undergraduate prospectus for entry in 2013

1 Many eminent speakers have visited the School recently
1. Daniel Kahneman, psychologist and Nobel laureate 2. Michelle Bachelet, under secretary general and executive director of UN women and former president of Chile 3. Brian Moore, presenter and former England Rugby Union player 4. Muhammad Yunus, economist and Nobel peace prize winner 5. Iain Duncan Smith MP, secretary of state for the UK Department of Work and Pensions 6. Madeleine Albright, professor of International Relations at Georgetown University and former United States secretary of state 7. Aung San Suu Kyi, Burmese opposition politician and the general secretary of the National League of Democracy 8. Rajiv Shah, administrator of USAID 9. Gunilla Carlsson, the Swedish minister for international development cooperation 10. Herman Van Rompuy, president of the European Council

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Meet LSE
LSE Open Days
Wednesday, 21 March 2012 Wednesday, 27 June 2012 Our Open Days give prospective students the opportunity to: • discover whether LSE is the place for you • attend specific subject talks • attend general talks on Applying to LSE and Careers • visit Information Stands: Accommodation, Admissions, Financial Support, Language Centre, LSE 100 and the Students’ Union • meet LSE academics and current LSE students • tour the campus and an LSE hall of residence If you would like to attend one of our Open Days you must book in advance at lse.ac.uk/meetLSE

LSE visits you
LSE representatives regularly visit countries throughout the world. During these visits we attend education fairs and conventions, visit schools, colleges and universities, and meet students for presentations, receptions and counselling sessions. In the UK, we attend UCAS and other conventions all over the country and make individual school and college visits. Further information about LSE visits can be found at lse.ac.uk/lseVisitsYou

More about LSE
For information about our videos, podcasts, campus tours, virtual tour and our email an alum scheme please visit lse.ac.uk/meetLSE

Join the global debate at LSE lse.ac.uk

ac.Welcome to LSE • A world leading research university • Global reputation for excellence • Teaching delivered by leading academics • Choice and flexibility of programmes • Generous financial support • Excellent graduate career prospects • Public lectures delivered by eminent outside speakers • International and cosmopolitan environment • Central London location • The British Library of Political and Economic Science Join the global debate at LSE lse.uk .

. 13 December 2013 Lent term Monday. the student and academic support services.uk/healthAndSafety. rather than detract from students” opportunities. age. 28 April to Friday. according to circumstances. Health and safety LSE is generally a low risk environment. the School reserves the right. life at LSE. 13 January to Friday. with details of the measures we take to ensure the health. LSE is not responsible for the content of external websites mentioned in the prospectus. 21 March 2014 Summer term Monday. You can find information on our safety policy at lse. race.uk/undergraduate Every effort is made to keep this prospectus up to date. Equality and diversity are integral to the School's priorities and objectives.About the prospectus This prospectus is for students interested in applying for an undergraduate degree at LSE. and that any subsequent changes would add to. cultural and economic backgrounds and ensure freedom from discrimination on the basis of disability. and tells you how to apply for admission. The next section contains more detailed descriptions of our degree programmes. However. 4 July 2014 Equality We will promote equality of opportunity for students and staff from all social. religion or belief and sexual orientation.ac. to alter or withdraw particular courses or course syllabuses and to alter the level of fees. safety and welfare of everyone involved with the School. We will support inter-faith and inter-cultural dialogue and understanding and engage all students in playing a full and active role in wider engagement with society.ac. If you require further information about life at LSE or the admissions process please refer to lse. 3 October to Friday. circumstances may occasionally make this impossible. The School makes every effort to ensure that programmes and courses are offered as described to students in this prospectus. fee and financial support information. Dates of terms 2013/14 Michaelmas term Thursday. for that reason. The first section provides a general introduction to the School and the programmes we offer. listed by subject. It is correct at the time of going to press (February 2012).

Founded in 1895. LSE . with students and staff from over 140 countries. visit and discover LSE Graduate careers After LSE Student finance Applications and admissions Other LSE programmes of study Subjects and courses Index Campus map inside back cover London map inside back cover flap Judith Rees Director. intellectual curiosity and commitment to their chosen subject. Our academics are at the forefront of developments in the social sciences and their expertise is called upon by governments. Students are selected for their academic ability. In addition. LSE attracts a wide variety of eminent public figures for lectures. the School is located in one of the most cosmopolitan and vibrant cities in the world. The interaction between staff. The LSE community is truly international. the School continues to be a place of genuine intellectual excitement and cutting-edge research. businesses and media around the globe. students and visitors both in and out of the classroom makes LSE a dynamic and stimulating environment. If you would enjoy the challenge and opportunities that we offer. then we look forward to welcoming you to the School. events and panel discussions. Contents 4 6 10 16 19 23 24 26 27 30 41 43 95 About LSE LSE degrees Life at LSE Student services Academic support services Meet.2 undergraduate prospectus A message from the Director / Contents A message from the Director The London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) is the world's leading dedicated social science institution. providing you with knowledge and experience that will prove hugely beneficial in your future academic. personal and professional careers. Despite the current global economic situation LSE’s graduates continue to be in great demand and our alumni can be found in senior positions around the world. I'm confident that your time at LSE will be both enjoyable and rewarding. Situated in the heart of  London.

Logic and Scientific Method BSc Politics and Philosophy BA Social Anthropology BSc Social Anthropology BSc Social Policy BSc Social Policy and Criminology BSc Social Policy and Economics BSc Social Policy with Government BSc Social Policy and Sociology BSc Sociology BSc Statistics with Finance UCAS course code L250 BSc/IntRel VL12 BSc/IRHis M100 LLB/Law N200 BSc/Man GL11 BSc/MathEc G1L1 BSc/MathEc LV15 BSc/PhilEc V503 BSc/Phil LV25 BSc/PP L601 BA/SocAnth L603 BSc/SocAnt L400 BSc/SocPol LM42 BSc/SPCr LLK1 BSc/SPE LL42 BSc/SocPGo LL34 BSc/SPSoc L301 BSc/Soc G3N3 BSc/StatFin Page 73 71 77 80 81 82 84 85 68 48 48 88 89 89 90 91 93 52 .Degree programmes and codes undergraduate prospectus 3 Degree programmes and codes Degree BSc Accounting and Finance BSc Actuarial Science BA Anthropology and Law BSc Business Mathematics and Statistics BSc Economic History BSc Economic History with Economics BSc Economics BSc Economics and Economic History BSc Economics with Economic History BSc Econometrics and Mathematical Economics BSc Environment and Development BSc Environmental Policy with Economics BA Geography BSc Geography with Economics BSc Government BSc Government and Economics BSc Government and History BA History UCAS course code NN34 BSc/AccFin N321 BSc/ActSci ML16 BA/AnthLaw G0N0 BSc/BMS V300 BSc/EcHist V3L1 BSc/EcHEc L101 BSc/Econ VL31 BSc/EcEcH L1V3 BSc/EcEcH L140 BSc/Ecomt FK84 BSc/EnvDev F9L1 BSc/EPEc L702 BA/Geog L7L1 BSc/GeogE L230 BSc/Gov LL12 BSc/GovEco LV21 BSc/GovHis V146 BA/Hist Page 44 50 47 51 54 55 58 56 59 60 62 63 64 65 67 68 68 70 Degree BSc International Relations BSc International Relations and History LLB Bachelor of Laws BSc Management BSc Mathematics and Economics BSc Mathematics with Economics BSc Philosophy and Economics BSc Philosophy.

and a range of independent and authoritative assessments have judged the School to be among the world's leading institutions for study of the social sciences. This can be an exploration of theoretical or technical developments in an academic subject. The School’s international reputation and London location ensure that in times of crisis it is often to LSE that the media turn first for a response. cosmopolitan and very much a part of the “real world”. is a prominent expert on happiness and well being. Why choose LSE? The School’s location in central London is fundamental to its identity. The focus of our teaching is on helping you to learn some of the different ways to test your – and other people’s – ideas: and. “to understand the causes of things” In . Government. Each year. The School offers courses not only in economics and political science. you are choosing not only a programme of study. many influential outside speakers come to the School (politicians. When you choose to be an undergraduate at LSE. including the basis of the modern welfare state and the development of free-market economics. and from the easy interchange of ideas between the School and the world outside. from its active academic debate on current social. taught within a number of departments and interdisciplinary institutes. It is the only university in the UK specialising in the study of the social sciences. or centre!) way to solve the world's problems. with radically differing experiences. we expect students to take at least one course in a subject outside their particular specialism. in the words of our motto. Professor David Metcalf is chair of the independent UK Migration Advisory Committee. while enjoying the cultural. views and beliefs. LSE offers you the opportunity – and the challenge – to study different ways of understanding human society together with people from all parts of the world. It is stimulating. the Law Courts and the media are all on the School’s doorstep. and has a worldwide reputation in the field. to give public lectures and to pursue their own research. but much is also applied to topical and practical concerns. If you welcome the stimulus of new experiences and ideas in a lively capital city – then choose LSE. outside Britain. Tony Travers (London and local government) and Professor Danny Quah (the weightless economy) will all be familiar names to the average news addict. For instance. Parliament. Professor Anne Power (housing policy).4 undergraduate prospectus About LSE About LSE The London School of Economics and Political Science – LSE – offers a unique opportunity to study the social sciences in a university institution with a worldwide academic reputation. industrialists) as well as leading academics from all around the world who visit to participate in teaching. Many past and present members of staff act as expert advisers to political parties. economic and political concerns. Professor Conor Gearty (human rights). business leaders. and interact within. social groupings. In the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise the School had the highest percentage of world leading research of any university in the country. founder of the Centre for Economic Performance. social and recreational facilities of one of the world's great capital cities. the Civil Service and policy pressure groups. LSE’s academic departments have also achieved outstanding results in the HEFCE/QAA teaching quality assessment/subject review exercises. The social sciences offer a number of ways of investigating and thinking about these questions: they do not teach you a “right” (or left. but also in a wide range of social science subjects. and about half the student body are postgraduates). rather than over green fields. Many influential developments in thinking about society. What we study LSE seeks to promote the impartial pursuit of knowledge and understanding about how people organise themselves into. The structure of our degrees emphasises the need for self study and rigorous intellectual skills where an individual student’s opinion . rerum cognoscere causas. we seek to make our work practical and relevant to the real world. in an atmosphere that encourages you to question ideas and to seek solutions to problems. but a place to live and work for three years. Professor Nicholas Stern (climate change). These qualities derive from the variety of its staff and students (about half our undergraduate students come from Who chooses LSE? Students who choose LSE are intent on experiencing an active and varied undergraduate programme. Emeritus Professor Lord Wallace is a government whip in the coalition government and Emeritus Professor Lord Layard. LSE looks out over the London skyline. most of our degrees. While aiming for the highest standards of independent judgement. the business and financial institutions of the City. economics and politics have originated in work carried out at the School. Teaching draws on the insights derived from our academic staff's current research. LSE is compact and full to the brim with students and staff – this just contributes to the vitality and friendliness of the place.

9% .matters.6% Asia 29. and from all social.1% North America 6. educational and ethnic backgrounds.200 new students enrol in September each year.5% Male postgraduates 28% Female postgraduates 30.6% Africa 1. If you are the kind of student who enjoys being challenged – intellectually.800 undergraduate students drawn from all over the world. The School has around 3. socially and personally – then LSE is an institution you should consider for your undergraduate degree programme. Undergraduate students by domicile UK 51.6% Rest of Europe 10.5% Other 0.6% Female undergraduates 20.6% Total students Male undergraduates 20. Approximately 1.

Our degrees also expect that you will have excellent skills in spoken and written English. and on the subject being studied. such as International Relations and History or with one major subject and one minor. at the other end you will find mathematics and related subjects. for most degrees. each subject has its own section describing the degrees and courses available. such as Geography with Economics. however. Lectures are attended by all the students taking the course (and some attending out of general interest). All subjects taught at LSE provide a useful intellectual training in different approaches to social questions. projects and other course work assignments make up a full working week. work in class and written work submitted for the class. More information about teaching and learning at LSE and the transition from school to university can be found at lse. for the programmes we offer. Further on in this prospectus. course during the year. Some subjects have a direct vocational or professional link. our students spend at least double the amount of contact time pursuing their own research. Some degrees give exemptions from certain professional examinations (details are given in the section on each subject). All first year undergraduate students take the LSE100 course. Lectures are not compulsory but are strongly recommended. in traditional academic subjects. on a popular course. but our degrees are intended to provide students with a sound intellectual background rather than professional training. The student’s academic adviser receives these reports and although they do not contribute to the final degree result. However. but the associated reading and writing of essays. and will require you to contribute to class discussion and produce course essays throughout your time at the School.uk/tlc LSE degrees Most of our degrees allow you to combine study in more than one subject either for joint honours. We do not. We believe that. made up of full and half unit courses. For the classes.6 undergraduate prospectus LSE degrees LSE degrees At LSE. from a range of courses in any other subject taught within the School to enable you to approach your main area of study in a more inclusive and holistic way. Classes. or equivalent. in which you work through questions and problems raised in the lectures and present and discuss your own papers or essays. In each course. and good grades at A level. you will have the chance to study a broad range of subjects. Our students go on to a range of careers which are rarely restricted by the choice of degree subject. ensuring students have a solid understanding of their subjects. running in parallel. which introduces students to the elements of thinking as a social scientist. The format for classes varies considerably depending on the subject and level but you are usually expected to submit two written pieces of work per LSE 100 The LSE Course: Understanding the causes of things LSE100 introduces first year undergraduates to the fundamental elements of thinking as a social scientist by . We believe that success in your degree and in your subsequent career is best achieved by choosing subjects that interest you and that you are good at. eg. In some courses. some of them you may have studied in school. The taught elements of our degrees are intended only as a framework around which each student must work. are obligatory and you are expected to prepare and fully participate in every class you attend. ie. In almost all our degrees. allowing you a structure for your own research and reading.  Teaching methods LSE believes in a traditional approach to teaching. they can affect whether the student is allowed to continue on the course and to take the examination. teaching consists of a mixture of lectures and linked classes. our degrees are designed to allow (and sometimes require) you to explore unfamiliar subjects. we do expect you to have good grades at GCSE (or equivalent) including Mathematics. like law or actuarial science. there could be as many as 300 students in a lecture. Class teachers report each term on each student’s attendance. We expect that in addition to formal contact time. plus LSE100 in the first and second years. expect you to have A level or previous qualifications in the subjects you wish to study at LSE. Management. you are allocated to a much smaller group of usually no more than 15. you normally take the equivalent of four courses in each year. At one end of the spectrum are subjects you might consider “arts” subjects like history. See Language studies (page 74) for more information. A modern foreign language option is generally available on those degree programmes which offer an outside option. the two functions of lectures and classes may be combined in seminars or small group tutorials: this may depend on the numbers taking the course. a high level of academic ability and commitment is more important than previous subject knowledge. Almost all require or allow you to choose at least one “outside” option.ac. Others draw on different subjects to provide an interdisciplinary approach to a particular topic. some will be new to you. A typical undergraduate timetable involves 9 to 15 hours of teaching per week.

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as well as an examination at the end. • All major changes to existing courses and programmes go to this committee as well.uk/calendar. LSE100 aims to produce students whose intellectual grounding in their discipline is complemented by an understanding of different ways of thinking. Each year the School conducts a comprehensive survey of students’ opinions of the teaching they have received. Focusing on “big” questions – such as “How should we manage climate change?”. This activity is conducted through several School committees. External systems 2008 HEFCE Research Assessment Exercise The Research Assessment Exercise (RAE) is a UK-wide assessment of research excellence at universities undertaken by the Higher Education Funding Council every five to seven years. including individual course guides and other information relating to the administration of our degrees is published in the School’s Calendar at the start of each session at lse. with the School topping or coming close to the top of a number of rankings of research excellence.  • Examiners from outside the School take part each year in setting examinations. and their comments and suggestions are taken very seriously. Examination and assessment Like our teaching methods. Examination is mostly by three hour unseen examination.ac. such as the Library and IT services. In this way. drawing on a broad range of disciplines across the social sciences. • Student views are very important as a measure of teaching quality. in many courses. In almost all degrees. not just the department putting the proposal forward. It also contains a Code of Good Practice for Undergraduate Programmes which describes the obligations which staff and students have to each other in the organisation and maintenance of the process of teaching and learning. course work assignments or project reports as part of the examination. reviewing results and deciding on degrees awarded. Learning and Assessment Committee by a team with internal and external members. Students will take the first half of LSE100 in the Lent term of their first year and the second half in the Michaelmas term of their second year. there is also a requirement to submit special essays. Further information about LSE100 can be found at lse. • The quality of each department’s educational provision is reviewed at five yearly intervals on behalf of the School’s Teaching. LSE has a traditional approach to examinations and assessments. There are also regular surveys on support facilities. In addition.ac. • External examiners also report to the School on standards and quality.uk/lse100 Programme regulations Detailed programme regulations.exploring real problems and real questions. each department has a staff/student committee. Proposed changes for future years are also published as they become available. The most recent RAE took place in 2008 and the results confirmed LSE’s position as a world leading research university. alternative forms of explanation and different strategies for abstraction and modelling that are used in the different social sciences. . Academic integrity LSE seeks to maintain the standard and quality of its teaching by using a range of different systems and measures: Internal systems • All proposals for new courses and programmes are considered carefully by a committee drawn from all teaching departments. all of which have student members. which is in turn represented on a Schoolwide undergraduate student forum. The course is assessed on the basis of writing assignments and in-class activities over the two terms. students are examined at the end of each year in the courses taken in that year. “Does culture matter?” and “Why are great events so difficult to predict?” – students explore the different types of evidence.

and this is by far the best result for any history degree in the UK.83 1224. It draws on multi-archival research to re-examine the final year of the First World War from an international perspective and to analyse the positions of both sides. LSE departments come top nationally by grade point average in Economics. with Anthropology coming second. These factors. My most recent book is With Our Backs to the Wall: Victory and Defeat in 1918. to include imperial. cultural. 1914-1918” as well as on the graduate courses “Crisis Decision-Making in War and Peace.84 32 26 27 70 73 66 I joined LSE in 1982 as a lecturer and became a professor of International History in 1998. This chair was endowed by Sir Daniel Stevenson (no relation of mine!) in 1932.ac. The skills our undergraduates and postgraduates acquire make them highly employable across a wide range of sectors. We interpret international history broadly. and although we are particularly strong on the twentieth century we offer courses on all periods since 1500. and strategic as well as political and diplomatic topics. More information about the RAE and individual subject areas can be found at lse. Indeed. Key: FTEs – full time equivalents GPA – Grade Point Average.57 1792.uk/RAE2008 .94 2. it reveals that the Allies’ eventual success was due to new organisational methods of managing men and material and to increased combat effectiveness resulting partly from technological innovation. law.96 2. taking into account the relative size of Unit of Assessment submissions within an institution 4* – world leading in terms of originality. and international business. combined with Germany’s disastrous military offensive in spring 1918. Among other things. I was appointed Stevenson Professor of International History in 2011.68 2. significance and rigour 3* – internationally excellent in terms of originality.2008 RAE rankings Rank 1 2= Institution University of Cambridge The London School of Economics and Political Science University of Oxford Imperial College London University College London Total FTEs submitted 2040. The Department of International History provides students with the opportunity to take specialised courses based upon the latest scholarly research. the media. Law and Social Policy.39 490. Our coverage is global.36 GPA 2. including government.98 2. My research interests lie in the origins. ensured an Allied victory – but not a conclusive German defeat. and impact of the First World War and international relations in Europe during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. 1914-2003” and “European Integration in the Twentieth Century”. the 2011 National Student Survey noted that 85 per cent of LSE history students secured graduatelevel jobs within six months of graduation. LSE is the institution with the greatest percentage of 4* research attributed to the academics submitted to the RAE. teaching. I currently teach about these areas on the undergraduate course “The Great War. significance and rigour Individual subject areas at LSE also head national tables of excellence.96 % 4* for the institution 32 35 % 4* or 3* for the institution 71 68 David Stevenson Stevenson Professor of International History 2= 4 5 2245. An exceptional wealth of primary source materials are available in London for student dissertations. course.

and supports a lively variety of affiliated social. in addition to tuition fees. film. London offers students an unparalleled environment in which to live and study. at little or no cost. to the homes of internationally renowned sporting events such as Wimbledon and to the many unique and varied parts of London – whether your taste is for chic boutiques and bright city lights.000 and the total for a 12 month calendar year = £12. Information on working during your studies can be found at lse.000. restaurants and bars. jazz and Latin • over 150 films (including late night shows) • over 100 theatres (and over 30 fringe events) • over 100 comedy venues • over 125 art galleries and visual arts presentations • over 100 nightclubs and discos • events in nearly 25 different sports • over a dozen dance performances and courses The School itself offers a very wide range of activities to its students.000 per month for living costs. it is possible to live economically in the capital by taking advantage of reduced price services and facilities on campus and beyond. tube or even river boat will bring you to the wide open spaces of the Royal Parks or Hampstead Heath. We advise that the total for a nine month academic year = £9. political and ethnic clubs and societies. the Royal Opera House and the British Library and Museum are right on your doorstep. making the most of student discounts and concessions in shops. International in flavour. shopping or even green spaces and the great outdoors.  Whether you are into art. The Students’ Union has its own newspaper. A short journey by bus. Educational benefits include libraries. The Beaver.uk/careersService LSE makes broad estimates of the costs of living in the London area and these are available on the School's website. A map of the local area can be found in the flap of the back cover. It is a centre for government and law. films and concerts. Whatever your interests or appetite you will find something to suit your palate and pocket in this truly international capital. London’s listing magazines are likely to tell you about: • over 300 venues for all kinds of music including classical/opera. the West End. dance. found that London is the most costeffective place to study in the UK because of the range of part-time work opportunities available in the capital and the higher rates of pay on offer. As a student at LSE you will be studying in the heart of a multicultural city alongside students from across the world. Living costs The perceived cost of living and studying in London is a concern for many students. the School estimates that students should allow about £1. rock.ac. The most important consideration is that you must satisfy yourself and the relevant authorities that you have sufficient funds to cover your entire period of study. vibrant and colourful city. there are many social events and entertainments throughout the year. Major cultural attractions such as theatreland. folk and country. sport. However. with many places of interest within easy walking distance. and by avoiding touristy areas of the city. a survey published by NatWest Bank. .10 undergraduate prospectus Life at LSE Life at LSE London is an exciting. London really does have it all. or quirky cafés and a village atmosphere. In any one week. architecture. professional institutes and all the resources of the University of London. It is truly one of the most dynamic and exciting cities in the world. Europe's leading financial market and a style setting centre of cultural life. roots. reggae and soul. music. For 2012/13. theatre. How much you spend in addition to your tuition fees is your decision and these figures are only intended as a guide. In fact the Student Living Index. LSE's weekly Student News lists many public lectures. Living in London Studying at LSE puts you right in the heart of London.

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such as theatre trips or film shows. meals are provided.ac.. Further information on all halls can be found at  lse. Nutford House. near the University of London central precinct.12 undergraduate prospectus Life at LSE Accommodation   Studying at LSE will be full of exciting challenges and for many students it will be their first experience of living independently. or a share in a flat or house. This is a selfcatered residence.uk * In exceptional circumstances the School reserves the right to reject qualifying applicants at its discretion.   The decision to create LSE was made by four leading members of the Fabian Society at a breakfast party in Surrey in August 1894.uk/accommodation Unlike many other European cities. In each residence there is a student committee to organise regular events.london. Graham Wallas and George Bernard Shaw.ac. whatever their home address or year of study. in the heart of London’s Theatreland. a studio. may be given priority for residences most suited to their needs. High Holborn has a fixed undergraduate/graduate mix. Carr-Saunders.uk/student Private accommodation Both the LSE and the University of London Housing Services offer a comprehensive support service to students seeking housing in the private sector.ac. Further information and advice about the service offered is available online at lse.uk/accommodation Tel: +44 (0)20 7955 7531 Fax: +44 (0)20 7955 7717 Email: Accommodation@lse. evening meals are provided.  Further information is available online at lse. College Hall. please contact the Disability and Wellbeing Office at disability-dyslexia@lse.uk LSE and University of London accommodation LSE offers a variety of styles of accommodation. providing a pathway to independence and establishing networks of friends that last a life time.ac. Rosebery and Bankside are catered halls. Bankside. The University of London also has intercollegiate halls which accommodate approximately 20 per cent of LSE first year undergraduate students. central London is mostly made up of offices and shops. There are five LSE Halls of Residence for undergraduate students: • Bankside House: 587 places in mainly single rooms.ac. This might be a room in a family house or flat.ac. . located just south of the Thames. Passfield and Rosebery are predominantly undergraduate in mix. We recognise that. • Passfield Hall: 100 single. Passfield. HughesParry Hall. Students from within London should apply for halls if they require a space and whilst we cannot guarantee making an offer to London students before term starts we would expect all students to be accommodated by the second week of term at the latest. International Hall. aside from your studies. • Carr-Saunders Hall: 132 single rooms and 12 twin rooms in the West End. next door to the Tate Modern gallery. Passfield and Carr-Saunders offer meals as part of the accommodation fees. many with private bathroom facilities. 42 twin and 14 treble rooms in a Georgian terrace overlooking a tree lined square in Bloomsbury. DID YOU KNOW.uk/accommodation and halls. It is not uncommon to spend up to 45 minutes travelling between the School and private accommodation. one of the most important aspects of your time in London is likely to be the place in which you live. near the Telecom Tower and Tottenham Court Road.. Disabled students. The School is able to offer accommodation to all first year undergraduate students and General Course students*. one meal a day (dinner) is included in the fees. • High Holborn: 448 spaces just a short walk from the School. Canterbury Hall and Connaught Hall. For further information. They were Beatrice and Sidney Webb. Residences offer a supportive environment for those living away from home for the first time. Carr-Saunders. There are seven mixed halls: Commonwealth Hall. • Rosebery Avenue Hall: 289 single (some equipped with mobility aids for wheelchair users) and 13 twin rooms close to Sadler's Wells Theatre.

Please check their website for more up to date prices. All provide vegetarian food.Life at LSE undergraduate prospectus 13 Costs and facilities LSE Halls* Rosebery Avenue Intercollegiate Halls** Commonwealth Nutford House 199 136-184 129 NO YES YES YES YES YES NO 25‡ Carr-Saunders High Holborn Hughes-Parry Number of spaces £ Price per week of a single room † £ Price per week of a shared room † Self-catering Meals provided* Games room Common room/Bar Launderette Central heating Parking Time to LSE on foot 587 157-170 91-104 ++ YES YES YES YES YES + 25 156 151 110-119 + YES YES YES YES YES NO 25 448 198-237 128 YES NO YES YES YES YES NO 10 226 160-170 95-134 + YES YES YES YES YES + 20 315 124-152 93-107 + YES YES YES YES YES NO 25 228 170-210 N/A  NO YES YES YES YES YES NO 20 270 195-239 N/A NO YES YES YES YES YES NO 20 414 170-210 167 NO YES YES YES YES YES NO 20 207 162-220 147 NO YES YES YES YES YES NO 20 300 170-188 132-169 NO YES YES YES YES YES NO 20 535 180-224 N/A  NO YES YES YES YES YES NO 15 * LSE Halls meals consist of breakfast (replaced by brunch at weekends) and dinner (with the exception of Carr-Saunders and Passfield Hall where only dinner is provided). ‡ Journey time by underground. + Limited facilities are available. † Rates quoted are approximate for the 2013/14 session. Meals are paid for separately. All halls provide vegetarian food. except at Passfield Hall and Carr-Saunders where the rates shown include meals. International Connaught Canterbury Bankside Passfield College . ** Intercollegiate Halls room rates include breakfast and dinner each day for all halls. ++ Approximately only 100 rooms will have access to a kitchen.

