1

How the degree
measures up stateside
FALL 2012 SPECIAL ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO THE NEW YORK OBSERVER
Stanford, MIT,
UPenn battle for
top-notch techies
College professionals
on the debacle
of student debt
Decoding
continuing
education
Interesting
campus
jobs
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hofstra.edu
prideandpurpose
At Hofstra, you’re at the center of everything.
So you can learn more. Think more. Be more.
More than 140 degree programs. Hundreds of
clubs and activities. A well-connected alumni network.
And easy 30-minute access to all the jobs,
internships and entertainment New York City
has to offer. All on a suburban Long Island campus
so beautiful, it’s a registered arboretum.
If you’re ready to do more with your education,
Hofstra University is ready for you.
Find out more @ hofstra.edu/observer
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321WEST44THSTREET, NEWYORK, NY10036
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New York’s
Best Public
Campus Art
The Globalization
of the MBA
Howthe degree
measures up stateside
THE EDUCATED OBSERVER
FALL 2012
Stanford, MIT,
UPennbattlefor
top-notchtechies
Collegeprofessionals
on thedebacle
of student debt
Decoding
continuing
education
Interesting
campus
jobs
ON THE COVER
A view of Pratt's
beautiful Brooklyn
campus in the autumn.
PHOTOGRAPHER
Josh Gerritsen
Publisher JARED KUSHNER
President CHRISTOPHER BARNES
Executive V.P. BARRY LEWIS
Senior V.P., JAMIE
Associate Publisher FORREST
Editorial Manager MICHAEL WOODSMALL
Senior Marketing Manager ZARAH BURSTEIN
Controller MARK POMERANTZ

EDITOR
BENJAMIN-ÉMILE
LE HAY
ART DIRECTOR
LAUREN DRAPER
WRITERS
CHLOE ASHBY
JESSICA BENHAMOU
YAEL BURLA
KELLY FAIRCLOTH
MARINA GERNER
NATALIE GLASER
JACK MCILROY
SAMANTHA NORMAN
MELISSA WILEY
COPY EDITOR
LESA ANDREASEN
PHOTOGRAPHY
MELISSA WILEY
PUBLISHER
BARBARA GINSBURG
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ACCOUNT
EXECUTIVE
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COORDINATION
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& CREATIVE
DIRECTOR
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ADVERTISING
PRODUCTION
LISA MEDCHILL
New York’s population has already begun to swell as students return
to school for the fall semester courses. They bring a new vibrancy to
the city that is not only intellectual, but also cultural. In this issue
we explore some of the current trends and relevant issues that aect
our community’s students and institutions of higher education.
First o, Yael Burla discusses the value of an MBA and the degree’s
popular development here and abroad. Then Jessica Benhamou (with
reporting from Natalie Glaser) investigates the world of continuing
education; what the options are and how they are expanding with
technology. Kelly Faircloth for Observer’s Beta Beat wrote a telling
article on which Ivy League schools are attracting top-notch
technology and innovation students. The front-runners may or may
not surprise you. Melissa Wiley takes us on a tour of some of the most
impressive installations of public artwork on New York City campuses.
On page 22, you’ll find our seasonal calendar of campus events,
festivals and performances that are open to the public. Autumn 2012
is jam-packed with artistic and academic collegiate activities for all.
Samantha Norman rounds out our book with an article on a group of
students who have taken on non-traditional campus jobs, many of
which are directly preparing them for their respective careers. Also in
this edition is a fascinating dialogue with two college faculty members
on the state of student debt and loans, in Marina Gerner’s “A Whole
Lotta Debt.” We hope you enjoy.
Cheers to a phenomenal fall!
Benjamin-Émile Le Hay
FALL 2012
A SPECIAL ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT
TO THE NEW YORK OBSERVER
3
Global MBA | How the MBA
market is trending today.
6
Continuing Education |
What programs are out there
and where they can take you.
11
Beta Beat Report | Which universities are attracting
the top technies.
14
Campus Art | Public collections that will
blow your mind.
22
Calendar | Where to get your collegiate
culture and academic fix.
25
Student Debt | Our experts dish on the good,
the bad and the ugly..
31
Jobs on Campus | Today's students have limitless
options when it comes to school jobs.
Note From the Editor
11
14
6
Table of Contents
EO_Fall2012_Mast/TOC/EL.indd 3 9/6/12 7:06:58 PM
Biotechnology
Business
Classics
Psychology
Sustainability Analytics
“ I’ve found a program where I can invent what I want to study, and have
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demand for innovation coming from my generation. e Postbaccalaureate
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program that would suit the person I want to be.”

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Untitled-44 1 9/5/12 5:03:04 PM
FALL 2012 3
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By Yael Buria
n our rapidly changing
world, students are con-
sistently trying to distin-
guish themselves from
their peers to achieve a com-
petitive advantage. A common
way of doing so is by continuing
one’s education in order to apply
certified degrees to more com-
petent jobs.
One of the most popular and
sought-after graduate degrees
in today’s economy is a Master
of Business Administration.
Access MBA, a campaign that
focuses on helping prospective
MBA students identify oppor-
tunities and obtain information
on business schools globally,
recently conducted a four-year
long data collection lasting
from January 2009 to May 2012.
The study allowed Access MBA
to analyze, among other infor-
mation regarding the process,
where their candidates chose to
pursue their education. Access
MBA allows business schools
to optimize their recruitment
process through promotion
and marketing of their brand.
As an advent group for eight
years, Access MBA has hosted
over 300 events in 60 countries
and is constantly adding busi-
ness educational programs to
its list of participating schools.
The study provides valuable in-
formation on developments of
the graduate degree. According
to the data during this period,
43% of the total 60,243 can-
didates wanted to get their
MBA in the US and 36% of them
opted for a Full-Time program.
This demand is directly in-
fluenced by the quality and
prestige of education systems
available in the country. The
data also ranks New York as the
city with the highest global de-
mand for US business schools,
leading with 79%, closely fol-
lowed by Beijing with 73% and
Sao Paulo with 63%. American
MBAs continue to attract most
students in China and Latin
America.
That being said, new edu-
cation markets for acquiring
MBAs are emerging in the
East. Part-time programs spe-
cifically are best in the Middle
East given their culture where
family-based companies are
conventional. This area of the
world predominantly expects
younger family members to re-
place existing positions held by
their fathers. A part-time MBA
program can be more appro-
priate and applicable to such
candidates.
This option is also more af-
fordable. A candidate’s budget
highly determines the location
choice for pursuing an MBA or
any other graduate degree and
can in many cases prohibit ob-
taining such degrees altogether.
The still increasing salaries
that part-time MBA programs
offer as incentives allows can-
didates with tighter budgets to
pursue this form of education.
One of Access MBA’s participat-
ing schools, Hult International
Business School, offers a unique
12-month intensive MBA de-
gree program which reduces
costs and time away from work
while increasing returns on in-
vestment more quickly. Hult is
ranked one of the No. 1 business
schools in international experi-
ence due to its global rotation
feature; having five locations
across the globe (Boston, Dubai,
London, San Francisco and
Shanghai) allows candidates to
rotate to up to two additional
campuses within the year while
completing the same academ-
ic program. This opportunity
gives Hult exceptional global
brand awareness. Access MBA
produced results confirming
that the MBA has been an ever-
increasing investment over the
past three years and that an in-
creasing number of candidates
from all over the globe prefer to
invest more in a branded MBA.
So what exactly is a “branded”
graduate educational program?
A recent article in the British
national daily newspaper, The
‘The perceptions
of the American
Dream in terms
of success after
graduation strong-
ly influences the
young generation
around the world.’
Christophe Coutat,
Access MBA
THE MBA IN
THE GLOBAL
MARKET
How the attractive graduate
degree is trending today
Continued on Page 4
I
Kellogg
School at
Northwestern
University.
EO_Fall2012_MBAglobal.indd 3 9/6/12 7:08:09 PM
4 FALL 2012
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Guardian, reported that the
U.S. is “the country with the
most reputable universities in
the world.” This notion applies
to both the graduate and un-
dergraduate schools in the U.S.
14 out of the top 20 universi-
ties in the world are located in
the US, according to The Time’s
higher education reputation
list. The article also noted a
drop in ranking of some of the
United Kingdom’s leading uni-
versities since last year, while
China is “expanding its higher
education system faster than
most other countries in the
world.” The reputation owned
by universities seems to have a
monumental focus for prospec-
tive students, even with tuition
fees escalating and competition
for admissions and future jobs
soaring. The brands that top
U.S. graduate education seem
to be marketed very well, given
their educational prestige and
consistent rankings, yet it is
always something graduate
schools can improve on.
Perhaps age of applicants is
another factor that determines
location choice. A few years
of work experience before en-
tering graduate school has
been proven to be beneficial
to applying classroom con-
cepts to real world situations.
Generally, European graduate
schools ask for such experience
more than American ones do.
Most MBA programs require
it regardless of their location,
which can certainly influence
a candidate’s application pro-
cess. In our Western minds,
people feel rushed to complete
their education as quick as pos-
sible with many students not
really knowing why they are
getting graduate degrees in the
first place. Work experience al-
lows people to really reflect on
their choice to pursue graduate
school – and to pursue it for the
right reasons.
Another factor in deciding on
which graduate school to apply
to is the definition of diversity.
At an Access MBA press confer-
ence in New York this past June,
a panel discussion of the grad-
uate school admissions process
across nations was opened. Two
of the four admissions directors,
Sharon Castonguay, Director of
Graduate Career Management
Center at Baruch College
and Nani Attar, Admissions
Director and MBA alumna of
IESE Business School, differed
in views towards what consti-
tutes an attractive and diverse
applicant. Ms. Castonguay’s
definition of diversity, the
most sought-after applicants,
is the underrepresented minor-
ity groups in the world, such as
women, black Americans, and
Latin Americans. The definition
of diversity in Europe, accord-
ing to Ms. Attar, revolves more
around a nationality difference
in that generally foreign appli-
cants are more attractive. Ms.
Attar expressed her will to go
back to the U.S. because of the
prevalence of gender equal-
ity there. “It is very behind
in feeling equal in the work
place; Europe may have some
qualities such as a longer ma-
ternity leave, but certainly
has less equality professional-
ly,” she said. Naturally, where
a candidate chooses to pursue
their MBA has a high correla-
tion with where they want their
next job to be located.
Education progresses at dif-
ferent rates around the world.
One country’s strongest asset is
another’s weakest. Some parts of
the world today, such as Eastern
Europe, are still having a tough
time entering the education
global market, namely due to the
intimidation of the competition
and the numerous visa issues
upon entering certain coun-
tries and studying in them. The
U.S. continues to compete the
best globally in terms of acquir-
ing a graduate degree. Access
MBA’s Founder and General
Director, Christophe Coutat, be-
lieves that “the perceptions of
the American Dream in terms
of success after graduation
strongly influences the young
generation around the world,”
which allows U.S. schools to se-
lect the best talent. According
to the Institute of International
Education in 2011, the number
of international students in the
U.S. increased to a record high
of 723,277 students, a 32% in-
crease from the previous year,
while the United Kingdom only
had a 6% increase from the pre-
vious year.
It is often the case, however,
that candidates are misinformed
of the opportunities outside
of the country. For one, educa-
tion is significantly cheaper in
Europe. Many prospective stu-
dents also believe their foreign
degrees will go unrecognized.
Further marketing the brand
of international graduate pro-
grams and their qualities should
immediately put them at a com-
petitive advantage with those in
the U.S. l
Harvard, UPenn
and Stanford all
have excellent
MBA programs.
Continued from Page 3
EO_Fall2012_MBAglobal.indd 4 9/6/12 7:08:43 PM
WHERE WE STAND
STUDYING DIVERSE PATIENT POPULATIONS
HELPS STUDENTS PRODUCE TOP USMLE
STEP 1 FIRST-TIME PASS RATES
TESTING WELL AND KNOWING
THE WORLD EVEN BETTER
WILL MAKE YOU STAND OUT
US/Canada: 1 (800) 899-6337 ext. 9 1280
sgu.edu/Iuture-students º sguenrolment@sgu.edu
©
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6 FALL 2012
By Jessica Benhamou
e all know that there
has been a surge
in the number of
people enrolling in
continuing education. Both re-
cent graduates and employees
working full-time are applying
for Masters and professional
qualifications, in order to elbow
their way up the corporate lad-
der, to boost their chances of
landing a first job with a lead-
ing organization, or simply to
change career path.
