree-
ment.
SECTION 4. SpeciaI Charge
or Surcharge for Revenue
Bond.
4.1. The City does hereby cre-
ate the Revenue Bond Special-
Surcharge District (the
"District¨) which shall include all
users which benefit from the
Project. There shall be charged
a special charge or surcharge
pursuant to Section 15 of the
Act for the services provided by
Project financed by the Rev-
enue Bond. The special charge
or surcharge shall be segre-
gated from other revenues of
the System and shall be used
for the payment of the Rev-
enue Bond. The special charge
or surcharge shall create net
income, remaining from time to
time after first paying all rea-
sonable and current expenses
of maintenance, repairs, re-
placements and operation, suf-
ficient to fund interest, reserve
and debt service fund annual
requirements and shall be
110% of the debt service re-
quirements on the Revenue
Bond.
4.2. Rates and coIIection.
The rate herein specific will be
collected as a special charge
or surcharge for the Project.
This special charge or sur-
charge shall remain in effect
until such time as the Revenue
Bond is defeased or paid in full.
4.3. InitiaI Surcharge. The ini-
tial special charge or surcharge
shall be set by resolution and
collected at the same time as
other charges of the utility. All
users within the District which
benefit from the Project, cur-
rent and future, shall be
charged the special charge or
surcharge. The special charge
or surcharge is found to be eq-
uitable for the services pro-
vided by the Project. The
special charge or surcharge
shall begin at such time as will
produce sufficient revenue to
pay principal of, interest and
Administrative Surcharge on
the Revenue Bond when due.
4.4. Segregation. The Finance
Officer shall set up bookkeep-
ing accounts in accordance
with South Dakota Legislative
Audit guidelines for the segre-
gation of the revenue, special
charges and surcharges.
4.5. Periodic review. The
amount of the surcharge shall
be reviewed from time to time,
not less than yearly, and shall
be modified in order to produce
such funds as are necessary
and required to comply with the
Loan Agreement's rate
covenant and to pay principal
of, interest and Administrative
Surcharge on the Revenue
Bond when due. The sur-
charge may be set by resolu-
tion in accordance with this
Section. The rate resolution
shall be necessary for the sup-
port of government and shall
be effective upon passage.
SECTION 5. AdditionaI
Bonds. As permitted by Sec-
tions 8 and 9 of the Act, Addi-
tional Bonds payable from
revenues and income of the
System or Project may be is-
sued, as permitted in the Loan
Agreement, and no provision of
this Resolution shall have the
effect of restricting the is-
suance of, or impairing the lien
of, such additional parity bonds
with respect to the net rev-
enues or income from the ex-
tensions, additions or
improvements. The City shall
have the right to issue addi-
tional bonds secured by a lien
subordinate to the lien from the
Revenue Bond pursuant to the
Loan Agreement.
SECTION 6. Project Fund Ac-
counts. For the purpose of ap-
plication and proper allocation
of the income of the Project
and to secure the payment of
principal, Administrative Sur-
charge and interest on the
Revenue Bond, the following
mandatory asset segregations
shall be included in the sewer
system account of the City and
shall be used solely for the fol-
lowing respective purposes
until payment in full of the prin-
cipal of and interest on the
Revenue Bond:
6.1. Project Revenue Ac-
count. There shall be de-
posited periodically into the
Project Revenue Account the
net revenues as defined in
Section 17 of the Act derived
from the operation of the Proj-
ect collected pursuant to the
Resolutions and resolutions of
the City of Philip, South Dakota
(collectively the "Rate Resolu-
tion¨). Moneys from the Project
Revenue Account shall be
transferred periodically into
separate funds and accounts
as provided below.
6.2. Project Debt Service
Account. Out of the revenues
in the Project Revenue Ac-
count, there shall be set aside
no later than the 25th day of
each month into the account
designated Project Debt Serv-
ice Account, a sum sufficient to
provide for the payment as the
same become due of the next
maturing principal of, interest
and Administrative Surcharge
on the Revenue Bonds and
any reserve determined by the
City's governing body to be
necessary. The amount set
aside monthly shall be not less
than one-third of the total prin-
cipal, interest, and Administra-
tive Surcharge payable on the
following January 15, April 15,
July 15, or October 15 and if
there shall be any deficiency in
the amount previously set
aside, then the amount of such
deficiency shall be added to
the current requirement.
6.3. Depreciation Ac-
count. There shall be estab-
lished a General Depreciation
Account. Out of the revenues
of the Project Revenue Ac-
count there shall be set aside
each month into the General
Depreciation Account an
amount determined by the
Common Council to be a
proper and adequate amount
for repair and depreciation of
the Project.
6.4. Project SurpIus Ac-
count. There shall be estab-
lished the Project Surplus
Account. Revenues remaining
in the Project Revenue Ac-
count at the end of any fiscal
year after all periodic transfers
have been made therefrom as
above required, shall be
deemed to be surplus and shall
be transferred to the Project
Surplus Account. Ìf at any time
there shall exist any default in
making any periodic transfer to
the Project Debt Service Ac-
count, the Common Council
shall authorize the City Fi-
nance Officer to rectify such
default so far as possible by
the transfer of money from the
Project Surplus Account. Ìf any
such default shall exist as to
more than one account or fund
at any time, then such transfer
shall be made in the order such
funds and accounts are listed
above.
When not required to restore a
current deficiency in the Proj-
ect Debt Service Account,
moneys in the Project Surplus
Account from time to time may
be used for any of the following
purposes and not otherwise:
(a) To redeem and prepay
the Revenue Bond when and
as such Revenue Bond be-
comes prepayable according
to its terms;
(b) To pay for repairs of or
for the construction and instal-
lation of improvements or addi-
tions to the System; and, if the
balances in the Project Debt
Service Account and the Proj-
ect Depreciation Account are
sufficient to meet all payments
required or reasonably antici-
pated to be made there from
prior to the end of the then cur-
rent fiscal year, then:
(c) To be held as a reserve
for redemption and prepay-
ment of any bonds of the Sys-
tem which are not then but will
later be prepayable according
to their terms; or
(d) To be used for any
other authorized municipal pur-
pose designated by the Com-
mon Council.
(e) No moneys shall at any
time be transferred from the
Project Surplus Account or any
other account of the Fund to
any other fund of the City, nor
shall such moneys at any time
be loaned to other municipal
funds or invested in warrants,
special improvements bonds or
other obligations payable from
other funds, except as pro-
vided in this Section.
SECTION 7. ApprovaI of Pay-
ing Agent/Registrar. The Rev-
enue Bond shall be payable at
the office of The First National
Bank in Sioux Falls, Sioux
Falls, South Dakota, hereby
designated as paying agent
and registrar.
SECTION 8. ApprovaI of
Bond CounseI. Meierhenry
Sargent LLP is hereby retained
as Bond Counsel with respect
to the Revenue Bond.
SECTION 9. Tax Matters. The
Ìnterest on the Revenue Bond
shall be excludable from gross
income for federal income tax
purposes under the Ìnternal
Revenue Code of 1986, as
amended ("the Code¨) and ap-
plicable Treasury Regulations
(the "Regulations¨).
SECTION 10. Covenants. The
City hereby covenants and
agrees with the District and
other owners of the Revenue
Bond as follows:
10.1. The City will punctu-
ally perform all duties with ref-
erence to the Project, the
System and the Revenue Bond
required by the constitution
and laws of the State of South
Dakota and by this Resolution.
10.2. The City agrees and
covenants that it will promptly
construct the improvements in-
cluded in the Project.
10.3. The City covenants
and agrees that pursuant to
Sections 25 through 27 of the
Act, the lawful holders of the
Revenue Bond shall have a
statutory mortgage lien upon
the Project and the extensions,
additions and improvements
thereto acquired pursuant to
the Act, until the payment in full
of the principal and interest on
the Revenue Bond, and the
City agrees not to sell or other-
wise dispose of the System,
the Project, or any substantial
part thereof, except as pro-
vided in the Loan Agreement
and shall not establish, author-
ize or grant a franchise for the
operation of any other utility
supplying like products or serv-
ices in competition therewith,
or permit any person, firm or
corporation to compete with it
in the distribution of water for
municipal, industrial, and do-
mestic purposes within the
City.
10.4. The City covenants
and agrees with the District
and other owners of the Rev-
enue Bond that it will maintain
the System in good condition
and operate the same in an ef-
ficient manner and at a reason-
able cost, so long as any
portion of the Revenue Bond
remains outstanding; that it will
maintain insurance on the Sys-
tem for the benefit of the hold-
ers of the Revenue Bond in an
amount which usually would be
carried by private companies in
a similar type of business; that
it will prepare, keep and file
records, statements and ac-
counts as provided for in this
Resolution and the Loan
Agreement. The Revenue
Bond shall refer expressly to
this Resolution and the Act and
shall state that it is subject to all
provisions and limitations
thereof pursuant to Section 19
of the Act.
SECTION 11. Depositories.
The Finance Officer shall
cause all moneys pertaining to
the Funds and Accounts to be
deposited as received with one
or more banks which are duly
qualified public depositories
under the provisions of SDCL
Ch. 4-6A, in a deposit account
or accounts, which shall be
maintained separate and apart
from all other accounts of the
City, so long as any of the
Bonds and the interest thereon
shall remain unpaid. Any of
such moneys not necessary for
immediate use may be de-
posited with such depository
banks in savings or time de-
posits. No money shall at any
time be withdrawn from such
deposit accounts except for the
purposes of the Funds and Ac-
counts as authorized in this
Resolution; except that mon-
eys from time to time on hand
in the Funds and Accounts
may at any time, in the discre-
tion of the City's governing
body, be invested in securities
permitted by the provisions of
SDCL 4-5-6; provided, how-
ever, that the Depreciation
Fund may be invested in such
securities maturing not later
than ten years from the date of
the investment. Ìncome re-
ceived from the deposit or in-
vestment of moneys shall be
credited to the Fund or Account
from whose moneys the de-
posit was made or the invest-
ment was purchased, and
handled and accounted for in
the same manner as other
moneys therein.
SECTION 12. Consent to Ap-
pointment. Ìn the event of mis-
management of the Project, a
default in the payment of the
principal or interest of the Rev-
enue Bond, or in any other
condition thereof materially af-
fecting the lawful holder of the
Revenue Bond, or if the rev-
enues of the Project are dissi-
pated, wasted or diverted from
their proper application as set
forth in the Loan Agreement,
Revenue Bond, or herein, the
City hereby consents to the ap-
pointment of a receiver pur-
suant to Section 33 of the Act,
and agrees that the receiver
will have the powers set forth
therein, and in Sections 34 and
35 of the Act to operate and ad-
minister the Project, and
charge and collect rates as de-
scribed therein.
SECTION 13. SeverabiIity. Ìf
any section, paragraph, clause
or provision of this Resolution,
the Loan Agreement, the Rev-
enue Bond, or any other Loan
Document shall be held invalid,
the invalidity of such section,
paragraph, clause or provision
shall not affect any of the other
provisions of this Resolution or
said Loan Agreement, Rev-
enue Bond, or any other Loan
Document.
SECTION 14. RepeaI of Res-
oIution. At such time as the
Revenue Bond are defeased
or paid in full, this Resolution
and the special charge or sur-
charge shall automatically be
repealed without any further
action of the City.
SECTION 15. Authorization
of City OfficiaIs. The Mayor,
Finance Officer, City Attorney
and City officials shall be and
they are hereby authorized to
execute and deliver for and on
behalf of the City any and all
other certificates, documents
or other papers and to perform
such other acts as they may
deem necessary or appropriate
in order to implement and carry
out the actions authorized
herein.
SECTION 16. Effective Date.
This Resolution shall take ef-
fect on the 20th day following
its publication, unless sus-
pended by a referendum.
Adopted at Philip, South
Dakota, this 4th day of Sep-
tember 2012.
APPROVED:
/s/ Michael Vetter, Mayor
(SEAL)
ATTEST:
/s/ Monna Van Lint, City Fi-
nance Officer
Adopted: Sept. 04, 2012
Published: Sept. 13, 2012
Effective: October 03, 2012
The Haakon County Commissioners ad-
dressed the Council.
The first order of discussion included that
of a lease agreement between the
County and City for the office spaces that
the City utilizes in the courthouse. The
City Council had requested a lease
agreement to outline the responsibilities
and payments as a means of protecting
both the City and County. (For the record,
a lease for the City's offices has not been
located.)
Ed Briggs, chairman, presented a draft
lease agreement for the Council's review.
City Attorney Tollefson disclosed to the
Council that she, as the State's Attorney
developed the lease per the County's re-
quest. She is also the City Attorney and if
the Council feels that this is a conflict,
they have the option to seek other coun-
sel for reviewing and discussing the
lease.
With no comments, Tollefson stated that
the lease is a standard lease and items
can be changed if there is a mutual
agreement between the County and City.
She then asked if the City had any rec-
ommendations to the lease.
FO Van Lint noted items in section two
and six that should be addressed. This in-
cludes adding space that is not currently
included in the lease, but utilized by the
City, as well as grammatical changes.
Tollefson noted that she will make the
suggested changes and forward the
lease for final approval during the next
meetings of the County Commission and
City Council.
Commissioner Nick Konst then inquired
with the Council as to their position with
Dakota Mill & Grain's (DM&G) proposed
expansion plan.
Mayor Vetter noted that the last discus-
sion with DM&G's representatives in-
cluded the City's request for an
engineered plan and a completed eleva-
tion study. To date, this information has
not been received.
Discussion about the economic impact
the expansion would provide as well as
concerns for the property owners in the
area ensued. The main concern is that of
the current flooding issues and the poten-
tial increase if the new rail siding is in-
stalled on the north side of the current rail
siding which will restrict the water flow fur-
ther.