Responsible not only for representing students. For more information. There are four full-time paid Sabbatical .uk/restaurantsAndCafes LSE Students’ Union LSE Students’ Union is dedicated to the welfare and representation of more than 9. which provide quality food at affordable prices. LSE’s Catering Services have been awarded Fair Trade Status for our commitment to offering products and services from fairly traded sources.Food and drink Our catering facilities offer a wide range of food and drink together with the opportunity to socialise with friends and colleagues. It also runs a number of bars and cafés which serve quality food and drink at good prices. which gives you access to all aspects of the Students’ Union. and is home to a vast array of sports clubs and societies. and shops which sell everything from snacks and stationery to hoodies and birthday cards. In essence it is responsible for almost every aspect of the social experience at LSE. please see  lse. together with two student pubs. the George IV and the Three Tuns. Every LSE student is automatically a member. Everything from joining one of the large variety of sports clubs and societies to getting discounted membership to the gym.ac.000 students. it also runs an Advice and Support Service. There are numerous restaurants and cafés on campus.

and the premises include a number of facilities shared by University of London students. ULU is housed nearby in Malet Street. discussion and decision making. and is responsible for the management of shared University of London sports facilities. For more information about sustainability at LSE visit lse. All societies are student run so it is a great chance to get involved. bars. the termly journal.   LSE’S environmental policy achieved national recognition in 2011 when it attained a “first” for its commitment to systemic environmental management and its environmental performance in the 2011 People and Planet Green League. right and centre compete for the hearts and minds of the uncommitted. Advice and support The Students’ Union Advice and Support Service offers all LSE students free. through lobbying and activism. Our Athletics Union is home to nearly 40 clubs for a wide range of sports. Pulse. There is a gym on campus. Issues can range from the local. such as the University of London Boat House at Chiswick. few students can resist at least one visit to this hotbed of debate. RAG RAG (Raising And Giving) is your outlet for all things altruistic. ULU offers a number of specialist sports clubs that cannot be catered for at single colleges. This is the third year that the School has achieved a first in the Green League. and the Clare Market Review. The crucible for debate is the weekly Union General Meeting where left. ULU runs sports leagues and competitions across London universities. Education Officer. The facilities available include a 25 acre sports ground at New Malden. there are facilities which cater to other sports like basketball. Media The Students’ Union also has an active media group made up of four different outlets: our weekly newspaper the Beaver. our radio station. and are entitled to make use of ULU's extensive facilities without payment of any extra membership fee. table tennis and squash. Community and Welfare Officer and Activities and Development Officer. which has ranked LSE as 22nd out of the 142 institutions ranked in this year’s table. Surrey. like cuts to higher education and unpaid internships. as well as facilities for martial arts. RAG week is held in the middle of Michaelmas term. called Berrylands which is a short train journey away from campus. This is done through the big events in the term like “Battle of the Halls” and “Freshers’ Ball” and also by coordinating with other student groups to put on events of their own. our student film group. For more information on the LSE Students’ Union visit lsesu. support and representation on a range of issues that you may face during your time at the School. LooSE TV.ac.com DID YOU KNOW.. Student activities Societies With over 150 societies in the Students’ Union. you can be sure that there is something to cater to your interests. but there’s always room for more. There is also a part-time paid Postgraduate Officer as well as part time officers who represent the many different groups of students on campus on a range of issues which effect them.uk/sustainableLSE . Bloomsbury. Campaigns The Students’ Union aims to improve the lives of students. cricket and rugby. to national issues.. Teams compete in a variety of competitions including those hosted by the British Universities and Colleges Sport (BUCS) and University of London Union. The newspaper London Student is also run by ULU. the General Secretary (often called president at other unions). Sports Sports enthusiasts won’t be disappointed by the activities on offer. cafés. shops and other recreation facilities. such as library opening times and printer facilities. Nearby. including a swimming pool. both present and future. All give students a great opportunity to make themselves heard and get real experience of operating within different fields of the media. University of London Union All registered students of the School are automatically members of the University of London Union (ULU) as well as the LSE Students’ Union. as well as a bar and dining facilities. We intend to continue to build on this success. rowing and tennis.Life at LSE undergraduate prospectus 15 Officers that are elected to represent you as students. LSE is famous for the political activism of its students. have a great time and leave your mark on the Students’ Union. More information about this service can be found on page 16. RAG is the fundraising body on campus and works to raise money for a variety of charities. ensuring that all students at LSE understand sustainability and contribute to creating a global sustainability culture. and is when everyone on campus gets together to raise as much money as possible in a week. Many former students maintain that they learned more discussing in the Tuns and the Quad then they ever did in class. independent and confidential advice. From knitting to investment there is something for pretty much everyone. At Berrylands you’ll find space that caters to a variety of outdoor sports such as football. The variety of societies changes with each new group of students that comes and goes.

uk/studentfinance.ac. UK students may be eligible for a Disabled Student Allowance to fund disabilityrelated costs. chaired by the Chaplain. To find a list of practices in your area visit nhs.gov. LSE Student Counselling Service This is a free and confidential service for all LSE students. make a preliminary visit to the School.ac. such as dyslexia and autism. Others are advised to maintain private insurance.ac. There are places for 63 children of students and staff of the School. The Chaplain is available to students of any faith or none for pastoral conversation and he organises regular services and special events for the whole School such as the Christmas Carol Service and a Multi-faith Act of Remembrance on Holocaust Memorial Day. There are advisers for students with mental health and well-being issues. Information about the NHS and how to register/make use of its services is available at lse.16 undergraduate prospectus Student services Student services LSE provides a range of support services on campus to ensure that the whole student experience is as rewarding and enjoyable as possible.lse. there may be a waiting list.uk/TLC) and provides a first point of contact for prospective and current disabled students. with representatives from each of the religious societies. The Student Counselling Service web page has further information and links to self-help websites for students.uk LSE's Disability Equality Scheme can be viewed at: www. Further information is available at lse. Medical Centre A Medical Centre is situated at LSE which provides full NHS services to registered patients and medical care to anyone who becomes ill or needs medical advice while at the LSE campus. This will be a place for quiet meditation and will house a large multi-faith room and purpose-built Islamic prayer rooms.  Disabled students have access to all LSE services and any activities located in rooms with poor physical access will be relocated as required.uk/studentCounsellingService Nursery The School provides a nursery for children between the ages of six months and five years.uk Dental Service A dental service is available at the School.  of the Teaching and Learning Centre (lse.uk/collections/ planningAndCorporatePolicy/pdf/ disabilityEqualityScheme. you should register with a local GP. The Disability and Well-being Service is part LSE Students’ Union Advice and Support Service The Students’ Union Advice and Support Service offers all LSE students free. and other impairments or long term medical conditions.ac.ac. A charge is made for dental services.uk/medicalCentre If you live outside the immediate area of the School. Overseas students on full-time programmes lasting six months or longer are eligible to use the National Health Service on the same terms as UK residents. More information can be found at lse.pdf Faith Centre LSE will be opening its state of the art Faith Centre as part of the new Students’ Centre in 2013. where possible. including halls of residence in the SE1 postcode. note-takers and support assistants • LSE Circles Network of peer support • Practical support provided by a Community Service Volunteer (CSV) • A room with bed and easy chairs • A Disability Equality Research Network for researchers who are disabled and/or researching disability An Individual Student Support Agreement (ISSA) records agreed “reasonable adjustments” for individual students and is circulated with the student's consent on a need-to-know basis. The Centre will be overseen by the School’s Interfaith Forum. From year to year.ac. which aims to help you cope more effectively with any personal or study related difficulties. The nursery is open for 50 weeks of the year including all term time.uk/nursery Disabled students (including students with dyslexia and long term medical conditions) Disability equality is a shared responsibility at LSE and disability is viewed as a valuable aspect of the diversity of the student body. specific learning differences/neurodiversity. He is supported by Associate Chaplains of different denominations and faiths. The Disability and Well-being Service can help you to access DSA services. including students with long term medical conditions and/or dyslexia. . It is advisable to start the process early. You can contact the Disability and Well-being Service by telephone: +44 (0)20 7955 7767 or by email: Disability-Dyslexia@lse. Additional facilities include: • A Neurodiversity Interest Group • Resources via Moodle and the  brainhe. Further details are available at direct. Prospective students are encouraged to make early contact with the office and. support and representation on a range of issues that you may face during your time at the School. independent and confidential advice.com website • Library assistance • Assistive software and specialist IT • Accessible and adapted rooms in halls of residence • Infra-red hearing support systems in all lecture theatres and larger classrooms • Readers.

Since mentoring groups often include students from the same department.ac. including sexual harassment. legal matters. and if we cannot advise you we can help you find someone who can. and many other areas. the advice Adviser to Male Students A member of the academic staff acts as the Adviser to Male Students. working visas after your studies. visa correction.  Further details can be found at lse. council tax. The new Students’ Centre is scheduled for completion in March 2013 and will include a number of student-facing services such as the Students’ Union reception. harassment.Our team of advisers will provide you with expert knowledge and impartial support on academic misconduct and appeals. including sexual . and to offer advice and support to male students with personal problems. women's right to choose and childcare costs. homelessness. tenancy contracts. Hardship funds are also available to help with unexpected medical costs. the site will become a student hub at the heart of LSE’s campus and should add significant value to the student experience at LSE. Housing the Students’ Union. periodically arrange opportunities for their mentoring groups to get together. budgeting. repeating students’ costs.  Adviser to Women Students A member of the academic staff acts as the Adviser to Women Students. They provide a friendly face for incoming students and information on the wide range of support services available at the School. We have a range of resources to help you. Mentors are mainly second and third year undergraduate students who have first-hand experience of studying at LSE. Student Mentoring scheme All new undergraduate students are automatically allocated a trained LSE Student Mentor. and to offer advice and support to women students with personal problems. She is available to discuss all issues of concern to women students in the School. We can also provide independent support and representation through a number of School procedures.uk/studentMentoring Mentors are in touch by email in midSeptember to answer any questions that come up before arriving. housing disrepair. The adviser has a positive commitment to increase awareness in the School of matters which concern women students and to take new initiatives which may improve the quality of life for women students in the future. this is a great chance to meet others who may share similar interests. Students’ Centre  LSE is seeking to transform the student social experience by building an exceptional new students’ centre. He is available to discuss any issues of concern to male students in the School. debt. landlord and tenant disputes. and offer confidential email advice and support throughout the entire first academic year.

A comprehensive list of recent graduate destinations can be found at lse. visit lse. and offices dealing with residences. organisational. go on to undertake academic research. term-time jobs to help you finance your study. study skills at the LSE Teaching and Learning Development Centre. helping you to develop entrepreneurial skills and develop your ambitions to work in social enterprise or start up your own business venture. We also run an extensive programme of careers fairs and forums. network with potential employers. Our students have exclusive access to extensive online careers . which will include a gym and dance studio. problem solving. a pub. IT skills with LSE IT Services. law. You can develop language skills at the LSE Language Centre. Entrepreneurship support Venture@LSECareers is our entrepreneurship and enterprise service. entrepreneurship. These events are your opportunity to learn about your future career options from the experts. LSE students and alumni can make appointments with our experienced team for careers advice. and targeted at the career needs of LSE students. sports and the Students' Union. industrial and commercial management. Syllabuses are generally wide and comparatively flexible and. large venue spaces. skills sessions and recruiter-in-residence sessions with top employers. vacation work or part-time. as well as part-time and vacation work. a media centre. Your future LSE graduates make their careers in a wide range of occupations and the choice of careers is extensive. Careers appointments LSE students have access to one-to-one careers appointments whilst at LSE and for up to two years after graduation.ac. LSE Careers can help you find your dream job. Careers events We offer a wide ranging programme of events designed to prepare students for the world of work.uk/venture for more information. See lse. find out more about individual organisations and develop specific skills that are crucial to success in both the graduate recruitment process and wider workplace. or enter journalism. internships.ac. find expert posts as economists. All are designed to provide a foundation for career development and you should read the more detailed sections on individual degrees in this prospectus for specific information. international organisations. and written and communication skills. which you can gain from activities with LSE clubs. business and creative skills. Each academic department has a dedicated careers adviser who runs specific careers information sessions. IT. or by undertaking voluntary work organised by the Volunteer Centre.ac. We offer a wide range of information and advice about graduate occupations. Graduates find employment in a range of occupations in areas such as finance.18 undergraduate prospectus Student services and representation centre. including master classes focusing on developing entrepreneurship and communication skills and a programme of seminars and workshops designed to help students market themselves to employers and to succeed at interviews and assessment centres. societies. numerical. policy and consultancy. To find out more about what LSE Careers offers. researched and written by LSE careers service staff. through which you can also view our events calendar. for this reason. qualify you for some exemptions in the respective professional examinations in later training. There is one golden rule to follow in choosing your programme: choose the subjects you like and are good at. lawyers or statisticians. CV and cover letter advice and practice interviews. and host many employer presentations. a fitness centre. together with the LSE Careers Service. and communication skills by participating in the LSE Student Tutoring Scheme. This is our online career management tool.ac. banking. sabbatical and general manager's offices. because of their content.uk/graduateDestinations Career considerations when choosing a programme Some degree programmes may. which takes place in schools in London. a learning space. you can search for current job vacancies at “My Careers Service”.uk/careersService Careers and employability LSE Careers can help you develop a plan of action and realise your career plans successfully. consultancy. join central or local government NGOs. LSE Careers encourages students to recognise and develop these skills from an early stage and to relate them to employer needs and activities in their applications. Each year we host sector specific careers fairs and forums covering sectors including advertising. both in the UK and overseas.uk/newStudentsCentre information resources. Our experienced team of careers advisers and information staff are committed to the personal and professional development of every LSE student and can provide assistance and advice. Whatever your aims. Your job search Whether you are looking for full-time graduate vacancies. Further information can be found at lse. Most courses at LSE will enable you to develop analytical. These can be complemented by team. Gaining employability skills We encourage students to start thinking about their career and begin gathering information long before graduation. employers and graduate study. accommodation. you ought not to allow your choice of programme to be dominated by thoughts of future careers unless you are firmly committed to a specific programme for professional reasons. book one-to-one careers advice and CV advice appointments and register your occupational interests to receive targeted careers emails. They may enter the teaching profession. an interfaith prayer centre. work experience. themed to match the career aspirations of LSE students. media.

000 e-journals and e-books. and throughout the year on finding. political science and the social. facilities and support. IT facilities on campus There are around 1. laptops that can be borrowed for use in the Library. The Library ensures there are multiple copies of books on your reading lists. It is also open for 24 hours from the beginning of the Lent term until the end of the examination period. economic and international aspects of history.Academic support services LSE provides a range of resources and services to help you make the most of your studies. high specification PCs. We are committed to user satisfaction and we always welcome feedback from our users. manuscripts. As an LSE student you will also have access to most libraries of other University of London colleges. sociology. relax with friends and have something to eat. with new services added regularly to enhance the user experience. power points. quiet and silent work. To find out more about the Library. excluding Easter week. a relaxing room in which concerts are often held. The Library’s services extend well beyond our physical walls. and material which we collect and preserve in digital formats via the LSE Digital Library. The Library is an ideal place to study with hundreds of study spaces and PCs. half of which are located . It has been recognised by the Higher Education Funding Council as one of only five National Research Libraries in England and its collections have been designated by the Museums. LSE Library Services LSE’s Library was founded in 1896 and is the major international library of the social sciences. abroad or on campus. and we also purchase e-book versions wherever possible. web pages and guides. The Library’s collections cover the social sciences in the widest sense.uk/library Information technology services IT Services provides a wide range of services. and high quality help. with extensive collections and high quality services to support your work. We also have different zones for group. The Library has an exceptional electronic collection containing over 60. The “Escape” area in the Library entrance lets you take a break from your studies. and videos showing you how to use key Library services. advice and training. LSE has a vibrant and modern Library service. wireless access. initially on topics like “How to find items on your reading list”. The vast majority of our electronic resources can be used anytime and at home. archives and rare books that total over four million separate printed items. including high speed network access. All items can easily be located via our Library Catalogue. The Library is open seven days a week during term time and vacations. The LSE Library is housed in the Lionel Robbins Building which is a focal point of the LSE campus and is used extensively by both students and researchers. Additional assistance and services are provided for disabled students. These are available alongside our printed collections of government publications. Libraries and Archives Council as being of outstanding national and international importance. a wealth of statistical materials. Library staff provide varied training. lockers. the Language Centre and your academic adviser. being particularly strong in economics. as well as many other academic libraries in the Greater London area and nationwide. All these will help you to succeed in your chosen degree. visit lse. assessing and using information relevant to your studies. Each academic department has a named contact in the Library who is always happy to assist you in your studies. We have achieved satisfaction ratings in excess of 90 per cent in recent user surveys and we are constantly looking to improve. Our orientation programme at the start of each academic year includes staff greeting people new to the Library. The School also has a separate collection for general literature which is housed in the Shaw Library. and we offer virtual enquiry services that provide support to our users wherever they are. group study rooms and photocopying and printing facilities.000 PCs for students to use on campus.ac. from support for IT and learning technology to the Library.

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Students may use their own computer either by plugging in to a network point in their study bedroom. the system records audio. PC availability. A daily Laptop Surgery provides free advice and hands on assistance with connecting to LSE resources from personally owned laptops and mobile devices. IT Services provides information and help with connecting to the LSE IT environment and accessing services and resources both on campus and off site. All student computer rooms and areas have printing facilities. and most of the larger teaching rooms. NVivo • Geographical analysis software (ArcGIS)  There are also 60 laptops available for LSE students to borrow and use in the Library. Moodle is a secure website which allows course tutors to provide access to a range of learning resources. by email or online. All students have access to Moodle using their LSE network username and password and it is available on and off campus. our aim is to provide you with the highest level of language support throughout your studies. . course and exam timetables. ATLAS. Using your own computer and mobile device Computer ownership is not obligatory. All IT training is provided free of charge for students who wish to improve or extend their IT skills. SPSS.uk/itservices/remote LSE Mobile is a phone app for students which lets you access LSE information such as campus maps.ac. office software and the internet. and an extensive wireless network across the whole campus. but if you do bring your own computer. or in a wireless zone located in the social and recreational areas in residences. However. You can also connect and print to student printers on the main campus and in halls of residence from your laptop.uk/itservices/facilities Specialist facilities are available for disabled students. including dedicated computer workstations and printing facilities. For more information see lse. RSS feeds to interesting sites and blogs.uk LSE Language Centre The LSE Language Centre is unique – no other centre specialises in creating courses targeted to the needs of students and practitioners in the field of social science and related areas of study. Some courses will have a range of features such as online discussions and quizzes. we recommend you use the Remote Desktop. For more information see lse. eg. course content will vary depending on what your tutor has decided to make available.ac. Training workshops run during the Michaelmas and Lent terms. For more information see lse. including: • Microsoft Office (Word.ti. It is particularly useful for students with learning disabilities or whose first language is not English.  Online learning (Moodle) Many courses at LSE provide additional online support through the School’s virtual learning environment: Moodle. PowerPoint. Content is then synchronised into a web page.lse. screen reading and voice recognition software for blind and visually impaired students. which is automatically uploaded for distribution via the School’s virtual learning environment (Moodle). For more information see lse.ac. For more information see lse. These provide access to network file space. If a lecturer has opted to use this service.uk/itservices/lsemobile IT support and training IT support is available through the IT Help Desk in the Library. Online computer training is also available and a wide range of online IT guides offer advice and quick solutions to the most frequently asked IT-related questions. Whether you are going to study a modern foreign language or need to improve your English for Academic Purposes (EAP). There are a small number of open access PCs in each residence computer room as well as printing facilities. STATA • Qualitative analysis software.ac.ac. news and events. without issuing or booking them in advance. SAS. or the online Virtual IT Assistance service – VITA. such as weekly lecture notes and online readings. Off campus. All our language courses utilise the specialist talents of our lecturers who relate their own expertise to the teaching of languages for specific purposes. All our teachers are native speakers who combine extensive teaching experience with an educational background in one or more of the subject specialisms offered at LSE.uk/itservices/accessibility IT facilities in residences All LSE-owned residences are wired for direct connection to the School network.ac.Academic support services undergraduate prospectus 21 in the Library. Access) • Microsoft Outlook and Internet Explorer • Firefox internet browser • Endnote bibliographical software • Quantitative analysis software. video (where cameras are installed) and whatever is displayed on the projector. Excel. There are over 300 laptop data points in the Library for students to get fast access to the internet. The IT Help Desk also provides one-to-one support for disabled students who wish to become familiar with the adaptive technologies and software available at LSE. We also provide free tools to help protect your computer from viruses and spyware. video lectures and the facility to submit assignments online. eg. All networked PCs on campus provide access to common desktop applications and specialist software. your Library account and more from your mobile phone or iPad.uk/itservices/training Lecture capture A fully-automated lecture recording system is installed in all of the lecture theatres. For more information see: moodle.

including English. one-to-one tuition • Language learning support skills. Comparative. Contemporary and European are also generally available on all degree programmes  • Our institution-wide language programme gives students who do not have a language component on their degree programme the chance to learn or improve a modern foreign language. these talks and workshops will help you adapt to the new academic environment.ac. Italian. each department has a departmental tutor responsible for the day-to-day running of undergraduate studies in the department (sometimes those duties are shared with a tutor responsible for a particular degree).lse. LSE Teaching and Learning Centre The LSE Teaching and Learning Centre offers a wide range of development opportunities to complement and strengthen your academic learning. In addition. French. Portuguese. Mandarin. we find that our students can often use some extra advice. problems and suggestions and also chairs the Undergraduate Students’ Consultative Forum. French. Especially if you are studying for the first time in the UK. We encourage students to seek advice from the professionals in order to make the most of their time at the School. Furthermore. Japanese. academic or otherwise.ac. Dean of Undergraduate Studies The Dean of Undergraduate Studies is responsible for the general oversight of the undergraduate student experience. We believe students should be largely responsible for organising their own work to keep up with course requirements. Languages currently offered: Arabic. • Study advice and personal development programme: A series of open lectures and workshops.uk/language Before your programme • An EAP Language Foundation Year for students looking to improve their English language skills. The academic adviser is also there to help with any academic. LSE GROUPS provides the opportunity to participate in a post-exam. designed especially for undergraduates and run with LSE Careers and the LSE Language Centre. effective reading. or which assignment has priority over your time. on which all departments have a student representative. two-week original research project • Learning World: One of the LSE Teaching and Learning Centre’s Moodle sites.uk/tlc and/or the teacher responsible for each course who guides the class teachers. Spanish and Business Chinese  • EAP insessional academic language support  Additional services • Proofreading. All members of academic staff set aside specified times (office hours) when they are free to see any student. advice from LSE staff and links to other student-centred departments. You can log in as a guest (moodle. Russian.ac. Spanish and Mandarin is generally available on those degree programmes which offer an outside option • Literature and society options. methods of assessment and challenges of living in London • LSE GROUPS: Part of the School’s Maximise Your Potential initiative. however. exam preparation and stress management. you may find it hard to decide what combination of courses to choose. which books or articles to read first. German. including the relationship between the academic and administrative aspects of undergraduate teaching and welfare. so the best way of finding out how we can support you is to visit our website lse. For example. administrative or personal questions where the student may not be sure which person or office is responsible. students can turn to their class teacher . who receives regular reports from class teachers and meets with the student during the course of the year to discuss their academic progress. Teachers and academic advisers For guidance about a particular class. Anyone who meets our admission standards should already have a good idea of the kind of skills needed. The LSE Language Centre is constantly reviewing its provision and delivery. consists of three modules which can be booked together or separately • A presessional EAP programme for students who need to develop their English language skills before starting their degree programme  During your studies • LSE offers a free modern foreign language certificate course to UK/EU undergraduate students who do not have a GCSE grade C or equivalent in a foreign language that is not their mother tongue • A modern foreign language and society option in Russian.uk) to get an idea of what Learning World has to offer • A limited number of one-to-one appointments with study advisers (in both quantitative and qualitative subjects) or the Royal Literary Fund Fellow (for writing advice) Further information can be found at lse. German. providing online resources for a range of study-related Academic guidance You will see from the detailed information on LSE programmes and teaching methods that we expect our students to spend a substantial part of their time in guided private study. beginning with an “Introduction to study at LSE” and continuing with topics including essay writing. You may also need extra help with quantitative courses or more general advice on adapting to the LSE academic environment. in addition to the formal instruction provided. The Dean acts as a channel for complaints. each student has an academic adviser. The Dean can also provide individual student counselling for those who are experiencing difficulties.22 undergraduate prospectus Academic support services No other language centre can match our experience in this developing field. Any undergraduate student can consult the Dean on any problem. translation and document authentication.

we attend UCAS and other conventions all over the country and make individual school and college visits. Campus tours will take place at 3pm on the following dates: Wednesday. During these visits we attend education fairs and conventions. Aimed at raising both aspiration and achievement. The tours last approximately 30 minutes and are led by a student guide. 27 June 2012 Booking is essential. There is no need to book in advance. Thursday. irrespective of their background. Our mentors work with students in London schools to help raise awareness and aspirations. and meet students for presentations.ac. receptions and counselling sessions. Priority to some of our initiatives is given to schools performing below the national average.ac.uk/meetLSE Campus tours If you cannot attend the Open Day. LSE CHOICE LSE CHOICE is a programme of Saturday morning sessions. Asia.uk/sroVideos Email an alum The Email an alum service gives you the opportunity to contact recent graduates and find out more about LSE from those with firsthand experience. In 2011/12 over 100 LSE students volunteered in 17 primary schools and secondary schools across eight London boroughs. 6 June 2012 Friday. we organise visits by academic and administrative members of staff to UK and overseas events. the tools to apply successfully to competitive universities.30pm Vacation: Monday – Friday between 11am – 12 noon. colleges and universities. Visitors are not required to book.30-3. with the aim of raising the aspirations of school and college students. both to higher education in general and to LSE specifically. Featured alumni can be found at lse. Our former students are in a unique position to answer your questions on their experiences prior to. can be found at lse.30am and 5pm. classes and seminars which reflect their subject interests. Year 11 Summer Schools Widening participation LSE encourages applications from all students with the very best academic potential. and can be made online at lse. experiencing higher education from the inside. All our work takes place in London. Student Shadowing scheme The Student Shadowing scheme is for sixth form students from London state schools or colleges who are seriously considering applying or have already applied to LSE. Drop in sessions Undergraduate admissions drop-in sessions provide prospective students with one-to-one advice on applying for an undergraduate degree at LSE. visit and discover LSE undergraduate prospectus 23 Meet. 8 June 2012 Alternatively you are welcome to conduct a self-guided tour of LSE on any weekday between 9. these schools are designed in close collaboration with LSE lecturers. Friday between 2. Study at LSE videos A collection of videos explaining why students should consider studying at LSE and how they can apply to the School are available at lse. both in the UK and overseas. The following list of activities includes some examples of current opportunities. Visitors can pick up a copy of LSExplorer from the Student Services Centre (ground floor. you can come along to a campus tour. and receive guidance on UCAS applications. they should just arrive at the Student Services Centre at LSE at 3pm on their chosen date. The 2012 Open Day dates are as follows: Wednesday. Support is given to students to enable them to improve their grades and feel confident about applying to LSE and similar universities.uk/lseVisitsYou LSE Open Days LSE holds two Open Days a year for prospective undergraduates to visit the School.uk/wideningParticipation . 21 March 2012 Wednesday. Students attend lectures. sample its unique atmosphere and meet members of our academic staff together with our current students. run two Open Days and arrange campus tours. the Middle East and in Europe. Full and up-to-date information about LSE visits. during and since their time at the School.ac. Further information can be found at lse. Summer Schools are organised for Year 11 students from London state schools and colleges. LSE visits you LSE representatives regularly visit a range of countries in North and South America. where they will be met by a student ambassador. visit and discover LSE Helping you choose To help all potential students make an informed choice about coming to LSE. and a Summer School designed to give talented young people in Years 12 and 13 from London state schools.Meet. Drop in sessions are open: Term time: Monday – Friday between 11am – 12 noon and Monday. In the UK. with state schools and colleges.ac. Student Tutoring and Mentoring LSE students also have an important role to play in widening participation in the LSE Student Tutoring and Mentoring scheme.uk/emailAnAlum Once you have decided upon a particular programme or area of study you are matched with a current LSE student and invited to spend a morning or afternoon on campus. Old Building) and explore the campus themselves. Africa. Tuesday. careers and key skills. visit schools.ac. The School is involved in a number of widening participation and access initiatives. Current activities involve students from Year 6 to Year 13 in a range of interactive projects.

249 Source: Destinations of Leavers of Higher Education Survey Further information about graduate destinations can be found at lse.24 undergraduate prospectus Graduate careers Graduate careers An LSE education is valued by employers because of the intellectual rigour of its courses. retail.php). in health and local authorities. However.homeoffice. The average salary for LSE undergraduates six months after graduation is £29. Graduate destinations The School is heavily targeted by employers. mainly as trainee accountants. media. you will be able to apply to work in the UK in a different scheme similar to Tier 2 (work category). researchers and analysts. We conduct research into the destinations of graduates six months and three years after graduation. and if you intend to stay in the UK after your studies (and would require a visa to do so) you should consult the information on the LSE website (at lse.uk/visas-immigration/working/) and UKCISA (at ukcisa. . Our students go on to all sorts of careers. The next largest group are those who work in financial services. A degree from LSE is widely recognised internationally. with the proportion in graduate level jobs around 30 per cent higher than the national average. software and electronics companies).uk/isis). there is a broad range of employers and types of work represented in our graduate destinations: management trainees (for example. marketing.ac. lawyers. and graduates from LSE are in great demand. the Tier 1 (Post-Study Work) category will close. personnel officers.uk/student/info_ sheets/working_after_studies.uk/graduateDestinations Working in the UK after graduation Following changes to UK Government policy. the job will have to be “graduate level” and you will have to earn a minimum of £20. publishers and booksellers. After completing your studies. This means you will need to find an employer to sponsor you. UKBA (at ukba. the breadth of the student experience and the global focus of the School. for banks. At the time of writing. gov. transport. the final details of these changes have not been published. engineering. This research continues to demonstrate the employability of LSE graduates. others work in various aspects of finance. in April 2012.org. and our graduates go on to great things in a variety of sectors around the world. There will also be a new Student Entrepreneur route. insurance companies and stockbrokers.000.ac. By far the largest single group of graduates go into further academic study or vocational training (mainly for law). charity and social workers and civil servants. food and drink. even within the early stages of their career.