These programs promise to
provide a gateway to dream
jobs, but is this really the case?
A survey in 2007, conduct-
ed by the Higher Education
Careers Service Unit (Hecsu),
indicated that there might
be a point to forking out the
big ones to reap the rewards
later. The survey found lower
rates of unemployment among
postgraduates (4.2%) than un-
dergraduates (6.2%) six months
after graduating.
While this difference in un-
employment may seem trifling,
postgraduates can expect to
earn much more too. Research
by the Association of Graduate
Recruiters has suggested that,
among employers who paid a
premium to attract graduates,
a significant proportion of-
fered on average around $7,000
extra to graduates with an MA
or MSc. The National Center for
Educational Statistics similarly
illustrates that continuing ed-
ucation can guarantee a more
generous paycheck, although
there is a vast discrepancy be-
tween the sexes.
For 25-34 year olds who are
working full-time, a woman with
a Masters earns no more than
a man with only a Bachelors’
Degree. In 2010, men and women
with a Masters earned $64, 200
and $49,800 respectively, while
men and women with only a
Bachelor’s degree could expect
to earn $49,800 and $40,000.
However, Bethan McKernan,
studying at Columbia’s School
of Journalism, recently discov-
ered the importance of having a
vocational qualification. Despite
having just graduated from
Oxford University with a BA in
English Literature, she was un-
able to find an entry-level job at
a leading broadsheet newspaper
in England.
“I didn’t want to go to
J-School when I left Oxford; I
wanted a job,” she told us. “I
edited Cherwell, where I had
very grown up encounters with
the financial and legal aspects
of journalism. I’d interned in
newsrooms at The Times and
the BBC… I resented having to
Continued on Page 8
HOPING FOR A FUTURE
Continuing education is firmly on the rise.
What fueling this higher-learning alternative?
W
Students are seeking new
educational methods to
edge out sti competition
in the work place.
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Fall is Just Around the Corner... Are You Heading in the Right Direction?
After the long, hot, lazy days of summer, fall is the time to look forward, to progress, and to move ahead. The NYU School of
Continuing and Professional Studies is dedicated to helping you to do just that. With more than 2,300 noncredit courses and a
broad array of professional certificates, we provide you with the tools to experiment, explore, and excel. This fall, strike out in a
new direction, choose the path less taken, plot your course for success. Enroll today at NYU-SCPS.
Online registration is quick and easy:
scps.nyu.edu/x566 or call 212-998-7150
New York University is an affrmative action/equal opportunity institution. ©2012 New York University School of Continuing and Professional Studies.
There’s Still Time to Register for Fall
Choose from professionally oriented programs in:
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Career and Life Planning
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Hospitality, Tourism, and Sports Management
Liberal Studies and Allied Arts
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Humanities and Performing Arts
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Job Number: a00122
Product: Fall CE General (Last Chance)
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Color/Space: P4C
Pub/Issue Date: New York Observer 9/12/12
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Proof #: 2
NYU-SCPS Office of Strategic Marketing and Communications
Untitled-36 1 9/5/12 3:00:25 PM
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find the money for another year
of education to do something I
thought I already knew how to
do.”
Ms. McKernan quickly
realized the benefits of study-
ing at this leading school in
journalism.
“I realized how vital it is
that young journalists are
properly prepared to enter the
working world… The course
is high octane and incredibly
thorough—the chance to be
taught, supervised and edited
by someone like Sheila Coronel
is an opportunity I doubt I’ll
come across again for a long
time. J-School is still a means to
an end but I can’t imagine a bet-
ter way of becoming the kind of
journalist I want to be.”
Columbia offers 13 profes-
sional master’s degrees and
post-baccalaureate classes in
over 50 subjects. Adults wish-
ing to expand or update their
career skills have always at-
tended evening classes at
schools in New York City, but
now, continuing education is
becoming increasingly popular
for working professionals.
“About a third [of our stu-
dents] are working journalists
and about a third are career-
changers,” explained Joanna
Hernandez, Director of Career
Services at CUNY. “The average
age of students is 27. The range
in ages is from 21 to 53.” These
programs do seem to boost one’s
career prospects, but perhaps
primarily thanks to the place-
ments the students can obtain
throughout the course, rather
than the course content itself.
“Most of the students do find
work in journalism,” added Ms.
Hernandez. “For example, for
the Class of 2011, more than 87
percent are earning their living
through journalism. Some have
full-time jobs, others are work-
ing a couple of part-time gigs,
and some are making their liv-
ing as freelancers.”
In response to an increasing
demand for professional quali-
fications, New York University
created a series of digital certi-
fication programs six years ago,
which allow students to spe-
cialize in programs like Digital
Media Marketing, SAS Data
Mining for Marketers, Web
Design and Digital Photography.
Tom Glaser, a student at NYU,
took a web analytics course at
NYU and enjoyed it so much that
he decided to take four more
courses to get certified with
NYU’s Digital Media Marketing
Certificate Program.
“The program gave me an
excellent foundation in digi-
tal marketing and I was able to
put a lot of what I learned into
practice at work,” Mr. Glaser de-
clared. Following this program,
he decided to change his career,
which is common among con-
tinuing education students.
To cater to professionals, con-
tinuing education has evolved
in recent years. Schools recog-
nize the need to offer flexible
scheduling solutions, including
distance learning and evening/
weekend classes. Some schools
offer three or five-day “inten-
sives,” which cram 24 or 40
hours of teaching into less than
a week’s time.
Online learning is also a blos-
soming business. For instance,
160,000 people registered for
an online artificial intelli-
gence course at Stanford last
year. On July 11, 2012, Sree
Sreenivasan was appointed to
be the first Chief Digital Officer
at Columbia University. “There
is so much noise about online
learning in higher education,
but there is really no need for
panic. It’s like 1996 right now—
before Google or Wikipedia,”
Sreenivasan explained. “The
conventions haven’t been set
yet. Columbia has been doing
its job very well for 250 years.
This next step must be thought-
ful and strategic.” l
‘The program gave me an excellent
foundation in digital marketing
and I was able to put a lot of what
I learned into practice at work.’
Tom Glaser, student at NYU
getting certified in
Digital Media Marketing
Continued from Page 6
Many continuing education
programs now oer distance learning
and evening/weekend classes.
EO_Fall2012_ContEd.indd 8 9/6/12 7:12:00 PM
FOR MORE INFO:
sps.cuny.edu/observer  212.652.CUNY
information@sps.cuny.edu
THE EDUCATION
YOU NEED
FOR THE LIFE
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Untitled-14 1 9/4/12 4:54:23 PM
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Untitled-16 1 9/5/12 9:37:15 AM
FALL 2012 11
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By Kelly Faircloth
as previously published
online for BetaBeat
n a clear November
day, the hard-working
students of Harvard
College took a collec-
tive study break and poured onto
the walkway in front of Lamont
Library. Undergrads, an inordi-
nate number of them sporting
hoodies, pressed their bodies
against a set of temporary bar-
ricades, their smartphones and
cameras held aloft, eyes intent
on a grinning visitor making his
way from one of the Yard’s gates
to a mic stand that had been set
up smack in the middle of the
walkway.
The excitement wasn’t for
Jason Segel, who would be se-
lected as the Hasty Pudding’s
Man of the Year in February,
nor for Andy Samberg, who’d
be tapped to give the Class
Day Speech later that year, but a
former classmate—a “concen-
trator” in computer science and
psychology—who eight years
ago had been just like them, a
hard-working kid with amazing
grades and questionable social
skills, well on his way to a com-
fortable future.
As Mark Zuckerberg paused
to answer questions, the giddi-
ness was almost enough to make
everyone forget that, like Bill
Gates before him, the Facebook
founder had dropped out of
Harvard well before receiving his
sheepskin.
Six months later, the day be-
fore Facebook’s IPO, Stanford
law fellow Brian Love published
an op-ed in the Boston Globe,
pointing out that Harvard had a
decent legal claim to a cut of the
$16 billion jackpot. After all, Mr.
Zuckerberg and his cofounders
built the site “while enrolled in
Harvard, working in a Harvard
dormitory, and using Harvard’s
computer network,” he wrote.
It’s impossible to say how
much Harvard could have added
to its already massive endow-
ment had the university pressed
the issue. But one point of com-
parison might be helpful: When
Stanford eventually sold its
shares in Google; the transac-
tion netted the school a cool $336
million. That would go a long way
toward re-energizing develop-
ment on that applied sciences
campus in Allston.
Still, given the millions being
minted by enterprising gradu-
ates of Stanford, the University
of Pennsylvania, and other insti-
tutions of higher learning, and
the spotty track record of the
nation’s most prestigious uni-
versity in the emerging realm of
tech-fuelled entrepreneurship,
potential students might be for-
given for wondering if a Harvard
education is still the best path to
success in the digital age.
A poster on the Q&A site
Quora recently inquired, “How
does a star engineering high
school senior choose among
MIT, Caltech, Stanford and
Harvard?” One reply compared
the various colleges to houses
at Harry Potter’s alma mater,
Hogwarts. Guess which school
got tarred with the villainous
name of Slytherin? The respon-
dent concluded: “Harvard is
known for social climbing and
an atmosphere where interac-
tions are perpetually shaded
with professional networking.”
Meanwhile, Harvard’s
neighbor in Kendall Square,
MIT–where the term “hacking”
was born to describe a clever
solution to a technical problem–
attracts the kind of student who
will turn a building facade into
a game of Tetris, just for giggles,
then go on to found a prom-
ising company like Dropbox.
Here in the five boroughs, two
Empire State bastions are tak-
Continued on Page 12
HARVARD GETS SCHOOLED
AS TECHIES FLOCK TO STANFORD, MIT
AND EVEN PENN, CRIMSON GOES GREEN WITH ENVY
O
Harvard
students wait
to see Mark
Zuckerberg,
who was
recruiting
students
for jobs and
internships.
EO_Fall2012_Harvard.indd 11 9/6/12 7:12:49 PM
12 FALL 2012
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H
ing advantage of Bloomberg’s
attempted great leap forward
to expand their innovative hold-
ings. Cornell is partnering with
Israel’s Technion Institute of
Technology to build a starchi-
tect-designed school of applied
sciences on sleepy Roosevelt
Island, while NYU is converting
the MTA’s old Brooklyn head-
quarters into a second tech city
campus.
Meanwhile, Stanford, the
“Harvard of the West,” recent-
ly received a 7,000-plus-word
article in The New Yorker for its
role in the Silicon Valley talent
pipeline.
Stanford gave birth to both
Yahoo and Google, provid-
ed Instagram founder Kevin
Systrom with the connections he’d
need to launch his photo sharing
application and, more impor-
tantly, sell it for a cool billion
dollars, and currently provides
a home base for alumnus and
PayPal Mafioso Peter Thiel to
hold forth on entrepreneurialism
(even as he offers “fellowships”
for students willing to drop out
and try building something
of their own). Would-be tech
moguls can gather at BASES,
the Business Association for
Stanford Entrepreneurial
Students, where they can attend
weekly lectures from luminar-
ies like LinkedIn founder Reid
Hoffman and VC Brad Feld. They
wrap up the year with four si-
multaneous funding competitions,
jockeying for $150,000 in prize
money.
The University of
Pennsylvania as a strong alumni
network in New York’s budding
tech scene, including Thrillist
CEO Ben Lerer, Local Response
CEO Nihal Mehta, and the entire
Warby Parker founding team.
Brett Topche, who is a princi-
pal at MentorTech Ventures, a
VC devoted wholly to startups
emerging from the university,
said Penn’s pitch to prospective
students is simple: “We’re not
just going to prepare you to go
get a vice president title at some
giant corporation—we’re going
to teach you how to create some-
thing from scratch.”
Even the humble University
of Washington is getting in the
game, recently dubbed “a north-
west pipeline to Silicon Valley”
in a flattering New York Times
write-up.
This is not to say that the
Crimson is in any immediate
danger of becoming an also-
ran. The university still sits
comfortably atop the upper ech-
elon of the world’s colleges, and
every year it sends 1,600 or so
graduates off to top-tier profes-
sional schools, prestigious jobs
at investment banks and con-
sultancies, tenure-track Ph.D.
programs and, for those naive
enough to have majored in
Folklore and Mythology, maybe
even a reporting job at the New
York Observer.
Then again, those jobs are
not what they once were.
Freshly minted lawyers are
practically making a federal
case about their grim employ-
ment prospects these days.
