You are on page 1of 12

Lapreport Mn Mng Nng Cao

H Tn: V Hong Linh MSSV: 11361921 Lp DHTH7ELT Ngy lm: 08/07/2012

ETHERNET AND ARP:

1. What is the 48-bit Ethernet address of your computer? Address of your computer: 6c:f0:49:42:ff:f4 2. What is the 48-bit destination address in the Ethernet frame? Is this the Ethernet address http://teacher-h83/? (Hint: the answer is no). What device has this as its Ethernet address? [Note: this is an important question, and one that students

sometimes get wrong. Re-read pages 468469 in the text and make sure you understand the answer here.] The destination address 6c:f0:49:43:16:0a is not the Ethernet address of http://teacher-h83/. 3. Give the hexadecimal value for the two-byte Frame type field. What do the bit(s) whose value is 1 mean within the flag field? The hex value for the Frame type field is 0x86dd. 4. How many bytes from the very start of the Ethernet frame does the ASCII G in GET appear in the Ethernet frame? The ASCII G appears 52 bytes from the start of the ethernet frame. There are 14 B Ethernet frame 5. What is the hexadecimal value of the CRC field in this Ethernet frame? The hex value for the CRC field is 0x 0d0a 0d0a.

6. What is the value of the Ethernet source address? Is this the address of your computer, or http://teacher-h83/ (Hint: the answer is no). What device has this as its Ethernet address? The source address 6c:f0:49:42:ff:f4 is neither the Ethernet address of http://teacherh83/ not the address of my computer. It is the address of my Gigabyte Card, which is the link used to get onto my subnet. 7. What is the destination address in the Ethernet frame? Is this the Ethernet address of your computer? The destination address 6c:f0:49:43:16:0a is the address of computer. 8. Give the hexadecimal value for the two-byte Frame type field. What do the bit(s) whose value is 1 mean within the flag field? The hex value for the Frame type field is 0x86dd.

9. How many bytes from the very start of the Ethernet frame does the ASCII O in OK (i.e., the HTTP response code) appear in the Ethernet frame? The ASCII O appears 52 bytes from the start of the ethernet frame. Again, there are 14 bytes of Ethernet frame, and then 20 bytes of IP header followed by 20 bytes of TCP header before the HTTP data is encountered. 10. What is the hexadecimal value of the CRC field in this Ethernet frame? The hex value for the CRC field is 0x 0d0a 0d0a.

11. Write down the contents of your computers ARP cache. What is the meaning of each column value? The Internet Address column contains the IP address, the Physical Address column contains the MAC address, and the type indicates the protocol type. 12. What are the hexadecimal values for the source and destination addresses in the Ethernet frame containing the ARP request message? The hex value for the source address is 6c:f0:49:42:21:c2. The hex value for the destination address is ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff, the broadcast address. 13. Give the hexadecimal value for the two-byte Ethernet Frame type field. What do the bit(s) whose value is 1 mean within the flag field?

The hex value for the Ethernet Frame type field is 0x0806, for ARP.

ICMP:

1. What is the IP address of your host? What is the IP address of the destination host? The IP address of my host is 192.168.1.113. The IP address of the destination host is 192.168.1.115. 2. Why is it that an ICMP packet does not have source and destination port numbers? The ICMP packet does not have source and destination port numbers because it was designed to communicate network-layer information between hosts and routers, not between application layer processes. Each ICMP packet has a "Type" and a "Code". The Type/Code combination identifies the specific message being received. Since the network software itself interprets all ICMP messages, no port numbers are needed to direct the ICMP message to an application layer process. 3. Examine one of the ping request packets sent by your host. What are the ICMP type and code numbers? What other fields does this ICMP packet have? How many bytes are the checksum, sequence number and identifier fields? The ICMP type is 8, and the code number is 0. The ICMP packet also has checksum, identifier, sequence number, and data fields. The checksum, sequence number and identifier fields are two bytes each.

4. Examine the corresponding ping reply packet. What are the ICMP type and code numbers? What other fields does this ICMP packet have? How many bytes are the checksum, sequence number and identifier fields? The ICMP type is 0, and the code number is 0. The ICMP packet also has checksum, identifier, sequence number, and data fields. The checksum, sequence number and identifier fields are two bytes each.

5. What is the IP address of your host? What is the IP address of the target destination host? The IP address of my host is 192.168.1.101. The IP address of the destination host is 192.168.1.126. 6. If ICMP sent UDP packets instead (as in Unix/Linux), would the IP protocol number still be 01 for the probe packets? If not, what would it be? No. If ICMP sent UDP packets instead, the IP protocol number should be 0x11

7. Examine the ICMP echo packet in your screenshot. Is this different from the ICMP ping query packets in the first half of this lab? If yes, how so? The ICMP echo packet has the same fields as the ping query packets.

8. Examine the ICMP error packet in your screenshot. It has more fields than the ICMP echo packet. What is included in those fields? The ICMP error packet is not the same as the ping query packets. It contains both the IP header and the first 8 bytes of the original ICMP packet that the error is for.

9. Examine the last three ICMP packets received by the source host. How are these packets different from the ICMP error packets? Why are they different?

10. Within the tracert measurements, is there a link whose delay is significantly longer than others? Refer to the screenshot in Figure 4, is there a link whose delay is significantly longer than others ? On the basis of the router names, can you guess the location of the two routers on the end of this link? There is a link TEACHER-H83.

UDP:

1. Select one packet. From this packet, determine how many fields there are in the UDP header. (Do not look in the textbook! Answer these questions directly from what you observe in the packet trace.) Name these fields. The UDP header contains 4 fields: source port, destination port, length, and checksum.