Konst questioned if the City will require a
building permit for their expansion and
what, if any, legal ramifications are
granted for construction in the railroad
right-of-way.
Ìt was noted that the City will require both
a building permit and flood plain develop-
ment permit for the expansion. Ìf the City
does not approve them, will it halt the
construction, is another question that
needs to be reviewed further. Ìt comes
down to the economic impact versus the
protection of the property owners in the
area.
Council Member Larson suggested con-
tacting the Army Corps of Engineers with
regard to the railroad's decision in filling
in the trestle bridge in years past. She
questioned if such work would require a
permit from them in addition would
DM&G be subject to obtaining a permit
for their proposed work. Ìn addition, could
we request the trestle be put back into
place to help undo the problems that
have arisen since it was narrowed with fill
dirt?
FO Van Lint reminded the Council that
their proposed expansion plan is within
the designated flood zone. The City has
an agreement with the Federal Emer-
gency Management Administration
(FEMA) to implement regulations for con-
struction in the flood zone as a protection
to those properties. The concern is how
much authority the City has with regard to
construction within the railroad right-of-
way.
Commissioner Gary Snook questioned
what the Haakon Railroad Authority's in-
fluences are and if they would have au-
thority with regard to DM&G's expansion
plan? FO Van Lint advised that it is
merely a legal entity with taxing authority
that allows and supports entities such as
DM&G to make application to the state for
railroad expansions and qualify for low in-
terest loans. Ìn her opinion, they would
need our support to expand.
Commissioner Rita O'Connell also ques-
tioned about the possibility of DM&G ob-
taining permits from the SD Dept. of
Environment and Natural Resources
(DENR). City Attorney Tollefson noted
that DENR deals mainly with drainage
while the Army Corp of Engineers is in
charge of river waters. She suggested the
City and/or County contact DM&G's engi-
neers with regard to the permits that they
are required to obtain in order to complete
their proposed expansion plan.
PWD Reckling confirmed that DM&G's
engineer is Andrew Kangas with Civil De-
sign Engineering.
Commissioner Steve Clements then in-
troduced Tony DeRunge, noting that he is
familiar with the railroad operations and
is willing to sit on the Haakon Railroad
Authority with County, City of Philip, and
Town of Midland.
By general consensus of the Council,
they are in favor of appointing Mr.
DeRunge to the Authority. Further re-
search will be completed in order to de-
termine how this appointment will be
accomplished.
Following a lengthy discussion, both the
City Council and County Commission, by
general discussion, voiced favor for the
expansion of DM&G, noting the economic
impact it will have for the area. Ìn addition,
reservations were noted for the impact
that it may have on the property owners
north of their proposed rail siding. They
confirmed that they would and should
work together to find the best solution for
both DM&G and the property owners.
Then, the City Council, by general con-
sensus, requested FO Van Lint contact
the Army Corps of Engineers and
DM&G's engineer regarding the various
permits that will be required for their pro-
posed expansion plan.
Commissioner Snook then questioned if
the Council had any concerns relative to
the increase in rent for the City offices in
the County Courthouse.
Commissioner Clements noted that the
amount was based on the annual Court-
house utilities divided by the number of
offices housed in the Courthouse.
No concerns were noted by the Council.
The Mayor and those in attendance
thanked the Commissioners and Tony
DeRungs as they left the meeting at this
time.
The Swimming Pool report was reviewed.
The pool attendance for the 2012 season
was reported at 7,008 which increased by
587 from the 2011 season.
DFO Smith reported that John Malik with
Malik Brothers Plastering, Ìnc. will begin
work on the exterior of the pool bath-
house on Sept. 5, 2012. She noted that
all of the preparation work has been com-
pleted and advised that the doors will
need to be painted next spring and new
signs will need to be made.
Ìt was suggested that the City might con-
sider contacting the morning swimmers
about painting the doors since they of-
fered to paint the bathhouse earlier this
year. Ìn addition, Council Member Larson
offered to make a new sign for the "pool
rules.¨
PubIic Comments:
None.
In Other Business:
The SDML Annual Conference is Oct. 2-
5, 2012, in Pierre. FO & DFO Smith will
be out of the office Oct. 3-5 for the con-
ference. Larson & Matt will be attending
on Oct. 4.
The next Regular Council Meeting will be
held on Monday, Oct. 1, 2012, at 7:00
p.m. in the Community Rm.
With no further business to come before
the Council, Mayor Vetter declared the
meeting adjourned at 8:28 p.m.
/s/ Michael Vetter, Mayor
ATTEST:
/s/ Brittany Smith,
Deputy Finance Officer
[Published September 13, 2012, at the
total approximate cost of $1,478.92]
Proceedings of Haakon
County Commissioners
REGULAR SESSION
September 4, 2012
The Haakon County Board of Commis-
sioners met at 1:04 PM on Tuesday, Sep-
tember 4, 2012. A quorum was
established with Chairman Edward
Briggs, Vice Chairman Stephen
Clements, Members Rita O'Connell, Gary
Snook and Nicholas Konst in attendance.
Western South Dakota Community Action
Executive Director Linda Edel, Auditor Pat
Freeman, Deputy Auditor Carla Smith,
Highway Administrative Secretary Val
Williams, Extension Secretary Sheryl
Hansen, Mike Seager, Tony DeRunge
and Pioneer Review Representative
Nancy Haigh were also present.
Member Rita O'Connell requested to
amend the agenda to discuss some li-
brary information at some point during the
meeting. A motion was made to amend
the agenda to include the discussion.
The August 7, 2012, Regular Meeting
Minutes and the August 21, 2012, Special
Meeting Minutes were read. Commis-
sioner Rita O'Connell made a motion to
approve these minutes. Ìt was seconded
with all in agreement.
The Supplemental Hearing for (226-222)
Emergency Management was held. No
one appeared before the commission. A
motion was made by Commissioner
Nicholas Konst, seconded with all in
agreement to supplement the fund by
$14,895.00.
Western South Dakota Community Action
Executive Director Linda Edel appeared
before the commission to explain what
their agency does for this area. Ìt is com-
prised of 14 counties in the area and cov-
ers approximately 6,000 square miles.
Their board has 42 members and meets
every third Wednesday of the month at
6:00 PM. Each member is reimbursed
mileage to and from the meeting and din-
ner is served the night of the meeting.
There are many programs the agency is
involved in, such as weatherizing homes,
furnace repairs, school supplies, and
commodities. All are distributed to those
in need and the elderly. Each county has
three representatives and at this time,
Midland is the only place where a repre-
sentative is located in Haakon County.
When asked for someone who might be
interested in being on the board, Com-
missioner Stephen Clements volun-
teered. A motion was made, seconded
with all in agreement to approve the ap-
pointment.
The following August 2012 fuel bids were
submitted:
FUEL BÌDS:
Courthouse: None
Highway Dept:
08-14-12 Fitzgerald Oil ........$3.67 No. 2
08-14-12 Cenex...................$3.52 No. 2
08-15-12 Fitzgerald Oil ........$3.68 No. 2
08-15-12 Cenex...................$3.50 No. 2
08-15-12 Fitzgerald Oil ........$3.64 No. 2
08-15-12 Cenex...................$3.40 No. 2
08-21-12 Fitzgerald Oil ..........$3.62 Gas
08-21-12 Cenex.....................$3.55 Gas
Highway Superintendent Kenny Neville
was not present at the meeting but Ad-
ministrative Secretary Val Williams gave
a report to the commission. There was
some discussion on a gate being locked
on a county road that had never been va-
cated. Ìt also provided access to public
land. Ìt was determined that State's Attor-
ney Gay Tollefson would write a letter
stating that the lock had to be removed
from the gate. The public land has to re-
main accessible to the public.
Extension Secretary Sheryl Hansen met
with the commission to answer some of
their questions on the 4-H program for the
2013 year. There has been a lot of discus-
sion over the last few meetings in regards
to the quality and time the present 4-H
program is providing Haakon County
members. This year Haakon County
agreed to participate in a four county plan
to share one advisor. Each county paid
the $4,187.50 to support the salary of the
advisor. The counties involved are
Haakon, Jackson, Jones and Mellette.
The general consensus is that this agree-
ment has not provided the level of partic-
ipation and the attention required to
provide Haakon County members with a
quality 4-H Program. Ìt was decided that
the $4,187.50 would be better spent, put
towards providing an advisor that could
be in the Haakon County Extension Office
four days a week and readily available to
our 4-H members. This is the way it was
budgeted for in 2013. A letter will be writ-
ten to inform SDSU that Haakon County
will not be participating in the four county
program for the 2013 year. Extension
Secretary Sheryl Hansen has agreed to
become Haakon County's 4-H advisor for
2013.
Mike Seager was asked to meet with the
commissioners to show his filming of the
2008 flooding of the Bad River around his
property. Mike had shown the film to the
City Council the previous month. The
commissioners were on the agenda of the
City Council to meet with them concern-
ing the rent lease and the Rail Road Au-
thority. The film that was reviewed was in
regards to the Dakota Mill and Grain ex-
pansion. There are two appointed mem-
bers on the City Council, Mike Vetter and
Greg Arthur. The two newly appointed
members for the Haakon County Com-
missioners are Nicholas Konst and Gary
Snook. Tony DeRunge was present at the
meeting and lives in the Midland area. He
expressed an interest in representing
Midland on the Rail Road Authority
Board. There is much left to do and a lot
more information to be gathered.
The Gross Courthouse Salary & Pay-
roll Warrants for the month of August
2012:
Commissioners, Wages ...........2,820.00
Auditor's Office.........................4,772.61
Treasurer's Office.....................4,772.61
State's Attorney's Office ...........3,468.34
Director of Equalization............2,586.53
Register of Deeds.....................2,911.17
Janitor ......................................1,989.04
Veteran's Office...........................810.00
Sheriff's Office.........................5,230.87
Highway Department..............21,463.29
WÌC and Health Nurse Sec......1,173.76
Librarians .................................1,877.46
Extension Secretary.................1,246.50
Emergency Management ............951.28
Weed Supervisor......................1,599.29
Wellmark Blue Cross Blue
Shield .................................13,295.57
Special Ìnsurance Services......1,332.01
AFLAC, premium.........................577.92
SD Retirement System.............5,880.02
Delta Dental ................................745.90
Vision Service Plan .....................155.65
First National Bank
SS & WH............................11,763.86
The Vendor Warrants were presented
for July Expenses paid in August 2012:
COMMISSIONERS
Pioneer Review Ìnc, Publishing ..389.56
SDACO Travel ...........................165.00
554.56
AUDITOR
Carla Smith, Prof Fees & Computer
Support ....................................50.99
Century Business Leasing, Maint -
Copier ....................................326.14
First National Bank, FNB BCBS Wire
Trans Fee .................................10.00
Patricia G Freeman, Prof Fees & Com-
puter Support .........................143.09
Patricia G Freeman, Travel ..........62.90
Golden West Tele Co,
Telephone ..............................179.80
Quill Corporation, Supplies ........139.00
SDACO, Travel ..........................165.00
1,076.92
TREASURER
Golden West Tele Co,
Telephone ................................70.49
McLeod's Printing & Supply,
Supplies .................................765.54
836.03
STATE'S ATTORNEY
SD Cle Ìnc, Professional Fees ...500.00
Tollefson Law Office, Office
Rent .......................................150.00
Legal Notlces
1hursday, 3eptember 13, 2012 · 1he Pioneer Review · Page 13
oontinued from page 12
oontinued on page 14
Tollefson Law Office, Supplies ...333.29
Tollefson Law Office, Travel .........65.12
Tollefson Law Office, Telephone ...75.00
1,123.41
COURT APPOINTED ATTORNEY
KSL Corp/Kevin S Lewis, Court Ap-
pointed Attorney ..................2,476.99
2,476.99
COURTHOUSE
City of Philip, Utilities .................612.50
Coyle's Super Valu, Supplies .......40.91
Heartland Paper Co, Supplies ...469.42
Ìngram Hardware, Supplies .........62.99
Kone Ìnc, Professional Fees ......230.03
MG Oil Company, Supplies ..........19.27
Petersen's Variety, Supplies .........28.56
Servall Uniform, Supplies ...........147.53
Walker Refuse Ìnc, Utilities ..........70.00
West Central Electric Utilities...2,499.73
4,180.94
DIRECTOR OF EQUALIZATION
Coyle's Standard, Fuel .................61.00
Golden West Tele Co,
Telephone ...............................115.92
Marshall & Swift/Boeckh, Professional
Fees .......................................454.30
McLeod's Printing & Supply,
Supplies ...................................40.40
Petersen's Variety, Supplies ...........5.49
Reliable Office Supplies,
Supplies ...................................16.87
Toni Rhodes, Fuel ........................24.22
718.20
REGISTER OF DEEDS
Century Business Leasing, Ìnc., Sup-
plies .......................................164.21
Golden West Tele Co,
Telephone................................111.22
McLeod's Printing & Supply,
Supplies ....................................50.91
Microfilm Ìmaging Systems Ìnc,
Professional Fees ...................200.00
SDACO Travel ............................165.00
691.34
VETERANS SERVICE
Terry Deuter, Travel ......................37.00
Golden West Tele Co,
Telephone ................................48.49
85.49
SHERIFF
AT&T Mobility, Utilities ..................85.69
Coyle's Standard, Repairs &
Maint ........................................57.95
Coyle's Standard, Fuel ...............446.60
Galls An Aramark Co, Repairs &
Maint ......................................203.51
Golden West Tele Co, Utilities ....142.54
Michael Koffler, Other Expense .....1.02
MG Oil Company, Fuel ...............163.56
NAPA, Repairs & Maint ................11.10
Petersen's Variety, Supplies .........24.98
Philip Volunteer Fire Dept,
Supplies ...................................40.00
Public Safety Equipment Co, Equipment
.............................................3,120.00
4,296.95
JAIL
Winner Health Mart, Jail
Expenses .................................18.74
Hughes County Auditor, Jail
Expenses ............................2,600.00
2,618.74
MENTALLY ILL
Pennington Co States Attny, Prof
Services .................................200.00
Radiology Associates, Prof Prof
Services .................................165.00
Rapid City Regional Hosp, Prof
Services ..............................2,483.84
2,848.84
LIBRARY
DEMCO, Supplies ........................92.42
Haakon County Public Library, Sup-
plies .......................................132.58
225.00
EXTENSION SERVICE
Carrie Weller, Travel ..................132.23
Crossroads Hotel, Travel .............37.50
Golden West Tele Co,
Telephone .................................12.61
Reliable Office Supplies,
Supplies ...................................97.20
279.54
WEED CONTROL
Warne Chemical & Equipment Co, Sup-
plies .......................................149.70
149.70
ROAD & BRIDGE
AT&T Mobility, Utilities ..................48.31
Butler Machinery Co Ìnc, Repairs &
Maint ...................................1,842.87
Cenex Harvest States,
Supplies ..............................1,076.00
Cenex Harvest States, Fuel ....9,061.73
Dales Tire & Retreading Ìnc,
Supplies .................................125.00
DWARE Ìnc, Travel ......................50.00
Golden West Tele Co, Utilities ....232.99
Grossenburg Ìmplement Ìnc, Repairs &
Maint ........................................64.32
Grossenburg Ìmplement Ìnc,
Supplies ...................................73.32
Heartland Waste Management Ìnc,
Utilities .....................................21.20
Ìngram Hardware, Supplies .........17.94
Kennedy Ìmplement & Auto Co, Repairs
& Maint ...................................383.53
Konst Machine, Repairs &
Maint ......................................204.95
Town of Midland, Utilities .............19.00
Morrison's Conoco, Supplies .....239.95
NAPA, Repairs & Maint ................76.89
NAPA, Supplies ............................91.74
Philip Motor, Ìnc, Repairs &
Maint ........................................43.20
Philip Motor, Ìnc, Supplies ............75.80
Quill Corporation, Supplies ..........85.45
South Dakota LTAP, Travel ..........70.00
SDACO, Travel ..........................165.00
SD DOT Finance Office, Road/Bridge
Projects ...............................7,222.53
Walker Refuse Ìnc, Utilities ..........70.00
Walker Automotive, Repairs &
Maint ...................................1,638.50
West Central Electric, Utilities.....266.69
West River Water Develop Dist,
Utilities ......................................40.00
23,306.91
9-1-1
Centurylink, 911 .........................144.76
Golden West Tele Co, 911 .........496.14
640.90
EMERGENCY & DISASTER
Golden West Tele Co, Utilities ....101.14
Lola Roseth, Travel ....................128.80
229.94
COURTHOUSE BUILDING
Ken's Refrigeration, Building
Fund ....................................1,341.37
1341.37
TotaI Checks.........................47,681.77
A motion was made, seconded with all in
agreement to approve the above war-
rants.