With storied firms like Dewey
and Leboeuf imploding, even
a degree from a well-ranked
law school is no guarantee of
a make-it-rain corporate law
salary. It’s still remotely pos-
sible for a gifted academic to
find a cushy tenure track—pro-
vided they don’t mind living in
Doha and they’ve got a certain
dramatic flair. Meanwhile,
the 2012 presidential election
is shaping up to be an alumni
circular firing squad of Bain
Capital versus the Harvard
Law Review. And dare we even
mention “Why I Am Leaving
Goldman Sachs”?
The characteristics that are
viewed as most critical to suc-
cess in the startup world happen
to be some of the very ones
that Harvard has for centu-
ries viewed as the kiss of death
for eager applicants. Harvard
students are, by and large, a
population of people who’ve
never been described as “dis-
ruptive” .Anyone willing even
to entertain the idea of failure—
a badge of honor on the startup
scene—might want to refrain
from mentioning it in his or her
admissions essay.
Of course, being out of step
with the times is not always a
bad thing and Harvard can usu-
ally afford to take the long view.
Founded in 1636, this august
institution predates the dif-
ferential calculus that makes
computing possible, the piano,
and the Enlightenment itself.
The leveling effect of the
Internet has only just begun
to lap at the steps of Widener
Library. Coding is about com-
petence, not pedigree. A
sufficiently motivated teenager
can build the next online jugger-
naut with little more than a Code
Academy account, a MacBook,
and a liter of Mountain Dew.
And the recent explosion in on-
line learning will only hasten
the trend, threatening the rel-
evance not only of Harvard,
but of formal education itself.
(Perhaps that’s why Harvard re-
cently partnered with MIT to
launch an online learning initiative
dubbed EdX.)
Harvard remains a leader in
biotech and other capital-inten-
sive fields and it has numerous
patents to show for its efforts.
A consumer Internet startup
doesn’t need the support of a re-
search institution; all it needs
is some server space. While
some universities have tried to
assert their claim to startups
created on campus (University
of Missouri being a prominent
example), there’s really no way
to shoehorn consumer Internet
innovation into a traditional re-
search university model.
That’s one likely reason
Harvard didn’t angle for a
cut of Facebook: the school’s
technical contribution was rela-
tively minor. “Students, in fact,
are perfectly capable of writing
code in their dorm rooms,” said
Brian Love, a Stanford Law fel-
low who’s written on the subject
of university patents, and they’re
“at the vanguard of what’s going
on in the high-tech world.” So a
couple of undergraduates can
team up and create something
valuable “without faculty men-
torship and without funding—at
least, direct funding—from the
university.”
That said, Harvard University
is not run by a bunch of dummies.
The institution’s leadership is
not about to sit back with its col-
lective nose in a Loeb Classical
Library tome while Stanford,
UPenn, and NYU vie for the
prestige, the superstars and the
future donations that it once
took for granted.
Instead, the university is un-
leashing a campus-wide push to
spruce up entrepreneurial of-
ferings and lend more support
to would-be innovators. Hence
Harvard is known for social
climbing and an atmosphere where
interactions are perpetually shaded
with professional networking.
Continued from Page 11
Ben Lerer founder
of Thrillist.
Mark Zuckerberg, founder
of Facebook.
Kevin Systrom, co-founder
of Instagram.
EO_Fall2012_Harvard.indd 12 9/6/12 7:13:32 PM
FALL 2012 13

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the creation of the Innovation
Lab (known on campus as the
I-Lab), a new home for would-be
entrepreneurs. Students contem-
plating the notion of starting up
can attend workshops on topics
like user-interface design, while
those who’ve reached the idea
development stage can schedule
office hours with entrepreneurs-
in-residence. Once they’ve got
a workable idea, they can claim
their own corner to work in, like
a study carrel but bigger.
With its open floorplan, enor-
mous windows, and bright
yellow walls, I-Lab—a $25 mil-
lion redo of the former WGBH
studios—is clearly based on
someone’s untested assump-
tions of what inspires young
people to productivity. Ideas are
scrawled across whiteboards;
tables are equipped with wheels;
power cords drop from the ceil-
ing. There’s also a kitchen
stuffed with free food and con-
soles for after-hours gaming.
In 2011, the school an-
nounced something called
the Experiment Fund, a ven-
ture capital fund based at the
School of Engineering and
Applied Sciences, which will
make seed-stage investments
in companies with some con-
nection to Cambridge. Eager to
avoid any conflicts of interest,
Harvard has no financial stake
in the fund. Rather, SEAS of-
fers access to faculty advisors
and, once renovations are com-
plete, will provide partner Hugo
Van Vuuren with an office. So
Harvard isn’t likely to make any
money out of this deal, though
the somewhat intangible ben-
efits to its reputation will likely
prove useful.
Mr. Van Vuuren (class of ’07)
was quick to point out that the X
Fund will serve Boston’s entire
Red Line corridor, which also
includes MIT and Tufts. But he
was effusive in his praise for the
university as a partner and he
expressed complete faith in the
school’s ability to change with
the times. “A university does
not remain the top university in
the world for 375 years without
adapting,” he said.
The question is whether a
real cultural shift can take root
with sufficient speed in such
staid soil. Harvard hasn’t been
a startup in centuries. Nor is the
school particularly famous for
its population of engineers and
entrepreneurs. Tuan Ho, whom
The Observer found working in
the I-Lab when we visited a cou-
ple of months ago, graduated in
2009 and is now the cofounder
of Tivli, a digital TV startup aim-
ing to disrupt the cable business.
When he was an undergradu-
ate, Mr. Ho explained, Mark
Zuckerberg was “like, the one
guy who did a startup—in spite
of Harvard.”
Yet the student body seems
ready to force the issue if they
must. Harvard’s introductory
computer science course, CS-50,
is bursting at the seams. That
growth is due partly to the ag-
gressive evangelical efforts of
instructor David Malan, said
teaching fellow Lexi Ross, but
she also name-checked both
The Social Network and the near
billion-dollar Instagram acqui-
sition as having had an effect.
“You didn’t have to be a com-
puter science person to know
what was going on,” she said.
Peter Boyce, a founding mem-
ber of Hack Harvard, has also seen
a shift. Mr. Boyce started out on
the “Goldman quant” track, but
found himself seduced after a
summer at Skillshare, a New
York-based startup that aims
to be a kind of Airbnb for those
with in-demand skills. “It’s a
more popular option,” he said of
the startup track. “I still don’t
think it’s, you know, the most
popular option.”
To some, the problem is best
viewed in economic terms. Even
with the troubles on Wall Street,
there’s still not much real incen-
tive for students to venture out
onto any entrepreneurial limbs.
“The opportunity cost for
them to become entrepreneurs
is much higher than the grads
of regular schools,” said entre-
preneur and academic Vivek
Wadhwa. MIT, on the other hand,
“has a huge advantage in being
an engineering school—so grads
leave with excellent technical
knowledge and mentors. Their
likelihood of success is higher
and opportunity cost lower.”
Moreover, the entrepreneur-
ial career path takes emotional
resilience and openness to the
humiliating public faceplant.
“It’s a very different world now,”
said Mr. Topche, one where stu-
dents can choose to create their
own job instead of pursuing one
at a multi-billion-dollar cor-
poration. But that requires a
different skill set, he noted, “and
the schools that figure out how
to prepare students with that
very different skill set, I think,
will have a very big advantage in
the coming decades.” l
EO_Fall2012_Harvard.indd 13 9/6/12 7:13:49 PM
14 FALL 2012
David Henderson's
Skylark can be seen
on Pratt's campus.
EO_Fall2012_CampusArt.indd 14 9/6/12 7:20:58 PM
FALL 2012 15
By Melissa Wiley
Conversations with John
Hatfield, Executive Director of
Queens’ Socrates Sculpture Park
and David Weinrib, Curator of
Pratt Institute’s Sculpture Park
in Brooklyn.
rt is a fluid con-
cept,” admitted John
Hatfield, Executive
Director of Queens’
Socrates Sculpture Park. From
architecture that serves no
utilitarian purpose to works de-
signed with a specific purpose
in mind, what sculptures and
public art do is influence the
way passersby perceive the built
environment
“The most successful and in-
teresting public art engages an
audience on a slightly different
level than you might typically
experience … in a museum or in
a gallery context,” Mr. Hatfield
said. “So it’s always present and
it’s there whether you’re pay-
ing attention to it or not. It can
be the subtext of things that are
going on.”
The accessibility of public
art, he continued, is critical to
how public works are under-
stood. “People kind of gravitate
here because their expectations
are different,” he said of the
sculpture park. “They are pro-
voked into curiosity—what is
this? What is this about?—in a
way that museums and galler-
ies can’t because you’re making
a very conscious decision when
you go to those places. You are
a cultural consumer when you
actively choose [to view art] or
spend money.”
Curator of Pratt Institute’s
Sculpture Park David Weinrib
acknowledged that the 50 or
so pieces he installs in the park
each year on loan from various
artists serve to bring “the ex-
perience of art into the public
purview.”
The sculptures currently in
Socrates Sculpture Park as part
of “Civic Action” work to set
up social situations and to in-
spire interaction. Students of
Brooklyn’s Pratt Institute often
find seated respite in a few of the
sculptures dotting the universi-
ty’s 25-acre campus.
“When we have artworks
that are meant to be engaging
to the public in an almost phys-
ical way, there’s an entry point
into what art is about,” Mr.
Hatfield said. “It can be an en-
tirely visual experience, but it
can also be a spacial one and an
interactive one.”
Placement almost always
contributes to the visual, spa-
cial or interactive experience
of a sculpture. “A piece can be
site-specific, designed around
a particular location,” Mr.
Weinrib said. “Other times it can
exist independently of its site,
but almost every single artist
considers where the work is in
relationship to (the]landscape.”
Perhaps the most powerful ef-
fect of public art is its ability to
shape the identity of a place be
that New York City or a college
campus and, at times, to create a
sense of oasis within a space.
“New York City is extremely
supportive of public art,” Mr.
Hatfield explained. “It contrib-
utes to the identity, say, of New
York City as being the cultural
capital of the world. I know that
sounds like hyperbole—but it’s
not when you see the wealth of
things that can be experienced
through art. You have some of
the greatest museums in the
world, we have an enormous
gallery system, the artist com-
munity that lives and works
here is a powerful engine, so
the public art works in concert
with that in the most public way
– in other words, it’s the most
visible way.”
Students at Pratt tend to no-
tice if a sculpture is removed
and will occasionally be upset
at the removal of a piece that,
known or unknown them, be-
came a part of their daily
backdrop—a testament to the
subconscious and powerful ef-
OUT IN
PUBLIC
New York City campuses’ outdoor art
Continued on Page 16

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16 FALL 2012
fect of the installations.
“People are walking by
things all the time, you know
hundreds of hundreds of people
are seeing public art and it con-
tributes to a feeling that this is a
very vibrant, creative environ-
ment. You go to cities that don’t
participate, don’t have public
art – it’s a different feeling.
“I find that the controversy
and the debate that are gener-
ated through public art – good
and bad – are still extremely
productive because it actual-
ly proves the point about how
art is powerful. If it elicits such
a strong reaction, it means
that work is functioning,” Mr.
Hatfield said.
Pratt’s Sculpture Park, said
Mr. Weinrib, is a reflection of
the energy of the school “where
people produce things all the
time in different departments.”
Seven years ago, when Mr.
Weinrib installed the park’s
first pieces, a student said
to him: “Now [Pratt] looks
like an art school.” While the
sculptures installed do not
specifically represent Pratt’s
identity as an institution, Mr.
Weinrib cited the sculptures’
different styles and points of
view as reflecting the varied
activities across campus.
As public art makes visible
the creative energy of NYC,
so does campus art make vis-
ible the creative energy of a
university.
The park thrives and contin-
ues to receive funding from the
school not only for enriching the
students’ daily campus expe-
riences, but also for providing
“an oasis for the Brooklyn com-
munity and the general public,”
Mr. Weinrib said.
The sculptures ask viewers
to continuously reconsider,and
to make sense of disparate
surroundings. “I liken the
Sculpture Park to a symphony.
Our challenge is to bring all of
the parts in harmony,” he said.
Here Educated Observer
presents a hand-picked assort-
ment of public art on display
(temporarily or permanently)
at some of our city’s college
campuses.
COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY
(Sculpture details supplied by
Columbia Law School)
REVSON PLAZA:
BELLEROPHON TAMING
PEGASUS: Jazques Lipchitz,
1966-77
This statue, located at the
west entrance of Jerome Green
Hall on Columbia Law School’s
Revson Plaza, is close to five sto-
ries high, roughly 23 tons and
one of New York City’s largest
sculptures. Depicted is Greek
hero Bellerophon fighting
winged horse Pegasus in a dem-
onstration of the dominance of
man over nature. The energy of
the sculpture comes as a con-
trast to Jerome Hall’s vertical
beams, while the statue’s myth-
ological elements complement
the neo-classical architecture
of Philosophy Hall across the
Plaza.
FLIGHT: Gertrude Schneider,
1979
“Flight” is an 8-foot, stain-
less steel triangle, anchored
Columbia's "Life Force" by David Bakalar.
‘The most successful and interesting
public art engages an audience on
a slightly dierent level than you
might typically experience …in a
museum or in a gallery context.’
John Hatfield, Executive Director of
Queens’ Socrates Sculpture Park
Continued on Page 18
Continued from Page 15
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EO_Fall2012_CampusArt.indd 16 9/6/12 7:21:47 PM
FOR PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT
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Untitled-44 1 9/5/12 5:05:40 PM
18 FALL 2012
at an angle in a patch of grass
in Revson Plaza. Its two sides
reflect the sky and surround-
ing buildings, as the textured
surfaces slightly distort the im-
ages. Originally titled “Abstract
Sculpture,” it has since assumed
the name “Flight.” Matte edges
remind viewers of the sculp-
ture’s boundaries.
THREE-WAY PIECE:
Henry Moore, 1964
“The Three-Way Piece” by
Henry Moore rests on three feet
and, with no clear beginning or
end, encourages viewers to cir-
cumnavigate the structure and
consider their location from dif-
ferent vantage points. Located at
the North end of the plaza, it in-
spires in viewers consciousness
of their elevated position on a
bridge connecting two Columbia
buildings above Amsterdam
Avenue. The round surfaces par-
allel the walls of St. Paul’s Chapel
while contradicting, in conjunc-
tion with “Bellerophon Taming
Pegasus,” the vertical beams of
Jerome Hall. Due to weathering,
a green patina has developed on
the sculpture and pedestal. It is
the first of Revson’s four bronze
sculptures and was a gift of the
Miriam and Ira D. Wallach (Class
of 1931) Foundation.
LIFE FORCE: David Bakalar,
1988/1992
“Life Force,” similar to “Three
Points,” is intended to inspire
interaction. It was positioned
to have viewers look through a
conical portal, the “eye” of the
sculpture, towards long views
of Amsterdam Avenue, fac-
ing Midtown to the South and
Washington Heights to the
North. According to the sculptor,
the piece represents “the birth
force, the death force, the com-
petitive force, and the nurturing
force.” Donated anonymously, it
honors Ruth Goldman Schapiro
from the Class of 1950.
TIGHTROPE WALKER:
Kees Verkade, 1973-79
This abstract sculpture was
created in memoriam to General
William J. Donovan, Class of
1907. It depicts one figure on the
shoulder of another, walking a
tightrope, the length of which is
left to the viewer’s imagination.
Before creating the sculpture,
Verkade watched films about
the war hero’s life and inter-
viewed people close to him. Mr.
Donovan, known as “Wild Bill”
Donovan, is considered the fa-
ther of the modern American
intelligence service. In World
War One, he headed New York’s
Fighting 69
th
Regiment and re-
ceived the Congressional Medal
of Honor. He received a grand
total of four of the nation’s high-
est honors by the end of his life.
Of Mr. Donovan’s many quali-
ties, Verkade chose to portray
his courage and “controlled
daring.”
CURL: H. Clement Meadmore,
1968
“Curl” stands outside Uris
Hall, a gift of Percy Uris to the
Business School. In Marina
Harrison and Lucy Rosenfeld’s
book “Artwalks in New York,”
Clockwise from top left: Lipchitz's Pegasus on Columbia's campus; Harry Leigh's Saratoga Winter,
George Sugerman's Bench and Raphael Zollinger's Welcome II, all at Pratt Institute.
Continued on Page 20
Continued from Page 16
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EO_Fall2012_CampusArt.indd 18 9/6/12 7:22:23 PM

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20 FALL 2012
Meadmore, an Australian na-
tive, said that he believes
public sculpture to be a“bridge
between human scale and ar-
chitectural scale.” The curved
form, made of hollow steel,
contrasts with the vertical and
modern Business School.
NEW YORK UNIVERSITY
THE BUST OF SYLVETTE:
Carl Nesjär, 1967
This piece sits in the court-
yard surrounded by NYU’s Silver
Towers apartments on Bleecker
Street. A sandblasted enlarge-
ment of a Picasso sculpture, it
was executed by Norwegian
sculptor Carl Nesjär and comple-
ments the surrounding buildings
and weighs about 60 tons.
PACE UNIVERSITY
(NEW YORK CAMPUS)
ACROBAT IN THE RING:
Chaim Gross, 1940s
This sculpture by Austrian-
born Chaim Gross on Pace’s New
York City campus is one of many
of Gross’ acrobatically themed
works. The acrobats’ freedom of
movement allowed him a multi-
plicity of design possibilities.
HUNTER COLLEGE
TAU: Tony Smith, 1961-62
Adjacent to the main sub-
way exit (on the corner of 68th
and Lexington Avenue), in
front of the West Building, sits
an iconic Hunter sculpture,
“Tau,” created by late Hunter
professor and respected art-
ist Tony Smith. Named for the
19
th
letter of the Greek alpha-
bet, it is made of black, welded
steel and is a representation of
Smith’s minimalist style. It en-
courages consideration of the
way the surfaces relate to each
other. Before Smith turned to
sculpture, he worked as an ar-
chitect on such projects as
Betty Parson’s house.
PRATT INSTITUTE
SCULPTURE PARK
(Sculpture descriptions provide
by Pratt Institute)
(Images COURTESY OF PRATT
INSTITUTE)
WELCOME II: Raphael
Zollinger, 2008
WELCOME II is a commen-
tary and protest on recent
events. “My work examines
both personal and public rep-
resentations of critical issues
in the realm of contemporary
social change.” The prisoners,
cast in hard cement with their
hands bound, sloped forward
to create archetypical images,
symbols of the abuse human
visit on one another. The origi-
nal installation incorporated a
neon sign, which spelled out an
ironic message.”
SKYLARK: David Henderson,
2005
In a sculpture that transi-
tion from coned spiral base to a
blossom extended from above,
Skylark is a dramatic thrust,
which gives the turquoise
fiberglass forms a monumen-
tally dramatic stance.
UNTITLED: Sung Ha No,
2000s
No has adapted his painting
vocabulary into three dimen-
sions. The paintings often
employ a single repeated form
in variations, and we find the
same theme here, in these un-
dulating colored stripes of
color. Almost figure like, they
create a lively pattern as they
incline from side to side, a ten-
sion captured in the forged
steel.
UNDULATED: Hans Van de
Bovenkamp, circa 2006
Large scale is often the sig-
nature of Van de Bovenkamp’s
work. He has done many sight-
ed piece for public spaces in the
U.S. and abroad. The brushed
stainless steel here catches
the light to further dramatize
the swerve of the undulating
forms. (It is his favored mate-
rial). Organic dramatic action,
flowing, bridging, swirling,
gives the rigid nature of steel
a different reality.
SARATOGA WINTER:
Harry Leigh, 2004
The original version for this
piece was in plywood with cut-
out flaps holding ordinary red
bricks, with an overlay of drawn
line textures. This enlarged ver-
sion commissioned by Pratt is
in steel with specially fabri-
cated ceramic inserts. Leigh
also works in manipulated thin
strips of plywood, often creat-
ing large scale baroque sinuous
bas-reliefs.
BENCH: George Sugarman,
circa 1982
George Sugarman has been
making sculpture for 60 years
and has created work in a variety
of styles, starting with his large
carved wood sculptures. These
works, such as bench, evolved
into poly-chrome works, using
a unique palette-non-decorative
and functional.
He dispensed with the use
of a base by employing a num-
ber of strategies and went on to
use shaped aluminum sheets, a
convenient material, for a num-
ber of outdoor commissions. A
number of his pieces are envi-
ronmental and he often creates
seating areas. This large bench
on the South Hall Lawn, which
the artist donated to Pratt, is
typical of his outdoor public
works. Sugarman’s work is ex-
hibited internationally. l
Hans Van de Bovenkam’s
impressive Undulation
at Pratt.
Continued from Page 18
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Untitled-11 1 8/29/12 1:52:02 PM
22 FALL 2012
SEPTEMBER 14
Ivy Style
Special Exhibitions Gallery at the
Fashion Institute of Technology
The Museum at the Fashion Institute
of Technology on 27th Street at 7
th

Avenue, will present for its fall ex-
hibition Ivy Style, which will be on
view through January 5. The show
will explore the classic, preppy form
of dressing and its progression
through the 20th century.
fitnyc.edu
OCTOBER 17
The Model Alliance
Katie Murphy Amphitheatre, Fred P.
Pomerantz Art and Design Center at the
Fashion Institute of Technology
As part of the school’s Fashion
Culture programming, former model
Sara Ziff and Fordham Law School
professor Susan Scafidi come to-
gether to discuss The Model Alliance,
a nonprofit advocacy group for
American models founded by Ziff in
2011. The Model Alliance works with
the Fashion Law Institute, established
by Scafidi, to promote fair labor stan-
dards for models in the U.S.
fitnyc.edu
OCTOBER 2 - 7
Shakespeare’s Globe Hamlet
Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts,
Pace University
This October the Schimmel welcomes
a production of Hamlet, as London’s
renowned theatrical entourage,
Shakespeare’s Globe theater, returns
to the Lower Manhattan stage for the
third time. Following a successful
tour and a stint at the Globe in 2011,
the political conspiracy, obsession,
violence, humor and tragedy, that is
Hamlet, is finally coming to the U.S.
pace.edu
OCTOBER 19
American
Showstoppers:
An Evening With
Harold Arlen
Featuring the Fred Barton
Orchestra with Stars from
the Broadway Stage
Michael Schimmel Center for
the Arts, Pace University
The evening of October 19
will be devoted to the music of the
legendary Harold Arlen, composer of
countless Broadway and Hollywood
songs (The Wizard of Oz to mention
just one) that will be brought to life
on the Schimmel stage by the 12-
piece Fred Barton orchestra and the
stars of Broadway.
pace.edu
OCTOBER 16
The Julliard Jazz Orchestra
in Memphis Jazz
Juilliard’s Peter Jay Sharp Theater
The Julliard Jazz Orchestra
performs original works by
Memphis-based jazz masters George
Coleman, Harold Mabern, Phineas
Newborn, and James Williams.
juilliard.edu
OCTOBER 24
Semyon Bychkov Conducts
the Juilliard Orchestra
Alice Tully Hall
The Juilliard Orchestra welcomes
Russian-born conductor and interna-
tional artist Semyon Bychkov to lead
a program featuring Rachmaninoff’s
Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini
and Brahms’ Symphony No. 4.
juilliard.edu
OCTOBER 27
William Christie
Conducts
Juilliard415
Alice Tully Hall
Early music special-
ist, conductor William
Christie, leads Juilliard
singers and Julliard415,
alongside members of his
Parisian ensemble Les Arts
Florissants, in Handel’s Il
Trionfo del Tempo e del Disinganno.
juilliard.edu
SEPTEMBER 5 -
DECEMBER 8
Robert S. Duncanson:
An Antebellum African
American Artist
Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Art Gallery,
Columbia University
Wallach Art Gallery presents the
first NYC survey of rarely-seen
paintings by the nineteenth-centu-
ry pioneer landscape artist Robert
S. Duncanson. The exhibition is
curated by renowned Duncanson
scholar, Joseph D. Ketner II, and
gathers works created by the artist
By Chloe Ashby and
Benjamin-Émile Le Hay
Autumn is bustling with campus
activity in New York this year.
In addition to the City’s ever
constant cultural life, schools
from Juilliard to Fordham
and CUNY are presenting a
vibrant and varied roster of
performances, exhibitions, talks
and festivals open to the general
public. We investigate just a few
of these events on our seasonal
calendar. Take advantage of all
that you can.
SELECT
COLLEGIATE
HAPPENINGS
THAT YOU’RE
INVITED TO
Model Alliance co-
founder Sara Zi.