” Caroline Lindner. motivated and commercially-minded graduates to Allen & Overy. diversity and career motivation of LSE students makes them a great fit for a career with Deloitte member firms. commercial awareness and entrepreneurial drive which make them highly sought after candidates. we’re also guaranteed an exceptional calibre of graduates.” Kelvin Cheung. focused on achieving. backgrounds and degrees. all of which are transferable into a legal career. high-performing graduates. in the top two UK universities for gaining Fast Stream roles.What do employers think about LSE graduates? “LSE graduates demonstrate a mix of sharp analytical ability.” Alex Snelling.” Sally Whitman. Graduate Recruitment Manager at Allen & Overy LLP . proportionately. Studying in a hugely international context set in the cultural melting pot of London further builds their ability to succeed internationally.” Philip Wilson.” Tarek Dawas. interests. Chief Psychologist and Head of Marketing for the Fast Stream “As one of the universities on Deloitte’s Global Universities Program. a desire to achieve and who will ultimately be the future leaders of the organisation. Senior Manager. talent and enthusiasm who have a wide range of experience. The high quality of degree programmes and the general university experience provided by LSE allows graduates to develop a range of skills. we know we’re soon to be joined by a really diverse range of talented individuals. A tremendous record. This is why LSE has been and will continue to be a significant part of our Graduate talent pipeline of diverse individuals who have intellectual curiosity. International Recruitment and Talent Director at The Body Shop “The energy and commitment of the students at our LSE FoodCycle hub is always an inspiration to the community on what young people can achieve if they just put their minds to it. LSE continues to be a source of high quality talent for many of our offices around the world.” Aaliya Jetha. Founder of FoodCycle “At Credit Suisse we look for people with vision. Global Universities Program at Deloitte “We continue to work closely with the LSE Careers Service to attract bright. When we hire from LSE. Senior Recruiter at Accenture Consulting “Civil Service Fast Stream greatly values LSE graduates – especially for their analytical skills – in fact recent data highlights that LSE is. Head of EMEA Campus Recruitment “Accenture looks to LSE to provide some of our very best. The quality.

while supervision is also available for the research degrees of MRes.. Mixing with people from varied backgrounds and being exposed to different ideas was enjoyable and challenging. By way of example. and interned with a former Foreign and Defence Secretary.ac. but I was encouraged (and required) to constantly question why the law is as it is and to think about what the law ought to be. and allows you to study subjects you have enjoyed at undergraduate level in more depth. Houghton Street Online. Whether or not you are planning a career in academia.uk/alumni or email the Alumni Relations team at alumni@lse. I am currently an Associate in the London Corporate Mergers and Acquisitions group. whilst at LSE I spent time with two leading investment banks. a free worldwide network of over 100. high-flying businessman or a leading academic. Sandwiched between the City. did mini-pupillages with top barristers’ chambers. Whether it is a global leader. The network provides students and graduates with access to alumni who have elected to offer their professional knowledge and expertise.. but also enabled me to see the world from a fresh perspective. On leaving LSE I had grown enormously intellectually. By studying at LSE students benefit from world-class teaching.ac. but they can also take advantage of a wealth of opportunities that are available only at LSE. but prior to graduation there are a number of services that will enable you to make the most of the network.   A total of 16 Nobel prize winners in economics. Tokyo and Beijing offices I have worked. and right at the heart of the British legal establishment. DID YOU KNOW. Westminster and the Royal Courts of Justice. A significant number of LSE students choose to pursue further study here – making the most of their connection with the School. I joined White & Case LLP in whose London. Alumni Relations has a number of services specifically developed to support students and recent graduates including the Alumni Professional Mentoring Network.000 alumni.uk After attending local state schools I studied Law at LSE and then undertook a master’s in International Relations at the University of Cambridge. .. a graduate degree can enhance your career prospects. This presents clear advantages when it comes to searching for an internship.uk/graduate Alumni Following graduation you will automatically join the LSE Alumni Association. but was also prepared for life in the wider world. MPhil or PhD. Following graduation you can stay connected with your former classmates and the School through LSE’s online alumni community.After LSE Stefan Mrozinski United Kingdom LLB in Laws Graduate studies LSE is one of the major world centres for the advanced study of the social sciences. For further information visit lse. Culturally LSE is also unique. LSE is also distinctive in its exclusive focus on the social sciences and humanities. Applicants for master's degrees at LSE are usually expected to have an upper second class honours degree or equivalent qualification in a subject appropriate to the programme to be followed.ac. There are also opportunities for non-degree research or other studies not leading to the award of a qualification. DID YOU KNOW. So during my Law degree not only did I learn what the law was. More information about graduate study is available at lse. The Alumni Relations team works closely with academic departments to ensure that current students have access to the alumni community during their studies through professional networking events and opportunities. took part in pro bono work at the Royal Courts of Justice. a few miles from one of the most important seats of power globally. This creates an atmosphere in the classroom (and on the campus) that is found nowhere else and means that subjects are studied from non-traditional perspectives.   In all 35 past or present world leaders have studied or taught at LSE and 31 current members of the UK House of Commons and 42 members of the House of Lords have also either taught or studied at LSE. peace and literature have been either LSE staff or alumni. every night of the week a “big name” will be speaking at the School. On completing my legal training at the College of Law. LSE offers over 140 taught programmes at graduate level. work experience or full-time employment.. students also find themselves next to the world’s pre-eminent financial centre. with probably the most diverse student body in the world. undertook a number of internships with global law firms.

Students from Wales will also be entitled to have their fees paid up front. there is a range of funding available for overseas students from external agencies. Scotland and Northern Ireland.675 in 2012) to help with living costs during term times and holidays will be available for all undergraduates from England.250 in 2012) will be available for students from families with incomes of up to £25. are not eligible to apply for UK Government funds. and this will take the form of part loan and part grant. since 1 September 2010 for a programme starting on 1 September 2013.000 and up to £42.168 per year. in the form of loans and grants. Financial support The School recognises that the cost of living in London may be higher than in your home town or country. Fees are fixed each spring for the following session only.  Home UK/EU fees For 2013 entry. A partial grant will be available for students from families with incomes between £25. lectures.gov. Government support for students from England Maintenance grants A non-repayable maintenance grant (which was worth £3. the LSE tuition fee for new overseas (non-EU) undergraduates will be set later in the year. membership of the Students’ Union.co. for students from elsewhere in the UK Different financial support packages are available for students from Wales. Overseas students are required to pay this fee in instalments or in full at the start of each year.gov. EU and overseas students. ie. Students from these countries should refer to one of the following websites: Student Finance Wales studentfinancewales. The fee covers registration and examination fees payable to the School. details of which are available from your home Fee assessment Broad guidelines on how students are assessed for fee purposes can be found  on page 38. However as a guideline for 2012 entry the LSE tuition fee for new UK and European Union (EU) undergraduates will be £8. Government support. classes and individual supervision. bodies or your home government. Fee loans will also be available to students from Scotland and Northern Ireland but terms may differ.uk/studentfinance for students from outside the EU Overseas students.uk Student Awards Agency Scotland saas. See direct. and lectures given at other colleges under intercollegiate arrangements and. is available to UK and some EU students.co. . It is also possible for you or your family to pay some or all of the fee up front. Instead.000 per year.Student finance Fees Every undergraduate student is charged a fee for each year of his or her programme. students ordinarily resident in England and EU students will not be required to pay any tuition fees up front. those from outside the EU.500 per year. EU nationals (or children of EU nationals) who have lived in the UK or islands for three years before the start of their programme. ie. Under the 2012 arrangements.600. in the form of bursaries and scholarships to UK. However. while LSE provides generous financial support. However. Maintenance loans A loan (which was worth £7. the cost of tuition will be covered by a non-means tested government loan which students will only start to repay once they have left their programme and are earning over £21. may now qualify for a student loan and grants.000. It does not cover living costs or travel or fieldwork. However as a guideline the LSE tuition fee for new overseas (non-EU) undergraduates in 2012 will be £15. under current arrangements. Overseas fees For 2013 entry.uk for students from the EU   Students from the EU are not usually eligible for UK Government financial support. the fees will be set later in the year.uk Student Finance Northern Ireland studentfinanceni.

value. LSE National Scholarships Programme (NSP) The Government has established  a national scholarships programme aimed at students resident in England from low income backgrounds starting in 2012 and given in partnership with universities.000 over a three year programme.org/learning). Northern Irish and EU students will be finalised once local administrations’ arrangements have been agreed.uk/ financialSupport for the latest information. with a maximum of £1.org. Full details of the NSP are published on our website. Scottish.ac. and can be used for accommodation or fees. Please check lse. The number.500 over a three year programme. LSE scholarships Each year LSE awards a number of scholarships – funded by private or corporate donation – to UK students. eligibility criteria and type of awards vary from year to year. this was worth up to £3.government or nearest British Council office (britishcouncil. or ukcisa. In 2012.000 being available as a cash award.uk LSE financial support for UK students LSE Bursary Students from England who are eligible for a full or partial grant are also eligible for an LSE Bursary. For students starting in 2012. The Government has said that the scheme is to be reviewed in 2012/13.500 per year – or £10. Awards are made on the basis of financial . Arrangements for Welsh. the LSE NSP was worth £6.

000 in entrance awards available to self-financing students of all nationalities. value. please see lse. This is amplified by the distinctive LSE ethos to broaden our horizons. please see lse. I am thrilled by LSE’s diversity and its multicultural education. As a result.ac.uk/financialSupport Access to Learning funds Registered UK students from low-income households can apply directly to LSE for Access to Learning funds. where young men and women can take a chance on a dream – take an idea that starts in the lecture theatre or in a discussion with your fellow course mates and turn it into a new project. and information on how to apply. to aim high and to continue to develop ourselves further. please see lse. These funds are designed for students who may need extra financial support for their programme.uk/financialSupport for overseas students LSE Undergraduate Support Scheme The LSE Undergraduate Support Scheme (USS) is designed to help overseas students who do not have the necessary funds to meet all their costs of study. Awards are renewable for each year of your programme. a new business or even a new industry that has the power to change the world around you. For more details about these scholarships. please see lse. For more details about these scholarships. The application deadline is likely to be April 2013. Our students bring with them the rich tapestry of the world’s great traditions and cultures. You can see that LSE is a great empowering institution. eligibility criteria and type of awards vary from year to year. currently worth £5. more details can be found at lse. and are provided by the Government to assist with living expenses. For a full list of business-related programmes and information on how to apply.000. Furthermore.ac. currently worth £5.uk/financialSupport Vyacheslav Polonski Stelios Scholar.000 and £6.985 per year. are available for UK students applying for business subjects at LSE. Ukraine BSc Management After three years of being a BSc Management student at LSE. LSE’s vibrant academic environment and its high quality of teaching encouraged me to think outside the box and to study a variety of questions during my degree in key areas of business management. I also learned several econometric tools and techniques to analyse and interpret data. this spirit has helped me to engage with the community and use my time and skills to benefit the people around me through volunteering and tutoring initiatives.ac. . In 2011. The number. What I love most about studying at LSE is that there are no limits or impediments to what you can do or what you can achieve here.uk/financialSupport LSE scholarships The School offers a limited number of undergraduate scholarships of varying amounts each year for overseas students. following LSE’s tradition to engage with the public and bring together intellectual leaders and business practitioners to discuss topical issues. This financial aid is available only for study at LSE. I can most certainly say that my undergraduate time has been informative. This conference developed into one of the largest global student-led forums of dialogue on global business strategy. for EU students LSE scholarships LSE offers a number of undergraduate scholarships of varying amounts each year to EU students. The amount of assistance will vary according to individual financial needs but awards are usually between £3. which provided me with a sound understanding of conceptual frameworks and thought-provoking topics such as group dynamics.need in the first instance. and information on how to apply. Awards are made on the basis of financial need in the first instance. The Stelios Scholarship gave me the opportunity to focus on my courses.985 per year.ac. I have founded and organised the LSE Student Strategy and Management Consulting Conference. and then academic merit. For example. and then academic merit. organisational behaviour and finance. I also started a company during my studies and held several leadership positions within the student societies on campus.uk/financialSupport Stelios scholarships Four Stelios scholarships. I was named as one of the runners up in the British Council “International Student of the Year” awards in 2011. For details of all the latest scholarships and information on how to apply please see lse.ac.uk/financialSupport Stelios scholarships Six Stelios scholarships. are available for EU students applying for business subjects at LSE. illuminating and productive. the School disbursed nearly £750. For a full list of business-related programmes and information on how to apply. leadership and organisational design. identify trends and evaluate theories. Personally.ac.

Please check specific entry requirements for each degree programme and the admissions criteria web pages at lse.ac. Applicants can contact UCAS at enquiries@ucas. we do not consider applications made “direct” to the School. at lse. In order to achieve this we encourage applicants from the widest possible range of schools and colleges to take advantage of the opportunities available at LSE. If you are offered a place at LSE and subsequently decide to defer your entry to the next year. You may also find the entry profiles on the UCAS website useful. However. can be found on the website at lse. However.uk/wideningParticipation Each application received is carefully considered on an individual basis. Alternatively you can telephone UCAS on 0871 4680 468 if you are calling from the UK or +44 870 1122211 if you are calling from outside the UK. Such candidates should apply nearer their intended start date. For details of specific opportunities see the Widening participation section of the website. Direct entry to second year Direct entry to the second year of a programme at LSE on the basis of first year undergraduate study at another university is rare. You should also access the information online at lse.com. We also consider the educational circumstances of applicants.ac. together with further information on direct entry to the second year. ALL applicants are strongly advised to submit their applications to UCAS by 15 January. Before you apply you should read all of the information and guidance in this section and on the degree programme pages. given the competition for places at LSE. We will only consider applications submitted to UCAS after 15 January if there are places still available on the relevant degree programme.uk/UGhowToApply these departments. When to apply Applications will be accepted by UCAS from 1 September 2012. we received 17. there is a great deal of competition for places at the School. so as to secure your place on a programme.ac. Guidance on completing your UCAS application form A detailed guide to completing the UCAS application form. .200 places. and is only permitted in exceptional circumstances.500 applications for 1. The UCAS code name and number for LSE is L72 LSE. and if you are successful. The academic department will consider your request and UCAS will be informed of any arrangement that is agreed between you and the School.ac.uk/UGadmissionsCriteria for specific details of subjects and grades needed. These can be found via the course search option at ucas.uk/UGhowToApply Entrance requirements How to apply Applying via UCAS All applications to LSE should be made online via UCAS at ucas. This means that if you are predicted or if you achieve the grades set out in the standard offer. Two year requests for deferral due to compulsory national service will not be considered. academic achievement (including both achieved and predicted grades). unfortunately this will not guarantee you an offer of admission. name and programme. subject combinations and references. before a final decision is made. You should read this information before you submit your application.uk/ UGMakingAnApplication. is given on the Making an application section of the website at lse. The last date for the receipt of applications to LSE to qualify for full and equal treatment is 15 January 2013. you should write to the Undergraduate Admissions Office stating your Personal ID number. As you will see from the individual programme information. In 2011.com/ students/coursesearch Deferred entry Most LSE departments welcome applications from students who plan to gain some work or service experience or to travel extensively between leaving school and starting a degree. Details of We welcome applications from all prospective students and want to recruit students with the very best academic potential irrespective of their background. You can apply a year in advance.ac. taking into account the full range of information presented on the UCAS form including the personal statement. Students currently enrolled at another university wishing to apply for direct entry to the second year should do so by 15 January in the usual way through UCAS. and also your reasons for deferring. Applying from outside the EU The UCAS application procedure allows students applying from outside the EU to do so at any time between 1 September and 30 June.uk for general information and guidance on the UCAS procedures. no guarantees can be given that you will receive an offer.30 undergraduate prospectus Applications and admissions Applications and admissions LSE receives applications via UCAS. it is likely that the offer of a place will be conditional on your end of year performance at your current university. ac. including advice on writing your personal statement and information for teachers/referees. Some LSE departments do not accept second year entry students.

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it is likely that the Undergraduate Admissions Office will request these before a decision can be made. it is important that applicants achieve consistently high grades throughout both years of their A level study. For programmes requiring A* in Mathematics. As the School has a responsibility for safeguarding children under English Law. appropriate senior staff will be notified of an offer of admission made to anyone who will be younger than 18 years of age at the time of registration. AS and A levels We expect applicants who are studying A levels to offer four AS levels (taken after one year of advanced study in Year 12) and then proceed to three full A levels (A2s) in Year 13. for instance. Please check individual degree entries for details. decisions will be made based on further details including. General Studies/Critical Thinking at A level If you are taking General Studies or Critical Thinking at A level. admissions tutors will continue to make decisions based on predicted A level grades. For the majority of our programmes. we might take a good grade in such a subject into account when making our final confirmation decision. If resourcing issues at your school prevent this then your referee should indicate in your reference whether resources are available to teach four or five AS levels in Year 12. A* grade at A level LSE includes an A* in its standard offer for a number of our degree programmes in the Departments of Economics. individual unit marks and other achieved grades. the personal statement and academic reference. Selectors may request to see unit marks in order to assess applications. if you hold a conditional offer for LSE and you don't quite achieve the grades we have asked for. and whether timetabling arrangements allow the uptake of a wide range of subjects. Please note that in cases where AS grades are not provided. your grades in this subject will not be included in our conditional offer. . as well as previous academic qualifications. Applicants applying for programmes requiring A* with A levels taken before 2010 when A* was not available will be considered equally alongside other applicants. As competition for places at LSE is intense. We normally make conditional offers based on three full A levels (A2s). However. Key skills Students are not required to have the Key Skills certificate for admission to LSE. Mathematics and Law. For applicants taking qualifications which do not include an A* grade equivalent. Unit grades AS unit grades already attained are used as part of our decision making process for some of our mathematics based programmes.Age requirements Admission to the School is based upon academic merit and potential.

it is not normally included in any conditional offer that we make. the skills of independent study and research which can be demonstrated through the EP are good preparation for undergraduate study. On the other hand. Business Administration and Finance or Public Services for our Social Policy. For some degrees we require Mathematics at A level or equivalent. where an A level student is asked to achieve a grade A. Further details can be found at www. Retakes Competition for places at the School is intense. including the following: International Baccalaureate Scottish Advanced Highers (normally three Advanced Highers or two. we might consider Society Health and Development. although we acknowledge that not all applicants will have the opportunity to complete one. we prefer students who have achieved high grades in their AS and A2 examinations at their first attempt. so it is important that you achieve consistently high grades throughout both years of your A level (or equivalent) studies. Whilst the grade that you achieve for your EP may not be specified in any conditional offer. Admissions tutors will normally consider one of the subjects listed below only if it is offered in combination with two generally preferred subjects. but also the combination of them. Therefore. two A levels in traditional academic subjects. French and Economics would be a suitable combination for almost any of our degrees. Certain subjects are considered by our admissions tutors to be a more effective preparation for studying at LSE. Cambridge Pre-U LSE is happy to consider candidates applying with the Cambridge Pre-U Diploma or one or more principal subjects in combination with A levels. com/students/ucas_tariff/factsheet/cie Advanced Diplomas LSE will consider Advanced Diplomas in pathways which are relevant to the programme applied for on an individual basis. we will ask for a Pre-U subject grade of D3. Other qualifications We accept a range of other UK and international qualifications.Applications and admissions undergraduate prospectus 33 an A* in Further Mathematics in addition to an A grade in Mathematics would be an acceptable alternative. but we would prefer the first example. In such cases we would consider applications from candidates with the Advanced Diploma (including an A level as part of their Additional/Specialist Learning (ASL)) who are also taking an additional free-standing A level in a generally preferred subject. plus one A level) Irish Leaving Certificate Welsh Baccalaureate Australian state school leaving qualifications Austrian Reifeprüfung/Matura Belgian Diploma van Hoger Secundair Onderwijs/Certificat d’Enseignement Secondaire Supérieur Canadian province school leaving qualifications Dutch Diploma Voorbereidend Wetenschappelijk Onderwijs (VWO) European Baccalaureate Finnish Ylioppilastutkinto/studentexamen French Baccalaureate German Abitur Hong Kong A levels Hong Kong Diploma of Secondary Education Malaysian Sijil Tinggi Persekolohan Malaysia (STPM) Mauritius Cambridge Overseas Higher School Certificate Polish Matura Singapore A levels and the Integrated Programme US Advanced Placement Tests More details of the grades expected in these qualifications together with information on other acceptable qualifications can be found on the LSE website at lse. The School considers not only the subjects offered by applicants at A level and AS level. For instance.uk/internationalStudents Subject combinations and “non-preferred” subjects We are looking for evidence that you have academic ability and achievement in breadth. in addition. Where an A level grade B is required we will ask for a Pre-U principal subject grade of M1.ucas. We therefore encourage those of you who are undertaking an EP to make reference to it in your application.ac. The conditions of individual offers may vary if the admissions tutor considers this appropriate. For example. VCE A level We would normally expect VCE A level candidates to take. Mathematics. For this reason. . Mathematics. details of subject requirements can be found in the programme entries. or Sociology programmes. However. French and Business would also be acceptable. it may be taken into consideration in the summer if you narrowly miss the conditions of your offer. Mathematics. At LSE offers are based on the achievement of specific grades in identified subjects. Whilst grades can be improved by re-sitting individual modules. Extended Project LSE recognises and values the Extended Project (EP).

they will consider Drama and Theatre Studies alongside one other subject from the non-preferred list. Predicted or actual grades which meet or exceed the standard offer will not guarantee an offer of admission. We require specific grades in particular subjects. these are only a guide and in some cases candidates will be asked for grades which differ from this. All applicants are normally expected to have at least grade B in GCSE English and Mathematics or the equivalent. The following English language qualifications are acceptable to LSE: • GCSE English Language with a grade B or better • International General Certificate of Secondary Education (IGCSE) English as a First Language with a grade B or better including the Speaking and Listening coursework component (Edexcel) or grade 2 in the optional speaking test (CIE)* • International English Language Testing Service (IELTS) academic test with a score of 7.  Successful applicants normally offer three A levels (A2s) in our generally preferred subjects. the new UK Border Agency guidelines stipulate that all students entering the United Kingdom to study must have an English Language qualification equivalent to the Common European Framework (CEFR) level B2 in each of the four sub-components of language learning (reading. or 107 in the internet based test with a minimum of 25 out of 30 in each of the four skills • Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE) with grade B or better. Social Policy and Sociology consider Drama and Theatre Studies equally with other generally preferred subjects. We do not use the UCAS tariff when setting our offers. or equivalent. 1127 Singapore) grade B or better • Singapore Integrated Programme (IP) Secondary 4 English Language grade B or better . International History.ac. Programme requirements Please see individual programme entries for specific requirements.uk/ UGhowToApply for more information. we may ask for specific grades in one or both of these subjects. Please see Entry requirements at lse. In cases where candidates are taking exams in two seperate sittings over the course of two years. Details can be found in the individual programme entries or the admissions criteria website. GCSEs If you have taken GCSE level qualifications. * The Departments of Anthropology. it is likely that you will be asked to provide evidence that your spoken and written English is satisfactory.0 in all four components • Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) with a minimum score of 627 in the paper test including 5. you may receive an offer based on specific grades in specific subjects. these will also be taken into account when the admissions tutors assess your application.ac. There are some programmes in our Social Policy Department which require a grade C or above for GCSE Mathematics. This list is indicative of the types of subjects that are non-preferred and the list is regularly reviewed by admissions tutors: Our non-preferred subjects include: Accounting Art and Design Business Studies Communication Studies Design and Technology Drama/Theatre Studies* Home Economics Information and Communication Technology Law Media Studies Music Technology Sports Studies Travel and Tourism An A level (or equivalent) in your first/ native language may not be counted. You should also note that we are less concerned with subject combinations at AS level. Some departments look for a number of A or A* grades at GCSE. or two generally preferred subjects and one from the following list of subjects that are non-preferred. if you are made an offer of a place at LSE and English is not your first language. if you have achieved grades in two subjects in a previous year and are taking two more subjects in the coming examinations period. International Relations. However. Therefore. Some programmes require grades higher than B in GCSE Mathematics and these are outlined in the programme entries of the prospectus.34 undergraduate prospectus Applications and admissions Accounting and Media Studies would not normally be considered as suitable as this combination includes two subjects on the non-preferred list below. It is not necessary to have the required grade in an acceptable English language qualification when you make your application to LSE. the majority of departments continue to regard Drama and Theatre Studies as a non-preferred subject. writing. 1125 Mauritius A. Furthermore. English language requirements All students are required to be sufficiently proficient in the English language to benefit from their studies at the School. speaking and listening) unless they are from a majority English speaking country. For instance.5 in writing and 50 in TSE. Usual standard offers We express our “usual standard offer” in terms of A levels (by which we mean A2s) and the International Baccalaureate (IB). although exceptions are made for applicants with extenuating circumstances. However. Details can be found in the admissions criteria section of the website at lse. In addition.uk/UGadmissionsCriteria. • Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE) with a grade A • Cambridge English Language (1119) conducted overseas by the University of Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate: B4 or better • O level (1120 Brunei.

The exam is a three hour paper comprising English comprehension exercises.• Pearson Test of English (General) with a distinction at level 5 in both the written test and oral test. Please note that test scores must be achieved from one sitting of the relevant qualification. essay questions and mathematical problems. No specific preparation is required although those asked to sit the exam may view a copy of previous years’ papers online. fee status or criminal convictions. or those whose qualifications are not familiar to us. those on Access or Foundation courses. *Exceptions If students offer the IGCSE in English as a First Language without the Speaking and Listening component or O level English (other than those specified above) and have been educated in the medium of English during their five most recent years of study (prior to 1 September 2013). Interviews We do not normally interview applicants. to take the LSE Entrance Exam. Interviews may be arranged for mature students or those with unusual qualifications. Since we .uk/language do not receive the final on-time application forms until late January. produced under exam conditions. We will not accept individual component scores from multiple tests. eg. The gathered field allows admissions tutors to give fair and equal consideration to all the applications which are received by UCAS by the closing date of 15 January.ac. LSE Entrance Exam We ask some applicants. For example. Gathered field Given the level of competition for many of our programmes you may be advised that your application is being held as part of a “gathered field” to be considered along side all “on-time” applications. then we will accept the qualification as sufficient evidence of English language proficiency. Processing your form We may ask applicants to provide further information relating to their application. we hold some earlier applications as part of this process. It means that we wish to look again at the early applications in the light of the later UCAS forms which we receive. Details can be found at lse. Applicants should provide this information as Considering your application UCAS sends application forms to LSE from the end of September onwards. The exam gives the admissions tutor the opportunity to see a sample of the applicant’s original work. We will contact you if we intend to consider your application as part of the gathered field. or where the School needs more information to help in making a decision. It is not possible for applicants to request an interview with the admissions tutor. The LSE Language Centre runs a range of pre-sessional courses for international students. we may require information concerning entry qualifications.

Therefore we do not envisage that we will be accepting applications during the adjustment period in 2013. In addition to A levels and the IB. but this will be confirmed on the LSE website. At undergraduate level. competition for places at the School is intense. we will send you further information about the School. For example.ac. London.500 applications for just 1. at lse. We aim to make a decision on all on time applications by 31 March. Offers of admission If we make you an offer of admission.soon as possible to avoid delays in the consideration of their application. so it may take some time before you receive our final decision. However.uk/UGofferHolders Appeals With 17. such as if a candidate’s study has been affected by personal circumstances which were not declared on the application form or if there is evidence of a failure of procedure in the admissions process. LSE provides you with an opportunity to study the social sciences in a truly international way. the School would welcome new applications for admission in the following year from those who have done better than expected and meet the School's entry requirements. Information for overseas students Students from all over the world have been welcomed at LSE since the foundation of the School in 1895. Adjustment period The level of competition at the School means that it is unlikely that there will be any vacancies on LSE programmes by the time A level results are published in mid-August. Further information for offer holders can be found at lse. At present there are over 150 countries represented on campus. surrounded by an entirely international community. there can be no guarantee that a place can be offered. In considering applicants with overseas qualifications. Your offer of admission and acceptance of a place applies to a named degree. you should let us know if you change the A level or equivalent subjects stated on your UCAS form or if there are extenuating circumstances which impact on your course of study. You should notify the Undergraduate Admissions Office if the details or circumstances of your application changes in any way.200 places. you are agreeing to abide by the rules and regulations of the School. an invitation to a Visit Day and information on registration and orientation. Unsuccessful applications can only be reconsidered in exceptional cases. which can be accessed via the UCAS Track service. In an increasingly globalised world. If LSE does not accept the qualification of your home country. eg. making LSE a uniquely international and cosmopolitan university in the centre of an equally cosmopolitan world city.uk/ internationalStudents These pages will tell you which qualifications are acceptable to LSE in conjunction with the LSE Entrance Exam and with A levels. By accepting an offer of admission. We receive a high volume of applications for many programmes. the website will provide information on what alternatives you could take. you should reply to this offer through UCAS. If you receive an offer of a place at LSE. family circumstances or disruption to the delivery of your course at school. Only in exceptional circumstances will the School permit a student to transfer from one programme to another within the School at or after registration. around 50 per cent of our students come from outside the UK. and accept that your relationship with the School is governed by English law. and that the English courts have sole jurisdiction. we accept a number of international qualifications which are listed on page 33. although our full attention will be given to appeals. All applicants from outside the UK should apply to LSE in the normal way through UCAS by 15 January. Copies of the regulations are available on request. Application and entrance requirements You should read the information on How to apply and Entrance requirements on pages 30 to 35. we look for achievement at a . illness. Please note that even in such circumstances. Notification of the admissions decision We will notify you of the final decision on your application through UCAS. You can find information about these and other international qualifications on the country pages on the LSE website.ac.