The next regular meeting will be on Tues-
day, October 2, 2012, at 1:00 PM in the
commissioner's room at the courthouse.
The meeting was adjourned at 5:45 PM.
HAAKON COUNTY COMMÌSSÌON Ed-
ward Briggs, Chairman
ATTEST:
Patricia G. Freeman, Auditor
[Published September 13, 2012, at the
total approximate cost of $146.21]
Legal Notlces
1hursday, 3eptember 13, 2012 · 1he Pioneer Review · Page 14
[Published September 13, 2012, at the total approxiate cost of $337.901]
oontinued from page 13
rIvod. Thoy joInod JnmIo`s µnronfs,
grnndmofhor nnd frIonds In fho coI-
obrnfIon of Wynff nnd IsnboIIn`s
fhIrd bIrfhdny. If wns Soµfombor 9.
Affor cookouf for Iunch nnd nn nf-
fornoon of roInxIng nnd vIsIfIng
!nIµh, Cnfhy, !Ichnrd nnd ÐInnn
wonf Info Iorosford fo gof n mofoI
room, fhon wonf bnck ouf fo fho
Sfownrf`s for suµµor. Ionu nnd
JnmIo hnvo n µInco rIghf In fho
mIddIo of corn fIoIds. Thoy hnvo nII
kInds of fnrm nnImnIs so fhoro Is
Iofs fo do. A good suµµor wns on-
joyod by nII, fhon somo moro roInx-
Ing fImo nnd vIsIfIng boforo
ovoryono cnIIod If n nIghf nnd wonf
fhoIr soµnrnfo wnys. JnmIo`s µnr-
onfs nnd somo fnmIIy sfnyod fhoro
on fho fnrm. Ivoryono mof bnck fo-
gofhor Sundny mornIng for bronk-
fnsf, oxcoµf for Job nnd CnssIo.
Thon If wns oufsIdo fo rIdo fho
horso nnd food fho fnrm nnImnIs.
!nfor, ovoryono wnfchod Wynff
nnd IsnboIIn oµon fhoIr bIrfhdny
gIffs. Coodbyos woro snId nnd fhoy
woro hondod down fho hIghwny for
homo. Thoy ngnIn sfoµµod nf KoI-
IIo`s on fho wny bnck fo droµ off
somo fhIngs for hor from JnmIo,
fhon If wns on fho rond ngnIn nrrIv-
Ing In IhIIIµ Info nffornoon. !nIµh
nnd Cnfhy gof fhoIr vohIcIo Iondod
nnd hondod for homo. Thoy snw
Iofs of corn nnd soybonns on fhoIr
frIµ. If Is vory dry fhnf wny, foo. If
wns fun fo soo dIfforonf counfry.
Snfurdny, Tony Hnrfy hnd
bronkfnsf ouf, vIsIfod ShIrIoy HnIr
nnd nf our µInco fo gIvo mo nows.
Tho Wosf ConfrnI IIocfrIc omµIoy-
oos woro on n bonofIf rIdo nnd n Iof
of moforcycIos woro comIng
fhrough Kndokn, fhoro wns n bnr-
bocuo nf fho Wosf ConfrnI buIIdIng
boforo fhoy wonf on fo ofhor µoInfs
of Inforosf. Tony vIsIfod !uss Hnf-
foI Infor In fho nffornoon.
!os nnd Muroo SfrubIo vIsIfod nf
our µInco In fho mornIng nnd mof
fho cnf fhoy wIII bo hoIµIng fnko
cnro of. IIII gof In somo cnrd gnmos
In fho nffornoon nnd I gof fhIngs
rondy for our frIµ fo !ochosfor.
Sundny, Coorgo CIffIngs hoIµod
Jody CIffIngs gof movod fo Murdo
whoro ho wIII bo fonchIng.
Sundny, Ðon nnd VI Moody wonf
ouf for Iunch nnd rnn ncross fho nn-
fIquo cnrs, sfroof cnrs, coIIocfIbIo
cnrs, frucks nnnunI swnµ moof nf
fho ConfrnI Sfnfos InIrgrounds.
Thoy fook n brIof wnIk fhrough n
Inrgo crowd IookIng nf Iofs nnd Iofs
of vnrIous boofhs of cnr nnd fruck
µnrfs for frndIng nnd swnµµIng.VI
fhoughf sho hnd bIf off n IIffIo moro
fhnn sho couId chow on fho donI,
buf If wns cooI nnd good oxorcIso
cnmo fo fho foro ns sho nnd Ðon
mndo fho round-frIµ bnck fo whoro
fho cnr wns µnrkod.
Tony Hnrfy cnIIod mo fo gIvo mo
hIs nows for Sundny. Wo woro In n
rosfnurnnf nnd I foId hIm fhnf I
dIdn'f hnvo n µon rIghf nf fho fImo.
I foIf n fnµ on my shouIdor nnd n
µon wns µushod ovor fho sonf fo
mo. Anywny, I gof fho nows nofos
fnkon. Affor church Sundny nnd
dInnor ouf, Tony hondod ncross
counfry on n frIµ norfh. Ho Iookod
nf fho counfrysIdo nnd fInnIIy cnmo
fo n sfoµ nf fho homo of ÐonnIo nnd
Ioboffo SchofIoId. Ho hnd n nIco
vIsIf nnd onjoyod suµµor boforo
hondIng bnck fo Kndokn.
Sundny onrIy, IIII nnd I woro on
our wny onsf. Wo nrrIvod nf fho
homo of CnrIy nnd Chnso Mny In
MndIson, nnd µInyod wIfh IIffIo
Jnxon, sIx wooks of ngo. IooµIo
µIny wIfh hIm nnd ho doosn'f ronIIy
µnrfIcIµnfo foo much. Wo hnd
Iunch, fhon Chnso nnd I dId somo
ynrd work. Thon on fo HnrrIsburg
fo fho homo of Amnndn nnd Adnm
CInfIIn whoro n fnnfnsfIc suµµor
wns rondy for us. Wo vIsIfod nf fho
IrIc Songor homo fo soo nII fho
fhIngs dono fhoro ns woII ns µIny
wIfh gronf-grnndson, III, nnd
gronf-grnnddnughfor, AvI. Wo woro
ovornIghf guosfs nf fho CInfIIn
homo.
Hoµo you nII hnvo n wondorfuI
wook.
BetwIxt PIaces News
{ccntInued trcm page ?)
View & downIoad onIine
production saIe books at:
www.RPIpromotions.com
PhiIip Livestock's FaII Horse SaIe
Berry Creek Ranch Horse SaIe
Tho Cnsoy TIbbs Soufh Ðnkofn
!odoo Confor wIII hosf n brnndIng
ovonf Snfurdny, Soµfombor 22.
Ownors of cnffIo or horso brnnds
In Soufh Ðnkofn cnn burn fhoIr
brnnd Info fho fImbors of fho rodoo
confor wnIkwny. Hundrods of brnn-
dors hnvo nIrondy burnod fhoIr
brnnds nf fho rodoo confor.
¨If`s goIng fo bo n dny of ncfIvIfIos
for nII ngos,¨ snId ÐIrocfor CIndy
Inho. ¨Wo hnvo mochnnIcnI buII
rIdos for kIds ngos fhroo fo l03. If
you`vo nIwnys wnnfod fo Ionrn how
fo roµo, wo`II hnvo cowboys uµ horo
fo fonch you. You cnn gof your
µhofo fnkon wIfh n rodoo cIown nnd
cnsf your vofo In fho chIII cookoff.¨
Irom ll:00 n.m. 3:00 µ.m. fho
dny wIII IncIudo roµIng, mochnnIcnI
buII rIdos nnd µhofos. A chIII cook-
off wIII run from ll:30 n.m. fo l:00
µ.m., fonfurIng chofs from nron
rosfnurnnfs. Tho horso frough wIII
bo fIIIod wIfh coId bovorngos for
kIds nnd nduIfs.
¨InrfIcIµnnfs do nof nood fIckofs
fo nffond fho rodoo confor ovonf,¨
snId Inho. ¨Tho µubIIc Is woIcomo
fo nffond fhIs fun dny of brnndIng,
roµIng, rIdIng nnd onfIng.¨ Irnn-
dors nro oncourngod fo rosorvo n
fImo fo burn fhoIr brnnd.
Tho SfIrIIng InmIIy MomorInI
!odoo wIII bo nf fho SfnnIoy
Counfy InIrgrounds wIfh fho cnI-
cuffn nnd fInnI go round foIIowIng
Infor fhnf nIghf, nnd n dnnco fo foI-
Iow. Irocoods of fho rodoo nssIsf
nron cnncor survIvors. Þow In Ifs
l5fh yonr, fhIs Is fho fIrsf yonr fho
SfIrIIng rodoo wIII bo hoId In Iorf
IIorro.
Ior furfhor InformnfIon nbouf
fho dny`s ncfIvIfIos or cosfs, confncf
fho rodoo confor nf 605-494-l094.
casey 1lbbs rodeo center
brandlng event 8eptember 22
Covornor ÐonnIs Ðnugnnrd hns
µrocInImod Soµfombor 9-l5 ns SuI-
cIdo IrovonfIon Wook In Soufh
Ðnkofn.
SuIcIdo occurs ncross nII ngo, oco-
nomIc, socInI nnd ofhnIc bound-
nrIos, nnd Is now fho l0fh IondIng
cnuso of nII donfhs In fho !nIfod
Sfnfos nnd fho nInfh IondIng cnuso
of nII donfhs In fho sfnfo of Soufh
Ðnkofn.
ThIs yonr`s fhomo Is CoIInborn-
fIons In SuIcIdoIogy: IrIdgIng fho
ÐIscIµIInos. If ¨omµhnsIzos fho
nood for nII honIfh cnro µrofossIon-
nIs fo work fogofhor, nf fho IocnI
IovoI, fo hoIµ µrovonf fufuro suI-
cIdos In fho sfnfo,¨ snId CIb Sud-
bock, µrogrnm mnnngor, wIfh fho
Sfnfo Ðoµnrfmonf of SocInI Sorv-
Icos` µrovonfIon µrogrnm.
SuIcIdos mny bo µrovonfod whon
suIcIdnI bohnvIors nro dofocfod
onrIy nnd IndIvIdunIs nro roforrod
fo sorvIcos nnd suµµorfs. HoIµ cnn
bo obfnInod In Soufh Ðnkofn com-
munIfIos for fho nssossmonf nnd
fronfmonf of suIcIdnI bohnvIors nnd
fhoIr undorIyIng cnusos.