William Christie conducts the Les Arts Florissants
at Alice Tully Hall on October 27.
EO_Fall2012_Calendar.indd 22 9/6/12 7:31:41 PM
FALL 2012 23
from the 1840s to the 1870s that, together,
present an overview of his life, milieu and
development.
columbia.edu
OCTOBER 15
Pratt Institute’s 125th
Anniversary Gala
Waldorf=Astoria
This celebratory event, marking Pratt’s
milestone 125th anniversary year, will
honor legendary and renowned individu-
als in the creative world, whilst raising
vital funds for student scholarships. This
year’s honorary degree recipients include
director Julie Taymor; artist Kehinde
Wiley; and Maximilian Riedel, CEO, Riedel
Crystal of America.
pratt.edu
SEPTEMBER 28 -
NOVEMBER 10
Party Headquarters: Art in the
Age of Political Absurdity
Pratt Manhattan Gallery
Just in time for the election season, Pratt
Manhattan Gallery presents this exhibi-
tion of works that pick up on the grand
tradition of political satire and hone in on
the American psyche in an era of political
polarization. The exhibition is guest curat-
ed by Eleanor Heartney and Larry Litt, and
will be introduced with an opening recep-
tion on September 27 from 6-8 p.m.
pratt.edu
OCTOBER 16 AND 30,
AND NOVEMBER 6
Pratt Falls events
Pratt Manhattan Gallery
Pratt Manhattan gallery presents its fifth
annual Pratt Falls series; the events in-
volve political cabaret and an election night
watch party.
pratt.edu
SEPTEMBER 28 -
OCTOBER 28
Trade School, part of Art,
Environment, Action!
The Sheila Johnson Design Center
Art, Environment, Action! is a creative
teaching laboratory and environmental
art space that brings together an array of
people working with art, pedagogy, and
ecology; the program invites public par-
ticipation and interaction. Trade School, an
alternative school that runs on barter – stu-
dents pay for classes with barter items such
as food, artwork, and services, rather than
money – is one of the leading artistic work-
shops in residence.
newschool.edu
SEPTEMBER 12 - 21
The Critical Moment: Architecture
in the Expanded Field,
March II Advanced Design Studio – Thesis 2012
The Arthur A. Houghton Jr. Gallery
The Critical Moment invites architectur-
al discourse; it prompts us to re-think the
object of architecture and to question the
very boundaries of architecture itself. The
innovative and visionary work produced
by the students in the Advanced Design
Studio of the Master of Architecture II
program addresses critical issues ranging
from urban theory to the present condi-
tion of globalization and the continual
emergence of new scientific developments
and technologies.
cooper.edu
OCTOBER 2 -
NOVEMBER 21
Massimo Scolari: The
Representation of
Architecture, 1967 – 2012
The Arthur A. Houghton Jr. Gallery
This exhibition, a retrospective of the
work of visionary architect and artist
Massimo Scolari, marks the first display
of Scolari’s work in the U.S since 1986.
The show, which originated at the Yale
School of Architecture in Spring 2012,
was curated and designed by Scolari
himself and features over 160 original
drawings, paintings, watercolors, and
other works completed between 1967
and 2012. Scolari was a former Visiting
Professor at The Irwin S. Chanin School
of Architecture at The Cooper Union in
1977 and 1978.
cooper.edu
OCTOBER 4 - 6
Yale School of Architecture
presents J. Irwin Miller
Symposium: The Sound
of Architecture
Hastings Hall, in Paul Rudolph Hall
This interdisciplinary symposium will
explore the auditory dimension of archi-
tecture. Architecture can create silent
spaces and spaces of noise, both of which
pry on our experiences and means of com-
munication. Today, more than ever, the
ways we listen in built spaces have been
transformed by developments in media,
music, and art. The Sound of Architecture,
organized by Professor Kurt Forster and
Ph.D. candidate Joseph Clarke, will draw
on experts from a variety of disciplines in
order to better our understanding of ar-
chitecture as an auditory environment.
architecture.yale.edu
Semyon Bychkov is to perform
at Juilliard on October 25.
Explore the world of preppy at FIT's museum.
The New Schools Trade
School in action.
EO_Fall2012_Calendar.indd 23 9/6/12 7:32:14 PM
FREE! Upcoming Events at
The Tina Santi Flaherty- Winston Churchill Series
Andrew Roberts September 19, 2012 | 7:00pm
Roosevelt House
Due to limited seating at Roosevelt House, this series is by inviation
only. To request an invitation, please email: rhrsvp@hunter.cuny.edu
Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney Conner Guest Writer
Jocye Carol Oates October 9, 2012 | 7:00pm
November 27, 2012 | 7:00pm
The Jack Burstyn Memorial Lecture
Dan Rose October 16, 2012 | 7:00pm
The Life and Work of Kurt Vonnegut
Sidney Ofñt October 22, 2012 | 7:00pm
The Elizabeth Strong-Cuevas Lecture
Gay Talese November 5, 2012 | 7:00pm

To RSVP for events e-mail twcce@hunter.cuny.edu or
call 212.650.3850; online RSVP is also available.
See our complete list of Fall 2012 courses at
www.hunter.cuny.edu/thewritingcenter-ce
Lewis Frumkes, director
The Writing Center
Writing | Literature | Culture
REGISTER TODAY FOR FALL 2012 CLASSES!
Featuring: Master Classes
Daphne Merkin- Memoir
Patricia Marx- Humor
Plus many more writing, literature, and specialty courses
C
NY
U
Untitled-16 1 9/5/12 9:33:08 AM
FALL 2012 25
Continued on Page 26
A
WHOLE
LOTTA
DEBT
Marina Gerner spoke with
Thomas Blum, Vice President
of Administration at Sarah
Lawrence College and
Roseanne Ackerley, Director of
Financial Aid at Hebrew Union
College, about the financial
woes of students today and the
status of educational loans in
America.
How has new student loan
legislation impacted the uni-
versity financially?
Thomas Blum: We have not
seen any financial impact, at
least to date, associated with
any of the regulatory or legisla-
tive actions taken.
As a college we are disap-
pointed that Washington has
not been able to sort out a more
permanent solution. Less than
a year from now on we are
going to be in the same situa-
tion. There are other changes
that are being planned. The
Department of Education
is negotiating new regula-
tions around student loans, in
particular addressing the dif-
ficulty of students paying back
their loans after graduation.
This morning new regulations
were issued regarding payback
plans for students in difficult
situations to provide new mech-
anisms to reduce the amount of
student loans.
Roseanne Ackerley: Well, we
have a needy student fund that
we use for our scholarships.
And even though the results
are not in yet, because students
apply throughout the summer
and the committee will meet in
the fall, I believe that a lot more
students will be applying for
scholarship help.
What are you hearing from
students?
AR: They are very upset
about the situation. We have a
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26 FALL 2012
5-year-seminary program, so
if a student takes out 20,500
in federal loans for the full five
years, that’s over $100,000 in
debts afterwards, having the
interest on top. Not having loan
subsidies and rebates affects
the students’ aggregate loan
amounts. It is troublesome.
Our Board of Governors has
met and formed a student wel-
fare committee trying to assess
what the school needs to do to
help our students.
The investigation is to reach
out to other schools, analyze
what they are doing and try-
ing to put together something
like that or a new strategy. The
Board of Governors is working
on it, but we don’t have all the
answers yet.
TB: Students were very
pleased that at least for one
year we have got an extension
on the interest rate on federal
student loans, keeping those
rates at the lower level instead
of returning them to 6.4 per-
cent. If that deal had not been
struck, our students would be
looking at 1,000 dollar more
per-year in loan pay back. That
would not be a good situation.
How has it alleviated stu-
dent financial concerns, if it
has at all?
TB: It will help, but it doesn’t
go all the way. It is a good start.
It links ability to pay back to
actual income in the form of in-
come based repayment plans
and this is a move in the right
direction.
A challenge here will be the
cost, because there is an esti-
mated addition to the deficit
associated with these plans.
It is a very small addition to
the overall deficit, but these
days everything seems open
for debate. I hope these chang-
es/ improvements will survive
and will make it out of nego-
tiation state to become real.
They will benefit all our stu-
dents who have federal loans.
It is hard to say that there’s
anything wrong resulting
from the regulations that we
have seen so far.
RA: The other thing I wanted
to say is that we are now rolling
out a financial literacy program.
That way our students can be-
come more financially savvy,
take out less in loans, and bring
down their overall debt.
We have in-house schol-
arships and there are also
out-of-house scholarships that
I put together for our students
in need. The outside scholar-
ships have doubled in the last
year; twice as many students
receive outside scholarships
now compared to last year… It’s
about 20% now. I know it’s not
high, but still twice as many.
Are there any further
changes that you anticipate?
TB: Broadly speaking, there
are higher education issues
that still need to be addressed.
We don’t hear too much about
burden on parents, but the
loans and home equity borrow-
ing that they take out burdens
them substantially.
Since 2008 when home eq-
uity started to dry up, it has
become harder for families
to make it all come together. I
would anticipate that we are
nowhere near the end of the
conversation on loan debt as
it relates to higher education.
The conversation about value
will continue to be front and
center for a good number of
years, certainly until the econ-
omy has recovered.
We have expended an awful
lot of effort as we continue to
demonstrate the value that
comes with a liberal arts educa-
tion. It is the best way to prepare
for an economy where change
is the only constant. The liberal
arts students that we graduate
are flexible, adaptable, and ready
to take on challenges. We have
given them that skill set. We
are doing our best to help our
students to find the best bal-
ance between grant aid, student
loans, and family resources.
How does the loan and tu-
ition structure in the United
States compare to your own
college days?
RA: Obviously, I had sub-
sidized loans when I was in
school. The two things that are
different now are that we have
income-based repayment pro-
grams and we also have loan
forgiveness programs. We
didn’t have these when I was in
school, so I will be paying a lot
for another 20 years.
The good thing is that the
government is offering loan
forgiveness programs. The bad
thing is that they are taking
away funds from grad students.
Tuition wasn’t as much when
I graduated 10 years ago. Now
tuition has doubled meaning
students need to take out more
in loans.
Graduate programs are more
expensive and students need
more funding compared to un-
dergraduates. It is a shame,
because it means that our
government is not valuing
our students who are in grad
school. You would think that
we want to promote higher ed-
ucation, but by taking away
subsidies we are negating this
premise and that is a problem.
TB: I love that question! You
know, loans were not as avail-
able as they are now. I went
to college in 1982. There were
federal loan programs but ac-
cessibility to the programs
and the amount of support was
much less than it is today. There
are a lot of reasons right now
to be concerned about exten-
sion in student loans. My take
is that it reflects changing de-
mographics, an increase in the
number and percentage in stu-
Continued on Page 28
‘Graduate programs are more
expensive and students need more
funding compared to undergraduates.
It is a shame, because it means that
our government is not valuing our
students who are in grad school.’
Roseanne Ackerley, Hebrew Union College
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EO_Fall2012_StudentDebtt.indd 26 9/6/12 7:27:23 PM
Explore graduate programs
focused on learner-centered
education.
Museum Educationō(DUO\&KLOGKRRG
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Become an educator who makes learning
come alive for all children.
Graduate School Open House
Tuesday, September 11, 5:15 - 7:00 pm
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Becoming a Teacher:
A Forum for Career Changers
Wednesday, October 3, 5:30 - 7:00 pm
RSVP to bankstreetcareerforum.eventbrite.com | 212.875.4404
Bank Street College Graduate School of Education
610 West 112th Street, New York, NY
www.bankstreet.edu/explore
Untitled-14 1 9/4/12 4:52:35 PM
28 FALL 2012
dents increasingly going into
education – it is a social good.
Loans are a form of public
investment into citizens and
residents of the U.S. If loans
help us to educate as many
students as now, I see many
benefits. A caveat is that it
would have been better from a
policy perspective if we found
a way to support students with
grant aid rather than with
loan aid.
Given the political realities
there is something to be cel-
ebrated in the loan volume.
People always talk about the
‘trillion dollar’ student loan
debt. This is more than credit
card debt, more than automo-
bile loan debt and the sky is
falling. I believe that these
comparisons are not fair by
any means. Credit card and
automobile debt are about con-
sumption, whereas taking a
student loan is about invest-
ment that will have a return.
One trillion dollars is an easy
number to focus on. Underneath
it [is] the fact that since mid-
1990s, there has been a 50
percent growth of students in
higher education and that is
only for the good.