For further information on the benefits and opportunities of higher education in the UK you should look at the website for Education UK at educationuk. should help you with these choices. Although many overseas qualifications meet the minimum requirements for eligibility. Some older students will have done A/AS levels after a break from study. Competition for places on LSE degrees is intense. then you will be asked to provide evidence of your written and spoken English. Open University credits. We will send you up-to-date information on visas and entry clearance. and whether the course ends in a formal written examination. Please remember to quote your Personal ID number on additional correspondence so that we can match it to your UCAS form. accommodation (page 12) and the dates of LSE orientation. Application and entrance requirements You should read the information on How to apply and Entrance requirements on pages 30 to 35 and apply to LSE in the normal way through UCAS by 15 January. together with the online resources. We are looking for evidence of recent study. during the last two to three years. eg.ac. In that case. how much written work the course requires of students. LSE also has a large proportion of postgraduate students.Applications and admissions undergraduate prospectus 37 similar level to those students taking A levels or IB. It is essential that your reference is provided by someone who knows your studies and/or employment record well.0 and 1. In considering applications from Access course students we will look at the number of contact hours a week between teachers and students. The information in this prospectus. See page 21 for further information. In some countries the LSE Student Recruitment Office. you will be guaranteed accommodation for the first year of study in either an LSE or a University of London Hall of Residence. If you have had a break from study after taking . provided you apply by the deadline specified in your offer pack. Details of acceptable English language qualifications can be found on page 34.uk/lseVisitsYou English language requirements If you are made an offer of a place at LSE and English is not your first language. This means that the student population at LSE is rather older on average than at many other universities. the individual programme entries in this prospectus list the number of applications for and available places on each programme. As an overseas student. LSE staff regularly travel overseas to advise applicants and prospective students. this does not guarantee admission to the School. you will no doubt want to think about adapting to new patterns of work. you should apply in the normal way. If you start an Access or other course in October. costs of living in London and the availability of financial support (see pages 10 and 27).org and also on the UK Council for International Student Affairs website at ukcisa. your referee will be unable to say much about your progress in time for the UCAS deadline for applications. and both the ability and the motivation to study at a fairly demanding level.ac. older undergraduates should not feel out of place. in collaboration with local alumni groups.uk Information for older students LSE welcomes applications from older students and values the contribution they make to the School community. Access or Return to Study courses. and may ask for a grade of 16 or above in specific subjects where the entry requirement for a programme is A* AA-AAA or “Mention Bien” where the entry requirement is AAB-ABB. Support for overseas students If we offer you admission we will ensure that your transition to the UK and to LSE in particular is as smooth as possible. including integration. we would normally expect an overall grade between 1. your experience and your plans and aspirations for university study. Standard offer conditions for students taking Access courses can be found online at lse. differentiation. more detailed report in February. The LSE Language Centre also runs presessional English language programmes. by 15 January. For students with the Baccalauréat from France. we would not normally make an offer of admission without asking you to take the LSE Entrance Exam. The British Council provides information for overseas students to help them make an informed choice about studying in the UK. • A level Mathematics. Some degree programmes set specific subject requirements. ie. technical or vocational qualifications. algebra and geometry and to be able to apply them. These include: • GCSE grade B or better in Mathematics or the equivalent This means that students are expected to understand basic techniques in arithmetic. Relevant study can consist of two subjects from the generally preferred list of A levels on page 33. You can find out about up-coming visits on the LSE website at lse. In considering a degree at LSE. which will give you some idea of the competition for admission. and your referee should send a further. runs pre-departure events which allow offer-holders to meet each other as well as recent LSE alumni before they start at the School.org. as well as the financial and social commitments involved. trigonometric and exponential functions. For students with the Abitur from Germany. for degrees in mathematical and statistical subjects This means that students are expected to have basic skills in calculus. ie.3 depending on the entry requirements of the programme applied for.uk/ UGentryRequirements If you have taken a course which was not formally examined. we would normally expect a “Mention Très Bien”. You and your referee may also wish to send extra information about your work.

like all UK universities. Exceptional Leave.38 undergraduate prospectus Applications and admissions a course which was formally examined. academic and health and safety reasons. the student can only appeal against his/her fee status assessment in highly exceptional circumstances (either a change in law or if a student becomes an EU national or child of an EU national or if an asylum seeking student is granted refugee status. which is owned and managed by the universities to provide statistics for the Higher Education Funding Councils and universities. AND c) that no part of this period of residence in (b) above was wholly or mainly for the purpose of receiving full time education. Details of the type of information held on computer by any organisation. a student must demonstrate: . which should be addressed to pcpd.uk How to contact us If you need to contact the Undergraduate Admissions Office during your application process you can get in touch with us in one of the following ways: Email: ug.uk/ UGhowToApply Data protection Any information provided by you may be held by UCAS and by the School on computer in accordance with the requirements of the Data Protection Act 1998. Support for older students At LSE. you may obtain a copy of information held about you on computer and/or in relevant paper files at the School. This is a public register which is available in most public libraries in the UK.Info.ac.org. The academic adviser (page 22). If you would like guidance on your status for fees. Among other purposes. as well as your tutors and lecturers. Even for a degree which may not appear to be in a quantitative subject. at ico. All information supplied to HESA is subject to strict confidentiality safeguards. Once a student has registered at LSE. Further information Fee status On receipt of your UCAS form the School carries out an assessment of your fee status determining the amount you are likely to pay at Registration. LSE. This decision is based on guidelines provided by the Department of Education: Education (Fees and Awards) Regulations 1997. this information will form the basis of records of registered students supplied to the Higher Education Statistical Agency (HESA). while study skills support is available from the Teaching and Learning Centre (page 22). your study throughout the degree programme and in preparation for examinations. Admissions policy A copy of the School’s admissions policy is available online at lse.ac. you may need to be able to deal with statistics. In addition to the HESA requirements described above. we would not normally make an offer of admission without asking you to sit the Entrance Exam. Please visit ukcisa. Humanitarian Protection or Discretionary Leave).uk for more information. Assessment is based more on traditional unseen examinations than in some other universities. you will need to provide the following information in all of your correspondence to the Undergraduate Admissions Office: • Personal ID number or LSE Student Number (after you have made an application) • Name • Date of birth • Programme applied for You will also be asked to provide this information if you call the office. AND b) that s/he has been ordinarily resident in the EEA/Switzerland for a specified three years preceding the commencement of their course (ordinarily resident. or can be accessed at the website of the Office of the Information Commissioner.admissions@lse. meaning habitually resident in the EEA/Switzerland).ac. A fee of £10 is payable for each enquiry. independent advice is available from UKCISA.uk Post: Undergraduate Admissions Office LSE Houghton Street London WC2A 2AE United Kingdom Tel +44 (0)20 7955 7125 Fax +44 (0)20 7955 6001 For security purposes.Rights@lse. The School’s entry describing its staff and student records (which would include your records as an applicant) is registered under number K4325564. The School offers several sources of advice and guidance to support you in your transition to academic life. in order to pursue its legitimate interests as an institute of higher education. its sources and those to whom it may be disclosed are listed in the national Data Protection Register. can help with a range of issues. willing and able to take initiatives in your own studies.gov. The Education (Fees and Awards) Regulations 1997 state that to be considered for “Home/ EU” fee status. teaching and learning depend very much on your own study and contributions to class discussions and debates: you have to be a self-starter. and a copy of the entry is available on request. and is published only as statistical tables. a) that s/he was settled in the UK/EU within the meaning of the Immigration Act 1971 on the first date of the academic year – 1 September of the year the applicant wishes to apply for (settled. The LSE Entrance Exam will test relevant mathematical understanding.uk You have the right of access to your personal records held on computer and/ or in relevant paper files. the purposes for which it is held. collects and processes information on its students for various essential administrative. meaning ordinarily resident in the UK/EU without any restriction). You may be asked to provide documentary evidence of your status/residence.

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ac. social science and information systems. the Diploma in Economics and the Diploma in Social Sciences are qualifications for students who have the ability. but who may not have the necessary formal entrance requirements. indicating that they are applying for second year entry.uk LSE considers applications from students of the University of London International Programmes for second year entry to complete their undergraduate degrees.In addition to the degrees listed above.uk or contact  LSE Office for University of London International Programmes Houghton Street London WC2A 2AE Tel: +44 (0)20 7955 7768 Fax: +44 (0)20 7955 7421 Email: uolip@lse..  If you would like further information about the degrees offered through the University of London International Programmes. Those interested in applying must do so via UCAS (ucas..   For more than 150 years. management. applicants should be aware that competition for admission to LSE is intense and should refer to the section Direct entry to second year on page 30. There are currently more than 45.uk or email enquiries@london. finance. Please see lse. the Diploma in Social Sciences or the first four full first year courses of one of the degrees.Other LSE programmes of study University of London International Programmes  The University of London International Programmes allow students from anywhere in the world to complete qualifications through independent study.000 students studying in over 180 countries. To be considered.ac. com). The degree programmes available are: • BSc Accounting and Finance • BSc Accounting with Law • BSc Banking and Finance • BSc Business • BSc Development and Economics • BSc Economics • BSc Economics and Finance • BSc Economics and Management • BSc Geography and Environment • BSc Information Systems and Management • BSc International Development • BSc International Relations • BSc Management • BSc Management with Law • BSc Mathematics and Economics • BSc Politics and International Relations  • BSc Sociology • BSc Sociology with Law There are also two programmes for students with a first degree: a BSc Graduate Entry route and a Diploma for Graduates.  A list of institutions can be found at: londoninternational.ac. These Diplomas are only available in institutions granted permission to admit students on to these programmes.ac. Students can choose from a range of degrees and diplomas in economics. and set and mark examinations to the same standards applied internally.ac. The programmes of study are subject to the same rigorous academic standards that shape LSE’s internal qualifications. motivation and potential to study at degree level. create learning materials. each developed by LSE academics and awarded by the University of London. the University of London has been offering international programmes to students all over the world. having studied syllabuses similar to those taken by internal students. students will need to have achieved or be predicted high marks in the Diploma in Economics.ac. LSE academics write syllabuses. .uk/study/UOLIP DID YOU KNOW. However.uk Website: lse. please visit londoninternational. Students who successfully complete the Diploma can apply to transfer to a degree and complete in a further two years.uk/ UGhowToApply for further information.

international relations. General Course students will normally have a GPA in excess of 3.uk/summerschool or contact the Summer School office: Tel: +44 (0)20 7955 7227 Email: summer.ac. and delivered by LSE faculty. one in London and one in Beijing. Options include: • Tailor-made training programmes • Open enrolment courses • Fully customised learning solutions For further information please contact LSE Executive Education on: Tel: +44 (0)20 7955 7128 Fax: +44 (0)20 7955 7980 Email: exec. Further information can be found at lse.ed@lse.uk Website: lse. or the equivalent. government and society. international relations and finance.uk Website: lse. LSE Summer School The Summer School was founded in 1989 to provide a wider audience with a taste of the “LSE Experience” through a programme of academically challenging courses.500 students from over 120 countries worldwide. Those admitted are attached to one of 19 academic departments and take four year-long courses chosen from more than 250 available. If you have any questions. Summer School courses are offered in many of the key disciplines at LSE. Students attend lectures and classes with degree seeking students. The majority of students are undergraduates. In addition. Courses are delivered in English by faculty from both institutions. however we also encourage applications from students holding university offers.uk/executiveEducation . such as: accounting.school@lse.3/4. finance.uk LSE-PKU Summer School LSE and Peking University jointly deliver a two-week Summer School each August.uk/ LSEPKUProgramme LSE Executive Education LSE Executive Education offers a range of training and educational programmes for executives and managers in both private and public sectors based upon the latest thinking and research from LSE. and will have completed two years of university level study at an institution outside the UK by the time of their enrolment at the School.ac.uk/generalCourse Summer schools LSE runs two summer schools aimed primarily at undergraduates. Based on regular LSE undergraduate teaching. health and welfare facilities.ac. based at the PKU campus in Beijing. providing a first taste of university life at a world class institution. For up-to-date information please see lse.ac. you are encouraged to contact the Student Recruitment Office: Tel: +44 (0)20 7955 6613 Fax: +44 (0)20 7955 6001 Email: gc@lse.ac. or need application material. and take the undergraduate examinations at the end of the academic year. have an academic adviser. law and management. Many of our students enjoy the experience so much that they return to study at LSE full-time. General Course students enjoy a bespoke social calendar.ac.ac.The General Course The General Course offers students from overseas universities the opportunity to spend a fully integrated year of undergraduate study at LSE. may attend any LSE lecture course and have full use of the Library and all student social. In 2011 we welcomed almost 4. English language. Applications are considered from February onwards in the year of entry and continue to be accepted until all the available places have been filled. economics. Please note that LSE does not offer any semester study options. economics. in subjects such as management. the Summer School offers two academically challenging and socially enriching three-week programmes in July and August.

are also published as they become available. including course withdrawals. Logic and Scientific Method BSc Politics and Philosophy BA Social Anthropology BSc Social Anthropology BSc Social Policy BSc Social Policy and Criminology BSc Social Policy and Economics BSc Social Policy with Government BSc Social Policy and Sociology BSc Sociology BSc Statistics with Finance UCAS code L250 BSc/InRel VL12 BSc/IRHis M100 LLB/Law N200 BSc/Man GL11 BSc/MathEc G1L1 BSc/MathEc LV15 BSc/PhilEc V503 BSc/Phil LV25 BSc/PP L601 BA/SocAnth L603 BSc/SocAnt L400 BSc/SocPol LM42 BSc/SPCr LLK1 BSc/SPE LL42 BSc/SocPGo LL34 BSc/SPSoc L301 BSc/Soc G3N3 BSc/StatFin Page 73 71 77 80 81 82 84 85 68 48 48 88 89 89 90 91 93 52 Language studies and social psychology are not available as degree subjects on their own at undergraduate level. including individual course guides and other information relating to the administration of our degrees is published in the School’s Calendar at the start of each session at lse.uk/calendar. but see pages 74 and 92 for departmental entries. Programme regulations: Detailed programme regulations.ac. .Degree BSc Accounting and Finance  BSc Actuarial Science BA Anthropology and Law BSc Business Mathematics and Statistics BSc Economic History BSc Economic History with Economics BSc Economics BSc Economics and Economic History BSc Economics with Economic History BSc Econometrics and Mathematical Economics BSc Environment and Development BSc Environmental Policy with Economics BA Geography BSc Geography with Economics BSc Government BSc Government and Economics BSc Government and History  BA History UCAS code NN34 BSc/AccFin N321 BSc/ActSci ML16 BA/AnthLaw GONO BSc/BMS V300 BSc/EcHist V3L1 BSc/EcHEc L101 BSc/Econ VL31 BSc/EcHEc L1V3 BSc/EcEcH L140 BSc/Ecomt FK84 BSc/EnvDev F9L1 BSc/EPEc L702 BA/Geog L7L1 BSc/GeogE L230 BSc/Gov LL12 BSc/GovEco LV21 BSc/GovHis V146 BA/Hist Page 44 50 47 51 54 55 58 56 59 60 62 63 64 65 67 68 68 70 Degree BSc International Relations BSc International Relations and History LLB Bachelor of Laws BSc Management BSc Mathematics and Economics BSc Mathematics with Economics BSc Philosophy and Economics BSc Philosophy. Proposed changes for future years.

Preliminary reading If you wish to gain further insight into the subject we suggest that you look at one of the following books: P Atrill and E McLaney Financial Accounting for Decision Makers (6th edition. which is a highly enterprising group of students within the School. 2009) Features of LSE courses Our programme is widely regarded as being at the forefront of international teaching in this field. Further information can be obtained from the Department or from the professional accountancy bodies themselves. You will have an academic adviser who is a member of staff from the Department of Accounting. as well as to more advanced academic study. including the Institute of Chartered Accountants in England and Wales (ICAEW). 2010) Z Bodie. we do not teach accounting or finance techniques with the aim of immediate application. C T Horngren. although candidates normally have A level Mathematics (or equivalent). management consultancy and financial management. The adviser’s . We are known for pioneering new approaches to the study of the modern practice of financial management in organisations. role is to follow your progress and deal with any concerns you might have. and half in related disciplines. investment analysis and management. or A level at grade A or above in Mathematics (or equivalent). W Clarke How the City of London Works (7th edition. BSc Accounting and Finance lse. To progress through the degree you will need to pass the appropriate examinations. you may obtain exemptions from some examinations of the professional accountancy bodies. Candidates offering A level(s) in the humanities are encouraged to apply. depending on the options you have taken.ac. Both subjects are central to the way in which management. R Merton and D Cleeton Financial Economics (2nd edition. and will be provided with support including tailored first year courses in mathematics and statistics Usual standard offer: A level: grades A A A International Baccalaureate: Diploma with 38 points including 7 6 6 or 6 6 6 at Higher level Other qualifications are considered. However. Degree structure The degree involves studying 12 courses over the three years.062 First year students 2011: 133 Accounting and finance are concerned with more than just computational skills. the Chartered Institute of Public Finance and Accountancy (CIPFA) and the Institute of Investment Management and Research (IIMR).uk/accounting lse. shareholders and society at large perceive. Recent graduates have gone on to work in the areas of professional accountancy. 2007) Professional training If you successfully complete the degree then. 2008) P Howell and K Bain Financial Markets and Institutions (5th Edition. understand and seek to change and control the nature of organisations. Prentice Hall. writing essays or working on class assignments. This means that. plus LSE100. Those candidates who do not have A level Mathematics (or equivalent) should be prepared to develop their mathematical skills. investment banking. Our staff includes internationally acknowledged leaders in both academic research and in professional accountancy and the financial markets. the Institute of Chartered Accountants of Scotland (ICAS). unlike professional courses.44 undergraduate prospectus Accounting and finance Accounting and finance accounting and finance that will be useful throughout your career.ac. the Chartered Institute of Management Accountants (CIMA). FT Prentice Hall. as well as to an understanding of how the market allocates finance to firms. 2008) A Bhimani. professional syllabuses are subject to frequent revision and it is not possible to specify now what exemptions may be available when you graduate. including the international dimension. Prentice Hall. We will encourage you to adopt a critical and flexible viewpoint and to look at the subject from a variety of perspectives. The Department of Accounting strongly supports the activities of the LSESU Accounting Society. You will have the opportunity to specialise in various fields within the subject area. but to enable our students to critically evaluate their usefulness in different contexts. Half of these are in accounting and finance. You will usually be assessed by written examinations at the end of each academic year. S M Datar and G Foster Management and Cost Accounting (4th edition.uk/finance UCAS code: NN34 BSc/AccFin Programme requirement: GCSE pass at grade A or above in Mathematics. FT Prentice Hall. Our aim is to give you an understanding of Teaching and assessment You will usually have about 12 to 15 hours of lectures and classes each week but you will also have to work hard on your own – reading. Sweet and Maxwell. the Association of Chartered Certified Accountants (ACCA). No specific subjects are required at A level. See page 33 for more information Applications 2011: 2. Some courses are assessed partly by essays or other work submitted during the year.

The academic societies have offered me so many unique opportunities.Accounting and finance undergraduate prospectus 45 First year: (*half unit) Elements of Accounting and Finance Economics B Probability and Statistics for the Social Sciences or Quantitative Methods (Mathematics)*. uses and limitations of accounting information and to some issues in finance and investment. computer rooms. Nigeria. will bring you into contact with students from other departments who can take it as an option. finance. economic history. Second and third years There are three core accounting and finance courses. . law. different clubs and societies. politics. Managerial Accounting focuses on planning and control in organisations. The aim of the course is to introduce students to the preparation. computing. for instance networking events have helped provide different avenues to start developing my future. services and activities that are available to you as a student such as the library. In the future. There is also a course in Economics. 1st year BSc Accounting and Finance The BSc Accounting and Finance is a fascinating programme. I really appreciate the different facilities. Oghosa Mildred Osa-Edokpolor Lagos. The non-academic societies like sports clubs and music society. Financial Accounting. psychology and sociology. such as comparative cost management practices. You may be able to choose one of your first year courses as an outside option from a wide range taught in other departments in subject areas including anthropology. Your choice of quantitative methods courses will depend on your background in mathematics and statistics. and sports facilities. The degree is very demanding and challenging. Commercial Law or an outside option First year The first year specialist introductory course. and management accounting and e-business. mathematics. LSE has helped me to “think outside the box” and I have become more confident as I have adapted to different challenges during my time at the School and in London. business statistics. Second year: Managerial Accounting Principles of Finance Microeconomic Principles or Macroeconomic Principles One option in econometrics. and includes an assessment of emerging topics. business statistics. Another positive feature about LSE is its location in the centre of London and the opportunities this gives you in the evening and at weekends. This means you will not be able to take an outside option in your first year. Analysis and Valuation provides an insight into the theory and practice of corporate financial reporting to investors and other interested parties. have helped create a balance between work and social life at the School and have also helped me to develop skills and interests away from academia. delivering a range of intellectual rewards. philosophy. Analysis and Valuation One option in accounting One option in finance One option from a list including options in accounting. I would like to either further my studies or go into full-time employment in one of the big accounting firms. It has a range of compulsory courses but also allows you to choose a number of courses that interest you. management. economics. Principles of Finance examines companies’ longer term investment decisions. Elements of Accounting and Finance. commercial law or an approved option LSE100 (Michaelmas term only) Third year: Financial Accounting. geography. and the ways in which these may be financed in the financial markets. you will be required to take courses in mathematics and statistics to give you access to the full range of options in years two and three. There are so many things I like about LSE it’s really difficult to decide what I like the most. management. operational and strategic decisionmaking. If you have not studied A level Mathematics (or equivalent). and Quantitative Methods (Statistics)* or Elementary Statistical Theory† Mathematical Methods or Basic Quantitative Methods or an outside option† LSE100 (Lent term only) † Choice will depend on your previous level of mathematics.

Large Issues: an introduction to social and cultural anthropology (Pluto Press. Our concern with the global south (or “third world”) leads to a serious engagement with issues of development.46 undergraduate prospectus Anthropology You take two further courses. Social anthropology is not a vocational degree. Governance and Risk Management (the framework of accountability relationships between corporate managers. international finance. unless you choose to carry on with research in the subject. multiculturalism and the direction of political and economic change in today’s world. Auditing. investors and other stakeholders). religious practice. Law courses are normally examined wholly by unseen examination. recent graduates have gone on to work in human rights. we also make a priority the development of the critical faculties of our students. writing coherently. globalisation. both of which involve studying 12 courses over the three years. At LSE we are distinctive in our strengths in the fields of law. plus LSE100. and of the interdependence of different parts of it. you may choose another approved course. gender. Teaching and assessment Most courses involve weekly lectures of one hour each. 2001) K Gardner Songs at the River’s Edge: stories from a Bangladeshi village (Virago. 2000) Degree structures We have two degree programmes. In addition. law. and Quantitative Finance (asset pricing. reasoning effectively and public expression are widely valued by employers. Assessment is generally a combination of continuous assessment (which usually involves one or two substantial essays per course) with a traditional unseen examination in May or June each year. Studying anthropology will provide a framework to help you see what is universal to all human societies and what is variable. In the final year of the BA/BSc Social Anthropology. business. human rights. 2007) T H Eriksen Small Places. risk management. development. Social anthropology studies human societies and cultures in a broad comparative perspective. teaching. the skills you develop in reading critically. industrialisation and the effects of neoliberalism. as a student you will increase your factual understanding of the world. and market microstructure). nationalism and everyday forms of the state. These are chosen from Management Accounting. Financial Management and Organisational Control (cost management and planning and control practices in complex organisations). While an anthropology degree is not a vocational training. Anthropology and counselling. 1999)  M Shostak Nisa: the life and words of a !Kung woman (Harvard UP. and also to understand what it means to belong to a cultural group whose values and rules may be very different from those familiar to you. different characteristics are outlined on the following pages. investments and performance evaluation. financial forecasting and derivatives pricing).000 words. Social anthropologists try to explain the causes of variation in social and cultural behaviour. in your third year (and may also take a third course in either accounting or finance in place of an outside option). Features of LSE courses Anthropology degrees across the UK share a common core of cross-cultural study. Their . Alternatively. We analyse all forms of information – from texts to films – in ways that will enable you to question received versions of the world. Thus. cognition. But it provides an excellent foundation for many careers. and associated classes where you discuss reading assignments in a small group with a teacher. nursing. The programmes aim to build your capacity to analyse social and political relations and so to engage productively in major debates of today concerning social justice. As well as encouraging sympathetic understanding of different cultural practices. Investments and Financial Markets (corporate finance. we show films about anthropology and the world’s cultures throughout the first two terms. students write a “special essay” of up to 8. theatre and film. kinship. In the first two terms you have up to eight contact hours of formal tuition a week. which vary in number depending on the degree. If you wish to gain exemptions from professional accountancy examinations you will normally need to take Commercial Law as an option. administration of refugees. Thus. Business statistics options include Introduction to Econometrics. Management related options include Organisational Theory and Behaviour and Operational Research Methods. There are tutorial meetings. medicine Preliminary reading If you wish to gain further insight into social anthropology we suggest that you look at one or more of the following books: R Astuti J Parry & C Stafford (eds) Questions of Anthropology (Berg. In the second year you take a further course in economics and in each year you will select a course from a range of options. Your academic adviser is available to offer general guidance and assistance with both academic and personal concerns. linked to essay assignments. Corporate Finance. one in accounting and one in finance. journalism.

South Asia* Cognition and Anthropology* The Anthropology of Christianity* The Anthropology of Development* Anthropology and Human Rights * Children and Youth in Contemporary Ethnography* Anthropology and Media* The Anthropology of Borders and Boundaries* The Anthropology of Post-Soviet Eurasia* Anthropological Approaches to Questions of Being* Research Methods in Social Anthropology* Anthropology of Schooling* Law option courses Administrative Law Commercial Contracts Law of Business Associations Advanced Torts Medical Law Civil Liberties and Human Rights Information Technology and the Law Conflict of Laws Family Law Law of Evidence International Protection of Human Rights Law and the Environment Intellectual Property Law The Law of Corporate Insolvency Labour Law . Anthropology of Religion. Southern Africa*. Advanced Theory of Social Anthropology goes deeply into the roots of modern theory in social anthropology. Advanced Theory of Social Anthropology) as well as ethnographic and thematic option courses. equally divided between anthropology and law.  Third year In the third year you must take Law and Institutions of the European Union and Property II. to give you a balanced grounding in both subjects. Sex and Gender The Anthropology of Economic Institutions and their Social Transformations Advanced Theory of Social Anthropology The Anthropology of Religion Anthropology half unit courses (typically six are offered each year) The Anthropology of a Selected Region eg. the availability of which varies from year to year. These include the core courses from the BA/BSc in Social Anthropology (Kinship. and considers the relationship between religion and modernity. The Anthropology of Economic Institutions and their Social Transformations examines the institutions of pre-market and market economies and their transformation as a result of state policies. personhood. Melanesia *. analyses the logic of some non-western systems of thought and philosophy. For the remaining two course units you may again choose from the list of approved options.Anthropology undergraduate prospectus 47 BA Anthropology and Law lse. it examines structuralism. kinship. See page 33 for more information Applications 2011: 104 First year students 2011: 15 First year (*half unit) Introduction to Social Anthropology Ethnography and Theory: Selected Texts Public Law Property I* and Introduction to the Legal System* LSE100 (Lent term only) Second year Political and Legal Anthropology Criminal Law Law of Obligations An option to the value of one course unit in anthropology LSE100 (Michaelmas term only) Third year Law and Institutions of the European Union Property II Options not already taken to the value of one course unit in law Options not already taken to the value of one course unit in anthropology First year You will take courses to the value of four units in the first year. India*. Options (* half unit) Anthropology full unit courses (offered every year) The Anthropology of Kinship.uk/anthropology UCAS code: ML16 BA/AnthLaw Usual standard offer: A level: grades AAB International Baccalaureate: Diploma with 37 points including 6 6 6 at Higher level Other qualifications are considered. For the remaining unit you can choose anthropology courses from a list of approved options. violence and the establishment and maintenance of forms of political and legal order. Post-Soviet Eurasia*. Marxism and postmodernism.ac. Sex and Gender. looks at the character of particular cosmologies and symbolic schemes. femaleness and maleness. The Anthropology of Religion examines the differences between local religious practices and world religions. South East Asia*. Criminal Law and Law of Obligations. dispute. The Anthropology of Kinship. Political and Legal Anthropology explores fundamental questions about how a wide range of societies handle conflict. development initiatives and incorporation into the global market. Sex and Gender considers the varied ways in which the family. Economic Institutions and their Social Transformations. birth and sex are understood in different cultures. Second year In the second year you must take the core courses of Political and Legal Anthropology. explores the reasons why ritual is so central to the organisation of cultural life. feminism. one course unit each from law and anthropology. Philippines*. and addresses contemporary perspectives and debates.

personhood. looks at the character of particular cosmologies and symbolic schemes. economic. (* half unit) The Anthropology of a Selected Region eg. Political and Legal Anthropology explores fundamental questions about how a wide range of societies handle conflict. Second and third years There are five core courses and an extended essay (which counts as one course unit) over the two years. language and literature or population studies. The Anthropology of Kinship.ac. In the second and third years you will also take options equivalent to one course unit per year. and options in coming years will change to reflect the research interests of staff. Only about six options are offered in any given year. explores the reasons why ritual is so central to the organisation of cultural life. for you to take options from three other colleges of the University of London which have anthropology departments: Goldsmiths College. It seeks to explain what is variable and what is universal in human culture and society by examining a range of political. kinship. and religious systems found among different peoples of the world. and addresses contemporary perspectives and debates. Introduction to Social Anthropology discusses the characteristic theories and methods of anthropology. social psychology. feminism. violence and the establishment and maintenance of forms of political and legal order. The Anthropology of Economic Institutions and their Social Transformations examines the institutions of pre-market and market economies and their transformation as a result of state policies. Sex and Gender considers the varied ways in which the family. The Anthropology of Religion examines differences between local religious practices and world religions. India*. Advanced Theory of Social Anthropology goes deeply into the roots of modern theory in social anthropology. Ethnography and Theory: Selected Texts introduces classic problems in understanding social institutions as they have appeared in the works of major theorists. politics. it examines structuralism. Philippines*. You choose one introductory option in any of the following subjects: economics. analyses the logic of some non-western systems of thought and philosophy. India or Melanesia). your ability to read and reflect on complete book-length texts. development initiatives and incorporation into the global market. birth and sex are understood in different cultures. international relations. Reading Other Cultures: the Anthropological Interpretation of Text and Film will develop your skills in anthropological analysis. Southern Africa*. to make well-grounded comparisons and to generate independent opinions. Melanesia*. Over the two years you must take at least one half unit course which focuses on the anthropology of a selected geographical or ethnographic region (for example. law. employment relations and organisational behaviour. Options In recent years the Department has offered a number of the half-unit social anthropology options listed below. Sex and Gender Political and Legal Anthropology The Anthropology of Economic Institutions and their Social Transformations Options to the value of one course unit from topics in social anthropology LSE100 (Michaelmas term only) Third year: Advanced Theory of Social Anthropology The Anthropology of Religion Options to the value of one course unit from topics in social anthropology  Special Essay Paper in Social Anthropology As anthropology may be considered an art or a science. The programme is the same. dependent on timetabling. South East Asia*. University College London. dispute. First year There are three core courses.48 undergraduate prospectus Anthropology Legal and Social Changes Since 1750 Outlines of Modern Criminology* Public International Law Sentencing and Treatment of Offenders* Taxation Media Law Jurisprudence One outside option LSE100 (Lent term only) Second year: The Anthropology of Kinship. and considers the relationship between religion and modernity.uk/anthropology UCAS code: BA L601 BA/SocAnth UCAS code: BSc L603 BSc/SocAnt Usual standard offer: A level: grades AAB International Baccalaureate: Diploma with 37 points including 6 6 6 at Higher level Other qualifications are considered and applications from mature students are welcomed. South Asia* The Anthropology of Christianity* Cognition and Anthropology* The Anthropology of Industrialisation and Industrial Life* The Anthropology of Development* Anthropology and Human Rights*  Anthropology and Media* BA/BSc Social Anthropology lse. Marxism and postmodernism. See page 33 for more information BA Applications 2011: 221 BA First year students 2011: 22 BSc Applications 2011: 102 BSc First year students 2011: 9 First year: Introduction to Social Anthropology Ethnography and Theory: Selected Texts Reading Other Cultures: the Anthropological Interpretation of Text and Film . family. It may be possible. South Asia. Post-Soviet Eurasia*. femaleness and maleness. we allow you a choice of BA or BSc in the title. geography. and the School of Oriental and African Studies.