If you boIIovo fhoro Is n suIcIdo
rIsk, confncf n µrofossIonnI Immo-
dInfoIy. CnII fho suIcIdo crIsIs hof-
IIno nf l-800-2?3-8255, n fnmIIy
µhysIcInn, n µsychInfrIsf, n modIcnI
omorgoncy room or n communIfy
monfnI honIfh confor In your nron.
Ior moro InformnfIon nbouf suI-
cIdo µrovonfIon In Soufh Ðnkofn or
fho Soufh Ðnkofn Sfrnfogy for SuI-
cIdo IrovonfIon, Iog onfo www.sd-
suIcIdoµrovonfIon.org/. Ior moro
InformnfIon nbouf bohnvIornI
honIfh sorvIcos In your nron, con-
fncf fho sfnfo CommunIfy Iohnv-
IornI HonIfh nf 605-??3-3l23 or Iog
on fo hffµ://dss.sd.gov/bohnvIornI-
honIfhsorvIcos/communIfy.
8ulclde Preventlon Week, 8ept. 9-16
NEWLY
REMODELED
Large
Deck
EstabIished
PIay Area
N
ew
ly
rem
o
d
eled
4
-b
ed
ro
o
m
h
o
m
e o
n
(2
) lo
ts
·N
ew
high-efficiency electric A
/C
, heating pum
p &
propane furnace
·N
ew
roof, siding, w
indow
s &
doors
·N
ew
'on dem
and¨ hot w
ater heating system
·N
ew
propane fireplace ·N
ew
carpet &
painting
·E
stablished Y
ard ·E
stablished Playground · V
ery nice large back deck
·2 blocks from
school
·L
arge 2-vehicle garage w
ith room
for w
orkshop
T
his is a very nice fam
ily hom
e that one could begin living in right aw
ay!
W
ould consider a contract for deed to qualified buyer!
CIose to
SchooI
2-VehicIe
Garage
For Sale by Owner
404 N. Larimer
Philip, South Dakota
Don & Tami Ravellette · (605) 859-2969
(605) 685-5147 · Cell
(605) 859-2516 · Work
Thursday, September 13, 2012 • The Pioneer Review •Page 15
Area News & Sports
NOTICE OF SALE
HOUSE with 10.5 ACRES
The Personal Representative oI the Estate oI Stephen JeIIords will oIIer Ior sale, on private
bids, the Iollowing described real estate: Acreage tract SE4SE4 SEC 30-2-22, Kadoka, SD (the
'Property¨). The Property includes a house and land, to be sold together in one transaction. The
address Ior the Property is 22800 SD Highway 248, Kadoka, SD 57543, and it located just oII
Highway 73, a quarter mile oII oI I-90, and has paved access oII US Hwy 16.
The house is a well-maintained, older home, 1566 sq. It., 2 or 3 bedrooms, 1 bath, large
living room, eat-in kitchen with pantry, upstairs bedroom or study, with a basement under halI
the house. It has many nice upgrades. The house has a concrete patio and a 325 sq. It. out build-
ing.
The land consists oI approximately 10.5 acres that could be commercial or agricultural. No
warranties are made as to actual acreage.
The house will be available Ior viewing and inspection on Sunday, September 9, 2012 and
Sunday, September 16, 2012, Irom 11 a.m. until 3 p.m. A title commitment shall be available
Ior review upon request.
Sealed, written bids shall be submitted to and received by noon on Monday, September 24,
2012, at the Law OIIices oI Nooney, Solay & Van Norman, 632 Main Street, Second Floor,
Rapid City, SD 57701, telephone 605-721-5846, attention to Kurt Solay.
Bid Iorms are required and may be picked up or requested Irom the Law OIIices oI Nooney,
Solay & Van Norman.
All bids should be made Ior the entire Property, including the house and the land, and shall
be accompanied by a check Ior 10° oI the bid. Each check shall be payable to Nooney, Solay
& Van Norman Trust Account.
The Iour highest bidders shall be notiIied by Monday, September 24, 2012, by 4 p.m. The
Iour highest bidders shall be entitled to participate in a live, telephonic auction Ior the Property
at 4 p.m. on Thursday, September 27, 2012.
TERMS OF SALE:
Upon determination oI the winning bid, a Purchase Agreement shall be entered into imme-
diately and shall contain the terms as set out below:
The Property is oIIered Ior sale as a cash sale, AS IS and WHERE IS. The check delivered
with the winning bid will be cashed immediately Iollowing the telephonic auction. The balance
oI the purchase price shall be paid in Iull upon delivery oI a Personal Representative`s Deed
and a title insurance commitment showing a clear title in the seller, but the buyer shall take the
Property subject to all recorded and unrecorded easements, right-oI-ways and reservations, iI
any. The seller shall pay the 2011 real estate taxes and the 2012 real estate taxes shall be prorated
to the date oI closing. Title insurance cost will be split 50/50. Possession oI the Property shall
be immediate upon payment oI the balance oI the purchase price.
The seller reserves the right to reject any and all bids at all times.
Volleyball program gets matching funds
Members of the Philip Modern Woodmen of America chapter recently helped raise money for the Philip volleyball team by
selling raffle tickets. The drawing for a four-wheeler or a golf cart and for a $1,000 savings bond was held July 4. It raised
$1,314. This includes $500 matched by Modern Woodsmen’s home office through the organization’s matching fund pro-
gram. The money will be used for supplies for camps to help the team. The matching fund program offers Modern Woodmen
members nationwide the chance to show their support for a community cause, organization or individual in need by holding
fundraisers. Modern Woodmen matches money raised up to $2,500. These fundraising projects contribute more than $6.5
million to community needs nationwide each year. Coordinated by local Modern Woodmen members, chapters provide op-
portunities to connect through social activities and volunteer projects. For more information about the local chapter and
how to get involved, contact Don Haynes at 859-2778 or dwhaynes@gwtc.net. Photo by Del Bartels
Philip team: Back row, from left: Glenn Parsons, Ryan Seager, Bob Thorson, Brit Miller and Dean Fitzgerald. Front: Dak
Carley, Colt Terkildsen, Jake Fitzgerald, D.J. Rush and Ron Coyle. Courtesy photos
The annual Ryder Cup Golf
Tournament took place Saturday,
September 8, at the Lake Wag-
goner Golf Course in Philip. The
event is a competition between
Philip, Wall and Murdo.
There are three different nine-
hole segments, the first being a
two-person alternate shot. This for-
mat has the first person hit the tee
shot, then the other person hits the
second shot, and shots alternate
until the ball is in the cup.
The second format is an individ-
ual match play, which has no team
member. It is one person from each
team playing each other, and the
object is to win the most holes.
The third format is a two-person
scramble, which has both team
members tee off and then the team
decides which ball is better, and
pick up the inferior ball, and both
players hit from the better ball.
This continues all the way through
the hole.
Each event has the opportunity
for a tie. Scoring for the two-person
alternate shot and the scramble
format is four points for a win and
two points for a tie. The individual
match play scores two points for a
win and one point for a tie.
There are three trophies up for
grabs. The Champions Cup is be-
tween Wall and Philip, the Inter-
state Cup is between Murdo and
Wall, and the Ryder Cup is be-
tween Philip and Murdo. This is
the ninth year for the Champions
Cup, which Philip has won since
the inception. The Interstate Cup
is in it’s fourth year, with Murdo
winning it last year, and Wall win-
ning it all other years. This is the
seventh year of the Ryder Cup,
which Philip has won since it’s in-
ception.
There is a captain from each
team, who pairs their members
and their opponents. The captains
are D.J. Rush for Philip, Dean
Schulz for Wall and Steve Reed for
Murdo.
Philip vs. Wall
Alternate shot: Philip – 10,
Wall – 10. Match play: Philip – 13,
Wall – 7. Scramble: Philip – 20,
Wall – 0. Total: Philip – 43, Wall –
17.
Philip vs. Murdo
Alternate shot: Philip – 14,
Murdo – 6. Match play: Philip – 16,
Murdo – 4. Scramble: Philip – 16,
Murdo – 4. Total: Philip – 46,
Murdo – 14.
Wall vs. Murdo
Alternate shot: Wall – 16,
Murdo – 4. Match play: Wall – 10,
Murdo – 10. Scramble: Wall – 12,
Murdo – 8. Total: Wall – 38,
Murdo – 22.
The Philip team consisted of
Glenn Parsons, Ryan Seager, Bob
Thorson, Brit Miller, Dean Fitzger-
ald, Dak Carley, Colt Terkildsen,
Jake Fitzgerald, D.J. Rush and
Ron Coyle. The Wall team included
Mike Larson, Jan Bielmaier, Stan
Anderson, Troy Schulz, Randy
Walker, Mark Ammann, Conrad
Kjerstad, Nathan Kleinschmit,
Dean Schulz and Chad Walker.
The Murdo team members were
Seth Geigle, Jody Gittings, Chris
Iverson, Steve Reed, Scott Kittel-
son, Rob Kaiser, Tyler Rankin,
Larry Ball, Brian O’Reilly and
Doug LaHaye.
The next Ryder Cup is scheduled
for September 7, 2013, at the Wall
Golf Course.
Ryder Cup Golf Tournament
said that in this area, “We are hard
working people. We feel put upon
by the government.” He talked
about doctors who spend too much
time filling out paperwork and a
banking industry that is being
strangled by regulations.
“Our ancestors came here to be
free,” agreed Noem. She exampled,
“The school lunch regulations are
something that should be as close
to our kids as can be ... not some
bureaucrat in Washington, D.C. It
might make sense in Washington,
but out here it’s crazy.” Audience
member Mike Piroutek said, “Mrs.
Obama said they are going to
change our food in the grocery
stores. I’m a meat and potatos
guy.”
Noem related that, concerning
the harassing of animals during
rattlesnake roundups, a top bu-
reaucrat admitted he thought his
department could put an animal on
Congressional town hall in Philip
Keith Emerson getting a point across to Kristi Noem. Congresswoman Kristi Noem and Ron Millage.
continued from page 1
Lakin Boyd – senior
Has a great attitude and a desire
to do well. Is attentive and willing
to learn. Completes all her
assignments on time. Works hard
to turn in quality homework.
Philip High School
September 2012 Students of the Month
Keegan Burnett – freshman
Positive attitude, contributes to class
discussions. Willing to help others.
Respectful of classmates. Has excel-
lent leadership qualities. Is a diligent
student. Has a great sense of humor.
the endangered species list simply
because it was being harassed by
humans. Noem said, “You know
what happens when an animal gets
put on the endangered species list.
It affects landowners.”
Before Noem began visiting with
audience members on a one-to-one
basis, she concluded, “We are not
talking about what’s important to
us enough. We need people to be
bold.”
PHILIP AARP/RTA … will meet Monday, Sept. 24, at 6:00 p.m.
with a soup supper and business meeting at the senior center. Brit
Miller, FNB loan officer, will be our speaker. Everyone welcome.
PUNT, PASS & KICK …will be held Friday, Sept. 14, at the foot-
ball field. Registration: 3:30; starts at 4:00 for ages 6-15 years. Must
have a copy of birth certificate. Questions: Doug Hauk, 859-2742.
CANCER SUPPORT GROUP …will meet Tuesday, Sept. 18, at
6:30 p.m. in the Senechal Apts. lobby in Philip. There will be a guest
speaker.
THE GARDEN CLUB … is sponsoring Bill Keck and his class
about “Fall Lawn Care” on Wednesday, Sept. 19, at 6:30 p.m. in the
Haakon Co. Courthouse community room. Everyone welcome.
To have your NON-PROFIT meeting listed here, please sub-
mit them by calling: 859-2516, or e-mailing to: ads@pioneer-
review. com. We will run your event notice the two issues
prior to your event at no charge.
Thursday, September 13, 2012 • The Pioneer Review •Page 16
Community
Greetings from cooler, breezy,
dry-as-a-bone, northeast Haakon
County. Thank goodness for cooler
temperatures this morning! It is
about 73˚ here, and a sweatshirt
feels good. I have become so accli-
mated to the hot temperatures that
I'm afraid winter is going to be
even more of a challenge than
usual this year! And while the cool
breeze feels good coming through
the open windows, it also carries
with it a good amount of dust be-
cause of the dry conditions. I guess
I'll be spending some quality time
with my dust cloth and vacuum
later today – again. I haven't had
to spend any time recently check-
ing the rain gauge, so that time
saved can be spent cleaning up the
dust.
A couple of days ago, I found my-
self wishing that flies were a cash
crop, because we have lots of them.
What a nuisance. I have a fly trap
hung in a tree in the yard, and it
doesn't take long for it to fill up. I
guess the flies have taken the place
of mosquitoes this year.
The activity around the neigh-
borhood has mostly involved work-
ing cattle and harvesting corn.
Thank goodness some of the neigh-
bors escaped the hail earlier this
summer, so there is at least a par-
tial crop to harvest. The dry condi-
tions have severely reduced the
yields, but some crop is better than
none. There are quite a few hay
trucks on the highways these days,
hauling feed to areas hardest hit by
the drought. Hopefully by next
summer we will have some mois-
ture for the parched pastures and
fields.
Several of the folks I contacted
this week haven't had any news to
report. It seems that everyone has
switched into fall mode, beginning
to get prepared for the winter. The
hot temperatures have been keep-
ing folks close to home also. An-
other factor is the fact that school
has started, which limits activities
of families with school aged chil-
dren. Whatever the reason, there
isn't a lot of news this week.