Circling back to 1982 when I
was at college, we had programs
but they were not as heavily uti-
lized. A college education did
cost less. I can say from my
personal experience, I was for-
tunate enough to have parents
who could afford to pay the tu-
ition of my college. But the way
many of my closest friends paid
was not through student loans
but by going into ROTC – in ex-
change for commitment to serve
in the military, the pentagon
would finance their education. I
have thought back on that a lot,
it was a very good program that
educated very bright people
and brought them into the mili-
tary, which was not a bad thing.
But while the individual has a
lot of choice in how to finance
education now, there was such
little choice then. While there
is nothing wrong with mili-
tary, I am not certain that all
my friends would have gone to
ROTC. Now there is much more
choice for the individual than
25 years ago and it is important
to keep that in mind. l
‘People always talk about the “trillion
dollar” student loan debt. This is
more than credit card debt, more
than automobile loan debt and the
sky is falling. I believe that these
comparisons are not fair by any
means. Credit card and automobile
debt are about consumption, whereas
taking a student loan is about
investment that will have a return.’
Thomas Blum, Sarah Lawrence College
Read us online
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summer? Learn Italian at the largest and
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Want to learn more? Come to our Open House
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To RSVP, please call 212.396.6653 or
email: parliamo@hunter.cuny.edu
Untitled-16 1 9/5/12 9:31:39 AM
DWI GHT SCHOOL CELEBRATES 140 YEARS OF
igniting the “spark of genius” I N EVERY CHI LD!
No two students are alike. And no other school cultivates the development of the whole
child in quite the same way Dwight School does.
Our world-class faculty maps the learning experience to ft the individual strengths and
passions of each student, making the possibilities for growth endless.
Founded in 1872, Dwight is dedicated to igniting the “spark of genius” in every child.
Personalized learning is the hallmark of a Dwight education, and we have been committed
to this noble purpose for 140 years.
We have also been committed to providing students with rigorous academic preparation
through the International Baccalaureate curriculum. The IB is the most challenging
pre-university course of study in the world.
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admissions@dwight.edu
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Preschool - Grade 12
Untitled-15 1 9/13/12 9:35:22 AM
FALL 2012 31
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By Samantha Norman
tories of students
dropping out of
school to chase un-
conventional job
opportunities in New York are
commonplace, despite the often
grim likelihood of success. It
is easy to be lured away from a
traditional school setting de-
void of the exotic opportunities
that New York offers.
Students attending universi-
ties in the New York area have
an advantage. They are able to
explore the unique employment
options that New York schools
have to offer while also getting
their degrees. Schools such as
Juilliard, Columbia, Pace, and
NYU offer students universi-
ty-paid positions that allow for
great learning opportunities, a
steady cash flow, and the ability
to stay in school.
KATHARINE ROBINSON, a
fourth year student studying
drama and acting, works in
the admissions department at
Juilliard.
Juilliard offers a multitude
of student employment oppor-
tunities that allow students to
gain experience with different
aspects of the performing arts.
In the admissions depart-
ment, Ms. Robinson holds an
array of different jobs such as
a tour guide, audition moni-
tor, and office assistant. She
worked all summer, Monday
through Thursday, and made
about $60 a day.
“I give general tours every
morning for prospective stu-
dents and their families. I show
them around the main perfor-
mance spaces, practice rooms,
explain the admission process,
and give them an idea of a day in
the life of a Juilliard student,”
she said.
“I’ve also been an audition
NOT YOUR AVERAGE GIG
Four students with cool campus jobs that are giving them valuable
and out-of-the-ordinary experiences
S
Continued on Page 33
EO_Fall2012_JobsCampus.indd 31 9/6/12 7:24:06 PM
SCHOOL OF THE ARTS
Escape from the grind. Learn from the best. Create from the heart.
92nd Street Y I Lexington Avenue at 92nd Street | An agency of UJA-Federation
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Enroll today at 92Y.ORG/SOA or call 212.415.5597.
Untitled-43 1 9/5/12 4:46:39 PM
FALL 2012 33
monitor for drama auditions
where I’ve done a number of
things from answering appli-
cants’ questions to monitoring
the auditions rooms and ush-
ering applicants into their
auditions.”
The job seems fitting, as Ms.
Robinson hopes to further her
career in drama and acting
after college. It allows her to
see the auditioning and appli-
cation process—a commonality
for aspiring actors—from the
other side.
“I get to meet all kinds of in-
teresting people coming from
all over the world who are pas-
sionate about their art. I also
feel like I get to use my personal
experience auditioning and try-
ing to find the right school to
help people in this big life step.
Choosing a school and putting
yourself on the line to audition
is a really pivotal moment in
people’s lives, and I enjoy get-
ting to be a little part of that.
You don’t get that experience
working in just any office job,”
she told Educated Observer.
DAVID VAN WINKLE, a rising
junior studying comparative re-
ligions at Columbia University,
holds a job in the Alumni Center.
He calls alumni and friends of
the university to solicit dona-
tions and update information
such as deaths, changes of ad-
dress, or new phone numbers.
He said that the hefty $12
an hour pay was the main at-
traction of the job, but that the
skills he has picked up while
working will be worthwhile in
future positions.
“I think being able to convince
strangers to give you money is a
useful skill in any profession,”
he said. “I am shooting for a ca-
reer as an attorney, so I suppose
being convincing is a transfer-
able skill.”
While working in a calling
center is not necessarily ex-
hilarating, it is study-friendly,
allowing for plenty of time to
study and get involved with
other activities on campus. Mr.
van Winkle said that the three-
hour shifts are great and that
the calling center is really flex-
ible with time off.
The job has also allowed Mr.
van Winkle to connect with
other Columbia students—
past and present. He works
with current undergraduate
and graduate Columbia stu-
dents and gets to converse with
Columbia alumni for hours.
All of these connections
could lead to great network-
ing opportunities, but Mr. van
Winkle doesn’t feel like he’s
part of a rat race.
“It’s definitely not a stuffy
work environment where ev-
eryone is climbing some ladder
to millionairehood. I enjoy de-
scending the stairs into the
basement of the Alumni Center,
putting on my headset, and
just talking to people for three
hours,” he added.
JAMES GISONDI, a rising
first year graduate student at
Pace University and a Human
Resources Management major,
doesn’t just work for a campus
organization - he helps run one.
In April of 2010, Pace University
started the Pace Perk Café as
an opportunity for market-
ing students and Lubin School
of Business students to prac-
tice managing a business, and
Mr. Gisondi will be the student
in charge this semester, head-
ing the café as the General
Manager.
Mr. Gisondi began working at
the café during its initial start
up three years ago and has been
moving his way up in the ranks
ever since. He first started as a
shift employee and then gradu-
ated to a purchasing manager,
and now will serve his first se-
mester as general manager.
As the General Manager, Mr.
Gisondi will handle all human
resources and operations tasks,
including approval of payroll,
shift scheduling, interview-
ing and hiring, discipline and
termination, presenting agen-
das at staff meetings and board
meetings, and delegation of re-
sponsibilities and tasks to other
employees.
“This is one of the most
unique jobs on campus. There is
no other student-run business
at Pace and I am now working as
the General Manager, so I will
have a say in every aspect of
the business,” he commented.
“I will be gaining experience in
many different fields and facets
of the business. I do not feel that
any other job on campus can
give me the same experience.”
The café is a true test of the
students’ ability to succeed in
the business world. It simulates
the operations of any other
business, requiring students to
apply through an eRecruiting
website or by handing their re-
sume in to the human resources
department, and upon hiring,
paying them an hourly salary
‘I think being able to convince
strangers to give you money is
a useful skill in any profession.
I am shooting for a career as
an attorney, so I suppose being
convincing is a transferable skill’
David van Winkle, Columbia University
camparative religions student
‘I get to meet all kinds of interesting people coming
from all over the world who are passionate about
their art. I also feel like I get to use my personal
experience auditioning and trying to find the right
school to help people in this big life step.’
Katharine Robinson,
Juilliard drama and acting major
Continued from Page 31
Continued on Page 35
EO_Fall2012_JobsCampus.indd 33 9/6/12 7:24:47 PM
:fcc\^`Xk\
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Students take
to univsersity greens
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K?<:8DGLJ9FF>@<#
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Inside New
York’s Exclusive
Alumni Clubs
Innovation in
Educating: How Technology
is a Game Changer
THE EDUCATED OBSERVER
SPRING 2012 SPECIAL ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO THE NEW YORK OBSERVER
EDUCATION SPRING 2012_COVER.indd 1 4/5/12 8:14:34 PM
Share and Email Digital Versions through:
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For advertising information, contact:
Barbara Ginsburg Shapiro, Managing Director
bshapiro@observer.com 212.407.9383 or
Jonathan B Klein, Account Executive
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The Educated Observer is a
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Let The New York Observer share a ‘behind the scenes’ view of the unique opportunities and resources
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ISSuE DAtES:
11/7
Issue
November
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10/24
Materials
10/26
Issue Date
2012
January
April
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1/9
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2013
Untitled-1 1 9/6/12 12:26:14 PM
FALL 2012 35
just as any regular employee
would receive.
Although the students were
given assistance in the begin-
ning, using the first semester
as a “pilot” period where they
received a budget to get the
business off the ground, the
fate of the café has been in their
hands ever since.
“At first, we were allotted
a certain amount of money,
mostly for our payroll ex-
pense, almost like a grant,” Mr.
Gisondi said. “Our financial
projections for the next se-
mester, as well as our financial
success that semester, allowed
us a lot of wiggle room finan-
cially and we were able to go
the semester after without that
so-called grant for payroll. We
were able to pay our own pay-
roll and needed little financial
assistance at that point. Now,
we do not receive any financial
assistance or 'grants.'”
The students have proved
to be equipped at running the
business, but they still take the
opportunity to learn from the
great experience being offered
to them.
“The café has indeed been
successful and students have
done a lot on their own but have
also received much help from
our board of directors, specifi-
cally Dr. Winsted, our faculty
advisor. As we move forward,
we all hope to gain valuable
learning experiences from han-
dling as much of the facets of
the business as possible,” Mr.
Gisondi said.
The success of the café, and
Mr. Gisondi’s positive experi-
ence while working there, have
only helped to assure him of
his decision to work in Human
resources.
“It has solidified my choice of
major because it has better pre-
pared me so far for what I want
to do, and it is almost like a test
to see whether or not I can han-
dle this kind of job, and I believe
I can handle it,” he said.
Beginning in June 2012,
ANTHONY GIAMBRA, a rising
junior at NYU majoring in an
Individualized Study in Film as
Idealized Experience, started
working as an undergraduate
intern for summer initiatives,
focusing on social media, com-
munication and welcome week.
At this job, Mr. Giambra uses
Social Media to promote NYU’s
Welcome Week—a week at the
beginning of the school year
designated to familiarize stu-
dents with NYU, and of course,
New York City. His tasks include
updating the NYU Welcome
Week Facebook, Twitter,
Instagram and Tumblr with
new, themed postings every
day of the week, as well as con-
tacting local vendors around
the downtown area to ask for
promotions to use as incentives
for social media participation.
“Every week or so, the
Student Resource Center will
auction off a prize to a se-
lect Facebook user for 'liking'
a certain post,” he explained.
“As for bigger projects, I have
made a 'Call Me Maybe' spoof
video highlighting the Student
Resource Center called “Find
Me, SRC” and created an en-
tire social media-inspired
Scavenger Hunt.”
NYU takes their Welcome
Week festivities seriously, rally-
ing big names like Alec Baldwin
and Jesse Eigenberg to speak
to the new students, proving to
them that they made the right
choice in this school. First im-
pressions are important. Mr.
Giambra’s job—although fun—
is crucial in making sure the
week goes out with a bang.
“I get to work on NYU
Welcome Week, the best and
biggest orientation week I
know. The events that I’m work-
ing on will inspire future NYU
students to get out of their com-
fort zone, make new friends,
and ‘take the reins’ of their fu-
ture in New York. Looking at
that alone, I feel as though my
job is both unique and fantas-
tic,” Mr. Giambra said.
While Mr. Giambra is not paid
in cash for the job, he receives
free housing for the sum-
mer as compensation for his
work at the Student Resources
Center. About 15 other stu-
dents work with him at the
Student Resources Center for
the summer, and while no other
students hold his position, he
said that he and his cowork-
ers all get along and help each
other with certain projects.