BSc Statistics with Finance was launched in 2011 following demand from the industry. Around 75 per cent of the programme consists of mathematics and statistics courses. subject to satisfactory progress. . All three programmes make heavy demands on mathematical and statistical abilities. Accreditation provides graduates with the status of Graduate Statistician. should they wish to. BSc Business Mathematics and Statistics allows a much broader choice of courses applying statistics to the social sciences. statistics. demographics. Courses taken as part of the degree can lead to exemptions from subjects of the core technical stage of the examinations of the Institute of Actuaries. statistics and finance it forms an excellent preparation for work in the field of finance and elsewhere. Combining mathematics. Of the three programmes. banking. civil The BSc Business Mathematics and Statistics programme offers a much broader choice of optional courses. as well as a choice of specialisation in social science fields such as economics. Several courses on either BSc Business Mathematics and Statistics or BSc Statistics with Finance may give entitlement to exemptions from the Institute of Actuaries examinations. statistics. information science or sociology. finance. accounting. all three undergraduate degrees are accredited by the The Royal Statistical Society. and helps to solve important problems for insurance. After the first year you will be able to choose which aspects of the application of mathematics and statistics suit your interests and career aspirations best. you should consider one of the three programmes offered in this area. The main pathways available are: • Applicable mathematics • Applied statistics • Business methods • Actuarial science (where courses followed are identical to those in the Actuarial Science degree) The BSc Statistics with Finance aims to give a thorough grounding in mathematics and statistics applicable to finance. Due to the degree structure accreditation is guaranteed for Actuarial Science students and is possible for Statistics with Features of LSE courses Applicants should apply for no more than one of these programmes. civil service. For details please look at the current students exemptions section of our website. graduate studies and business consultancy. Applicants are strongly advised to visit the Institute of Actuaries website for further information. students may move between these three degrees. accounting.Applied statistics and actuarial science undergraduate prospectus 49 Anthropological Approaches to Questions of Being* Children and Youth in Contemporary Ethnography* The Anthropology of Borders and Boundaries* Research Methods in Social Anthropology* Anthropology of Schooling* Applied statistics and actuarial science service. If you have enjoyed A level Mathematics and are interested in the applications of statistics to the social sciences. as well as finance itself. In addition. the BSc Actuarial Science programme has the heaviest mathematical and statistical component. finance and statistics. subject to students successfully completing a set number of statistics courses in their second and third year. graduate studies and business consultancy. in their second year. commerce. as well as for graduate studies. They have exactly the same first year courses and. government. a grade of professional membership of the Society. Recent graduates have gone on to work in the areas of insurance. business and finance. as well as banking. Graduates will be able to go on to work in the areas of insurance. banking. The programme in the first and second year is largely fixed. Recent graduates have gone on to work in the areas of insurance (life and general). and 25 per cent of finance courses. The programme is accredited by the Institute of Actuaries and therefore there are two ways to get exemptions. industry and academic researchers. BSc Actuarial Science applies mathematical skills to a range of applied subjects. while a wider variety of options are available in the third year.

Finance and Business Mathematics and Statistics students depending on course choices. one of which must be Mathematics. LSE is located in the heart of the city offering so many interesting places to visit nearby and a great variety of entertainment. ©Wingspan Productions for the BBC. 1998) T H Wonnacott and R J Wonnacott Introductory Statistics (Wiley. 2010.ac. 2001) P J Davis and R Hersh The Mathematical Experience (Houghton Mifflin. General books related to mathematics and statistics are: D Hand Statistics: a very short introduction (Oxford University Press. 1990) P Eccles An Introduction to Mathematical Reasoning (Cambridge University Press. Your academic adviser will be available to offer general guidance and assistance with both academic and personal concerns. The lecturers at LSE are friendly and always make the lectures as interactive as possible. Executive Producer: Archie Baron. I’ve also taken advantage of the talks and career events that have been put on and they have certainly given me a clear insight into my future career path and given me valuable opportunities to network with people from various firms. BSc Actuarial Science lse. London is one of the busiest cities in the world and is truly a great place in which to study and live. Dan Hillman. 1 hour). seminars or workshops totalling between 10 and 15 hours per week.50 undergraduate prospectus Applied statistics and actuarial science Jeh Ying Wong Petaling Jaya. with the emphasis on marks gained in the second and third years. A DVD is available to order from Wingspan Productions. There are usually opportunities for internships in actuarial and financial firms which students from all three programmes can arrange for themselves with help from the Careers Service or with placement companies that co-operate with the Department of Statistics directly. Preliminary reading and video The following documentary gives insight into the exciting world of statistics: The Joy of Stats: (approx. plus LSE 100. Besides that. A small number of courses are assessed by project work. and you will be expected to meet him or her every term. The student community at LSE is diverse and provides you with the opportunity to meet and interact with people from different parts of the world. we recommend: V Bryant Yet Another Introduction to Analysis (Cambridge University Press. 2008) K J Devlin The Millennium Problems: the seven greatest unsolved mathematical puzzles of our time (Granta Books. Director and Producer. 1990) N L Biggs Discrete Mathematics (Oxford University Press. Teaching and assessment You will usually attend a mixture of lectures and related classes. The Careers Service at LSE is very helpful in providing advice and support when you’re making job applications. 2003) Degree structure Each degree involves studying 12 courses over three years. Most courses are assessed by a three hour examination in June. 2005) J S Rosenthal Struck by Lightning: the curious world of probabilities (HarperCollins.uk/statistics UCAS code: N321 BSc/ActSci Programme requirement: GCSE pass at grade A or A* in Mathematics Usual standard offer: A level: grades A A A. The subjects I study in my degree are very interesting and closely relate to what I want to do in the future. The class of degree you will attain is based on the assessment over all three years. 2000) For more serious preparatory study. 2005) J A Paulos Innumeracy: mathematical illiteracy and its consequences (Fsg Adult. Malaysia 1st year BSc Actuarial Science I came to LSE because of its great reputation and the fact that the Actuarial Science programme at the School has always been regarded as one of the best actuarial courses in the UK. Further Mathematics is highly desirable .

See page 33 for more information Applications 2011: 257 First year students 2011: 21 First year: (* half unit) Elementary Statistical Theory Mathematical Methods Economics A or Economics B (Economics A must be approved by the Departmental Tutor) Elements of Accounting and Finance or Introduction to Abstract Mathematics LSE100 (Lent term only) Second year: Further Mathematical Methods (Linear Algebra and Calculus) Sample Surveys and Experiments* and Applied Regression* Another option in mathematics. Survival Models: an introduction to actuarial mathematics and statistics. LSE has an accreditation agreement with the Institute and Faculty of Actuaries. or anything else that might interest you. An outside option: you can choose from courses in economics. sociology. social psychology. Actuarial Investigations: Financial: a course on compound interest techniques from an actuarial viewpoint. This is normally well above a pass mark. Further Mathematical Methods: this covers the mathematics needed for statistics and actuarial courses. You might be able to gain exemptions from the core technical stage of the Institute and Faculty of Actuaries examinations if you reach a sufficient standard in the relevant LSE courses. or any other context. Second year The second year courses are: Probability. The exemption system on a course by course basis will still be in place. information technology. mathematics or population studies LSE100 (Michaelmas Term only) Third year: Stochastic Processes* Time Series and Forecasting* Regression and Generalised Linear Models* Actuarial Mathematics: Life Actuarial Mathematics: General* BSc Business Mathematics and Statistics lse. even if that is not the case for individual courses. Third year There are no options in the third year. finance. See page 33 for more information Applications 2011: 556 First year students 2011: 77 Stochastic and Actuarial Methods in Finance (Students can substitute some of these courses to the value of one unit with another approved subject. First year Elementary Statistical Theory is a theoretical statistics course which is appropriate whether or not your A level Mathematics course included statistics. Distribution Theory and Inference Actuarial Investigations: Financial* Survival Models* One option in sociology. Introduction to Abstract Mathematics introduces the student to rigorous mathematical thinking and is strongly recommended for first year students.ac. statistics or operational research One option from a list of subjects in economics. Stochastic Processes and Time Series and Forecasting cannot be substituted). Further Mathematics or a science is recommended . Elements of Accounting and Finance will give you an introduction to the preparation. statistics (including Applied Regression* and Applied Statistics Project*).Applied statistics and actuarial science undergraduate prospectus 51 International Baccalaureate: Diploma with 38 points including 7 6 6 at Higher level (with 7 in Mathematics) Other qualifications are considered. Mathematical Methods is an introductory level “how to do it” course designed to prepare you for using mathematics seriously in the social sciences. There may be changes to the programme given here for the second and third years of the degree to keep up with developments in actuarial science. Alternatively you can do an applied statistics project. International Baccalaureate: Diploma with 38 points including 7 6 6 at Higher level (with 7 in Mathematics) Other qualifications are considered. You will also take an economics course. social psychology and information systems. but you might substitute up to one full unit of these courses with an option taught outside the Department. mathematics. In addition to this. Distribution Theory and Inference: this will develop your knowledge of probability and statistics beyond the first year course. It forms the basis for later statistics options.uk/statistics UCAS code: G0N0 BSc/BMS Programme requirement: GCSE pass at grade A or A* in Mathematics Usual standard offer: A level: grades A A A including Mathematics. social psychology or a language course LSE100 (Michaelmas term only)  Third year: At least one option in advanced topics in statistics or actuarial science First year: (* half unit) Elementary Statistical Theory Mathematical Methods Elements of Accounting and Finance or Introduction to Abstract Mathematics Economics B LSE100 (Lent Term only) Second year: Probability. uses and limitations of accounting information and the problems of finance and investment. This means that students with a high enough average mark on related courses can get all exemptions on offer. It will also provide the probability and statistics basis for all third year courses.

ac. See page 33 for more information Applications 2011: 171 First year students 2011: 12 First year: (*half unit) Elementary Statistical Theory Mathematical Methods Economics B Elements of Accounting and Finance or Introduction to Abstract Mathematics LSE100 (Lent term only) Second year: Further Mathematical Methods (Linear Algebra and Calculus) Probability. finance. You take one course in applied statistics.52 undergraduate prospectus Applied statistics and actuarial science At least one option in advanced topics in mathematics or operational research Not more than two options from advanced topics in management. Elementary Statistical Theory is concerned with both theory and application and is appropriate whether or not your A level Mathematics course included statistics. Finally. which allows you to develop concepts in the areas of sample surveys and experiments. you can choose between the courses Elements of Accounting and Finance and Abstract Mathematics. There may be changes to the programme given here for the second and third years of the degree to keep up with developments in industry and academic research. (* half unit) Statistics options include: Time Series and Forecasting* Regression and Generalised Linear Models* Stochastic Processes* Stochastic and Actuarial Methods in Finance* Market Research: An Integrated Approach Aspects of Market Research* Bayesian Inference* Mathematics options include: Optimisation Theory* Real Analysis* Differential Equations* Discrete Mathematics* Game Theory Chaos in Dynamical Systems* Mathematics of Finance and Valuation* Probability for Finance* Theory of Algorithms* Algebra and its Applications* Other related options include: Model Building in Operational Research Actuarial Mathematics: Life Actuarial Mathematics: General* Decision Sciences in Theory and Practice  You may take up to two outside options from a list including:  Managerial Accounting Organisational Theory and Behaviour Commercial Law Information Technology and the Law Industrial Economics Monetary Economics Demographic Description and Analysis A language course Note that your choice may be limited by the second year subjects you have taken. and at least one of these two should be in statistics. social psychology. Second year You take a course in Further Mathematical Methods.  Your fourth course is chosen from a list including:  Microeconomic Principles Macroeconomic Principles Information Technology and Society Principles of Finance A demography course You may also choose to take a language course. Introduction to Abstract Mathematics is for students who want to deepen their mathematical skills and is useful for certain mathematics courses in the second and third year. as well as regression and analysis of variance. Due to timetabling constraints. Economics B provides an introduction to microeconomics and macroeconomics. Third year Your choice in the third year is very wide.uk/statistics UCAS code: G3N3 BSc/StatFin Programme requirement: GCSE pass at grade A or A* in Mathematics Usual standard offer: A level: grades A A A including Mathematics. accountancy.  BSc Statistics with Finance lse. You should take at least two of the courses on offer in statistics. it may not be possible to choose certain course combinations. economics. It forms the basis for later statistics options. Distribution Theory. Mathematical Methods will continue your A level studies and includes calculus and linear algebra. mathematics and closely related areas. building on the Mathematical Methods course. Elements of Accounting and Finance will give you an introduction to the preparation. You will also take another course in statistics. law and demography  First year You follow a largely common first year programme with both BSc Actuarial Science and BSc Statistics with Finance. mathematics. or operational research. uses and limitations of accounting information and the problems of finance and investment. Further Mathematics is highly desirable International Baccalaureate: Diploma with 38 points including 7 6 6 at Higher level (with 7 in Mathematics) Other qualifications are considered. and Inference Principles of Finance   One course in mathematics or statistics LSE100 (Michaelmas term only)  .

For the remaining two course units various options are available depending on your interests and career plans. as is a choice of two courses in advanced topics in finance. Second year You take a course in Further Mathematical Methods. . There may be changes to the programme given here for the second and third years of the degree to keep up with developments in industry and academic research. It forms the basis for later statistics options. Investments and Financial Markets or Quantitative Finance  One course in advanced topics in mathematics. finance. Introduction to Abstract Mathematics is for students who want to deepen their mathematical skills and is useful for certain mathematics and statistics courses in the second and third year. you can choose between the courses Elements of Accounting and Finance and Abstract Mathematics. Economics B provides an introduction to microeconomics and macroeconomics. building on the Mathematical Methods course. or theory of survey sampling. actuarial science. uses and limitations of accounting information and the problems of finance and investment. statistics or operational research   One additional course in mathematics. Mathematical Methods will continue your A level studies and includes calculus and linear algebra. discrete mathematics. you will receive the statistical foundations needed for the third year. or a topic of choice from other departments First year Elementary Statistical Theory is concerned with both theory and application and is appropriate whether or not your A level Mathematics course included statistics. it may not be possible to choose certain course combinations. Due to timetabling constraints. optimisation theory. and Inference. Third year In the third year you have more choices than before. statistics. Analysis and Valuation Managerial Accounting Other related options include: Model Building in Operational Research Actuarial Mathematics: Life Actuarial Mathematics: General* Decision Sciences in Theory and Practice  You may take up to two outside options from a list including:  Organisational Theory and Behaviour Commercial Law Information Technology and the Law Industrial Economics Monetary Economics Demographic Description and Analysis Note that your choice may be limited by the second year subjects you have taken. (* half unit) Statistics options include: Stochastic Processes* Stochastic and Actuarial Methods in Finance*   Bayesian Inference* Mathematics options include: Optimisation Theory* Real Analysis* Differential Equations* Discrete Mathematics* Game Theory Chaos in Dynamical Systems* Mathematics of Finance and Valuation* Probability for Finance* Theory of Algorithms* Algebra and its Applications* Finance options include: Corporate Finance. Finally. Elements of Accounting and Finance will give you an introduction to the preparation. In Probability. In the Principles of Finance course you examine the theory of financial decisionmaking by firms and the behaviour of the capital markets in which these decisions are taken.Applied statistics and actuarial science undergraduate prospectus 53 Third year: Regression and Generalised Linear Models* Time Series and Forecasting* Corporate Finance. Two half unit courses (Regression and Generalised Linear Models. For the fourth course you can choose among subjects such as statistical project work. differential equations. and Time Series and Forecasting) are compulsory. Distribution Theory. applied regression. real analysis. Investments and Financial Markets   Quantitive Finance Accounting options include: Financial Accounting.

Teaching and assessment You will have 8 to 10 hours of timetabled classes per week. the ability to evaluate and analyse data. as well as shorter term teaching and research staff. all courses are taught in small weekly discussion groups led by a member . the economic and social effects of wars. as well as making class presentations. which has 17 full-time teachers. You will usually have to present about four papers or essays for each course. Our courses cover all the main approaches to the subject. 18301914 (Oxford University Press. the importance of education and human capital in economic change. Within the degrees students may choose between economic courses. You will have an academic adviser who will advise on course choices. combined with two options from any of the first year courses made available by other departments. 10. offer general guidance and assistance with both academic and personal concerns and help with your project. 1992) Degree structure You may take a degree in economic history at LSE in a number of ways: in a single honours degree. as well as those of the historian. of staff.000 word research project is counted as one course out of the eight in the second and third years. or as a major subject with a minor in economics. is the largest in the country in this subject area.000 word project First year You take basic courses in economic history and economics. quantitative and non-quantitative courses. Economic and social history is concerned with understanding the process of change in the past. If you are looking for a more structured degree with less choice you should consider the joint degree with economics. Our graduates can be found in senior positions throughout the professions. as well as from a range of geographical areas and time periods. the effect of business organisation on economic performance. 1997) E L Jones Growth Recurring: economic change in world history (Clarendon Press. All degrees involve studying 12 courses over the three years. plus LSE100. All other courses are assessed by means of formal three hour examinations. These skills are highly valued by most employers. the history of economic development in the third world. 1820-1990 (Allen & Unwin. change in social behaviour in the past. and to present an argument orally or on paper. in a joint honours degree with economics. business. The 10. the City. the civil service and government. BSc Economic History lse. Typical issues which the subject addresses are: economic globalisation in a historical perspective. the statistician and the sociologist. It uses the skills of the economist. You may also take economic history as a minor subject with economics as a major (see page 59).ac. You will gain a range of research skills including numeracy. India and Japan One economic history option Either a second economic history option or one outside option LSE100 (Michaelmas term only) Third year: Two advanced economic history options One other economic history option Preliminary reading If you wish to gain further insight into the subject we suggest that you look at one or more of the following books: J Diamond Guns. As well as lectures. 1870 to the Present Day Economics A or Economics B One outside option One international history course from an approved list LSE100 (Lent term only) Second year: Theories and Evidence in Economic History Comparative Economic Development: Late Industrialisation in Russia. See page 33 for more information Applications 2011: 123 First year students 2011: 20 First year: The Internationalisation of Economic Growth. 1988) A L Kenwood and A Lougheed The Growth of the International Economy. Germs and Steel: the fates of human societies (Norton. and the causes of population change and migration. 1997) R Floud Land of Hope and Glory: the people and the British economy.uk/economicHistory UCAS code: V300 BSc/EcHist Usual standard offer: A level: grades A A B International Baccalaureate: Diploma with 37 points including 6 6 6 at Higher level Other qualifications are considered.54 undergraduate prospectus Economic history Economic history Features of LSE courses Our Department.

in the third year. It is similar to the joint degree with economics. Being in London adds to this excitement as we have the city of London as our campus. Furthermore. with only one economic principles course. Where history can sometimes go round in circles or economics too theoretical. Sweden. Economic history explains how and why things happened.ac. Comparative Economic Development covers the industrialisation process in late developing countries such as Russia. Japan and India. Holland. economic history brings the two disciplines together to provide interesting insights. See page 33 for more information Applications 2011: 32 First year students 2011: 1 In this degree. You would take two economic history courses. and an option from another subject area at LSE. I really like how economic concepts that appear abstract and distant from real life come together in economic history. Theories and Evidence in Economic History examines theories and concepts used in economic history and provides an introduction to the methods used by economic historians to collect evidence and generate inference on relevant historical questions. Being part of the student societies has helped my confidence and given me the opportunity to work with people professionally. BSc Economic History with Economics I chose to come to LSE because it is one of the few universities which offers a combination of economics and economic history as an undergraduate programme. I intend to explore my options and maybe return to LSE after a few years work to do a master’s. economics is a minor subject. In the third year. but you would not take statistics courses in first and second year.000 word project. BSc Economic History with Economics lse. you would only need to take one further economic principles course. Belgium and India all at the same time! People at LSE have interesting backgrounds and great stories. our cricket team regularly trains at Lords and the Oval and for me the novelty of being in London never wears off. you choose two courses in the second year from a wide range.Economic history undergraduate prospectus 55 Second and third years You take two compulsory courses. you choose three courses in economic history and submit a 10.uk/economicHistory UCAS code: V3L1 BSc/EcHEc Usual standard offer: A level: grades A A B with A in Mathematics International Baccalaureate: Diploma with 37 points including 6 6 6 at Higher level (to include Mathematics) Other qualifications are considered. First year: The Internationalisation of Economic Growth. UK 2nd year. Economic history options Second year courses Business and Economic Performance since 1945: Britain in International Context The Evolution of Economic Policy in Advanced Economies The Making of an Economic Superpower: China since 1850 Comparative Economic Development: Late Industrialisation in Russia. Society and Economy in England and Europe 1450-1750 From Money to Finance: European Financial History. It also has a unique history and reputation for being one of the best universities in the world. There are not many other universities in the world where I would find myself with someone from Pakistan. at least one of which has to be in economic history. Similarly. Economic history equips you with the tools for a variety of fields. (This course is optional in joint degrees.) In addition. language and music. We also get the best and most famous speakers and artists to visit LSE. As part of the Economic History Society committee it has been a enjoyable challenge to launch a new society! Working with the Pakistan Society has helped me reunite with Pakistani culture. India and Japan Latin America and the International Economy Towns. The best part of LSE has to be the diversity. 1870 to the Present Day . 800-1750 The Industrial Revolution Advanced third year courses The Origins of the World Economy 1450-1750 Africa and the World Economy Issues in Modern Japanese Economic Development Innovation and Finance in the 19th and 20th Centuries The Economic History of North America: from Colonial Times to the Cold War China’s Traditional Economy and its Growth in the Very Long-Term Saad Khalid Lincoln.

 Theories and Evidence in Economic History.uk/economicHistory UCAS code: VL31 BSc/EcEcH Usual standard offer: A level: grades A A B with A in Mathematics International Baccalaureate: Diploma with 37 points including 6 6 6 at Higher level (to include Mathematics) Other qualifications are considered. 1450-1750 From Money to Finance: European Financial History. India and Japan Latin America and the International Economy Towns. See page 33 for more information Applications 2011: 228 First year students 2011: 16 First year: The Internationalisation of Economic Growth. India and Japan Latin America and the International Economy Towns. It will appeal if you want training in the application of economic theory and quantitative methods to real problems. 1450-1750 Africa and the World Economy Issues in Modern Japanese Economic Development Innovation and Finance in the 19th and 20th Centuries The Economic History of North America: from Colonial Times to the Cold War China's Traditional Economy and its Growth in the Very Long-Term BSc Economics and Economic History lse. Economic history options Second year courses Business and Economic Performance since 1945: Britain in International Context The Evolution of Economic Policy in Advanced Economies The Making of an Economic Superpower: China since 1850 Comparative Economic Development: Late Industrialisation in Russia. 1450-1750 From Money to Finance: European Financial History. one of which is the compulsory second year course.56 undergraduate prospectus Economic history Mathematical Methods Economics B One outside option LSE100 (Lent term only) Second year: Microeconomic Principles or Macroeconomic Principles Theories and Evidence in Economic History One economic history option One outside option LSE 100 (Michaelmas term only) Third year: Microeconomic Principles or Macroeconomic Principles One advanced economic history option One option in general economic history 10.000 word project This joint degree is an alternative way of studying economics. mathematics. You will have some freedom to choose between different economics and economic history courses. 800-1750 The Industrial Revolution Advanced third year courses The Origins of the World Economy.000 word project Economic history options Second year courses Business and Economic Performance since 1945: Britain in International Context The Evolution of Economic Policy in Advanced Economies The Making of an Economic Superpower: China since 1850 Comparative Economic Development: Late Industrialisation in Russia. Society and Economy in England and Europe.ac. You will also complete a research project in economic history in which you will use quantitative and/or computing skills. Society and Economy in England and Europe. Second and third years You take four more courses in economics or quantitative methods (or three such courses and an outside option) and three in economic history. statistics and economic history. the other an advanced course. First year You take courses in economics. 800-1750 The Industrial Revolution Advanced third year courses The Origins of the World Economy. 1450-1750 Africa and the World Economy Issues in Modern Japanese Economic Development Innovation and Finance in the 19th and 20th Centuries The Economic History of North America: from Colonial Times to the Cold War China's Traditional Economy and its Growth in the Very Long-Term Economics B Elementary Statistical Theory LSE100 (Lent term only)  Second year: Microeconomic Principles or Macroeconomic Principles One econometrics course Theories and Evidence in Economic History One economic history option LSE100 (Michaelmas term only) Third year: Microeconomic Principles or Macroeconomic Principles One economics option or an outside option One advanced economic history option 10. 1870 to the Present Day Mathematical Methods .

The second year concentrates on building a firm grasp of core analytical methods in economics and applying them to a range of problems. Degree structure We offer two single honours degrees. for example in banking and financial services. or to take up positions as economic or management consultants. Others choose to join international organisations. advising on mergers and acquisitions. Many of our graduates choose to pursue careers in the financial sector. Our BSc Economics programme provides a well rounded coverage of the economics discipline. plus the innovative LSE100 in Lent term. You can also take economics as a major subject with economic history as a minor. both microeconomic and macroeconomic. The BSc Econometrics and Mathematical Economics programme enables students to build a particularly strong quantitative background. while the third year allows students to specialise and to apply those methods to particular areas. are people often not any happier? Can government policies influence this? Why are some governments captured by elites and more prone to corruption than others? What steps should be taken now to combat global warming? Questions such as these. analytical and trading fields. in analysing and constructing complex arguments and in communicating these effectively. and testing hypotheses against data. not only in economics but also in finance. management. you will have the chance to learn from economists at the cutting edge of their field. A first degree in economics provides an excellent preparation for a range of careers.Economics undergraduate prospectus 57 Economics options (joint degree) Second year courses Microeconomic Principles Macroeconomic Principles Introduction to Econometrics Principles of Econometrics Third year courses Microeconomic Principles Macroeconomic Principles Advanced Economic Analysis Problems of Applied Economics History of Economics: How Theories Change Development Economics Monetary Economics International Economics Industrial Economics Economic Policy Analysis Public Economics Labour Economics Economics and applying these skills. A significant number choose to go on to graduate study. rather than simply prepare themselves for a prosperous future. in applying these methods to a diverse range of problems. and one in econometrics and mathematical economics. The study of economics therefore involves developing problem-solving skills. statistics and one other course. as economies grow richer. As an undergraduate in the Department. without losing sight of the real world. It is also possible to study degrees that combine economics in various ways with Features of LSE courses The Economics Department is regularly ranked number one outside of the USA for its published research in economics and econometrics and in 2008 the national Research Assessment Exercise assessed LSE Economics as the best single department in any major discipline. all of which are being examined by leading economists at LSE. though you should note that all modern economics requires an aptitude for and enjoyment of mathematics and that the first year core for all includes both mathematics and statistics. The economics programmes at LSE aim to provide students with a thorough grounding in the analytical methods of economics and to develop their skills . What caused the great economic crisis of 2008 and what policies were the right reaction? Is globalisation increasing inequality within countries? Between countries? Why. which is becoming more and more important for a successful career in economics. The following descriptions show the pattern of study for each degree. illustrate the broad scope of economics today. Every student will take economics. The BSc Economics with Economic History programme provides an option for students with a secondary interest in economic history. but we particularly welcome students who want to learn about economics. mathematics. from barriers to economic development to international financial crises. to become professional accountants and auditors. one in economics. equipping students with the necessary quantitative skills. The first year of all our degrees will give an essential foundation in the subject. An open-minded and scientific approach to these issues requires formal modeling of economic relationships. development and other fields. Economics today tackles a broad range of problems. including mathematical and statistical abilities.