Dick and Gene Hudson have
been entertaining company for the
past few days. The children of
Gene's cousin, Duane Price, arrived
Saturday. Derald and Julie Price,
Denver, and Rae and Billy Floyd,
Oklahoma, and their families have
enjoyed seeing the countryside,
checking cattle, and all the other
ranch activities. I'm sure they are
enjoying Gene's cooking, also! Jon
and Connie Johnson and boys
joined the group for supper on Sat-
urday and Sunday. Monday, just
Connie and Noah Johnson joined
the group for supper. Jon Johnson
was gone to Wheaton, Minn., and
both Avery and Wyatt are in
school. The Price relatives returned
to their homes Tuesday.
Coreen and Julian Roseth helped
their son, Nick, move to Philip re-
cently. Nick has an apartment
there and is working at the sale
barn.
Nels and Dorothy Paulson were
in Pierre Friday. Saturday morn-
ing, they had a visit from their
friends, Otis and Amber Funk, who
live near Pierre. The Funks were in
the area looking for antelope – I
guess the archery season is now
open. Don Sandal was at Paulsons
earlier in the week cleaning seed
wheat. The rest of their time has
been spent checking fences and
water and just generally keeping
an eye on the cattle. Nels solved a
mystery this week – he found the
culprits that were digging up his
potatoes. It turns out that he has a
bunch of very hungry pheasants
who are scratching the potatoes out
of the ground and making a meal of
them! (Most of the potatoes in my
garden are about the size of golf
balls this year, so those would
probably qualify as an appetizer
rather than a meal.) It is a chal-
lenging year for both man and
beast (and birds)! Happy belated
birthday to Nels – he celebrated
another year on September 10.
Bill and Polly Bruce spent part of
the week recuperating from their
Labor Day weekend family gather-
ing. All of their children were
home, as well as several of the
grandchildren. Polly said over 40
people were there, all of them en-
joying visiting and spending time
together. The last of the crowd left
Labor Day. The most entertaining
part of the weekend was the home-
made cannon that shot bowling
balls! A friend from the Cresbard
area brought the cannon, and they
had fun shooting it through old
buildings, etc. Activities at the
Bruce ranch this week included
cattle working and hay hauling.
Bill and Polly went to Pierre
Thursday. They attended church in
Midland Sunday, followed by lunch
at a local cafe. Polly got word last
week that her younger brother, Leo
Nemec, had a heart attack. Leo
lives in North Dakota. He is home
now and doing better. He'll have a
procedure later to have another
stent placed in his heart to improve
blood flow. Modern medicine is
amazing!
Max and Joyce Jones were in
Akaska September 1 to attend
their friend, Jane Barber's, wed-
ding. The next day, they traveled to
Spearfish to be on hand for a 90th
birthday celebration for friend Lyle
Collins. They got to see a lot of old
friends at both activities, with a
chance to visit and get caught up
on everyone's news. This past week
has been quieter, which is not a
bad thing.
Mary Briggs stopped to visit with
Lil Briggs last Thursday on her
way home from Pierre. Warren
Briggs’ oldest son, Anthony, is
staying with Lil since his work has
ended at the ranch. He is working
at Red Rossa and will also be work-
ing as a lifeguard at the YMCA in
Pierre. Lee Briggs has been busy
with silage cutting, cattle work,
and all the other seasonal activi-
ties.
Duane Roseth went to Boyd
Waara's retirement party at the
Philip bank Friday. Saturday,
Duane and Lola's son, Thor, wife
Jackie, and and their baby son,
Royce, were afternoon and supper
guests at Duane and Lola's – I'll
bet grandpa and grandma enjoyed
that!
On a personal note, I want to say
congratulations to Boyd Waara on
his recent retirement from the
bank. We were fortunate enough to
have Boyd as our banker for many,
many years, and he remains a dear
friend. He served his customers
and community well, and he held
leadership roles in the state's bank-
ing industry. It is so important in
an agricultural community to have
a banker who thoroughly under-
stands the ag industry, and Boyd
knows agriculture and finance in-
side out. And besides that, he has
a lot of common sense, which is all
too often in short supply! His re-
tirement is well earned, and I wish
him and Jeanie only the best!
Marge Briggs has no news this
week, but she did have the weather
data for August, 2012: High tem-
perature was 108˚ on the 29th, four
days of 100˚ or above, 18 days of 90˚
or above, and 26 days of 80˚ or
above. The lowest maximum tem-
perature was 77˚ on the 16th. The
minimum temperature was 44˚ on
both the 16th and 17th.We had six
times of 50˚ or below during Au-
gust. The average high was 90˚, av-
erage low was 57˚, and the month's
average temperature was 73˚.
Precipitation for the month was
.63”. Normal is 1.85”, leaving us
1.2” below normal for the month.
The precipitation to date for the
year is 9.95”. Normal is 13.10”,
leaving us 3.15” below normal for
the year, which equates to 75.95%
of normal.
According to Marge, at the end of
August we had 19 days of 100˚ or
above for the year. And on Septem-
ber 10 when we visited, we were up
to 21 days of 100˚ or above. I'm hop-
ing that we won't have any more
100˚ plus days! Thanks to Marge
for compiling this data.
Our week here at the ranch has
been kind of a blur. Last Tuesday,
two sets of company left, and I just
had time to freshen the beds when
friends from the Missoula area ar-
rived to visit and spend the night.
They were headed on a three-week
tour of various historical sites in
the South and along the East
Coast. Wednesday, our nephew,
Justin Neuhauser, Watertown,
came to the ranch to work on a cou-
ple of pickups that weren't running
quite right. He is an excellent me-
chanic! (We selfishly keep encour-
aging him to move closer!) Wednes-
day afternoon, an elk hunter ar-
rived. Thursday afternoon, our son,
Scott, and friend Mike Hoy arrived
to help gather cattle. Mike had a
little incident with a four-wheeler,
so he headed back to Rapid City
Thursday evening, but Scott stayed
for the weekend. Friday, our elk
hunter left with his big elk, and our
nephew, Dylan Neuhauser, arrived
to help with weekend cattle work.
We weaned calves Friday and preg
tested Saturday (thanks, T.J.
Gabriel). Saturday, our daughter-
in-law, Corry, and grandkids
Marisa and Austin arrived to
spend the weekend. Austin was cel-
ebrating his third birthday, and
when his parents asked him what
he wanted to do to celebrate, he
said he wanted to go to grandpa
Randy's and ride in the tractor. So
that is what they did! And grand-
daughter Marisa spent a lot of time
spoiling the kittens. It was a great
weekend! More elk hunters arrived
Monday. It is just that time of year
at our house – no time to get bored,
that's for sure!
Today is September 11, and as I
write this, I am thinking about that
fateful day in 2001. It was such a
terrible tragedy – one that will not
be forgotten. On that day, and for
many days and weeks afterwards,
people from across the nation
stepped forward to help with the
disaster. And many people made
the decision to join the military and
serve our country to help keep us
safe and free. Today, I am grateful
to all those who stepped up and for
all those who continue to serve.
Today, I'll set aside a little time in
memory of those that lost their
lives and in sympathy for the
countless people who this tragedy
affects to this day. God bless them
all.
Clint, Laura, and Alivya Alle-
man decided to label their Labor
Day festivities as a "staycation"
since they didn't go very far. They
did take in local area activities and
people. Monday, Clint, Laura and
Alivya went to Dick and Gene Hud-
son's home for supper and visiting.
They had a good time, and Alivya
and Dick became great buddies.
They kept busy this week with
ranch and house activities. Laura
found time to can salsa, sauces,
and jam while keeping tabs on
Clint as he finds himself in the
fields now. Laura helped her folks,
Randy and Joy Yost, in Hayes. She
enjoys being so close to family!
Alivya is now a chatter box and
talks all the time, delighting every-
one as she discovers a new world of
communicating. Alivya was able to
spend time with both sets of grand-
parents this past week. Aunt Kelly
and cousin "Mo" Morgan watched
Alivya Saturday at the ranch as
Clint treated Laura to a movie, din-
ner, and amusing conversations.
Sunday, they spent time with the
Yosts for food, fun, and football. Ac-
cording to Laura (and I'm sure
Clint will agree), "Life is good."
I hope you will go out and make
this a wonderful week! Enjoy the
cooler temperatures!
Moenville News
by Leanne Neuhauser • 567-3325
procrastinator, putting off until to-
morrow, things you should be doing
today? Heed these words and take
action on something in your life
that you have been putting off and
begin to cultivate a new habit in
your life.
I encourage you to make a list of
all the projects that you have
started but not finished-all the “to
dos” that have been hanging over
your head, all those little things
that have become huge – and prior-
itize them. Face up to those things
you've been putting off and admit
that you have been procrastinating,
and then take action.
You'll see that the battle is al-
ready half won! And what benefits
you'll reap – less negative stress, a
feeling of being productive, a sense
of pride, savings of money, time, en-
ergy, and hassles, and probably an
overwhelming desire to tackle the
next item on your list. Remember
the battle cry: Take action now!
Take action now!
Several years ago, I remember
quite clearly that there was this lit-
tle thing left undone in my life.
Since it was such a little thing I ba-
sically let it go, and time passed.
Suddenly this issue surfaced again,
this time just a tad bit bigger of a
problem, and as before, I put it off.
Time passed.
A couple of months later, by the
time it reared its ugly head again,
it was a monster. It ended up cost-
ing me huge amounts of money and
an incredible amount of time. It
caused embarrassment and was a
very painful experience for me. It
also taught me something – a lesson
that has lasted me many years now.
(Sometimes I just have to learn les-
sons the hard way, I guess.) This
one I have learned well. Do not put
things off!
Today, my battle cry is “Take ac-
tion now!” Putting things off until
later is a bad habit that most of us
have fallen into at one time or an-
other. How about you? Are you a
Bob Prentice speaks to thousands of people in highly motivational
seminars each year. Call Bob for more details at 605-450-1955 and
be sure to check out Bob’s website at: www.mrattitudespeaks.com
by Representative
Kristi Noem
In South Dakota, we are big on
helping one another. If someone
runs out of gas or gets a flat tire, in
South Dakota, folks still stop to
lend a hand. In fact, that is one of
the things I love most about the
people in our state: their big
hearts.
I was able to see South Dakota
kindness on full display recently in
Rapid City during the annual
United Way Day of Caring. Over
1,200 volunteers came out to do-
nate their time and talents at over
80 work sites around the city. From
painting houses to mowing lawns
and visiting with local seniors, the
outpouring of love and spirit of
community was truly inspiring.
I felt blessed to be a part of it. I
was able to visit the Minneluzahan
Senior Center, where I met with
some older and wiser South
Dakotans. I also went to the Work-
ing Against Violence, Inc. domestic
violence shelter in Rapid City,
where Executive Director Mary
Corbine gave me a tour and told me
about the amazing work they’re
doing in the community.
The first “Day of Caring” was in
1999, and it’s wonderful to see how
much it has grown and to witness
the kind of impact a volunteer ef-
fort like this can have. But volun-
teering isn’t just limited to one-day
events. Countless South Dakotans
make giving their time a constant
commitment.
I was in Sioux Falls in August for
the eighth annual WomenUnite
event and was impressed by the
number of strong women who were
involved with volunteer-related ac-
tivities on a regular basis. Their
latest “Girls on Track” program is
targeted to girls in sixth through
eighth grade and is designed to
help them be strong, confident and
active young women.
When we volunteer, we’re not
just donating our time for a couple
hours, we’re improving communi-
ties, helping someone in need and
inspiring others to do the same. In
South Dakota, giving one another
a helping hand is second nature,
but I still encourage folks to seek
out opportunities in their commu-
nities to volunteer.
South Dakota’s helping hands
classlfleds · 869-2616
1hursday, 3eptember 13, 2012 · 1he Pioneer Review · Page 17
0IassItIed AdvertIsIng
CLASSIFIED RATE: $6.50 nininun for firsi 20 words; 10¢ ¡cr
word iIcrcaficr; includcd in iIc Píoncc¡ Hcuícu, tIc P¡o¡ít, ö TIc
Pcnníngton Co. Cou¡unt, as wcll as on our wclsiic.
www.¡ionccr-rcvicw.con.
CARD OF THANKS: Pocns, Triluics, Eic. . $6.00 nininun for
firsi 20 words; 10¢ ¡cr word iIcrcaficr. EacI nanc and
iniiial nusi lc counicd sc¡araicly. Includcd in iIc
Píoncc¡ Hcuícu and tIc P¡o¡ít.
BOLD FACE LOCALS: $8.00 nininun for firsi 20 words; 10¢
¡cr word iIcrcaficr. EacI nanc and iniiial nusi lc counicd sc¡-
araicly. Prinicd only in iIc Píoncc¡ Hcuícu.
NOTE: $2.00 addcd cIargc for loollcc¡ing and lilling on all
cIargcs.
DISPLAY AD RATE: $8.00 ¡cr colunn incI, includcd in iIc
Píoncc¡ Hcuícu and tIc P¡o¡ít. $5.55 ¡cr colunn incI for iIc
Píoncc¡ Hcuícu only.
PUBLISHER'S NOTICE: All rcal csiaic advcriiscd in iIis ncws¡a¡cr is suljcci io iIc Fcdcral Fair
Housing Aci of 1968, wIicI nalcs ii illcgal io advcriisc ºany ¡rcfcrcncc, or discrininaiion on
racc, color, rcligion, sc×, or naiional origin, or any inicniion io nalc any sucI ¡rcfcrcncc, liniia-
iion, or discrininaiion."