“I enjoy working with happy,
driven people who love NYU
Welcome Week and help re-
mind me why I love NYU as well.
It’s definitely a lot of work, but
I’m learning day-by-day how to
work through it,” Mr. Giambra
admitted.
This opportunity not only
helped Mr. Giambra to adjust to
the workload and workweek of
a fast paced job, but it allowed
him to explore his interest in
social networking.
“Hopefully, I can pursue a
career in film, whether it be
editing, producing, writing,
directing, and/or acting (or
all of the above,) but I think
that in the world of tomorrow,
knowing how to market one-
self through social networking
proves most important when
wanting to get a name out
there--especially through all of
the clutter,” Mr. Giambra told
Educated Observer.
“Every job wants to know
how to improve their prod-
uct/business through SEO
(search engine optimization),
hashtags, and the like. When
learning about the business
and its characteristics, I can ul-
timately decide how to promote
an event, such as NYU Welcome
Week, in the best way.”
Whether Welcome Week is
successful or not, Mr. Giambra
had a good summer. “I got free
housing out of the whole deal,”
he said. “And for my birthday,
they gave me a red velvet cup-
cake. It was amazing.” l
‘I enjoy working with happy, driven
people who love NYU Welcome
Week and help remind me why I
love NYU as well. It’s definitely a
lot of work, but I'm learning day-
by-day how to work through it.’
Anthony Giambra,
NYU film major
‘I will be gaining experience in many
dierent fields and facets of the business.
I do not feel that any other job on campus
can give me the same experience.’
James Gisondi,
Pace University student
Continued from Page 33
EO_Fall2012_JobsCampus.indd 35 9/6/12 7:25:00 PM
Directory
36 FALL 2012
Directory
BANK STREET COLLEGE
GRADUATE SCHOOL
OF EDUCATION
Master’s degree programs in
learner-centered education
Founded in 1916, Bank
Street College of Education
in New York City has a rich
history of innovation and of
learner-centered education.
Bank Street’s pioneering
ideas about developmentally
appropriate practices, the value
of observation and reflection,
and the importance of discovery
and experiential learning have
influenced successful teaching
and learning approaches in
schools, museums, and other
learning environments across the
nation and abroad. The College
includes both the Graduate
School and a lab school called
the School for Children.
Bank Street Graduate
School graduates facilitate
learning, create community,
and encourage students to
engage fully in the process
of inquiry and discovery, and
of creating understanding.
Master’s degree students
actively participate in small
classes, discussion groups, and
extensive supervised fieldwork,
and receive rich faculty
mentorship and advisement.
Course work focuses on human
development, curriculum and
inquiry, and ways of engaging
children as active learners.
Theory and practice are
integrated in all components of
a Bank Street education.
Our master’s degree
programs include child
life, teacher preparation,
special education, literacy,
museum education, bilingual
education, and school
and community-based
leadership. Most programs
lead to initial and professional
certification. Students with
initial certification from
undergraduate programs
will find graduate programs
that lead to professional
certification, including
curriculum and instruction and
teacher leader in mathematics
education.
To learn more about our
programs, join us for our
September 11th Open House.
For more information, visit
bankstreet.edu/explore, email
gradcourses@bankstreet.edu,
or call 212-875-4404.
CHRISTIE’S EDUCATION
Christie’s is the only major
auction house in the world
that directly runs educational
programs at the graduate
level. Courses are taught by an
international team of dedicated
art-world experts, academics
and practitioners who are
committed to educating and
inspiring the next generation of
art-world professionals.
Christie’s Education gives
students unique insight into the
art market, with unparalleled
access to Christie’s auction
house and the works of art that
pass through it every week.
The history of art is explored
through continuing firsthand
observation of works in many
media, and students address
issues of meaning, originality and
authenticity.
Christie’s Education, New
York has been designated as
a degree-granting institution
by the New York State Board
of Regents. Our Master’s
program in the History of Art
and the Art Market: Modern
and Contemporary Art is
registered with the New York
State Education Department.
Part-time Certificate options in
Art Business and Modern and
Contemporary Art in New York
are also available.
Christie’s Education, New York
also offers several short courses
on topics as diverse as fine art,
wine and jewelry. Each course
provides participants with a
unique, behind-the-scenes view
of the art world.
Contact: +1 212 355 1501 or
christieseducation@christies.edu
Find us on Facebook:
facebook.com/christieseducation
THE SCHOOL OF
CONTINUING
EDUCATION AT
COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY
The School of Continuing
Education at Columbia
University is a resource for those
who wish to take their lives in
new directions, with a mission
to transform knowledge and
understanding in service of the
greater good.
The School offers thirteen
applied master’s degrees in the
established and emerging fields
of Actuarial Science, Bioethics,
Communications Practice,
Construction Administration,
Fundraising Management,
Information and Digital Resource
Management, Landscape Design,
Sports Management, Strategic
Communications, Sustainability
Management and Technology
Management. Each program
provides practical, professional
education for students seeking
demanding, focused training.
Courses are taught by faculty
and industry leaders who bring
current perspectives into the
classroom. Full- and part-time
options vary by program.
The Postbaccalaureate
Studies program at the School
of Continuing Education
offers university courses
and certificate programs in
over 50 subject areas for
graduate school preparation,
academic enrichment or career
advancement. Working with
advisers, each student develops
a plan of study tailored to his or
her background and academic
goals. Business courses and
certificate programs are offered
both on campus and online.
The School also offers
certificate programs, summer
courses, high school programs
in New York, Barcelona and
Jordan, and a program for
learning English as a second
language.
Though the offerings are
diverse, they are unified by a
mission to mount innovative,
instructional programs that
meet Columbia’s standard of
excellence, take good advantage
of its resources, and produce
positive educational outcomes
for the members of the student
body.
For information, go to www.
ce.columbia.edu, email ce-info@
columbia.edu or call (212) 854-
9666.
EDUC_0912_Writeups.indd 36 9/6/12 7:09:52 PM
Directory
FALL 2012 37
Q&A WITH DWIGHT SCHOOL
CHANCELLOR STEPHEN SPAHN,
THE LONGEST-SERVING HEAD
OF SCHOOL IN NEW YORK CITY
Q: What is your philosophy and what
makes a Dwight education unique?
A: After 45 years in education, I’ve
learned—and am reminded time and
again—that no two children are alike.
That’s why Dwight School customizes the
educational experience for each student
based on individual strengths and interests.
We believe that there is a “spark of genius”
in every child, and our job as educators
is to find and ignite that spark through
personalized learning so that every student
can realize his or her greatest potential.
Q: Dwight offers the International
Baccalaureate curriculum. What makes
the IB desirable?
A: The IB is recognized as the gold
standard and the most challenging
academic pre-university course of study
in the world. We believe it offers the best
preparation and rigorous personalized
education needed to develop critical, open-
minded thinkers and leaders who can thrive
anywhere in the world. Dwight was the
first US school to offer the comprehensive
IB curriculum from preschool through the
twelfth grade.
Q: Why is this an especially exciting
time for Dwight?
A: We’re celebrating our 140th
anniversary as well as the opening of our
fifth global campus in South Korea. The
Dwight Schools is a global network with
campuses in New York, London, Canada,
Beijing, and Seoul dedicated to educating
children who can make a real difference.
To learn more/apply, call (212) 724-
7524, e-mail admissions@dwight.edu, or
visit www.dwight.edu.
‘GAME CHANGER’ FOR CUNY
OVER 37% MORE GRADUATES
MANY TO TOP GRAD SCHOOLS
Achievement, grit, perseverance and
creativity: These are the hallmarks of
The City University of New York Class
of 2012, which earned a record 14,800
associate degrees, 21,500 bachelor’s
degrees and 11,000 graduate degrees.
That total is 37.6 percent higher than in
2001, when the University took steps
to increase academic quality, including
raising senior college admission
standards.
“Those who were naysayers of this
reform movement now have something
to reflect upon, because we’ve never
seen growth of this magnitude — and
we’re all delighted,” Chancellor Matthew
Goldstein said.
He noted some of the prestigious
graduate schools where students
were heading — Berkeley, Cambridge,
Columbia, CUNY, Harvard and MIT
doctoral programs; Duke, Georgetown
and Harvard law schools; and Einstein,
Harvard and Mt. Sinai medical schools
among them — calling this year “a
game-changer for this University.”
Jordan Stockdale (Hunter College
M.A., special education) grew up in
Kansas City, but wanted to live and
teach in New York. He joined the
city Teaching Fellows Program and
taught in East Harlem’s PS 57, “a
high-needs school and a really good
school. Being a minority male, I want
to inspire younger students who
look like me to succeed.” He won a
Fulbright Fellowship to teach English
in Spain for 2012-2013, but intends to
return to teaching in the city and earn
a doctorate.
THE CUNY SCHOOL OF
PROFESSIONAL STUDIES
The Education You Need for
the Life You Lead
The CUNY School of
Professional Studies (SPS) has
become one of the City University
of New York’s fastest growing
schools. CUNY SPS currently
serves over 2,000 students
through its online baccalaureate
degrees, master’s degrees,
and certificates, in addition to
enrolling over 3,500 students
in its non-credit professional
development programs.
Home of CUNY’s first fully
online degree programs, SPS
has found novel ways to fulfill
CUNY’s mission of access with
excellence, reaching students with
new modes of teaching, multi-
faceted courses, and educational
experiences tailored for diverse
constituencies. Its programs
are genuinely groundbreaking,
providing timely, innovative and
high-quality instruction designed
to address topical or unmet
needs.
For more information about the
programs offered at CUNY SPS,
visit www.sps.cuny.edu or call
(212) 652-CUNY (2869).
EDUC_0912_Writeups.indd 37 9/13/12 9:32:58 AM
Directory
38 FALL 2012
FIND YOUR PRIDE
AND PURPOSE AT
HOFSTRA UNIVERSITY
A University of Distinction
Since its founding in
1935, Hofstra University has
evolved into a nationally and
internationally renowned
university that continues to
achieve further recognition
as an institution of academic
excellence.
The Hofstra North Shore-
LIJ School of Medicine at
Hofstra University welcomed
its second class of students in
August 2012, and is on the path
to become a leader in medical
education. The University
recently established a School
of Engineering and Applied
Science with an innovative
co-op and cross-disciplinary
education program and a School
of Health Sciences and Human
Services. The addition of a
school of engineering makes
Hofstra only the third school in
the New York metropolitan area
to have schools of law, medicine,
and engineering.
The Best and Brightest
Every day on Hofstra’s vibrant
campus, our dynamic students
enrich, enlighten and challenge
one another, both inside and
outside the classroom. With an
average undergraduate class
size of 21 and a student-to-
faculty ratio of 14-to-1, students
are encouraged to debate,
question, research, discuss
and think critically in an open
and broad-minded learning
environment.
Our hardworking, ambitious
students are taught by
Guggenheim Fellows and
Fulbright scholars; Emmy
Award recipients; prize-winning
scientists; leaders in business,
education and the health
sciences; and knowledgeable
and insightful thinkers.
See for Yourself
We invite you to come see
the campus for yourself. See
the energy, focus and drive of
our students. Meet our award-
winning and prestigious faculty.
Explore Hofstra’s beautiful
campus. Your journey begins at
hofstra.edu
CONTINUING
EDUCATION AT
HUNTER COLLEGE
Exciting things are happening
with Continuing Education at
Hunter College this fall! Have
you ever wanted to learn to
play an instrument, speak a
foreign language or design your
own webpage? Perhaps you
are looking to improve your
computer literacy or develop
your financial skills. Continuing
Education at Hunter College
offers courses designed to meet
your specific educational needs.
Our portfolio of courses includes
language and communication
skills, computer and technology,
accounting and general business,
as well as arts and personal
enrichment.
Continuing Education at
Hunter College allows you to
pursue quality education in a
short amount of time. Whether
you are new to the workforce
or looking for a career change,
our Certificate Programs are
designed to prepare you for
exciting new careers in a variety
of fields. We offer a variety
of Certificate Programs- from
Interpretation/Translation to
Legal Studies to Medical Coding
and Billing.
Need a course to help you with
your professional development?
Courses such as Creative
Problem Solving and Decision
Making, Customer Service
Training for Managers, and How
to Build a Growing Profitable
Business will help you achieve
your goal. Our newly added
coaching courses are designed to
equip leaders and managers with
the tools and skills to be effective
in their positions.