Each student has an academic adviser who is available to offer general guidance and assistance with both academic and personal concerns on an individual basis. If you have taken a gap year it may be helpful for you to review the mathematics that you have learnt previously. Business Studies or Media Studies Usual standard offer: For students taking three A levels: grades A* A A with an A* in Mathematics. we suggest looking at one or more of the following popular books: T Harford The Undercover Economist (Abacus.lse.uk/resources/podcasts/ PublicLecturesAndEvents. as well as LSE100 teaching. The study of economics in all these degrees requires core study in economic principles and mathematics. other editions of these books are also relevant. environmental policy. The project element of the degree in Econometrics and Mathematical Economics is assessed through the submission of a report. which will differ from these popular presentations. and are therefore very mathematically demanding. Other degrees including Economics BSc Economic History with Economics (see page 55) BSc Economics and Economic History (see page 56) . No other specific subjects are required at A level. 2008) International Baccalaureate: Diploma with 38 points including 7 6 6 at Higher level (with 7 in Mathematics) Other qualifications are considered. BSc Environmental Policy with Economics (see page 63) BSc Geography with Economics (see page 65) BSc Government and Economics (see page 68) BSc Mathematics and Economics (see page 81) BSc Mathematics with Economics (see page 82) BSc Philosophy and Economics (see page 84) BSc Social Policy and Economics   (see page 89) It is also a very good idea to have a look at one or more economics textbooks. mathematics and statistics. with an A* in Mathematics. 2007) and Superfreakonomics (Penguin. 2008) The UK launch of these books was held at LSE and a podcast of these authors speaking in our Old Theatre. 2009) S D Levitt and S J Dubner Freakonomics (Penguin. Accounting. Further Mathematics taken at A level is strongly preferred and is seen as an additional or fourth subject. Students taking Further Mathematics to AS level only will be required to achieve grade A Preliminary reading For those wishing to gain further insight into what economists study. Although the editions listed below are recommended. Details of these degrees are in the separate sections for those subjects.htm Teaching and assessment You will have around 12 hours of lectures and classes each week. 2009) N G Mankiw and M P Taylor Macroeconomics: European Edition (Worth publishers. BSc Economics econ. to have a clear idea of what the serious university study of the subject involves. This is the foundation upon which the rest of your studies will be based. Thus a combination of Mathematics. along with many other talks. 2008) P Collier The Bottom Billion: why the poorest countries are failing and what can be done about it (Oxford University Press. is available at www. For students taking four or more A levels: grades A*A A plus a pass in a fourth A level. See page 33 for more information Applications 2011: 2. McGraw Hill. government. but we prefer traditional academic subjects to subjects such as Communication Studies. This should be taken into consideration when deciding whether this is the most suitable degree programme for you.lse. A level Economics is not essential. R Frank Microeconomics and Behavior (8th edition.ac. A fourth course is chosen from a wide range of options offered by other LSE departments. Courses are assessed through examinations in June each year.ac. All of the programmes taught in the Department of Economics take a mathematically rigorous approach to the subject. geography.58 undergraduate prospectus Economics economic history.798 First year students 2011: 196 First year: Economics B Mathematical Methods Elementary Statistical Theory One outside option LSE100 (Lent term only) Second year: Microeconomic Principles I or Microeconomic Principles II Macroeconomic Principles Introduction to Econometrics or Principles of Econometrics One outside option LSE100 (Michaelmas term only) Third year: Four options from economics or closely related subjects First year In the first year you will take compulsory introductory courses in economics. Classes in groups of around 15 students are the main form of interaction with teachers. philosophy and social policy. in preparation for beginning studies at LSE. Further Mathematics and one other subject is not seen as providing the required breadth of knowledge and skills. These degrees are maintained by other departments at LSE. 2007) and The Logic of Life (Little Brown.uk UCAS code: L101 BSc/Econ Programme requirement: A level Mathematics is required. mathematics. 2010) P Krugman The Return of Depression Economics and the Crisis of 2008 (Penguin.

uk lse. with an A* in Mathematics.uk/economicHistory UCAS code: L1V3 BSc/EcEcH Programme requirement: A level Mathematics is required. Second and third years This programme differs from the BSc in Economics in that you are not required to take an econometrics course in the second year. See page 54 for other combinations of economics and economic history. Investments and Financial Markets or Quantitative Finance Development Economics Economic Policy Analysis Economic Theory and its Applications The Evolution of Economic Policy in Advanced Economies   Further Mathematical Methods Game Theory History of Economics: How Theories Change Industrial Economics International Economics Labour Economics Latin America and the International Economy Locational Change and Business Activity The Making of an Economic Superpower: China since 1850 Managerial Accounting Management Accounting. Thus a combination of Mathematics. Options This list demonstrates the wide range of third year courses offered on the BSc Economics programme. Accounting. The list may change as new options are developed and others are withdrawn. etc). No other specific subjects are required at A level. macroeconomics (the study of fluctuations and longer term growth in output. Financial Management and Organisational Control Model Building in Operational Research Monetary Economics Operational Research Methods Philosophy of Economics Political Economy Politics and Economic Policy Politics of International Economic Relations Public Economics Principles of Finance Problems of Applied Econometrics The Economic History of North America: From Colonial Times to the Cold War    Theories of Regional Development and Change BSc Economics with Economic History econ. Business Studies or Media Studies Usual standard offer: For students taking three A levels: grades A* A A. In the third year we offer specialist options in all the main fields of economic enquiry and students may choose their courses according to their interests. For students taking four or more A levels: grades A*A A plus a pass in a fourth A level. with an A* in Mathematics. See page 33 for more information Applications 2011: 65 First year students 2011: 1 First year: Economics B The Internationalisation of Economic Growth. More technical versions of both microeconomics and econometrics are also offered. the exchange rate. 1870 to the Present Day Mathematical Methods Elementary Statistical Theory LSE100 (Lent term only) Second year: Microeconomic Principles I or Microeconomic Principles II Macroeconomic Principles Theories and Evidence in Economic History An economic history option LSE100 (Michaelmas term only) Third year: Two economics options One economic history option One outside option or an economic history dissertation  This degree programme features economic history as a minor subject. and an economic history course. This is the foundation upon which the rest of your studies will be based.ac. but we prefer traditional academic subjects to subjects such as Communication Studies. Governance and Risk Management Business and Economic Performance Since 1945: Britain in International Context Commercial Law Comparative Economic Development: Late Industrialisation in Russia. First year In the first year you will take an introductory course in economics. a mathematics course.lse. A level Economics is not essential. unemployment. A fourth course is chosen from a wide range of options taught outside of the Department.ac. Further Mathematics taken at A level is strongly preferred and is seen as an additional or fourth subject. Not all options will necessarily be taught every year: Advanced Economic Analysis Africa and the World Economy Auditing. One of these courses could be from a selected list of relevant courses offered outside of the Department. for those who are more mathematically inclined. Students taking Further Mathematics to AS level only will be required to achieve grade A International Baccalaureate: Diploma with 38 points including 7 6 6 at Higher level (with 7 in Mathematics) Other qualifications are considered. and take fewer economics options in . a statistics course. India and Japan Corporate Finance. and econometrics (the application of quantitative methods to economic data).Economics undergraduate prospectus 59 Second and third years The second year consists of compulsory courses in microeconomics (the study of households and firms). Further Mathematics and one other subject is not seen as providing the required breadth of knowledge and skills. inflation.

and between statistics and a course chosen from a long list of options from other departments. For students taking four or more A levels: grades A*A A plus a pass in a fourth A level. Business Studies or Media Studies.60 undergraduate prospectus Economics the third year. Governance and Risk Management Corporate Finance.lse. with A* in Mathematics. two other courses are chosen from a wide range taught by the Economics Department and other departments. according to individual interests.ac. and some in mathematical economics. No other specific subjects are required at A level. This involves obtaining and analysing data to answer a question of economic interest. Accounting. Second and third years The second year includes compulsory courses in both microeconomics (the study of households and firms) and econometrics (the study of statistical methods applied to economics). with an A* in Mathematics. mathematics and statistics. This is the foundation upon which the rest of your studies will be based. Options This list demonstrates the range of third year courses offered on this degree. some in theoretical econometrics. but we prefer traditional academic subjects to subjects such as Communication Studies. A fourth course may be chosen from the wide range of options offered by other departments across LSE. Students also complete a project in quantitative economics. An attractive selection of courses might be Mathematics and at least one physical science Usual standard offer: For students taking three A levels: grades A* A A. Students taking Further Mathematics to AS level only will be required to achieve grade A International Baccalaureate: Diploma with 38 points including 7 6 6 at Higher level (with 7 in Mathematics) Other qualifications are considered. Students are supervised by a member of staff and find this an enjoyable element of the course. Further Mathematics taken at A level is strongly preferred and is seen as an additional or fourth subject. Thus a combination of Mathematics. The list may change as new options are developed and others are withdrawn. The list may change as new options are developed and others are withdrawn. Imperialism and High Speed Growth   Monetary Economics Political Economy Principles of Econometrics Public Economics The Economic History of North America: from Colonial Times to the Cold War The Origins of the World Economy. In addition. Distribution Theory and Inference or an outside option LSE100 (Michaelmas term only) Third year: Econometric Theory or Economic Theory and its Applications or Problems of Applied Econometrics Two economics options 10. Some students are most interested in applied econometrics. students have a choice between macroeconomics and a mathematics course. The quantitative project provides excellent training for practical work in future employment or research.  The third year gives opportunity for further specialisation. Not all options will necessarily be taught every year: Advanced Economic Analysis Auditing. Options This list gives a selection of third year options offered on this degree programme.uk UCAS code: L140 BSc/Ecomt Programme requirement: A level Mathematics is required.000 word project in quantitative economics First year In the first year you will take compulsory courses in economics. Further Mathematics and one other subject is not seen as providing the required breadth of knowledge and skills. Not all options will necessarily be taught every year: Advanced Economic Analysis Africa and the World Economy Development Economics Economic Policy Analysis History of Economics: How Theories Change Industrial Economics Innovation and Finance in the 19th and 20th Centuries International Economics Introduction to Econometrics Issues of Modern Japanese Economic Development: Late Industrialisation. Three courses in economic history are taken in place of these. In addition. 1450-1750 BSc Econometrics and Mathematical Economics econ. on a topic of their choosing. Investments and Financial Markets Development Economics Economic Policy Analysis . A level Economics is not essential. See page 33 for more information Applications 2011: 201 First year students 2011: 4 First year: Economics B Mathematical Methods Elementary Statistical Theory One outside option LSE100 (Lent term only) Second year: Microeconomic Principles II Principles of Econometrics Macroeconomic Principles or a course in mathematics Probability.

the processes which drive the changes are economic. . loss of biodiversity. any attempts to manage the use of environmental resources to achieve more sustainable forms of development have to begin with a clear understanding of the socioeconomic processes involved. respectively. students learn both about conceptual and applied aspects of environmental problems. Understanding and addressing issues such as human-induced climate change and global biodiversity depletion must take into account the uneven production and distribution of ecological and social harm. urbanisation. whether in the public sector for government departments and agencies. in the private sector for industry and environmental/ management consultancies or in the NGO sector for pressure groups and think tanks. challenging students to interrogate pressing real-world problems and proposed solutions. industrial development. It is increasingly recognised that environmental problems cannot be divorced from challenges to human well-being and development. Such teaching is designed to develop graduates with analytical and critical competencies for employment or graduate study in environmental policy and studies. soil erosion and desertification. the degrees equip students to critically analyse environmental policies on the basis of rigorous social science. Distribution Theory and Inference Public Economics Quantitative Finance Environment The BSc Environment and Development and BSc Environmental Policy with Economics degree programmes offer an inter-disciplinary social science approach to environmental matters.Environment undergraduate prospectus 61 Game Theory History of Economics: How Theories Change Industrial Economics International Economics Labour Economics Macroeconomic Principles Managerial Accounting Management Accounting. Our teaching emphasises the fact that the majority of environmental problems arise from human actions and decisions. Current patterns of population growth. development studies and economics. social science scholars have usefully questioned how “environmental” problems are defined and analysed. Recent graduates have also gone on to further study at graduate level. and that all environmental management schemes seek to achieve objectives defined by humans within constraints imposed by political and economic systems. You will also have the opportunity to take courses outside the One of the critical questions in modern society is how to manage processes of economic and social development so that we can make sustainable improvements in human welfare without destroying the environmental resource base on which all life depends. You will be taught by a team of very experienced researchers with acknowledged expertise in environmental and ecological economics. national and international level. ozone depletion and global warming. Financial Management and Organisational Control Model Building in Operational Research Monetary Economics Operational Research Methods Philosophy of Economics Political Economy Principles of Finance Probability. from the local to the global. Exposed to stateof-the-art knowledge through researchinformed teaching. social and political. Although such environmental changes manifest themselves as physical problems. Indeed. Who benefits and who loses from environmental projects and practices? Similarly. environmental hazards and environmental risk management and natural resources management. Features of LSE courses The BSc degrees in Environment and Development and in Environmental Policy with Economics differ from most university environment programmes as they focus on the subject from a social science rather than a natural science perspective. Major issues include pollution. environmental geography. Recent graduates have gone on to work in all areas of environmental policy and economics at the local. development studies. environmental policy and planning. business and the environment. Therefore. These two environmental degrees enable students to benefit from the excellent reputation of the School within both the fields of environmental and. This focus reflects the strengths of LSE research in understanding the social causes of problems and making evidence-based recommendations to address them. the negative outcomes of some environmental projects have led many to question how such projects are economically justified and implemented. and the use and consumption of resources are resulting in environmental changes on all scales. Above all.

as well as prominent public figures. There are clear guidelines and advice for all assessment assignments. For the BSc Environmental Policy with Economics programme. Students on these programmes should expect to pay a fee to contribute to the costs of fieldwork. Economy and Society One course from a list of approved first year geography and environment options or an approved outside option LSE100 (Lent term only) Second year: Introduction to Development in the South Environment: Science and Society Applied Environmental Economics One course from a list of approved second year geography and environment options or an approved outside option LSE100 (Michaelmas term only) Third year: Environmental Governance Environment and Development Two courses from a list of approved third year geography and environment options Preliminary reading If you wish to gain further insight into the subject we suggest that you look at one or more of the following books: W N Adger and A Jordan (eds) Governing Sustainability (Cambridge University Press. See page 33 for more information Applications 2011: 99 First year students 2011: 9 This degree allows you to build a critical understanding of processes of environmental change as they relate to human well-being and development. You will also be involved in fieldwork. particularly in the course Applied Environmental Economics. Environmental courses typically have a three hour examination plus an extended essay (or practical work for methods courses). or other departments in the School. a third course on contemporary geographical issues. First year: Environmental Change: Past. plus LSE100. International Relations and Social Policy. M Toman and R U Ayres Scarcity and Growth Revisited (Resources for the Future. Present and Future Sustainable Development Environment. while also allowing students to follow particular interests in environmental and development studies or economics. Environment and Development. on spatial analysis and research techniques have practical work.62 undergraduate prospectus Environment Department and participate in the lively academic culture of the School through the public lecture series. seminars and classes totalling 12 to 15 hours per week. mainly in your first year. Further details on the nature of any fieldwork and on any associated costs will be made available upon induction. and another course from an approved list of geography and environment and outside options. there are also a range of economics courses which are taken in each of the three years.uk/geographyAndEnvironment UCAS code: FK84 BSc/EnvDev Usual standard offer: A level: grades A A B Teaching and assessment For each course you will have a combination of lectures. Present and Future. In this way. while also equipping you with the broader skills needed for environment and development policy and analysis. 2007) J Elliot An Introduction to Sustainable Development (Routledge.ac. You will have an academic adviser who will meet you six or seven times a year and help you to gain the most from your studies. and a fourth course from within the Department of Geography and Environment. The degrees are designed to develop core knowledge and skills. 2000) D Simpson. students gain exposure to leading scholars and practitioners across the social sciences. Courses which focus . The other environment-related courses build upon this understanding of the natural world but adopt a social science perspective. Government. you take courses in Introduction to Development in the South. 2006) D Pearce and B Barbier Blueprint for a Sustainable Economy (Earthscan. such as Economics.  In the third year you take courses in Environmental Governance. First year You take two courses which deal with the natural environment and with global issues relating to environmental change and sustainable development. These environment-related courses include some economic analysis. activism. You will usually have examinations for each course you have taken at the end of the academic year. Environment: Science and Society and Applied Environmental Economics. International Baccalaureate: Diploma with 37 points including 6 6 6 at Higher level Other qualifications are considered. 2nd edition. Fieldwork and industrial visits are a component of both the BSc Environment and Development and the BSc Environmental Policy with Economics degree programmes. 2005) BSc Environment and Development lse.  Second and third years In the second year. 2009) N Carter The Politics of the Environment: ideas. and two courses from an approved list (one of which may be an Independent Research Project)  Options (* half unit) First year  (Not all options are available every year) One from:  Economics A or Economics B Degree structure Students taking either the BSc Environment and Development or the BSc Environmental Policy with Economics take 12 courses over three years. They include some exposure to natural science concepts in the course Environmental Change: Past. policy (Cambridge University Press.

you take two core environmental courses. Society and Space Location and Spatial Analysis Political Geographies. In the third year. First year You take courses which deal with the physical environment and with global issues. See page 33 for more information Applications 2011: 90 First year students 2011: 3 First year: Environmental Change: Past.uk/geographyAndEnvironment UCAS code: F9L1 BSc/EPEc Programme requirement: A level in Mathematics at grade A Usual standard offer: A level: grades A A B. Present and Future Sustainable Development Economics B Mathematical Methods or Quantitative Methods (Mathematics)* and Quantitative Methods (Statistics)* LSE100 (Lent term only) Third year: Environmental Governance Environment and Development  Two courses from a prescribed list of options This degree allows you the powerful combination of studying the environment while furthering your understanding of economics. India and Japan States. Social and Environmental) (compulsory pre-requisite for Independent Research Project) Law and the Environment Poverty. and Microeconomic Principles I. Economy and Society Quantitative Methods (Mathematics)* and Quantitative Methods (Statistics)* Second year  One from: Comparative Economic Development: Late Industrialisation in Russia. Second and third years In the second year. 1870 to the Present Day Introduction to Political Theory Contemporary Europe The Structure of International Society Methods in Spatial and Social Analysis From Empire to Independence: The ExtraEuropean World in the Twentieth Century Introduction to Social Anthropology Population. you must take Environmental Governance along with Environment and Development and then choose two courses from a combination of economics and geography and environment options.Environment undergraduate prospectus 63 The Internationalisation of Economic Growth.ac. It is structured as a major/ minor degree and the programme is tightly specified in order for students solidly to build economic knowledge and skills alongside environmental options. including an A in Mathematics International Baccalaureate: Diploma with 37 points including 6 6 6 at Higher level (to include Mathematics) Other qualifications are considered. Policy and Planning The Geography of Gender: Global Perspectives Applied Location and Spatial Analysis The Political Geography of Development and the South Second year: Environment: Science and Society Applied Environmental Economics One course from second year  approved options Microeconomic Principles I LSE100 (Michaelmas term only) BSc Environmental Policy with Economics lse. Nations and Empires Economy. an approved geography and environment option. together with an economics course and a mathematics course. . Social Exclusion and Social Change Demographic Description and Analysis Third year Two from: Independent Research Project Theories of Regional Development  and Change Urban Development: Politics. Policy and Space Research Techniques (Spatial.

M Bradshaw. the internal structures of each degree are quite different. 2007) unep. social and environmental geography with reference to developed and developing countries. P Crang and M Goodwin (Eds) Introducing Human Geographies (2nd edition. 2006) The focus of geography at LSE is on spatial and location dimensions of economic. Africa. P J Taylor and M Watts Geographies of Global Change: remapping the world (Blackwell. As we attempt to sustainably improve human welfare and environmental quality.asp W Murray Geographies of Globalization (Routledge. The core BA degree is a specialist degree designed for students who wish to focus on human geography either on its own or with some exposure to other social sciences taught at the School. Latin America. administration. 2005) P L Knox and S A Marston Places and Regions in Global Context (Pearson. social and economic aspects of geographical enquiry. Teaching and assessment For each course you will have a combination of lectures and classes (12 to 15 hours per week in the first year). This allows you to apply your knowledge to a small research exercise in your own chosen field of interest. All of these degrees involve studying 12 courses over the three years. You will also be involved in fieldwork some of which may be abroad. focusing especially on environmental. consultancy. society and policy (Oxford University Press. 2006) D Perrons Globalisation and Social Change: people and places in a divided world (Routledge.org/geo/geo4. If you are particularly interested in the environment please also see the BSc degrees listed on page 61.uk/geographyAndEnvironment UCAS code: L702 BA/Geog Usual standard offer: A level: grades A A B International Baccalaureate: Diploma with 37 points including 6 6 6 at Higher level Features of LSE courses The Geography and Environment Department brings together specialists from a number of different countries and disciplines. Hodder Arnold. economic and environmental aspects of geography and inform the policy process. the Middle East. P Daniels. Courses usually have a three hour examination plus an extended essay (or practical work for methods courses). Courses which focus on spatial analysis and research techniques have practical work. teaching and further study. BA Geography lse. as well as to develop skills in the manipulation and evaluation of geographical information. skilled in economic. Further detail on the nature of any fieldwork and any associated costs will be made available upon induction. There are a wide range of course units taught within our degree. This is optional in the case of BSc Geography with Economics. You will usually have examinations for each course at the end of the academic year. planning. in Europe. political and economic forces which shape development and social change in our interdependent global economy. Geography degree courses are structured to help you understand the uneven nature of economic and social development and the varying characteristics of people's lives in different locations. 2008) P Dicken Global Shift: mapping the changing contours of the world economy (Sage Publications. 2002) W Oates (Ed) The RFF Reader in Environmental and Resources Management (Resources for the Future. 2004) A Rodríguez-Pose The European Union: economy. plus LSE100. 2005) Degree structure You can specialise in geography in a BA single honours degree or in a BSc with economics as a minor subject. P Shaw and J Sidaway (Eds) Human Geography Issues for the 21st Century (Prentice Hall. Students on these programmes should expect to pay a fee to contribute to the costs of fieldwork. 2009) R J Johnston. it is vital that we have a good understanding of the social. The main characteristics of these degrees are shown on the following . pages. Many staff have Preliminary reading If you wish to gain further insight into the subject we suggest that you look at one or more of the following books: P Cloke. The BA Geography has an Independent Research Project in the final year.ac. However. South Asia and South East Asia. development. 2002) UNEP Global Environmental Outlook 4: Environment for Development (UNEP. Our major/minor degrees allow you the option of mixing geography with a deeper understanding of economics. You will have an academic adviser who will meet you at regular intervals to help you to gain the most from your studies. as are the levels of choice. Recent graduates have gone on to work in the areas of financial services.64 undergraduate prospectus Geography Geography specific regional interests – for example. Fieldwork is an important component of the BA Geography and can be part of the BSc Geography with Economics. As part of your learning you will develop the analytical and communication skills necessary for many occupations and careers. marketing. social and environmental processes and problems. 2007) R Flowerdew and D Martin Methods in Human Geography (Pearson/Prentice Hall. We are concerned primarily to improve understanding of the social. The degree seeks to produce highly-trained geographers.

Geography undergraduate prospectus 65

Other qualifications are considered. See page 33 for more information Applications 2011: 231 First year students 2011: 23 If your interest in geography is mainly in the areas of society, economy and environment and you have no desire to pursue further studies in physical geography, then this broadly based programme should be ideal. Please be aware that not all options are available every year. First year: Environment, Economy and Society Methods in Spatial and Social Analysis Either Environmental Change: Past, Present and Future or Contemporary Europe An approved outside option LSE100 (Lent term only)  Second year: Research Techniques (Spatial, Social and Environmental) LSE100 (Michaelmas term only) Three from: Economy, Society and Space Location and Spatial Analysis Introduction to Development in the South Political Geographies, Policy and Space Environment: Science and Society Applied Environmental Economics

London’s Geographies: An Introduction to Cultural and Historical Geography An approved outside option Third year: Independent Research Project Three from: Theories of Regional Development and Change The Political Geography of Development and the South Urban Development: Politics, Policy and Planning The Geography of Gender: Global Perspectives Applied Location and Spatial Analysis Environmental Governance Environment and Development A second year geography and environment option First year You study two core courses, Environment, Economy and Society and Methods in Spatial and Social Analysis, and choose between either Environmental Change: Past, Present and Future or Contemporary Europe. You may select a fourth course from a range of other approved options available at LSE.  Second and third years The second year core courses provide a thorough grounding in the key environmental, economic, social and political aspects of the discipline and form the basis for a range of more specialist third year options. In particular, Research Techniques

helps to prepare you for undertaking the Independent Research Project in the third year. Your fourth course may be a geography and environment option, or a course from another department at LSE. In the third year you complete your Independent Research Project and take three further geography and environment options.

Methods in Spatial and Social Analysis or Contemporary Europe or Elementary Statistical Theory (if not taking Quantitative Methods (Statistics)) or Environmental Change: Past, Present and Future or Sustainable Development LSE100 (Lent term only) Second year: Microeconomic Principles I Location and Spatial Analysis LSE100 (Michaelmas Term only) Two from: Economy, Society and Space Introduction to Development in the South Political Geographies, Policy and Space Environment: Science and Society Applied Environmental Economics Research Techniques (Spatial, Social and Environmental) (required for Independent Research Project in the third year) London's Geographies: An Introduction to Cultural and Historical Geography Theories of Regional Development and Change Third year: Macroeconomic Principles Applied Location and Spatial Analysis Two from: Theories of Regional Development and Change † The Political Geography of Development and the South

BSc Geography with Economics
lse.ac.uk/geographyAndEnvironment UCAS code: L7L1 BSc/GeogE Programme requirement: A level Mathematics at grade A or above Usual standard offer: A level: grades A A B including an A in Mathematics International Baccalaureate: Diploma with 37 points including 6 6 6 at Higher level (to include Mathematics) Other qualifications are considered. See page 33 for more information Applications 2011: 173 First year students 2011: 25 This major-minor degree is a tightly focused programme which will help you to develop a coherent understanding of both disciplines. Please be aware that not all options are available every year. First year: Economics B Mathematical Methods or Quantitative Methods (Mathematics)* and Quantitative Methods (Statistics)*  Environment, Economy and Society

66 undergraduate prospectus

Geography

Government

Urban Development: Politics, Policy and Planning The Geography of Gender: Global Perspectives Environmental Governance Environment and Development Independent Research Project (requires Research Techniques course in the second year) One of the second year geography and environment option courses not taken in year two  An economics course from a list including Development Economics Industrial Economics and Public Economics † if not already taken First year Core courses in human geography, economics and mathematics are combined with options in statistics, research methods and European geography. Second and third years In the second year, you take one compulsory course in geography, a compulsory course in microeconomics and two from a range of geography and environment options. In the third year you take one compulsory course in macroeconomics, a compulsory course in geography and choose two from a list of geography and environment as well as economics options.

Government
Features of LSE courses
The LSE Government Department, which brings together staff from many parts of the world, covers almost all areas of political studies, and represents a comprehensive range of academic approaches and expertise. In studying for one of the degrees offered by the Department, you will follow courses from a range of sub-fields in political science: comparative politics, rational choice theory, political economy, public administration and public policy, European politics and political theory. You will learn about the concepts and theories which underpin the study of politics, including ideas such as justice, democracy, liberty, sovereignty and rights. You will compare political phenomena in a variety of cultures and countries, learning about the diversity of political processes and using empirical analysis to answer broad theoretical questions about the political world.

Politics is about power, conflict and ideas. The study of politics involves analysis of the ways in which individuals and groups define and interpret political issues and seek to shape government decisions. It encompasses a broad spectrum of activities relating to public affairs, from elections and bureaucracies to wars and terrorism. Because it is at the junction of power and morality, politics has always attracted the attention of philosophers and historians, and its study, originating in Athens in the fourth century BC, is the seed bed of all the social sciences. Politics graduates have a range of skills and can fit into a variety of positions in modern life. Our former students have followed careers in business and banking, in the law, in central and local government, in teaching and research, in public and university administration, and in journalism and television.