TIis ncws¡a¡cr will noi lnowingly accc¡i any advcriising for rcal csiaic wIicI is a violaiion of
iIc law. Our rcadcrs arc inforncd iIai all dwcllings advcriiscd in iIis ncws¡a¡cr arc availallc
on an cqual o¡¡oriuniiy lasis.
you ioday! (25 words for $150.
EacI addiiional word $5.} Call
iIis ncws¡a¡cr or 800-658-
3697 for dciails.
OTR & DRIVER OPPORTUNITY
$1500.00 SICN-ON DONUS!
EXP. OTF Drivcrs, TDI,
33¢/34¢, $375 no., IcaliI ins.,
crcdii, 03¢ safciy lonus, Call
Joc for dciails, 800.456.1024,
joc¸iliirucl. con.
¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯
AUTOMOTIVE
FOR SALE: 2002 Ford Fangcr
E×i. Cal 4×4, 110K nilcs, 4.0L
V-6, vcry good sIa¡c. Call 859-
2354 aficr 5 ¡.n. PF2-2ic
BUSINESS & SERVICES
ROUGH COUNTRY SPRAYING:
S¡ccializing in conirolling
Canada iIisilc on rangcland.
ATV a¡¡licaiion. ALSO. ¡rairic
dogs. Call Dill ai 669-2298.
PF41-23i¡
HILDEBRAND STEEL & CON-
CRETE: ALL iy¡cs of concrcic
worl. FicI, Collccn and Havcn
Hildclrand. Toll-frcc. 1-877-
867-4185; Officc. 837-2621;
FicI, ccll. 431-2226; Havcn,
ccll. 490-2926; Jcrry, ccll. 488-
0291. K36-ifn
TETON RIVER TRENCHING:
For all your rural waicr Iool-
u¡s, waicrlinc and ianl insialla-
iion and any lind of laclIoc
worl, call Jon Joncs, 843-2888,
Midland. PF20-52i¡
BACKHOE AND TRENCHING:
Pcicrs E×cavaiion, Inc. E×cava-
iion worl of all iy¡cs. Call Drcni
Pcicrs, 837-2945 or 381-5568
(ccll}. K3-ifn
GRAVEL: Scrccncd or rocl. Call
O'Conncll Consiruciion Inc.,
859-2020, PIili¡. P51-ifn
WEST RIVER EXCAVATION
will do all iy¡cs of ircncIing,
diicIing and dircciional loring
worl. Scc Craig, Diana, Saunicc
or Hcidi Collcr, Kadola, SD, or
call 837-2690. Craig ccll. 390-
8087, Saunicc ccll. 390-8604;
wrc׸gwic.nci K50-ifn
FARM & RANCH
TRAILER TIRES FOR SALE:
Cci rcady for fall Iauling! 12-
¡ly, 235/85/16F. $155
nounicd (liniicd quaniiiics
availallc}. Lcs' Dody SIo¡, 859-
2744, PIili¡. P40-ifn
FOR SALE: 4895 swaiIcr, 535
JD lalcr. Call (ccll} 488-0147.
P40-2i¡
FOR SALE: 250 acrcs of siand-
ing corn, io lc lalcd or cui for
silagc. Milcsvillc, SD. Call 859-
2943 or 685-5157. P36-ifn
GARAGE SALES
HUGE DOWNSI2ING YARD
SALE: Sc¡i. 14-15, 9an-5¡n,
201 Jaclson Avc., Murdo. (2} rc-
iiring icacIcrs' wardrolcs.
woncn's iall sz 10-14, ncn's
sIiris, XL-XXL, ncw Cricui na-
cIinc, Orccl car¡ci sIan¡oocr,
snall a¡¡lianccs, lois of falric,
lilc-ncw Scars cnlroidcry na-
cIinc and lois norc. P40-1i¡
RUMMAGE SALE: Sc¡i. 15, 9
a.n. io 2 ¡.n., 210 S. Auio,
PbIIIp, Carincr's sIo¡ casi of
Midwcsi Co-o¡. Daly cloiIcs,
girls 0-5T, grain & lalc noisiurc
icsicrs, llanlcis, nisc. liicIcn
iicns, sonc furniiurc, Ionc
dccor, nucI norc ly salc day.
P38-3ic
HELP WANTED
NEEDED: Young, sirong ¡crson
io Icl¡ nc wiiI sonc yard worl.
Call Virginia Woldcn, PIili¡,
859-2900. PF2-2ic
HELP WANTED: Full-iinc &
¡ari-iinc ai Focl 'N Foll Lancs,
PIili¡. Call 859-2430 for norc
infornaiion. P39-ifn
PART-TIME FALL HELP
WANTED ai iIc Wall Colf
Coursc. Call Sian ai 381-2861.
WP51-ifn
MISC. FOR SALE
FOR SALE: 10×12 iwo-siory
sioragc sIcd, insulaicd, wiiI
lcncI and sIclving, $1,900. Call
Jcrcny ai 685-4085. PF2-2ic
FOR SALE: Scvcral nicc uscd
rcfrigcraiors. Dcl's, I-90 E×ii 63,
Do× Elddcr. 390-9810. P38-4i¡
FOR SALE: Fo¡c Iorsc Ialicrs
wiiI 10' lcad ro¡c, $15 cacI.
Call 685-3317 or 837-2917.
K44-ifn
REAL ESTATE
2-BEDROOM HOUSE FOR
SALE IN WALL: Ncw siccl roof,
ncw car¡ci, frcsIly ¡ainicd,
fcnccd-in laclyard, wood siovc,
ccniral air and lois of sIadc!
Call 515-3496 for norc dciails.
PW39-2i¡
HOUSE FOR SALE IN PHILIP:
Malc an offcr! 2 lcdroons, 1
laiI, dining roon, a¡¡lianccs,
fcnccd lacl yard. 859-2483 or
859-3095 or lcavc ncssgc.
PF52-ifn
RENTALS
FOR RENT: 1 lcdroon a¡ari-
ncni in PIili¡, $275/noniI
¡lus dc¡osii. Call 391-3992.
PF45-ifn
APARTMENTS: S¡acious onc
lcdroon uniis, all uiiliiics in-
cludcd. Young or old. Nccd
rcnial assisiancc or noi, wc can
Iousc you. Jusi call 1-800-481-
6904 or sio¡ in iIc lolly and
¡icl u¡ an a¡¡licaiion. Caicway
A¡arincnis, Kadola. WP32-ifn
RECREATION
FOR SALE: 1997 Polaris ATV,
6×6, rcluili cnginc, ncw cIains
and s¡roclcis, wiiI ¡low and
wcncI, $4,700. Call Jcrcny
Noicloon, 685-4085. PF2-2ic
CLASSIFIED POLICY
PLEASE READ your classificd
ad iIc firsi wccl ii runs. If you
scc an crror, wc will gladly rc-
run your ad corrccily. Wc accc¡i
rcs¡onsililiiy Ior tbe IIrst In-
correct InsertIon onIy. Favcl-
lciic Pullicaiions, Inc. rcqucsis
all classificds and cards of
iIanls lc ¡aid for wIcn or-
dcrcd. A $2.00 lilling cIargc will
lc addcd if ad is noi ¡aid ai iIc
iinc iIc ordcr is ¡laccd. AII
pbone numbers are wItb an
area code oI 60S, unIess otber-
wIse IndIcated.
THANK YOUS
Vc uouíd ííIc to tIunI cuc¡¸-
onc uIo cunc to uísít Gíud¸s ín
tIc Ios¡ítuí. SIc o¡tcn s¡oIc o¡
¸ou¡ uísíts und t¡uí¸ u¡¡¡ccíutcd
¸ou tuIíng tIc tínc to uísít Ic¡.
TIc ¡uníí¸ cun`t Icgín to cx-
¡¡css to tIc PIííí¡ Ios¡ítuí und
nu¡síng Ionc stu¡¡ Iou nucI uc
uuíucd tIc cu¡c ¸ou guuc Gíud¸s
ouc¡ tIc ¡ust J2 nontIs.
Vc uouíd ííIc tIís connunít¸
to Inou ¸ou¡ condoícnccs Iuuc
gíucn us uíí con¡o¡t und soíucc
du¡íng tIís tínc. You¡ sto¡ícs
uIout Gíud¸s nudc us snííc und
íc¡t us uítI nun¸ no¡c Iu¡¡¸
ncno¡ícs.
To uíí tIc ncígIIo¡s und
¡¡ícnds uIo I¡ougIt ¡ood, uc
uunt ¸ou to Inou Iou Icí¡¡uí ít
uus. TIc cu¡ds und ¡Ionc cuíís
uc¡c uíso g¡cutí¸ u¡¡¡ccíutcd.
TIc ¡¡o¡cssíonuíísn o¡ HusI
Func¡uí Honc nudc tIís dí¡¡ícuít
tínc so nucI cusíc¡ ¡o¡ us.
TIunI ¸ou, cuc¡¸onc, ¡o¡ ¸ou¡
Iíndncss du¡íng tIís tínc.
HícI SnítI ö ¡uníí¸
TIunI ¸ou so uc¡¸ nucI to uíí
uIo nudc n¸ ¡ctí¡cncnt ccícI¡u-
tíon sucI u ncno¡uIíc cucnt. TIc
cu¡ds, ¡Ionc cuíís, Intc¡nct ncs-
sugcs und ¡c¡sonuí uísíts uííí
stu¸ uítI nc ¡o¡ u uc¡¸ íong tínc.
I Iuuc Iud tIc ¡¡íuíícgc o¡
uo¡Iíng uítI tIc Icst custonc¡s
und co-uo¡Ic¡s ín tIc uo¡íd. Du¡-
íng tIc ¡ust 4U ¸cu¡s, tIc¡c Iuuc
Iccn cxIííu¡utíng IígIs und
Icu¡tI¡cuIíng íous. TI¡ougI
cucI und cuc¡¸ onc n¸ ¡¡ícnds,
co-uo¡Ic¡s und custonc¡s Iuuc
sIoun ínc¡cdíIíc Iíndncss und
undc¡stundíng uIííc sIu¡íng
IotI n¸ ¡o¸s und n¸ so¡¡ous.
Fí¡st Nutíonuí HunI ín PIííí¡
Ius Iccn un cxcc¡tíonuí cn-
¡ío¸c¡. Its nunugcncnt und
Iou¡d o¡ dí¡ccto¡s t¡uí¸ cu¡c
uIout tIcí¡ ¡co¡íc, tIcí¡ cus-
tonc¡s und tIcí¡ connunít¸ und
tIut s¡í¡ít ¡c¡ncutcs tIc cntí¡c
stu¡¡.
I Iuuc ¡cccíucd nun¸ qucs-
tíons uIout uIut I (uc) u¡c goíng
to do nou. Ou¡ íntcntíons u¡c
¡¡ctt¸ sín¡íc. Vc íntcnd to cn¡o¸
tIís connunít¸ und tIc uondc¡-
¡uí ¡co¡íc ín ít us íong us uc ¡os-
síIí¸ cun. VIííc uc nu¸ tuIc u
t¡í¡ o¡ tuo nou und tIcn, tIís ís
ou¡ Ionc und uc Iuuc no dcsí¡c
to ícuuc ít.
Ho¸d Vuu¡u
¡ricc ¡aid, 24 Ir iurn around for
nail in. SD owncd lusincss.
Visii www.nidwcsigold-silvcr.
con for insiruciions or call 605
260 4653.
EMPLOYMENT
CITY ADMINISTFATOF - HAF-
FISDUFC,SD. DA Dcgrcc rc-
quircd; Salary u¡ io $80,000.00
- Jol Dcscri¡iion availallc ai
www.Iarrislurgsd. gov. Sulnii
rcsunc io coniaci ¸Iarris-
lurgsd.gov. Dcadlinc io a¡¡ly is
09/18/2012.
LEADEF PFINTINC IS LOOKINC
for a full-iinc ¡rcss o¡craior in
our wcl ¡riniing o¡craiion. E×-
¡cricnccd ¡rcfcrrcd lui willing
io irain iIc rigIi candidaic. A¡-
¡licaiions can lc scni io
randy¸lcadcr¡riniing.con.
NOW HIFINC. Full iinc nc-
cIanic and full iinc ¡aris nan-
agcr . Pollocl In¡lcncni,
Pollocl SD. Call Dalc or Dcnisc
ai 605-889-2435. Con¡ciiiivc
wagcs in good Iuniing/fisIing
arca.
FT PHYSICAL THEFAPIST and
FT FcIal Managcr. Fcs¡onsillc
for ircaiing in¡aiicnis, swing-
lcd and oui-¡aiicnis. Con¡cii-
iivc con¡cnsaiion, lcncfiis and
¡rofcssional growiI in a caring
worling cnvironncni. Avcra
Hand Couniy Mcnorial Hos¡i-
ial, Millcr, SD. 605.853.0300 or
www.AvcraJols.org.
MODFIDCE-POLLOCK SCHOOL
DISTFICT sccls Kindcrgaricn
icacIcr and full-iinc ¡ara¡ro-
fcssional. Qucsiions? Call 605-
845-9204. Scnd a¡¡licaiion io.
Tin Frcdcricl; 1107 1si Avc E;
Molridgc, SD 57601. EOE.
NOTICES
ADVEFTISE IN NEWSPAPEFS
siaicwidc for only $150.00. Pui
iIc SouiI Daloia Siaicwidc
Classificds Nciworl io worl for
Ihc Pionccr Pcvicw
Busincss & ProIcssionol DirccIory
K0NA|| f. MANN, ||8
FamiIy Dentistry
Monday - Tuesday - Thurs. - Friday
8:00 to 12:00 & 1:00 to 5:00
859-2491 · Philip, SD
104 Philip Ave. · South of Philip Chiropractic
HILDEBRAND READY-MIX
PLANTS IN PHILIP & KADOKA
Qualiiy Air-Eniraincd Concrcic
CaII toII-Iree 1-SSS-S39-2621
RIcbard HIIdebrand
S3?-2621 - Kadoka, SD
Rent Thio Spuce
S7.25/ueek
3 month min.