We offer courses that
meet the needs of working
professionals, people new to the
job market, or individuals who
just want to learn a new skill
or explore a new hobby at an
affordable price.
This fall, find your success with
Continuing Education at Hunter
College!
LÉMAN MANHATTAN
PREPARATORY SCHOOL
Parents seeking a private
school education for their child
have many excellent choices in
New York City. But there is no
school quite like ours.
Located in historic downtown
Manhattan, Léman Manhattan
is the school that offers the
rigorous academics and an
International Baccalaureate
Diploma delivered by a highly
engaged faculty.
It’s the school that teaches the
critical thinking skills that are keys
to preparing today’s graduates
to succeed at top choice colleges
and throughout their lives.
It’s the school believes learning
courage, resilience, empathy
and open-mindedness is just as
important as learning calculus,
chemistry and history.
It’s the school with state-of-
the-art facilities including: a
light-filled library, performing
arts auditoriums, rock climbing
wall, roof-top playground,
regulation-size gymnasiums,
personal training room and two
competition-size pools.
It’s the school that offer small
classes and Personal Learning
Plans designed to challenge and
excite each student to reach his
or her potential.
It’s the only preparatory
school in Manhattan with
established sister schools in
Europe, Asia, Latin America and
throughout the US offering our
students exciting opportunities
to participate in international
academic, athletic, music and art
exchange programs.
Léman Manhattan offers
a one-of-a-kind international
boarding program where
students from around the world
can share culture and diverse
perspectives to create a truly
global community.
All of this contributes to
a learning experience that is
second to none.
Where does your child go to
school?
EDUC_0912_Writeups.indd 38 9/6/12 7:10:26 PM
Directory
FALL 2012 39
MEDILL NORTHWESTERN
UNIVERSITY
Founded at Northwestern
University in 1921, Medill
offers a Master’s of Science
in Journalism program that
combines the enduring skills
and values of journalism with
new techniques and knowledge
that are essential to thrive in
today’s digital world.
As the media industry
experiences unprecedented
change, Medill leads the way
in training a new generation of
multimedia journalists who are
not only thriving in this new
media landscape, but are also
helping to shape it.
Perhaps your goal is to
expose wrongdoing through
investigative reporting or to
give voice to the voiceless. You
might aspire to create finely
crafted prose or tell stories with
interactive tools. Maybe you
want to be a beat reporter or a
magazine editor. Or maybe you
see yourself as a broadcaster,
web producer or media
entrepreneur. Perhaps your
path is still unclear, but – like
your Medill classmates – you
have a passion for journalistic
storytelling, a creative instinct
and a commitment to good in
the world.
Whatever your motivations
and ambitions, you can find
your niche at Medill.
“Many people say that
instead of going to grad school,
you should go straight into the
field to get work experience,”
said Garin Flowers (MSJ11), who
is now a reporter for WCTV
in Tallahassee, Fla. “I feel as
though I am getting work
experience and a master’s at the
same time. Professors believe
that we are current working
professionals and treat us that
way, pushing us to the limit.
When we go out into the field,
which is almost right away, we
build sources, meet with public
officials, work on in-depth
enterprise stories and so much
more.”
The full-time faculty
members at Medill are seasoned
professionals with extensive
industry experience and
contacts. The school also draws
on Chicago’s vibrant journalism
community for accomplished
adjunct professors who
specialize in reporting,
photography, videography,
interactive publishing, non-
fiction narrative, magazine
editing, web design and more.
A Medill degree is one of
the strongest credentials a
journalist can possess. You will
be able to go further and faster
in a rapidly changing profession
where there is a growing range
of opportunities in new and
traditional media.
For more information about
the Medill MSJ program,
please visit www.medill.
northwestern.edu, or contact
Anne Penway, Director of
Admissions and Financial
Aid, at 847-467-1238 or
a-penway@northwestern.edu.
THE NEW SCHOOL
Ranked by U.S. News and
World Report as one of the
best graduate schools for
public affairs, the Milano
School of International Affairs,
Management, and Urban Policy
trains leaders for the nonprofit,
public, and private sectors.
Milano’s graduate programs
blend theory, research, and client-
based project work and practice
to prepare a new generation of
professionals to become agents
of change in an increasingly
complex and interconnected
world.
Milano offers master’s degrees
in environmental policy and
sustainability management,
international affairs, nonprofit
management, and organizational
change management; and
master’s and doctoral degrees
in urban policy. Milano also
offers post-graduate certificates
in leadership and change,
organizational development, and
sustainability strategies.
In addition to its degree
programs, Milano houses
institutes and projects on the
cutting edge of civic engagement.
The Community Development
Finance Project seeks to
connect the private, public, and
philanthropic capital markets
with the dynamic fields of
community development, social
innovation and entrepreneurship,
sustainability management, and
design. The Center for New York
City Affairs seeks to improve
the effectiveness of government
and other organizations in their
work with low-income urban
communities. The Center is widely
recognized for its role as a non-
partisan broker of information
and analysis. Projects include
Child Welfare Watch, Feet in
Two Worlds, Insideschools,
and the politics and advocacy
specialization at Milano.
Milano is a part of The New
School for Public Engagement,
which is a division of The New
School, a leading university in
New York City.
THIS FALL, EXPERIMENT,
EXPLORE, AND EXCEL
WITH NONCREDIT
COURSES AND
CERTIFICATES AT
THE NYU SCHOOL
OF CONTINUING
AND PROFESSIONAL
STUDIES (NYU-SCPS)
Fall is traditionally the
time when people turn their
attention back to business, to
their studies, and to pursing
personal and professional
growth. This fall, the NYU
School of Continuing and
Professional Studies (NYU-
SCPS) will offer more than
2,300 noncredit courses from
which to choose, as well as a
broad array of professional
certificates. In challenging
job markets, these programs
provide a cost-effective way to
gain knowledge, to broaden or
to acquire new skill sets, and to
earn respected credentials.
NEW FALL COURSES
New courses help to keep
you on top of the changing
job market, in tune with
emerging technologies, and
informed about our increasingly
globalized world. Make
sense of today’s tumultuous
financial environment by
better understanding “Market
Crashes,” maximize your
organization’s use of new
communications techniques
by enrolling in “Social Media
Management,” understand the
mindset of one of our time’s
greatest innovators by exploring
“The Genius of Steve Jobs,”
and much more.
NYU-SCPS ONLINE: LEARN
WHERE AND WHEN YOU WANT
NYU-SCPS offers online
content in finance, real estate,
design, marketing, creative
writing, foreign languages, and
more. From courses like “iPad
and iPhone App Development”
and “Introduction to Real
Estate Finance,” to a host of
certificate programs ranging
from “Financial Planning” to
“Digital Media Marketing”—
online programs are designed to
hone your skills and to broaden
your horizons.
Enroll for fall now!
Visit: www.scps.nyu.edu/
x566
Call: 212-998-7150
EDUC_0912_Writeups.indd 39 9/6/12 7:10:37 PM
Directory
40 FALL 2012
INDIANA UNIVERSITY
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC
AND ENVIRONMENTAL
AFFAIRS
SPEA Connect Online
Graduate Programs in Public
Affairs
Indiana University’s School
of Public and Environmental
Affairs (SPEA) is now offering
an online Master of Public
Affairs degree through SPEA
Connect, and is the highest-
ranked MPA program to make
its degree completely available
in an online format.
The online MPA gives
students and working
professionals access to one
of the world’s leading public
affairs programs, allowing
them to continue their careers
while learning new skills and
furthering their education.
SPEA is a world leader in public
and environmental affairs and
is the largest school of public
administration and public
policy in the United States.
SPEA’s public affairs graduate
programs are ranked No. 2 in
the nation by U.S. News and
World Report.
The online MPA addresses
the fact that, in today’s
challenging economic
environment, many
professionals are unable or
unwilling to commit to a full-
time graduate program that
could force them to uproot
families and put their careers
on hold. SPEA Connect, a
joint initiative between IU
Bloomington and Indiana
University-Purdue University
Indianapolis, allows learners
around the world to earn a
prestigious degree without
having to relocate.
In addition to the online MPA
degree program, SPEA Connect
allows students the opportunity
to pursue online graduate
certificates in public and
nonprofit management. SPEA
Connect also plans to offer an
online graduate certificate in
public budgeting and financial
management in the near future.
To take the next step in your
career please visit speaconnect.
indiana.edu/observer, email
speacnnt@indiana.edu, or call
812-855-4547.
WRITING CENTER AT
HUNTER COLLEGE
Fall 2012 at the Hunter
Writing Center CE promises
to be extraordinary. The new
Tina Santi Flaherty Winston
Churchill series, which launched
on June 8th at the Morgan
Library, will continue at
Hunter’s renowned Roosevelt
House on September 19th with
author, Andrew Roberts. In
October, you won’t want to
miss author/teacher Sidney
Offit presenting an evening
discussing his best friend, the
late Kurt Vonnegut. Joyce
Carol Oates, our Gerta Whitney
Vanderbilt Conner Guest Writer
this year, will also be speaking
this fall, and Daniel Rose will
give the annual Jack Burstyn
Memorial Lecture. Finally, Gay
Talese will deliver the first
Elizabeth Strong-Cuevas lecture
in November. As for courses,
the inimitable Daphne Merkin
and The New Yorker’s Patricia
Marx will give master classes in
Memoir and Comedy-Writing,
respectively. In addition to
our standard courses such as
“Fiction Writing” and “Murder
You’ll Write”, we will introduce
“Writing and Selling Personal
Essays” with Nancy Kelton, and
“Editing for Self-Editors” with
Beena Kamlani. As a spring
preview, we will once again be
offering the Best-Selling Author
Series. Scheduled guests
include A.M. Holmes, Lee Child,
and Steve Berry. In addition,
the Great Thinkers series will
host guest speakers such as
Lewis Lapham, Alan Guth and
Edward Whitten. Finally, next
June the Writing Center CE will
hold its third annual Writers
Conference. We hope you will
join us at all of our exciting
upcoming events. The Hunter
Writing Center CE is sui generis.
Enjoy!
PARLIAMO ITALIANO
AT HUNTER COLLEGE
Benvenuti! Want to
experience a taste of Italy, but
can’t afford to travel? Learn
Italian at the largest and most
innovative Italian language
school in New York City. Our
professional Italian teachers, all
native speakers, hold degrees
from Italian universities. All
are trained in our successful
method, which has made us
the foremost school of Italian
language in the U.S. Fall
classes begin October 1st and
run through December 15th.
We will also have intensives
and workshops during the
September Intersession. All
classes are targeted to anyone
over 18 years old that has a
yearning to learn the Italian
language.
We know you can learn
to speak Italian, to speak it
fluently and with an excellent
accent - and we prove it to you
at your very first lesson!
We keep our classes small,
with about 14 people in each,
and use original materials which
make it easy to learn. Classes
range from Elementary through
Advanced and are offered
in the daytime, evening and
Saturdays to fit your schedule.
While classes are conducted
only in Italian, you will
understand and respond
because we teach using the
method developed by the
Founding Director Franca
Pironti Lally. This method has
been tested and refined since
our school was established
more than 30 years ago.
Join us at Parliamo Italiano at
Hunter College!
EDUC_0912_Writeups.indd 40 9/6/12 7:10:53 PM
M.A. in History of Art and the Art Market:
Modern and Contemporary Art
Certificate in Modern and
Contemporary Art in New York
The Christie’s Art Business Certificate
Short Course Programs
Design-Your-Own Courses
View full schedule at christies.edu
Contact
christieseducation@christies.edu
+1 212 355 1501
Christie’s Education New York
11 West 42nd Street, 8th Floor
New York, NY 10036
Keep in touch with Christie’s Education
TAKE YOUR NEXT
STEP IN THE
ART WORLD WITH
CHRISTIE’S EDUCATION
MASTER’S AND CONTINUING
EDUCATION PROGRAMS
Untitled-47 1 9/6/12 9:35:49 AM
“CUNY students continue to win the nation’s most prestigious awards coached by our world
class faculty. This year they include Clarendon and Beinecke Scholarships to Oxford,
Fulbright, Math for America, and National Institutes of Health Fellowships, and a record 16
National Science Foundation awards of $126,000 each for graduate study in the sciences.
No other University system in the Northeast won more NSF graduate awards.”
— Matthew Goldstein, Chancellor
1-800-CUNY-YES cuny.edu/allstars
All Star HS ads_NY Observer 8/30/12 1:32 PM Page 1
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