Degree structure
You can study government in a single honours BSc degree, or in joint honours degrees with economics, history, or philosophy. There is also a joint honours degree with social policy, described on page 90. All degrees involve studying 12 courses (as well as LSE100) over a three year programme of study and all have some compulsory courses covering topics in political science, political thought, comparative politics and public policy. In the joint degrees, students are required to take in addition a minimum number of economics, history or philosophy courses respectively.

Government undergraduate prospectus 67

Options
This list gives you an idea of the range of subjects available. There are some restrictions on the combinations of options and the order in which you can take them. In the joint degrees fewer government courses can be taken than in single honours. Comparative Politics States, Nations and Empires Democracy and Democratisation  Theories and Problems of Nationalism From Empire to Globalisation European Politics Government, Politics and Public Policy in the EU Politics and Institutions in Europe Political Theory Contemporary Political Theory Key Themes in the History of Political Thought Public Policy Public Policy Analysis Public Choice and Politics Politics of Economic Policy Politics of Money: Finance of Trade

assistance with both academic and, where appropriate, personal concerns. Assessment usually involves a written examination in each subject at the end of the academic year. For some courses, assessment will also involve an extended essay.

There are preliminary reading lists relevant to the joint degrees with economics or history in the relevant subject sections.

Third year: Advanced Comparative or European Politics Advanced Political Theory

BSc Government
lse.ac.uk/government UCAS code: L230 BSc/Gov Usual standard offer: A level: grades A A A International Baccalaureate: Diploma with 38 points including 7 6 6 at Higher level Other qualifications are considered. See page 33 for more information Applications 2011: 324 First year students 2011: 26

Public Policy One outside option First year Two of your courses will be in government. In Introduction to Political Science, you will study the comparative analysis of a range of political phenomena, including the forms of states and regimes, theories of elections and voting, political ideologies, the causes and consequences of democracy, and the management of the economy. In Introduction to Political Theory, you will study the foundations of western political thought, followed by modern political theory. For your two remaining courses you may choose from the range of social science options on offer across the range of subject areas taught at LSE. There will be departmental recommendations on the choice of appropriate outside options. Second and third years

Preliminary reading
If you wish to gain further insight into the subject we suggest that you look at one or more of the following books: The general character of politics I Katznelson and H Milner (eds.) Political Science: state of the discipline (New York: Wiley, 2002) R Goodin The Oxford Handbook of Political Science (Oxford University Press, 2009) J Colomer The Science of Politics: an introduction (Oxford University Press, 2011) Political thought Many classic texts of political thought are readily available in a variety of editions, eg, Machiavelli The Prince J S Mill Considerations on Representative Government D Miller A Very Short Introduction to Political Philosophy (Oxford University Press, 2003) Political analysis and political institutions G Almond, G Bingham Powell, R Dalton and K Strøm Comparative Politics Today:  a world view, 9th edn, (Longman, 2009) P Dunleavy and J Dryzek Theories of the Democratic State (Palgrave Macmillan, 2009) W R Clark, M Golder and S Nadenichek Golder Principles of Comparative Politics (CQ Press, 2009)

First year: Introduction to Political Science Introduction to Political Theory Two outside options LSE100 (Lent term only) Second year: Four courses from: Comparative Politics European Politics Contemporary Political Theory Public Policy One outside option LSE100 (Michaelmas term only)

Teaching and assessment
Teaching involves lectures and classes. Classes usually focus on more detailed discussion of the issues arising from lectures, and learning how to present and critique arguments. Classes are held in small groups of at most 15 students. You will also have an academic adviser who will meet you at regular intervals to discuss your work and offer guidance and

In the second year you will take a broad range of courses covering: Comparative Politics, European Politics, Public Policy Analysis and Contemporary Political Theory. These are designed to give you a grasp of the comprehensive character of the study of politics. There is also provision for the study of an outside option in the second year. In the third year students are required to take more advanced courses which follow on from the areas of study introduced in the second year. Opportunities are available to specialise in areas which interest you most, ie, Comparative Politics, Political Theory or

and an optional element of economic history is included. See page 33 for more information Applications 2011: 228 First year students 2011: 13 This joint honours degree combines courses from the fields of government and history in approximately equal weighting. One option from another subject is possible. Two from: Introduction to Political Science Introduction to Political Theory An outside option Second year: Microeconomic Principles Macroeconomic Principles Introduction to Political Theory or Introduction to Political Science † or a government option Public Choice and Politics LSE100 (Michaelmas term only) Third year: Two government options One economics option One government. However. However.ac. The programme offers a range of government course options. economics or an outside option † if not already taken First year Your study begins with basic courses in each subject. There is a further opportunity to take an outside option in the third year. and historical developments on the other.ac.ac.68 undergraduate prospectus Government Public Policy. The emphasis is largely.uk/government UCAS code: LV25 BSc/PP Usual standard offer: A level: grades A A A International Baccalaureate: Diploma with 38 points including 7 6 6 at Higher level Other qualifications are considered. including a mathematics course (the choice of course depends on your previous knowledge of mathematics: for students without A Level Mathematics. as the interplay between economics and the process of government is central to political life. First year: Introduction to Political Science or Introduction to Political Theory BSc Politics and Philosophy lse. it is strongly recommended that they take a specially designed statistics course in order to bring them up to the required level for further study). on the modern period. See page 33 for more information  Applications 2011: 444 First year students 2011: 23 This joint honours degree combines courses from the fields of government (politics) and philosophy in approximately equal weighting.uk/government UCAS code: LV21 BSc/GovHis Usual standard offer: A level: grades A A A International Baccalaureate: Diploma with 38 points including 7 6 6 at Higher level Other qualifications are considered. See page 33 for more information Applications 2011: 800 First year students 2011: 42 This joint honours degree provides a particularly strong combination of study. and a further range of options in both subjects. Second and third years You combine advanced study of optional government subjects with compulsory courses in Microeconomic Principles and Macroeconomic Principles. First year: (*half unit) Economics B Basic Quantitative Methods or Quantitative Methods (Mathematics)* and Quantitative Methods (Statistics) LSE100 (Lent term only) BSc Government and History lse. Public Choice and Politics. you will have a considerable . you will have a considerable amount of choice in how you balance your study and in the specific courses taken within each of the two fields. The aim is to provide you with a good insight into the interaction between political ideas and institutions on the one hand. One history option One further government or history option One outside option LSE100 (Lent term only) Second year: Two history options (national or international) Two government options LSE100 (Michaelmas term only) Third year: One history option (document based) One government option Two government and/or history options (may include an outside option) BSc Government and Economics lse. including courses on political economy and public choice (the use of the analytical tools of economics in the study of politics).uk/government UCAS code: LL12 BSc/GovEco Programme requirement: A level or International Baccalaureate Higher level Mathematics is required Usual standard offer: A level: grades A A A including Mathematics International Baccalaureate: Diploma with 38 points including 7 6 6 at Higher level (to include Mathematics) Other qualifications are considered. although by no means exclusively.

International history undergraduate prospectus 69

amount of choice in how you balance your study and in the specific courses taken within each of the two fields. Rather than simply studying the core elements of politics and philosophy “side by side”, the aim of this degree is to show how the study of each is relevant for understanding political practices and behaviour, and for the understanding and development of political ideals. To this purpose, in their third year, students will take a course in Philosophy and Public Policy, which examines specific policy questions from conceptual and normative perspectives. First year: Logic Reason, Knowledge and Values: An Introduction to Philosophy Introduction to Political Theory Introduction to Political Science LSE100 (Lent term only) Second year: One government option (Comparative Politics or European Politics) An approved outside option or a further government option Morality and Values or Contemporary Political Theory Philosophy of the Social Sciences or Evidence and Scientific Method or Philosophy of Science or Scientific Revolutions: Philosophical and Historical Issues LSE100 (Michaelmas term only)

Third year: Philosophy and Public Policy One government option (Political Theory or Public Policy) Any government option or an approved outside option An extended essay in government or philosophy or a government, philosophy or an approved outside option

International history
programme by, for example, subsidising part of the cost of additional language certificate courses. Past students have followed a range of careers in politics, journalism, public administration, the foreign service, industry, commerce and the legal profession, as well as in research, teaching, libraries and archives.

Features of LSE courses
History is a wide ranging and challenging subject to study. It seeks to understand the past and to make sense of the present, adding an important dimension to the understanding of many aspects of human society. The International History Department is world renowned in its field, offering a unique perspective on the history of relations between states, peoples and cultures. The Department prides itself on giving students the benefit of ground-breaking research throughout its teaching programme. The departmental environment is collegial and supportive. Students and staff attend a number of informal social events during the course of the year. Students are also invited to attend a weekend retreat at Cumberland Lodge in Windsor Great Park during the Michaelmas term. We also encourage our students to pursue their personal development outside the confines of their degree Our degrees will give you a broad international perspective on the past. We give attention both to domestic and international issues and many of the courses we offer deal with major events in the history of international relations. Since the behaviour of countries in the international arena cannot be understood without a knowledge of their distinct social, political, economic and cultural characteristics, we provide courses covering major aspects of the history of ideas and mentalities. Through studying history you will learn how to analyse complex evidence from a variety of sources, to develop your analytical powers and to present your findings effectively. These skills and a broad knowledge of the development of the world around us are valued by many employers.

Degree structure
You can take history as a single honours degree in BA History or in a joint honours degree with either international relations in the BSc International Relations and

70 undergraduate prospectus International history

Emily Delahaye Hadleigh, United Kingdom 2nd year BA International History
After coming to the Open Day I was impressed by how the campus was right in the centre of London and by the facilities, such as the Library, the School could provide. I also liked LSE’s global outlook which was something I found lacking in some of the other universities I visited. I love the LSE history programme because it is so broad. In the second and third years you can pick from a really large number of options. The staff teaching those options know so much about their subject from their research and make lectures very interesting. The History Department is smaller than most so there is a nice sense of community, fostered by the friendly staff. The Department and the History Society organise social events as well as intellectual debates which help your understanding of the subject. History gives me so much knowledge about the world today and is very relevant. The things I like best about studying at LSE is that the diversity of the people here is very unique and this has broadened my understanding of the world outside of Britain. Moreover, the international reputation LSE has enables the School to attract interesting and powerful people to come to speak in its public lecture series. LSE has given me a lot of confidence in myself. I was nervous about getting involved but now I’m on the committee for two societies and write when I can for the LSE newspaper, The Beaver. I also feel more confident in classes as we are required to give regular presentations and are pushed to give ideas and justify them.

History or with government in the BSc Government and History. There is a separate section on economic history. In all degrees you will study 12 courses over three years, plus LSE100.

BA History
lse.ac.uk/internationalHistory UCAS code: V146 BA/Hist Programme requirement: A level History is not a requirement Usual standard offer: A level: grades A A A International Baccalaureate: Diploma with 38 points including 7 6 6 at Higher level Other qualifications are considered. See page 33 for more information Applications 2011: 554 First year students 2011: 30 First year: Two from:   From Empire to Independence: The ExtraEuropean World in the Twentieth Century War and Society from the Renaissance to the Napoleonic Era c1500-1815 International History since 1890 The Internationalisation of Economic Growth, 1870 to the Present Day Plus: Either a further course not taken above or an approved outside option  An approved outside option LSE100 (Lent term only) Second year: One from: Towns, Society and Economy in England and Europe, 1450-1750

Teaching and assessment
You will have a combination of weekly lectures and small classes, amounting to about eight contact hours per week. In addition, you will need to read extensively and write between three to five essays and/or class papers per course. You will have an academic adviser who will offer support if any problems should arise. You will have a written three hour examination for each course. A 10,000 word dissertation is compulsory in the final year of the BA History, and is an option in the final year of the BSc International Relations and History.

Preliminary reading
If you wish to gain further insight into the subject we suggest that you look at one or more of the following books: D Cannadine What is History Now? (Palgrave 2002) R Evans In Defence of History (Granta, 1997) A Best et al An International History of the Twentieth Century and Beyond  (Routledge, 2008) D Reynolds One World Divisible   (Norton, 2000) D Stevenson 1914-1918: the History of the First World War (Allen Lane, 2004) O A Westad The Global Cold War: Third World interventions and the making of our times (Cambridge University Press, 2007)

International history undergraduate prospectus 71

The Industrial Revolution The History of Russia, 1682-1825 The Early Colonial Empires: Europe and the World 1400-1750 Muslims, Christians and Jews in the Early Modern World Anglo-Spanish Relations in the Age of Elizabeth I and Philip II The European Enlightenment, c1680-1799 Napoleon and Europe Modernity and the State in East Asia: China, Japan and Korea since 1840 Empire and Nation: Britain and India since 1750 Four Reichs: Austria, Prussia and the Contest for Germany since 1618 Plus: Either Representing the Past: Historiography and Historical Methods or one option from Selection List A One option from Selection List A or one option from Selection List B or Latin America and the International Economy or The Evolution of Economic Policy in Advanced Economies or The Making of an Economic Superpower: China since 1850 An approved outside option LSE100 (Michaelmas term only) Third year: Two options from Selection Lists A or B, one of which must be from Selection List B if none were taken in the second year Either a further option from Selection Lists A or B not already taken or an approved outside option 

10,000 word dissertation First year You will take at least two broad history survey courses listed at the beginning of this section. You may choose your outside options from any of the courses made available by other departments at LSE. Second and third years You take one course from a wide range of options before the twentieth century, ranging from the fifteenth to the nineteenth century. For your second and third courses you can pick from a range of subjects covering both the history of a specific country and the international history of a region. There is also an optional course on historiographical debates and methods of the historian. Choices cover major European countries and non-European countries, including the US, India and East Asia, as well as relations between powers both within Europe and outside. Your final course is another approved outside option. In your third year you will take at least another two history of a country or international history courses. At least one of these will be a document based course from a wide range of options which allows you to specialise in one particular area which interests you (if not already taken in the second year). You will also research and write a dissertation of 10,000 words on a topic which you choose. Because of the wide range of options we offer, you can choose to follow one of several specialised paths: to take mainly European or non-European courses, early or modern courses, or a mixture of periods and areas.

Options Most courses are offered every year. Courses marked ‡ are document based special subjects (referred to above). List A The Arab-Israeli Conflict: Nationalism, Territory, Religion Britain and Empire from 1780 to the Present Day The International History of the Cold War, 1945-1975 The History of the United States since 1783 Four Reichs: Austria, Prussia and the Contest for Germany since 1618 The History of Russia, 1682-1825 The Great War, 1914-1918 The Early Colonial Empires: Europe and the World, 1400-1750 Frontiers of Nationalism, Statehood, and Independence: the History of Eastern and South-Eastern Europe, 1914-1990 Empire and Nation: Britain and India since 1750 Muslims, Christians, and Jews in the Early Modern World Modernity and the State in East Asia, China, Japan and Korea since 1840 The Cold War and European Integration, 1947-1992 Latin America and the United States since 1898 List B Anglo-Spanish Relations in the Age of Elizabeth I and Philip II

Russia in Revolution, 1914-1921‡ Germany's New Order in Europe, 1939-1945‡ Limited War During the Cold War Era: The United States in Korea (1950-53) and Vietnam (1954-75)‡ The Struggle for the Persian Gulf, 1951-2003‡  The European Enlightenment, c1680-1830‡ Napoleon and Europe‡ The Cold War Endgame ‡

BSc International Relations and History
lse.ac.uk/internationalHistory UCAS code: VL12 BSc/IRHis Programme requirement: A level History is not a requirement Usual standard offer: A level: grades A A A International Baccalaureate: Diploma with 38 points including 7 6 6 at Higher level Other qualifications are considered. See page 33 for more information Applications 2011: 445 First year students 2011: 30

This joint honours degree allows you to combine historical studies with contemporary and theoretical studies in international relations. First year: The Structure of International Society

one of the document based special subjects in international history and a further course in either subject (this may include a dissertation in history) or from another department. or in international organisations. c1500-1815 A language course An approved outside option Second year: International Political Theory Two modern international history options (a historiography option course is available) Either Foreign Policy Analysis or International Organisations LSE100 (Michaelmas term only) Third year: Either Foreign Policy Analysis or International Organisations (whichever was not taken in the second year) A further international relations option  Document based special subject in international history One international history option (may include dissertation) or international relations option or one outside option First year The core course The Structure of International Society examines the nature and functioning of an international society of states distinctive for the absence of a common government. Your final two options are chosen from the history survey courses listed at the start of the section or from the wide range offered by other departments at LSE. It deals with the nature of the changing relations between states and with nonstate actors. In the third year. including language courses. Others have taken up careers in international business and banking. do they often cooperate and obey the law? What is meant by international integration and how do we explain regional developments like the European Union. International relations Features of LSE courses Our degrees aim to give you insight into how the international community works. Many study the programme for general interest or to lead to graduate study or research rather than in preparation for a career. and courses in international history. Second and third years You take International Political Theory. or study it as part of a joint honours degree in the BSc International Relations and History. the customs. You take a core course on modern international history (International History since 1890). a few students each year enter their country's diplomatic service and many more go into other branches of government and often reach senior positions. The total teaching . Degree structure You can take a single honours degree in our BSc International Relations.72 undergraduate prospectus International history International relations International History since 1890 LSE100 (Lent term only) Two of the following:  From Empire to Independence: The ExtraEuropean World in the Twentieth Century War and Society from the Renaissance to the Napoleonic Era. or the re-emergence of the United Nations? We will also investigate the widely different characters and circumstances of states: the highly uneven distribution of money. Teaching and assessment Each course involves a series of lectures supported by classes where you will meet in a smaller group with a member of staff. welfare and knowledge has major implications for the foreign policies of states towards each other. and for the maintenance of international order. However. institutions and organisations from which the theory and history of its development are formed. It studies the functioning of the international system – the forces. International relations is the study of an international system composed of territorial states which acknowledge no superior authority over matters which they consider of vital interest. in the media. Additionally you take a core course in international relations (Foreign Policy Analysis or International Organisations). rules. Questions of central interest to the programme are – why do states go to war and what impact does this have on the international system? Why. factors and interests. You will study alongside students from a wide range of countries. you take a further international relations core course with one international relations course. You will have regular meetings with an academic adviser who in your first year will mark your written work for The Structure of International Society course and discuss your academic progress and any problems which you might have. on the other hand.

1999) F Halliday Rethinking International Relations (Palgrave Macmillan.International relations undergraduate prospectus 73 time amounts to around ten hours per week. as well as LSE100 teaching.uk/internationalRelations UCAS code: L250 BSc/IntRel Usual standard offer: A level: grades A A A International Baccalaureate: Diploma with 38 points including 7 6 6 at Higher level Other qualifications are considered. S Smith and P Owens (Eds) The Globalization of World Politics: an introduction to international relations (Oxford University Press. paperback. 1999) R Jackson and G Sorensen An Introduction to International Relations (Oxford University Press. You will have examinations at the end of the first and second years for each of the four courses you have taken. See page 33 for more information Applications 2011: 1.310 First year students 2011: 46 Preliminary reading If you wish to gain further insight into the subject we suggest that you look at one or more of the following books: J Baylis. with K Ainley Understanding International Relations (Macmillan. 1947-1992 Four Reichs: Austria. Prussia and the  Contest for Germany since 1618 An approved foreign language course Third year: (*half unit) A course relevant to the study of international relations approved by the student’s teacher from a selection list Three from: Theories and Problems of Nationalism The Ethics of War Politics of International Economic Relations Strategic Aspects of International Relations Sovereignty. which examines the nature and functioning of an international BSc International Relations lse. There will also be four examinations at the end of the third year unless you take the opportunity to submit the 10. 1870 to the Present Day The Arab-Israeli Conflict: Nationalism. M Nicholson International Relations (Macmillan. 2004) F Halliday Revolution and World Politics (Macmillan. Knowledge and Value: An Introduction to Philosophy Key Concepts in Sociology: An Introduction to Sociological Theory Plus: One outside option . 1682-1825 Empire and Nation: Britain and India since 1750 Modernity and the State in East Asia: China. Japan and Korea since 1840 The Cold War and European Integration.000 word dissertation Direct entry to second year The Department does not normally accept applications for direct entry into the second year of the BSc International Relations programme. Students who are already studying at another university are advised to apply for entry into the first year of the degree rather than for second year. Rights and Justice: Issues in International Political Theory Systemic Change in the Twentieth Century: Theories of the Cold War Europe's Institutional Order International Protection of Human Rights Genocide Managing China's Rise in East Asia* Southeast Asia: Intra-regional Politics and Security* A 10. 2000) M Cox (Ed) E H Carr: a critical appraisal (Palgrave: 2000. Note: The International Relations Department reserves the right to withdraw courses with fewer than eight students registered. Statehood and Independence: The History of Eastern and South-Eastern Europe 1914-1990 Public International Law The International History of the Cold War. 1914-1918 The Early Colonial Empires: Europe and the World 1400-1750 Frontiers of Nationalism. 2010) C Brown. Global Transformations: politics. Territory. economics and culture (Polity Press. 1999) First year: The Structure of International Society International History since 1890 LSE100 (Lent term only) One from: Introduction to Political Theory Reason. 2009) B Buzan and R Little International Systems in World History: remaking the study of international relations (Oxford University Press. First year You take the core course The Structure of International Society. Religion The Great War.000 word dissertation for assessment on an approved topic of your choice. 1998) J Young and J Kent International Relations since 1945: a global history (Oxford University Press.ac. 1945-1975 The History of the United States since 1783 The History of Russia. 2004) Second year: International Political Theory International Organisations Foreign Policy Analysis LSE100 (Michaelmas term only) One from: Economics A The Internationalisation of Economic Growth. 1994) D Held et al.

  Options International relations options are listed above. German. Foreign Policy Analysis looks at the theory and history of how foreign policy is made and how it is implemented. you may prefer to pursue a pathway with a more legal or a more economic emphasis by choosing among the options permitted by the regulations for this degree. but please consult your programme regulations for precise details. All courses relate language study to the field of interest of social science students using a variety of written and audio sources. international law and international history. You may choose your final course from the full range of options offered by other departments. economic and social areas. and you take a course in International History since 1890. You can take an option outside your department in most undergraduate degrees. and looks at the development of thinking about them.74 undergraduate prospectus xxxx International relations Language studies society of states distinguished by the absence of a common government.000 words) and one from a course relevant to the study of international relations taught in another department. which provides some of the empirical and illustrative material for the study of international relations. sociology or political theory. You develop an analytical approach to literature and an appreciation of the relevance of its relationship to social developments and political events Comparative Literature and Society studies twentieth century world literature in its socio-political context. you are introduced to key authors and literary movements in relation to the twentieth century. You choose an option in philosophy. economics and politics. thereby expanding on the range of themes studied in English Literature and Society Contemporary Literature and Global Society studies world literature in the context of modern globalised society European Literature and Society studies twentieth century European literature in the context of major trends in politics and philosophy In French. In English Literature and Society. Alternatively. Language studies Features of LSE courses The study of language or literature is placed firmly within the context of society. The fourth course is chosen from a list of options covering economics. the history of the international economy. Second year There are three compulsory core courses. but an ability to use language to explore issues relating to these societies Many students enter at an advanced level of language competence of A level or Although the School does not offer full degrees in languages. Outside the Department you may wish to study a modern foreign language or the government and politics of a region or courses concerned with democracy or development. Third year You take four further courses from a list of options: three from a list of mainly international relations options (including an optional dissertation of 10. The options offered are: English Literature and Society Comparative Literature and Society Contemporary Literature and Global Society European Literature and Society Russian Language and Society German Language and Society French Language and Society Spanish Language and Society Mandarin Language and Society . and develop not only linguistic competence in your chosen language. International Organisations is concerned with the work of the United Nations and of a range of regional organisations in the security. you continue to consolidate your existing language skills. the LSE Language Centre runs a successful programme of degree options. International Political Theory deals with the key concepts of the subject. Russian and Spanish Language and Society.

000 words) French. summary. poetry and drama Extensive use of archive recordings of authors.000 words) European Literature and Society Course requirements: Although an A level pass or equivalent in literature is useful. management. with the aim of completing Language and Society Three in your second or third year of study. Spanish and Mandarin Language and Society One (Beginners) Indicative content: Beginners to intermediate study of the target language. individualism and alienation in the post colonial and post-totalitarian context. students encouraged to draw upon background in their main discipline Development of transferable skills through the design. TV news) Practice of grammar. it is not an absolute requirement Indicative content: Study of twentieth century World Literature in its socio-political context Study of major cultural themes eg Fabianism. performing a variety of linguistic tasks in a range of factual and expressive contexts with reference to culture and society. You will develop additional transferable skills. poetry and drama Extensive use of archive recordings of authors. but please consult your programme regulations for precise details. Russian and Spanish Language and Society Two (Intermediate) A bridge to advanced study of language and society: Discussion of issues that are essential for contemporary society (work and business. cultural imperialism. translation and essay writing Development of transferable skills through the management of a course portfolio and the delivery of oral presentations English Literature and Society Course requirements: A level or equivalent accreditation/level Indicative content: Study of twentieth century British literature in its socio-political context Including topics: war.Language studies undergraduate prospectus 75 equivalent. team work. the themes of alienation and identity in twentieth century literature in a European context Critical appreciation of literature and the elements of style in prose. leisure and work. presentation and organisational skills. management. and video. major cities. time management. Four and Five. students encouraged to draw upon background in their main discipline Development of transferable skills through the design. and video. Depending on your main degree course options and linguistic ability you can progress through a maximum of three years of study by taking Language and Society Three. eg. Cold War. utopia/dystopia genre. eg. which will not only support your main course of study. education and careers Interpreting documents and data containing some elementary topical facts and figures Building up grammar and vocabulary skills relevant to the communicative objectives Working on transferable skills through the management of a course portfolio and the delivery of oral presentations Comparative Literature and Society Course requirements: Although an A level pass or equivalent in literature is useful. management. art as an index of social . or if you have a GCSE or equivalent experience in a relevant language. students encouraged to draw upon background in their main discipline Assessment by final examination and extended coursework essay (3. youth problems. cultural aspects.  Students who follow any of these options will make gains that are not just language related. and video. In this case you should be willing to commit yourself to two or three years of study. art with a social function. imperialism and feminism Principal movements: modernism. study of individual authors Critical appreciation of literature and the elements of style in prose. However. if you are an absolute beginner. poetry and drama Development of transferable skills through the design. Elements of style in prose. study of individual authors with a global identity Critical appreciation of literature and the elements of style in prose. you may be eligible to take either Language and Society One. poetry and drama Extensive use of archive recordings of authors. media) Interpretation of documents and data containing a variety of topical facts and figures (newspaper articles. eg. it is not an absolute requirement Indicative content: Study of contemporary world literature in the context of modern globalised society Study of major cultural themes.000 words) Degree option structure You can take an option outside your department in most undergraduate degrees. presentation and discussion of an original research project (3. French. presentation and discussion of an original research project (3. eg existentialism seen in the context of mid-century totalitarianism and modern media-driven society. or Language and Society Two. presentation and discussion of an original research project (3.000 words) change and its role in the media-driven society of the modern world. political engagement (especially the Thirties) and post-modernism Contemporary Literature and Global Society Course requirements: Although an A level pass or equivalent in literature is useful. it is not an absolute requirement Indicative content: Study of European twentieth century literature in the context of major trends in politics and philosophy Study of the major trends in modern philosophy in the context of cultural themes. but will also further enhance your future employment prospects. Russian.

uk/language.500 words) Law French and Spanish Language and Society Five (Mastery) Course requirements: completion of Language and Society four or equivalent accreditation/level Indicative content: Further advanced study of the target language and society. writers and thinkers Development of transferable skills through the design. writing. reading and listening within set topics and individual student project work Study key texts/works with an appreciation of gender.76 undergraduate prospectus Language studies Law French. reasoning about many varied aspects of human activity. Our staff expertise covers an unusually wide range of specialist options. reading and listening within set topics and tasks Introduction of key issues. in Language and Society One: six hours. foreign policy Practice of summary and translation skills based on specialised documents Development of transferable skills through the design. eg. Russian. writing. In addition to being a preparation for the legal profession. Further details and other information on our other language programmes can be downloaded from the Language Centre lse. practising all four skills: speaking. Recent speakers include Lord Philips. bilingualism. Comparative and English Literature both involve two weekly contact hours. and analytical and logical . Spanish and Mandarin Language and Society  Three (Advanced) Course requirements: Good pass at A level or equivalent in the target language Indicative content: Post A level study of language and society. Taking samples from relevant artists. reading and listening within set topics and individual student project work In-depth study of contemporary topics. tax advice. political or philosophical issues in the target societies. a senior Justice of the US Supreme Court. racism. Present of the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom. practising all four skills: speaking. knowledge of law and the analytical and logical reasoning skills it develops will be valued by many employers. summary and translation skills Development of transferable skills through the management of a course portfolio and the delivery of oral presentations discussion of an original research project (2. eg. The Law Department at LSE organises a series of lively events and evening lectures. throughout the academic year. Russian and Spanish Language and Society Four (Proficiency) Course requirements: completion of Language and Society Three or equivalent accreditation/level Indicative content: Advanced study of the target language and society. Jack Straw. presentation and Teaching and assessment All students benefit from a set number of weekly teacher contact hours on our courses. management. Language and Society Three: four hours. The study of law involves examining and analysing the rules and institutions that society establishes to promote justice and order. German. Contemporary. social. and Professor Jeremy Waldron.ac. globalisation. insurance and the civil service. For further details see www. Language and Society Five: two hours. writing.uk/collections/law/programmes/ doubledegree/guidelines. management. The Department of Law also runs a double degree programme with Columbia University Law School in New York. presentation and discussion of an original research project (4.lse. The qualities we hope you will develop while studying law are independent and original thought. from New York University School of Law. Language and Society Two: five hours.500 words) French. practising all four skills: speaking. for example. given by distinguished lawyers. Teaching is supplemented by directed study in the Language Showroom and the Virtual Learning Environment at LSE. German. European integration. Justice Scalia. which will be of value even if you are not necessarily planning to become a lawyer. Recent graduates have pursued a variety of careers including accountancy.htm Features of LSE courses We aim to encourage you to develop a broad outlook on legal issues and gain an understanding of the functions of law in society and of the legal system and the formal rules of law. banking. radicalism from a multilingual/multicultural perspective Study of key historical events Practice of grammar. Students will be assessed by a final examination and some continuous assessment. the former Justice Secretary. ac. This LSE LLB/JD (juris doctor) programme is open to LLB students and applications are invited during their second year of study. Language and Society Four: three hours.

you may have seminars instead where a short lecture leads on to group discussion. and complete a Legal Practice Course approved LLB Bachelor of Laws lse. you will need to serve for two years under a training contract with a practising solicitor. There are innumerable societies at LSE and I have enjoyed being a member of the Pakistan. you normally need at least a lower second class honours degree. Prior to coming to London I was a shy student and I never thought I would ever be able to stand for any elections but LSE gave me confidence and made it possible for me to become the International Officer of my hall of residence (Bankside). sra. 2006) I chose LSE because of its international reputation. You will have examinations at the end of the year on the courses you have taken. Most law graduates will normally be granted a certificate of completion of the academic stage of training and may attend a Legal Practice Course before entering into a training contract. Badminton and Aerobics societies. Professional training The Bar A student with a law degree from LSE will normally be eligible to be considered for a place on the Bar Professional Training Course. Berrington Close. You can expect about 12 to 15 hours of tuition each week.uk To enrol for the Bar Professional Training Course. its top class rating in social science subjects and its central London location. Teaching and assessment Most courses at LSE are taught through lectures and compulsory classes which are small discussion groups. Some of the optional courses are examined by essay. as well as LSE100 teaching. B98 0TD. There are a number of things I like about my programme but the practical approach to studying Law is something I particularly admire. normally taken in year 12. Direct entry to the second year of the degree is not permitted in any circumstances. It offers valuable advice on seeking part-time jobs and provides skill sessions to help you to improve your CV. London EC4A 1NE or barcouncil. You should check the position personally by obtaining the relevant regulations from: The General Council of the Bar.uk/students/students.page Komal Anwar Karachi. Arabic.uk/law UCAS code: M100 LLB/Law Programme requirement: A range of good grades at GCSE level (if taken) followed by three A levels and accompanied by a fourth AS level. or in a joint honours degree with anthropology. cover letters and application forms when you are applying for employment upon graduation. by the Law Society. with an A* in a generally preferred subject (with some flexibility for candidates who do not conform to the standard pattern of qualifications as indicated above) . The moot court at LSE and the various mooting competitions that are held throughout the year make it possible for students to understand the subject even better.Law undergraduate prospectus 77 Degree structure You can study law at LSE in a three year LLB (Bachelor of Laws). Pakistan 2nd year. You must pass each set of examinations to progress to the next stage of the degree. LLB in Laws Preliminary reading If you wish to gain further insight into the subject we suggest that you look at one or more of the following books: J Adams and R Brownsword Understanding Law (Sweet and Maxwell. Ipsley Court. The Careers Service at LSE has helped me tremendously since I started at the School. The profession of solicitor To qualify as a solicitor. After I graduate I plan to do my Legal Practice Course (LPC) and hope to eventually join a corporate law firm in London.ac. In some courses. The Cambridge Law Studies Test is not considered a relevant qualification for entry Usual standard offer: A level: grades A* A A. Redditch. LSE has been a treasure box for me full of opportunities that have helped me become a much better person than I was. The School also has an excellent reputation in the job market and this makes it the best place to study for students. 2/3 Cursitor Street.org. You should check the position personally with: The Solicitors Regulation Authority. 2006) A Bradney et al How to Study Law (Sweet and Maxwell. 2005) C Gearty Can Human Rights Survive? (Cambridge UP.org.