AGRICULTUREJFARMING
TILLACE FADISH? COVEF
CFOPS? Planiing in iIc fall?
Savc your io¡soil and rciain nu-
iricnis ly ¡laniing covcr cro¡s
now. Call Calcl Svarioicn wiiI
qucsiions 1-(800}-488-0605.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
SAVE A TFEE ly SAYINC NO! To
SD Dc¡arincni of Trans¡oria-
iion Co io
wwww.saynoiosddoi.con.
AUCTIONS
LAND AUCTION. 5,055+/-
Acrcs, Sianlcy Couniy, Cro¡-
land, CFP and Crassland, 11
nilcs noriI of Haycs, SD, Ocio-
lcr 3rd , 2012. Call Daloia
Pro¡criics, Todd ScIucizlc, Auc-
iionccr, 605-280-3115,
www.DaloiaPro¡criics.con.
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY
CONTFACT SALESPEFSONS
scll acrial ¡Ioiogra¡Iy of farns,
connission lasis, $7,000-
$10,000/noniI. Provcn ¡roduci
and carnings, Travcl rcquircd.
Morc info ai ns¡Ioiosd.con or
call 605-882-3566.
BUYING GOLDJSILVER
CONVEFT YOUF COLD, SIL-
VEF, ¡laiinun inio casI. To¡
PBILIP B00Y SB0P
·Complete Auto Body Repairing
·Glass Ìnstallation ·Painting ·Sandblasting
ToII-Free: 1-800-900-2339
Pee Wee & Toby Hook
859-2337 · PhiIip, SD
Pioneer Review
CIassifieds
$6.50/week
. up to 20 words;
10¢ per word there-
after. FiII out the
form beIow & maiI
your cIassified and
payment to:
The Profit
PO Box 788
PhiIip, SD 57567
1) ________________
2) ________________
3) ________________
4) ________________
5) ________________
6) ________________
7) ________________
8) ________________
9) ________________
10) _______________
11) _______________
12) _______________
13) _______________
14) _______________
15) _______________
16) _______________
17) _______________
18) _______________
19) _______________
20) _______________
__________________
__________________
__________________
__________________
__________________
__________________

CONCRITI CONSTRLCTION
Sgq-¿1oo · Philip, SÐ
Ior ull yoor concrete
constroction needs:
Pioneer Review Ad DeadIine:
Tuesdays at 11:00 a.m.
****
CaII 859-2516
ads@pioneer-review.com
ALL types!

Backhoe
Trenching
Directional
Boring
Tire Tanks
Located in
Kadoka, SD
Home: (605) 837-2945
Cell: (605) 381-5568
Excavation work of
APARTMENTS AVAILABLE!
PHILIP PLAZA:
2 Bedrooms Available
RIVERVIEW APARTMENTS:
2 Bedrooms Available
(washer/dryer hook-ups)
Apartments carpeted throughout,
appliances furnished,
laundry facilities available.
For app||cal|or
& |rlorral|or:
PR0/Rerla|
Varagererl
1113 3rerrar 3l.
3lurg|s, 30 5ZZ85
ê05-31Z-30ZZ or
1-800-211-282ê
WWW.prorerla|
raragererl.cor
WWW.lreererlers
gu|de.cor

Get your septic tank
pumped before winter!
Also certified to inspect tanks.
CaII Marty Gartner
today!
685-3218 or 859-2621
PhiIip
(2) Gcnt!c, Wc!!-Brnkc
Gc!dIngs
Tn bc sn!d In PhI!Ip, 5D
nn 5aturday, 5cpt. 22nd
at thc Bad RIvcr
Extravaganza Hnrsc 5a!c
TraIncd & RaIscd by
DanIc!!c PIrnutck
´|´tc rcdc |ncsc ncrscs
a|ncs| ctcrq daq. Tncq arc
safc and gcn||c, and natc occn
uscd a |c| cn ca|||c. |´tc cuncd
|ncn sincc |ncq ucrc oaoics.¨
(605) 515-1953
If you`ro IookIng fo buy or soII, fho
CInssIfIods hnvo ovoryfhIng you
nood. So, gof fho scooµ nnd chock
ouf fho CInssIfIods for yoursoIf.
IhIIIµ, SÐ
859-25l6
J0e J-ej|t d J|eaee- mee|ea
View &
download
online
prodoction
sale catalogs
at:
www.
rpipromotions.
com
CNLINE
NCW:
Pbilip Livestock's
Fall Extravaganza
Horse Sale
¨ ¨ ¨ ¨
Berry Rancb
Horse Sale
Thursday, September 13, 2012 • The Pioneer Review •Page 18
www.
Ravellette
Publications.
com
WEBSITE ADDRESS:
www.phiIipIivestock.com
EmaiI: info@phiIipIivestock.com
TO CONSIGN CATTLE OR HAVE A REPRESENTATIVE LOOK AT YOUR CATTLE, GIVE US A CALL:
THOR ROSETH, Owner
(605} 685.5826
BILLY MARKWED, FIeIdman
Midland · (605} 567.3385
JEFF LONG, FIeIdmanJAuctIoneer
Fcd Owl · (605} 985.5486
Ccll. (605} 515.0186
LYNN WEISHAAR, AuctIoneer
Fcva · (605} 866.4670
DAN PIROUTEK, AuctIoneer
Milcsvillc · (605} 544.3316
STEVEN STEWART
Yard Foreman
(605} 441.1984
BOB ANDERSON, FIeIdman
Siurgis · (605} 347.0151
BAXTER ANDERS, FIeIdman
Wasia · (605} 685.4862
PHILIP LIVESTOCK AUCTION
(60S) SS9:2S??
www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com
lkllll ll\läIê|K 1||IlêK
lkllll, äê|Ik 01KêI1
Upoom1ng Co111e So1es:
TUESDAY, SEPT. 1S: SPECIAL STOCK COW &
DFED HEIFEF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE.
WEIGH-UPS: 10 A.M. BRED CATTLE: 12 P.M. (MT}.
EAFLY CONSICNMENTS.
BRED HEIFERS:
MARK & KARLA WELDON - 100 DLK HOME FAISED DFED
HFFS; DFED. LDW DLK ANC; CLV. 2-15 FOF 45 DAYS
STOCK COWS:
TOM WILLIAMS - ºCOMPLETE DISPERSION" - 80 DLK 2 TO 7
YEAF OLD COWS; DFED. DLK; CLV. 3-10
MATT REEDY - ºCOMPLETE DISPERSION" - 65 DLK & DWF
4 YF OLD TO DFK MOUTH COWS; DFED. DLK; CLV. 3-20 FOF 45
DAYS
GUY CASTEEL - 50 DLK 4 YF OLD TO SOLID MOUTH COWS;
DFED. DLK; CLV. 3-22
LYNN DENKE - 40 DLK & DWF SOLID TO DFK MOUTH COWS;
DFED. DLK; CLV. 4-5 FOF 55 DAYS
OBIE BRUNSKILL - 35 DLK DFK MOUTH COWS; DFED. DLK;
CLV. 3-15 FOF 60 DAYS
TUESDAY, NOV. 6: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE & FECULAF
CATTLE SALE
WEDNESDAY, NOV. ?: WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 13: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE & FECU-
LAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 20: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE
& FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, NOV. 2?: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE & FECU-
LAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 4: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS PFECONDITIONED CALF
SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE. CALVES FOF THIS SALE, MUST DE
WEANED, AT LEAST 6 WEEKS, & HAVE PFECONDITIONINC SHOTS
(FOUF-WAY, PASTEUFELLA, 7-WAY, & HAEMOPHILUS}.
TUESDAY, DEC. 11: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF SALE
& FECULAF CATTLE SALE & WELLEF ANCUS ANNUAL DULL & FE-
MALE SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 1S: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE & FECU-
LAF CATTLE SALE & THOMAS FANCH FALL DULL SALE
TUESDAY, DEC. 2S: NO SALE
2DJ2 Horse So1es:
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 22: DAD FIVEF FALL EX-
TFAVACANZA HOFSE SALE. CO TO WWW.PHILIP LIVE-
STOCK.COM TO VIEW CATALOC OF CALL PLA AT 605-
859-2577.
SHAWN FREELAND - 25 DLK DFK MOUTH COWS; DFED. DLK;
CLV.
CASEY SAMMONS - 25 FED & A FEW DLK DFK MOUTH
COWS; DFED. DLK; CLV. 3-3 FOF 57 DAYS
TERRY GUNN - 14 DLK DFK MOUTH COWS; DFED. DLK; CLV.
4-1
MOR£ CONS1GNM£NTS BY SAL£ DAY. CALL THOR ROS£TH AT
tDS-SS9-2S?? OR tDS-tSS-SS2t FOR MOR£ 1NFORMAT1ON.
TUESDAY, SEPT. 2S: SPECIAL FEEDEF CATTLE, ALL-DFEEDS
CALF SALE & FECULAF CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. 2: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE & FECULAF
CATTLE SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. 9: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 10: SPECIAL STOCK COW & DFED HEIFEF
SALE & WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. 16: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 1?: WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. 23: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 24: WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
TUESDAY, OCT. 30: SPECIAL ALL-DFEEDS CALF SALE
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 31: WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
SATURDAY, NOV. 3: SPECIAL STOCK COW AND DFED HEIFEF
SALE & WEICH-UP COW, DULL & HFFT. SALE
VIEW SALES LIVE ON THE INTERNET! Go to: www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com. UpcomIng saIes & consIgnments can be
vIewed on tbe Internet at www.pbIIIpIIvestock.com, or on tbe DTN: CIIck on SALE BARNS NORTH CENTRAL
PLA |s now qua||f|ed to hand|e th|rd party ver|f|ed
NhT6 catt|e (Non-hormona| Treated 6att|e}.
Reep suppor11ng R-CALF USA! R-CALF USA 1s
our vo1oe 1n governmen1 1o represen1 U.S.
oo111e produoers 1n 1rode morKe11ng 1ssues.
]o1n 1odog & Þe1p moKe o d1]]erenoe!
PhiIip Livestock Auction, in conjunction with
Superior Livestock Auction, wiII be offering
video saIe as an additionaI service to our consignors,
with questions about the video pIease caII,
Jerry Roseth at 605:685:5820.
859-2577
PhiIip, SD
CATTL£ R£PORT - TU£SDAY, S£PT. JJ, 2DJ2
A b1g run o] o11 o1osses o] oo111e. Reo1 b1g
oroud o] bugers. MorKe1 verg oggress1ve! We
1ooK ]or 1Þ1s oo1] morKe1 1o ge1 s1ronger, espe-
o1o11g 1] ue oon ooo1 o]] ond see some ro1n. Cou
morKe1 s1eodg s1rong.
YEARLINGS:
PETERSON RANCH - PHILIP
61 .........................DLK & DWF STFS 842=........$145.75
11........................CHAF & DLK STFS 751=........$149.75
60 .........................DLK & DWF STFS 836=........$145.75
JOHN & DEDE LONG - UNION CENTER
143 ...............DLK & DWF SPAY HFFS 748=........$142.85
FAIRBANKS RANCH - WHITE RIVER
62 .........................DLK & DWF STFS 891=........$139.75
PASS CREEK RANCH - KADOKA
45....................................FED STFS 800=........$146.00
69........................CHAF & FED STFS 896=........$139.25
39................CHAF & FED SPAY HFFS 824=........$135.50
DAVE COLBURN - FAIRBURN
78............................DLK SPAY HFFS 685=........$146.75
85............................DLK SPAY HFFS 638=........$146.75
47 ...............FWF & HEFF SPAY HFFS 647=........$144.25
GORDON AMIOTTE - WANBLEE
13....................................DLK STFS 771=........$148.50
LANDERS LIVESTOCK - HOT SPRINGS
53 .................DLK & DWF SPAY HFFS 807=........$136.25
134 ...............DLK & DWF SPAY HFFS 906=........$131.50
JIM SMITH - OWANKA
16 .........................DLK & DWF STFS 645=........$154.00
32.................DLK & DWF OPEN HFFS 576=........$149.75
ROSETH BROTHERS - MIDLAND
78..................FED & DLK SPAY HFFS 686=........$144.75
33..........................FED & DLK STFS 722=........$142.00
PETERSON RANCH - PHILIP
59.................DLK & DWF OPEN HFFS 766=........$139.50
MIKE & ANITA HEATHERSHAW - QUINN
26...........................DLK OPEN HFFS 728=........$143.25
STEVE CLEMENTS - PHILIP
32...........................DLK OPEN HFFS 768=........$142.00
RAYMOND LONGBRAKE - HOWES
15...........................DLK OPEN HFFS 747=........$142.00
HEATH FREEMAN - OWANKA
13...........................DLK OPEN HFFS 772=........$141.75
GARY WILLIAMS - WALL
21.................DLK & DWF OPEN HFFS 752=........$141.75
JIM WHITCHER - SCENIC
12...........................DLK OPEN HFFS 767=........$140.25
ED BRIGGS - MIDLAND
17.................FED & DLK OPEN HFFS 786=........$138.75
NICHOLS CASPERS - NEW UNDERWOOD
24...........................DLK OPEN HFFS 805=........$137.25
LYNN DENKE - CREIGHTON
7.............................DLK OPEN HFFS 787=........$137.25
DELORIS POSS - PHILIP
16...........................DLK OPEN HFFS 824=........$136.50
JERAMY WARD - MARTIN
15...........................DLK OPEN HFFS 839=........$136.25
FOLAND RANCH - MIDLAND
43.................DLK & DWF OPEN HFFS 840=........$136.00
JERRY & AUSTIN GRIMES - KADOKA
14...........................FED OPEN HFFS 819=........$135.75
13...........................FED OPEN HFFS 842=........$135.25
JIM & LUISA TINES - NEW UNDERWOOD
21...........................DLK OPEN HFFS 854=........$135.25
CUNY RANCH - BUFFALO GAP
37...........................DLK OPEN HFFS 851=........$135.25
IRWIN FERGUSON - KADOKA
19..................................HEFF STFS 958=........$134.50
PAUL & DEBRA DELBRIDGE - HOWES
13.................DLK & DWF OPEN HFFS 885=........$134.25
MCDANIEL BROTHERS - PHILIP
47...........................DLK OPEN HFFS 874=........$134.00
LANCE FREI - RED OWL
8.............................DLK OPEN HFFS 847=........$134.00
TOM GODDARD - PRAIRIE CITY
22...........................DLK OPEN HFFS 878=........$132.75
14...........................DLK OPEN HFFS 741=........$143.50
SHAW RANCH INC - WHITE OWL
18...........................DLK OPEN HFFS 908=........$132.50
TODD TRASK - WASTA
18...........................DLK OPEN HFFS 920=........$132.00
TODD GODDARD - PRAIRIE CITY
11...........................DLK OPEN HFFS 923=........$131.25
FLOYD GABRIEL ESTATE - CREIGHTON
30.................DLK & DWF OPEN HFFS 946=........$130.00
LARRY & JEFF GABRIEL - QUINN
32.................DLK & DWF OPEN HFFS 878=........$132.25
JT MOON - CREIGHTON
25.................DLK & DWF OPEN HFFS 919=........$130.75
GABE GROPPER - LONG VALLEY
19......................X DFED OPEN HFFS 906=........$129.75
CLEM HANDCOCK - LONG VALLEY
9 ..................DLK & DWF OPEN HFFS 1049=......$123.25
MERLE HICKS - MARTIN
13.................FED & DLK OPEN HFFS 1009=......$129.00
DARRELL STEFFES - VALE
6.............................DLK OPEN HFFS 981=........$128.25
JEFF NELSON - PHILIP
11...........................DLK OPEN HFFS 903=........$128.00
MARK WILLIAMS - KADOKA
8.................CHAF & FED OPEN HFFS 986=........$127.00
ROBERT R. YOUNG SR. - UNION CENTER
6...................FED & DLK OPEN HFFS 975=........$126.00
JOAN JENKINS - HERMOSA
11 ................DLK, FED & CHAF STFS 654=........$148.50
13................DLK, FED & CHAF HFFS 586=........$144.50
SPRING CALVES:
SEVEN BLACKFOOT RANCH - MILESVILLE
121..................................DLK STFS 447=........$183.00
50....................................DLK STFS 360=........$201.00
68 ...................................DLK HFFS 372=........$174.00
DAVID & JUSTIN MARLER - PIEDMONT
33....................................DLK STFS 459=........$182.00
7......................................DLK STFS 336=........$202.00
10 ...................................DLK HFFS 319=........$181.00
KELLY RIGGINS - PHILIP
96....................................DLK STFS 445=........$180.00
95 ...................................DLK HFFS 428=........$180.00
RISSE HALF BOX V RANCH - MARTIN
51 ...................................DLK HFFS 413=........$176.00
HENRY HANSON - PHILIP
29.........................FWF & DWF STFS 391=........$186.00
38..................................HEFF STFS 355=........$180.00
30...................................DWF HFFS 353=........$170.00
CHRIS MCFARLAND - RAPID CITY
84 ...................................DWF STFS 494=........$175.00
13 ...................................DWF STFS 377=........$190.00
102 ......................FWF & DWF HFFS 449=........$165.50
18...................................DWF HFFS 376=........$164.00
OBIE BRUNSKILL - PHILIP
29 .........................DLK & DWF STFS 507=........$170.00
24.........................DLK & DWF HFFS 486=........$160.00
23.........................DLK & DWF HFFS 491=........$147.50
SILVER RIDGE TARANTAISE (CARL NOVOTNY)-MARTIN
67....................................FED STFS 551=........$157.75
67...................................FED HFFS 531=........$144.00
19...................................FED HFFS 430=........$158.50
LARRY DEGEEST - NEW UNDERWOOD
7......................................DLK STFS 499=........$166.00
ALTON THOMPSON - MARCUS
8....................................CHAF STFS 371=........$178.00
6 ..................DLK, FED & CHAF STFS 327=........$200.00
10................DLK, FED & CHAF HFFS 320=........$164.00
WEIGH-UPS:
MARC SCARBOROUGH - HAYES
1.................................X DFED COW 1565=........$88.00
2 ........................CHAF & FED COWS 1420=........$84.00
4 ..........................FED & DLK COWS 1436=........$83.75
1 ......................................DLK COW 1310=........$81.50
DIAMOND S RANCH LLC - UNION CENTER
1......................................DLK DULL 1925=......$104.50
1......................................DLK DULL 1930=......$102.50
1 .....................................FED DULL 1925=........$99.00
1......................................DLK DULL 2010=........$98.50
BILL SLOVEK - PHILIP
1 ......................................DLK COW 1415=........$86.00
BILL SHORB - HERMOSA
1......................................DWF COW 1580=........$84.50
1 ......................................DLK COW 1295=........$82.00
1......................................DWF COW 1465=........$80.00
SEVEN BALCKFOOT RANCH - BILLINGS, MT
1......................................DLK DULL 1805=......$103.00
1......................................DLK DULL 1845=........$96.00
1......................................DLK DULL 1920=........$95.50
DAN OLDENBERG - PHILIP
1 ......................................DLK COW 1415=........$84.50
FLOYD GABRIEL EST - CREIGHTON
1 ......................................DLK COW 1230=........$83.00
RICHARD KIEFFER - STURGIS
1 .....................................FED DULL 1895=......$100.00
MATT VANDERMAY - LONG VALLEY
3.....................................DLK COWS 1512=........$82.50
DANNY FINN - MIDLAND
6..........................FED & FWF COWS 1478=........$82.50
3 ....................................FED COWS 1318=........$82.00
3 ....................................FED COWS 1215=........$81.50
6 ....................................FED COWS 1479=........$81.00
SCHULTES RANCH LLC - HOWES
9.....................................DLK COWS 1449=........$82.50
JUDY & STEVE DALY - MIDLAND
1 ......................................DLK COW 1430=........$82.50
1................................DLK COWETTE 935=........$102.00
MIKE NELSON - PHILIP
1 ......................................DLK COW 1495=........$82.00
PAUL & DEBRA DELBRIDGE - HOWES
1 ......................................DLK COW 1485=........$81.50
TRAVIS DEJONG - PHILIP
1 ......................................DLK COW 1515=........$81.00
1 ....................................CHAF COW 1445=........$79.50
1......................................DWF COW 1440=........$76.00
RAPID CREEK RANCH - BELVIDERE
1 .....................................FED DULL 2345=........$95.50
PAUL RICHTER - NEW UNDERWOOD
1......................................DLK DULL 2165=........$95.00
CHUCK & TOBY KROETCH - PHILIP
2..........................DLK & DWF COWS 1538=........$79.50
1......................................DWF COW 1485=........$78.00
ank you, McDaniel Brothers & Bill
Gottsleben for donating two lambs for the
roll-over auction with all the proceeds to go
to Philip Volunteer Fire Department.
ank you to the following donaters: PLA,
Karl Schulz, Jerry Roseth, Duane Roseth, Ju-
lian Roseth, Larry Smith, Mark Williams,
Foland Ranch, Mike Noteboom, Richard Job-
gen, Hostutler Ranch, Je Nelson, Kelly Rig-
gins, Seven Blackfoot Ranch, Mark Johnson,
Bill Weller, Clint Jensen, Dale Christensen,
Rodney Sharp, & Billy Markwed.
Total proceeds: $2,940.00
Lunch Specials:
Monday-Friday
11:00 to 1:30
Call for
specials!
Regular Menu
Available Nightly!
* * *
Friday Buffet
5:00 to 8:00 p.m.
Downtown Philip
Reservations:
859-2774
~ Saturday, Sept. 15 ~
Prime Rib
~ Monday, Sept. 17 ~
Prime Rib Sandwich
The Steakhouse & Lounge
Open Daily ~ Monday thru Saturday
S
a
la
d
B
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r
A
v
a
ila
b
le
a
t
L
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n
c
h
!
~ Tuesday, Sept. 11 ~
Petite Ribeye
~ Wednesday, Sept. 12 ~
Indian Taco or
Taco Salad
~ Thursday, Sept. 13 ~
Beef Tip Basket
~ Friday Buffet, Sept. 14 ~
Seasoned Steak
Chicken ~ Shrimp
Good luck, Scotties, during Homecoming!
S.D. Highway Patrol combines two squads
The Badlands Squad and the
Southern Hills Squad of the South
Dakota Highway Patrol have been
combined. Still under their own
names, they will be led by one ser-
geant, and many of their combined
meetings will be held in Rapid
City.
The state’s highway patrol is di-
vided into three districts. District I
covers the northeastern part of the
state, and is based out of Aberdeen.
District II covers the southeastern
part of the state, and is based out
of Sioux Falls. District III, based
out of Rapid City, covers all of
western South Dakota except for
Lyman, Tripp and Gregory coun-
ties.
Captain Kevin Karley, com-
mander for District III, said, “We
seem to have a problem keeping a
supervisor in the Badlands squad.
What we have is a revolving door
for supervisors.” The main reason
is that the past few supervisors
have wanted to live closer to Rapid
City.
Randi Erickson, now a highway
patrol training coordinator in
Pierre, had lived in Rapid City for
about a year while heading the
Badlands Squad. Karley said “With
new technology, we can work from
almost anywhere.” But heading a
squad from that far away did cre-
ate a lot of “windshield time.” The
Badlands Squad consists of six
troopers; one trooper living in
Philip, two in Wall, two in Kadoka
and one in Murdo. “And I don’t
foresee us changing that anytime
in the near future,” said Karley.
Kevin Kinney, now a highway
patrol statewide crash reconstruc-
tion supervisor, used to head the
Southern Hills Squad. That squad
consists of four troopers, two living
in Hot Springs and two living in
Custer.
The sergeant position that heads
both squads is currently vacant,
and has been since July 24. The de-
partment is preparing to put up the
position for promotion statewide.
“We have not filled the vacant po-
sition yet because we decided to
hold a promotional assessment cen-
ter and update our qualified candi-
date list prior to making another
promotion,” stated Karley.
The car lot on the southwest corner of Highway 73 and Pine Street has been leveled, and covered with chip seal. Craig
Burns, parts manager for Philip Motor, said that having the parking lot resurfaced now was a timing thing. The chip sealing
company was to already be in the Philip area for other jobs. The crew started mid-morning and was done before that evening.
Photo by Del Bartels
Philip Motor Inc. chip sealing car lot
Dakota Rural Action, in collabo-
ration with local farmers, is host-
ing the fourth year of Farm Begin-
nings classes starting in November
in Sioux Falls.
The class helps participants to
learn first hand about low cost, sus-
tainable methods of farming and
the tools to successfully launch a
profitable farm enterprise. Applica-
tions are due September 28. Class
size is limited and scholarships are
available. Course information and
the online application can be found
at www.dakotarural.org/farmbe-
ginnings or by contacting Dakota
Rural Action at (605) 697-5204 or
heidiku@dakotarural.org.
Farm Beginnings classes are
held twice a month from November
to March. Students take part in
sessions such as whole farm plan-
ning, financial planning, market-
ing, business planning, connecting
with resources, and connecting
with mentors. On farm education is
offered in the spring and summer
months through a variety of farm
tours and skills sessions. The
course includes for students to fur-
ther their skills by participating in
mentorships/apprenticeships with
local farmers.
Course graduates are engaged in
a variety of enterprises, including
livestock, grains, vegetable and
fruit production, dairy, specialty
products, and community sup-
ported agriculture. Participants
can be of any age, do not need to
own land, and include prospective,
beginning, part-time or full-time
farmers.
Farm Beginnings® is an estab-
lished curriculum developed over a
decade ago and is replicated in sev-
eral different states, including
Minnesota, Illinois, Nebraska,
North Dakota and New York.
Dakota Rural Action has adapted
the curriculum to meet the needs of
regional farmers. The project is
supported by the Beginning
Farmer and Rancher Development
Program of the National Institute
of Food and Agriculture, USDA,
grant #2010-03066.
Dakota Rural Action is a grass-
roots family agriculture and con-
servation group that organizes
South Dakotans to protect family
farmers and ranchers, natural re-
sources and this unique way of life.
Farm Beginnings
class deadline
September 28
The South Dakota Department
of Transportation requests the co-
operation of all farmers and ranch-
ers in removing processed hay from
the highway right of way.
State regulations require that
hay be removed from the right of
way within 30 days of being
processed, but no later than Octo-
ber 1.
Removing hay bales from the
highway right of way is an impor-
tant safety consideration for mo-
torists. The bales or stacks can be
a safety hazard for vehicles forced
to leave the road and, in some
cases, can restrict a driver’s sight
distance. Hay left in the road
ditches late in the year can also
cause snowdrifts across the high-
way.
For more information, contact
Jason Humphrey at 605-773-3571.
Remove hay
from highway
right of way
www.RavellettePublications.com

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