Second and third years For the Part I (second year) examination. particularly in relation to personal injuries and consumer contracts and to how those principles meet the needs of society. Public Law will give you a general introduction to public law and government in the UK. Introduction to the Legal System (one term) will introduce you to the way in which the legal system works. taken over three years. Property I (one term) introduces the fundamental concepts of the law of property.78 undergraduate prospectus Law International Baccalaureate: Diploma with 38 points including 7 6 6 or 6 6 6 at Higher level Other qualifications are considered. Law of Obligations is an introduction to the basic principles of the law of civil wrongs (tort) and contracts. See page 33 for more information Applications 2011: 2. Options (* half unit) This list is to give you an idea of what may be available: not all of these courses will necessarily be taught every year. the Intermediate. Political and Legal Anthropology Administrative Law Commercial Contracts Law of Business Associations Advanced Torts Medical Law Civil Liberties and Human Rights Information Technology and the Law Conflict of Laws Family Law Law and Institutions of the European Union Law of Evidence Introduction to Civil Law International Protection of Human Rights Law and the Environment Intellectual Property Law Law of Corporate Insolvency Labour Law Property II Public International Law Taxation Full unit essay option (12. you take a compulsory course in Jurisprudence and choose optional courses to the value of three units. Criminal Law will give you a grounding in the general principles of criminal law and an examination of its social applications.000 words)* An outside option (one of over 100 courses in other subjects taught at LSE) Intercollegiate law option (an LLB course taught at another college of the University of London) . First year: (* half unit) Intermediate Exam: Law of Obligations Property I* and Introduction to the Legal System* Public Law Criminal Law LSE100 (Lent term only) Second year: Part I Exam: Courses to the value of four units from law options LSE100 (Michaelmas term only) Third year: Part II Exam: Jurisprudence Courses to the value of three units from law options First year You take the subjects necessary for the Intermediate examination.000 words) Competition Law Media Law Outlines of Modern Criminology* Sentencing and Treatment of Offenders* Half unit essay option (6.000-8.241 First year students 2011: 161 Note: No direct entry into second year The LLB (Bachelor of Laws) consists of three parts.000-15. you choose optional courses totalling four units (see below). Part I and Part II examinations. For the Part II (third year) examination.

You will be assigned a member of staff as your academic adviser who will have pastoral responsibility for you and can advise you on your choice of subjects. so that graduating students have good business sense alongside strong theoretical understanding. Many recent graduates have found employment in management consultancy. and the ability to understand Features of LSE courses A feature of the programme is its emphasis on the social sciences – in particular. economics. Preliminary reading If you wish to gain further insight into the subject we suggest that you look at the following: Eluyahn Goldratt and Jeff Cox The Goal:  a process of ongoing improvement  (Gower. so that students leave the programme with a good understanding of the basis of social science claims to knowledge. and in classes or seminars. Alongside these courses. and to give oral presentations. as managers in an unpredictable world. marketing. Students will also have the opportunity to take courses in other related departments within the School. As students progress through the degree they will develop a better sense of where they wish to specialise. You will have to prepare essays. To cope with the challenges of the 21st century. 1993) S Robbins and T Judge Organisational Behaviour (12th edition. reports. leadership. government and social enterprises around the globe. through LSE 100. 2005) . students are encouraged to think about theory and evidence: “What data might support this claim?”. and in both quantitative and qualitative research methods. based on their own interests and career aspirations. Pearson Prentice Hall. Graduates of LSE. Moreover. The degree provides foundational skills and a theoretical grounding in management research in the first and second years. investment banking. and what careers they wish to pursue. The Department offers options in subjects such as decision science. or an exam in May or June. These skills are developed throughout the degree programme starting from the first year. employment relations. psychology and sociology – as a lens for understanding organisations and management practice. with performance in the second and third years counting most heavily. a range of foundation courses provide students with an understanding of the role of the core business disciplines: accounting. Assessment for a course can either take the form or an essay or assignment to be handed in. general management and public sector management among other areas. “What are the unstated assumptions behind this statement?”. the core course in organisational strategy and through attending the many public events organised by the Department and the School – the programme gives students an unrivalled opportunity to develop strategic awareness and breadth of perspective. are in a unique position to make sense of. operations and information management. drawing on the various relevant disciplinary perspectives within the Department of Management and within the School. finance. This BSc in Management aims to develop an understanding of management from a social science point of view. Teaching takes place in lectures. or proceed to graduate study in a management discipline. The LSE Management degree is designed to provide students with the knowledge and skills to succeed as the managers of tomorrow in business. students will have a choice of subjects from a list of options.Management undergraduate prospectus 79 Management and critically evaluate evidence relating to management practice. or a mixture of these. This disciplinary training is complemented by a series of courses focusing on the key functions of the modern organisation. managers will require a deeper understanding of the global business environment and the social world as well as a greater capacity for ongoing learning than provided by traditional business education. a group project. The programme also develops practical management skills. to conduct robust and valid quantitative analysis and present the results. information systems. and thrive. to write clearly both for managerial and scientific purposes. finance. organisational behaviour and strategy. where you will be expected to discuss the ideas presented in lectures. 2006) J Roberts The Modern Firm: organisational design for performance and growth (Oxford University Press. This degree will serve students in good stead whether they wish to go straight into the job market. Teaching and assessment You can expect to have between 12 and 18 hours of teaching a week depending on the options chosen and the year of the programme. problem sets or presentations for classes. 2004) K Legge Human Resource Management: Rhetorics and Realities (Anniversary Edition. Palgrave. and a third year core course provides a viewpoint on organisational strategy. politics and everyday life (Norton. Going beyond fads and catchphrases. including the ability to work in teams. Basingstoke. and marketing. The programme will also give students a good grounding for management research. human resource management. economics. disciplinary courses provide training in economics and organisational behaviour. Your final grade will be based on your performance over all three years. 2004) A Dixit and B Nalebuff Thinking Strategically: competitive edge in business. In the third year. and a core course in organisational strategy and wide choice of options in the third year. as the world’s leading social science research institution. Degree structure In the first and second years. management science.

Chemistry.80 undergraduate prospectus Management BSc Management lse. management science. Biology) or Economics International Baccalaureate: Diploma with 37 points including 7 6 6 at Higher level including Mathematics However. employment relations.165 First year students 2011: 116 First year (* half unit) Elements of Financial Accounting or Elements of Management Accounting and Finance* Core Business Disciplines – Finance and Operations Management* Economics B Quantitative Methods (Mathematics) * Quantitative Methods (Statistics)* Leadership and Communication in Teams* Organisational Behaviour* Second year  Core Business Disciplines II – Marketing. Students may choose to focus on one particular management specialism. Analysis and Valuation Finance Principles of Finance Corporate Finance.ac. . provided they are studying a natural science subject (Physics. A level pass at grade A in Mathematics or higher level Mathematics or another subject demonstrating quantitative ability Usual standard offer: A level: grades A A B including an A in Mathematics However. eg. Financial Management and Organisational Control Financial Accounting. History and the natural sciences) are preferred to subjects such as Business Studies or Accounting. Chemistry. or may instead choose to “mix and match” and to build their own programme. Biology) or Economics and has Mathematics standard grade 7  Other qualifications are considered. courses up to the value of one unit which are normally available only to second or third year students taught within the School or at other colleges of the University of London where practicable.  The list of options is currently being revised but an indicative list of subjects is:   Accounting Elements of Financial Accounting* Elements of Management Accounting and Finance* Managerial Accounting Management Accounting. See page 33 for more information Applications 2011: 2. if an applicant has a grade B in A level Mathematics.uk/management UCAS code: N200 BSc/Man Programme requirement: Traditional academic subjects (such as Economics. Management and Competitive Advantage* International Context of Management* Organisational Behaviour and Employee Relations Leadership* Managing Diversity in Organisations* Information Systems E-business* Digital convergence and service innovation* Managing information assets* Philosophy Business Ethics* Outside option Subject to approval by the Departmental Tutor. English Literature. if an applicant has not done Mathematics at Higher level their application may be considered. their application may be considered provided the applicant has obtained a grade A in an A level natural science subject (Physics. Human Resource Management and Information Systems Economics for Management Analytical Methods for Management or Social Science Research Methods for Management One option Third year Strategy Three options Students can choose four course units from a list of options from across the Department of Management and more generally across the School. Investments and Financial Markets Quantitative Finance Economics and economic history   Macroeconomic Principles Industrial Economics   Business and Economic Performance since 1945: Britain in International Context Law Commercial Law Marketing International Marketing: A Strategic Approach Market Research: An Integrated Approach Aspects of Market Research*  Management science Introduction to Management Science Decision and Risk Analysis* Introduction to Decision Sciences* Optimisation for Decision Making* Managerial Economics and Strategy Interdisciplinary Organisational Theory for Management* Evolutionary Psychology for Management* Topics in Management Research* Firms.

Mathematics and economics undergraduate prospectus 81 Mathematics and economics Features of LSE courses The Mathematics Department at LSE is internationally renowned for its teaching and research in mathematics related to the social sciences. Both our degrees are taught jointly with LSE’s world class Economics Department and enable you to build a strong quantitative knowledge base – increasingly important for a successful career in economics and finance. plus LSE100. and other fields of application. You will have an academic adviser who will be available to offer general guidance and advice on your studies. should they wish to. International Baccalaureate Diploma with Higher level Mathematics with 7 Usual standard offer: A level: grades A* A A. . please see BSc Mathematics with Economics on page 82. Further Mathematics is highly recommended International Baccalaureate: Diploma with 38 points including 7 6 6 at Higher level (with 7 in Mathematics) Other qualifications are considered. and banking. optional. Teaching and assessment You will usually attend two lectures and one related class for each course per week (eight lectures and four classes). in their second year. 2005) Mathematics is essential for an understanding of modern economics. business and many other fields. the ability to think analytically is something that remains with you for the rest of your life. P Eccles An Introduction to Mathematical Reasoning (Cambridge University Press. Both our degrees are carefully structured so that the mathematical and statistical topics you study are those of greatest relevance to economics and finance.uk/maths UCAS code: GL11 BSc/MathEc Programme requirement: A level pass at grade A* in Mathematics. and this is necessary for some of the advanced mathematics required in finance. 1997) R Allenby Numbers and Proofs (Butterworth-Heinemann.ac. Recent graduates have gone on to work in the areas of corporate finance. enabling you to adapt to new developments in your chosen career. 1996) If you wish to gain further insight into what economists study we suggest that you first look at the following popular book: T Harford The Undercover Economist (Oxford University Press. accountancy. economics. 2002) M Liebeck A Concise Introduction to Pure Mathematics (Chapman & Hall/CRC Mathematics. economics. In addition you will work on exercises in your own time. Graduates will be able to combine a good understanding of modern economics with a high degree of mathematical expertise. First year: Introduction to Abstract Mathematics Elementary Statistical Theory Mathematical Methods Economics B LSE100 (Lent term only) Preliminary reading For an introduction to mathematics as it is applied in economics and finance. The BSc Mathematics with Economics has mathematics as its major subject and economics as its minor subject. regardless of whether you have previously studied economics. These are then discussed in the weekly classes of 15 students. and study of mathematics will make up approximately 75 per cent of the degree. This combination is an excellent foundation for careers in many walks of life. sessions. and you will be expected to meet him or her at least twice a term. You will have examinations in all courses you have taken at the end of each year (May or early June). or both. Degree structure The degree involves studying 12 courses over three years. The BSc Mathematics and Economics is a joint degree where students study roughly equal amounts of both subjects over their three years. 1997) BSc Mathematics and Economics lse. For a major/ minor degree with more emphasis on mathematics. Both degrees have exactly the same first year courses and students may move between these two degrees. A degree combining these two strongly related disciplines gives you the opportunity to study both economics and mathematics in-depth and enables you to acquire the technical aptitude and analytical skills to proceed to a successful career in finance. See page 33 for more information Applications 2011: 525 First year students 2011: 51 This programme is balanced evenly between mathematics and economics. we recommend: M Anthony and N Biggs Mathematics for Economics and Finance (Cambridge University Press. particularly the mathematics necessary for understanding economics. 2006) Much of university level mathematics is concerned with formal proofs and rigorous mathematical argument. Although specific techniques may go out of date. we recommend:  T Gowers Mathematics: a very short introduction (Oxford. Many have pursued graduate study in areas related to mathematics. management. For an introduction. This degree will be of interest if you have a mathematical/scientific background. with an A* in Mathematics. The first year courses additionally have extra.

Introduction to Abstract Mathematics will give you a gentle introduction to modern mathematics with emphasis on careful reasoning. Third year In the third year you take one course in advanced mathematical economics. mathematics or finance option One other option First year You take four core foundation courses. Differential Equations.ac. You will usually take a half unit course in Real Analysis. or Algebra and Number Theory. Principles of Econometrics and Principles of Finance. following on from the Abstract Mathematics course in the first year.82 undergraduate prospectus Mathematics and economics Second year: Microeconomic Principles I or Microeconomic Principles II Further Mathematical Methods (Calculus and Linear Algebra ) Another option in economics or finance Either another option in mathematics or an outside option LSE100 (Michaelmas term only) Third year: An advanced option in mathematical economics One mathematics option One economics. subject to the approval of the course tutor.  and another in either mathematics or economics or finance. Mathematical Methods will continue your A level studies and includes calculus and linear algebra. Elemental Statistical Theory is also an introductory level course. whilst underlining the connections between the two subjects. International Baccalaureate Diploma with Higher level Mathematics with 7 Usual standard offer: A level: grades A* A A. see BSc Mathematics and Economics on page 81. Second year In the second year.uk/maths UCAS code: G1L1 BSc MathEc Programme requirement: A level pass at grade A* in Mathematics. You also take another course from: Macroeconomic Principles. Your additional options total three course units: these must include two half unit courses in mathematics. Economics B is an introductory course and you do not need previous knowledge of the subject. Further Mathematics is highly recommended International Baccalaureate: Diploma with 38 points including 7 6 6 at Higher level (with 7 in Mathematics) Other qualifications are considered. Options (* half unit) Mathematics Optimisation Theory* Differential Equations* Discrete Mathematics* Algebra and Number Theory* Game Theory I* Chaos in Dynamical Systems* Optimisation in Function Spaces* Theory of Algorithms* Mathematics of Finance and Valuation* Probability for Finance* Graph Theory* Algebra and its Applications* Complex Analysis*  Economics Macroeconomic Principles Principles of Econometrics Economic Theory and its Applications   Econometric Theory Advanced Economic Analysis   Monetary Economics Any other approved course in economics Finance Principles of Finance Quantitative Finance This programme is a major/minor in favour of mathematics. with an A* in Mathematics. which build on your first year studies and reinforce your understanding of economics and mathematics. and another half unit in either Optimisation Theory. Discrete Mathematics. Mathematical Methods will continue your A level studies and includes calculus and linear algebra. Elemental Statistical Theory is also an introductory level course. Economics B is an introductory course and you do not need previous knowledge of the subject. one in Microeconomic Principles and another in Further Mathematical Methods. You may defer this course to the third year. If you have not previously taken an outside option. See page 33 for more information  Applications 2011: 349 First year students 2011: 23 . Introduction to Abstract BSc Mathematics with Economics lse. First year: Introduction to Abstract Mathematics Elementary Statistical Theory Mathematical Methods Economics B LSE100 (Lent term only) Second year: Microeconomic Principles I or Microeconomic Principles II Further Mathematical Methods (Calculus and Linear Algebra) Real Analysis* Options to the value of one and a half course units in mathematics or statistics LSE100 (Michaelmas term only) Third year: An advanced option in mathematical economics Two options in mathematics and statistics One other option First year You take four core foundation courses. you may choose any suitable course taught at LSE. you take two core courses. For a programme that is evenly split. and take another appropriate course instead.

Differential Equations. A recent Guardian survey ranks us as the Department with far and away the best job prospects in the UK . government. The first is a commitment to clarity of expression and argumentative rigour. logic and scientific method for philosophy graduates. Third year In the third year you take one course in advanced mathematical economics. media and education. Second year In the second year. You will be able to broaden your mathematical knowledge by taking a further one and a half course units in mathematics (Optimisation Theory. The second is a commitment to doing philosophy in close contact with the social and natural sciences. as well as learning the skills and techniques of reasoning. but your choice must include at least one unit in mathematics and no more than one unit of statistics.Philosophy. and Mill) and contemporary sources. Recent graduates have gone on to work in banking and financial services. as too are the principles of evidence and of inductive reasoning.or herself at some point in his or her life. Your additional options total three course units. Algebra and Number Theory) or statistics (the full unit course Probability. This means taking great care to avoid obscure or grand statements that one cannot back up with precise arguments or evidence. Hume. notwithstanding the changes in your body. Microeconomic Principles and Further Mathematical Methods. we believe that this is because of the analytical rigour and interdisciplinary nature of our degrees. and scientific method in an interdisciplinary way. management consultancy. You can choose from mathematics. economics or statistics options. following on from the Introduction to Abstract Mathematics course in the first year. and have also proved very successful in gaining entry to graduate programmes. but which many nonphilosophers do not pursue in depth. Kant. knowledge acquisition. In addition to courses in familiar areas of philosophy (like moral philosophy and philosophy of mind and Studying philosophy means engaging with some profound and fascinating questions. You will do so by studying works by the major authors of the Western tradition (including Plato. questions that any inquisitive and critical thinker will ask him. Distribution Theory and Inference Regression and Generalised Linear Models* Stochastic Processes* Time Series and Forecasting* Philosophy. and do we possess it? What makes you the same person over time. Discrete Mathematics. Formal logic is an important part of the degrees. Here are some examples of these questions: In philosophy of science: How does science generate knowledge? Does science discredit religious belief? In ethics: What does morality require? Why be moral? In political philosophy: Is equality of basic rights and resources required by justice? In metaphysics: What is freedom of the will. Our research and teaching programmes have two distinctive features. Options (* half unit) Mathematics Optimisation Theory* Differential Equations* Discrete Mathematics* Algebra and Number Theory* Game Theory  Game Theory I* Chaos in Dynamical Systems* Optimisation in Function Spaces* Theory of Algorithms* Mathematics of Finance and Valuation* Probability for Finance* Graph Theory* Algebra and its Applications* Complex Analysis*  Economics Economic Theory and its Applications Macroeconomic Principles Principles of Econometrics   Statistics Bayesian Inference* Probability. You can also take one outside option of any suitable course taught at LSE. beliefs and values over your life? Our graduates have excellent job prospects. You will take a half unit course in Real Analysis. We study questions of moral and political philosophy. Features of LSE courses In studying philosophy at LSE you will debate and investigate the issues and problems which have preoccupied philosophers since Greek times. Aristotle. whilst underlining the connections between the two subjects. which build on your first year studies and reinforce your understanding of economics and mathematics. logic and scientific method undergraduate prospectus 83 Mathematics will give you a gentle introduction to modern mathematics with emphasis on careful reasoning. subject to the approval of the course tutor. you take two core courses. Distribution Theory and Inference).

ac.html Either Quantitative Methods (Mathematics)* and Quantitative Methods (Statistics)* Logic Or Mathematical Methods and Elementary Statistical Theory (Logic is then taken in the second year) Second year: An approved course from the philosophy option list below Either Logic (must be taken if not taken in the first year) or an approved course from the philosophy option list below Either Microeconomic Principles I or Microeconomic Principles II Macroeconomic Principles LSE100 (Michaelmas term only) Third year: An approved course from the philosophy option list below Either an approved course taught outside the Departments of Philosophy and Economics or an approved course from the economics or philosophy option list below Degree options We offer both a single honours BSc Philosophy. Reason. you take a core course in economics and a core course in philosophy. Philosophy and Public Policy. You can then take either two half course units of mathematics and statistics (in order to master the basic skills that you will need for core second and third year economics courses) or a full unit of mathematics and a full unit of statistics (in order to provide yourself with a more comprehensive basis for advanced economics courses in your later years). and your studies will provide you with a good general basis for a wide range of occupations and professions. as well as LSE100 teaching.uk/philosophyLogicAnd ScientificMethod UCAS code: LV15 BSc/PhilEc Programme requirement: A level (or equivalent) in Mathematics is expected Usual standard offer: A level: grades A A A. Your attendance at classes and performance will be carefully monitored. inflation. you complete your first year by taking Logic. you will have to complete several essays and/or exercises as part of your class work. The course in Philosophy of Economics links the two subjects. All lectures are done by Faculty. For each course. Economics B gives you a thorough grounding in basic micro. 1987) B Williams Morality: an Introduction to Ethics (Canto. and you will have a personal academic adviser to provide assistance and guidance.and macroeconomic analysis. There are also two core courses in economics: Microeconomic Principles (the study of households and firms) and Macroeconomic Principles (the study of unemployment. 2003)  This joint degree allows you to study some of the central questions of philosophy alongside core courses in economics.  The skills in reasoning which you will gain can be applied to any subject matter. the balance of payments. The Department of Government also offers the BSc Politics and Philosophy. Many second and third year classes (and even some first year classes) are taught by Faculty as well (other classes are taught by PhD students in the Department). Logic and Scientific Method and a joint BSc degree in Philosophy and Economics. etc). Preliminary listening The lecture “Science and Pseudoscience” by the late LSE philosopher Imre Lakatos.com/2010/10/alexvoorhoeve-on-inequality.lse. If you take the two half course units of mathematics and statistics. We are committed to giving undergraduates a good deal of face-to-face time with Faculty. one of which must be Mathematics International Baccalaureate: Diploma with 38 points including 7 6 6 at Higher level (with 7 in Mathematics) Other qualifications are considered. Knowledge and Values gives a critical introduction to some of the central problems and classic texts of philosophy. we therefore offer courses in the Philosophy of Economics.84 undergraduate prospectus Philosophy. You complete your studies with economics options as outlined above and one further course which may be chosen from any subject at LSE.ac. Knowledge and Values: An Introduction to Philosophy LSE100 (Lent term only) An approved course from the economics option list below Philosophy of Economics First year In your first year. Philosophy of Biology and Cognitive Science.  BSc Philosophy and Economics lse.htm “Is Inequality Bad?” an interview on Philosophy Bites with Alex Voorhoeve on philosophybites. See page 33 for more information Applications 2011: 267 First year students 2011: 27 . including propositional logic.  Second and third years In these years you take the Philosophy of Economics and you have your pick of several philosophy courses. First year: Economics B Reason. 1993) K Popper Conjectures and Refutations: the growth of scientific knowledge (Routledge. You will have an examination for each course in June of the year in which you have taken it.uk/collections/lakatos/ scienceAndPseudoscience. All teachers have weekly office hours in which you can further discuss material from the lectures and classes. logic and scientific method language). predicate logic and the theory of identity. which introduces the basic system of modern formal logic. If you take the full units of mathematics and statistics. available in a recording at www. then you take Logic in the second year.  Preliminary reading R Descartes Meditations (any edition) T Nagel What Does It All Mean? (Oxford University Press. Evidence and Scientific Method and the History of Science. You will also have the opportunity to take a significant number of courses in other departments at LSE. Teaching and assessment You will have at least a one hour lecture and a one hour related class for each course each week. Philosophy of the Social Sciences.

the nature of rational action and the role of values in social science. the basics of transfinite arithmetic. Philosophy of the Social Sciences: a discussion of different views concerning the appropriateness and possible limits to the scientific approach to the study of society. consciousness and attention. including their relation to central metaphysical and normative disputes.  Philosophy and Public Policy: this course will focus on the application of normative analysis of policy questions. and individual rights and distributive justice. how it is justified. Deontic Logic: the logic of vagueness. Scientific Revolutions: Philosophical and Historical Issues: an examination of certain basic methodological and philosophical problems as they arise from detailed historical study of episodes of apparently radical theory change in science (so-called scientific revolutions). Logic and Scientific Method lse. infinity. (b) Extensions of and alternatives to classical Logic. including the aesthetics of Schopenhauer and Nietzsche. functions and orderings. including: the axioms of set theory and their rationale.Philosophy. Philosophy of Science: the nature of scientific reasoning and the principles of evaluating evidence. the idea of the mind as a computer. See page 33 for more information Applications 2011: 92 First year students 2011: 15 First year: Reason. how it is acquired.ac. mind and brain. Knowledge and Values: An Introduction to Philosophy Logic Two approved outside options LSE100 (Lent term only) Second year: Philosophy of Science or Philosophy of the Social Sciences or Evidence and Scientific Method or Scientific Revolutions Up to three courses on the philosophy option list An approved outside option LSE100 (Michaelmas term only) Third year: Up to four courses from the philosophy option list An approved outside option BSc Philosophy. innateness and cognitive development. and French and East European Phenomenology. such as the allocation of health care resources. such as: European Literature and Society (taught in the Language Centre but in consultation with Philosophy): Literary treatment of the major philosophical trends of the twentieth century. relations. It also deals with the basis of collective and individual decision making. animal minds. the nature of species. the modularity of mind. problems and topics in contemporary normative philosophy. Intuitionistic Logic. the Darwinian revolution and various revolutionary changes in accepted theories of light. Russell’s Paradox. the philosophy of language and the philosophy of mind. the paradox of the absurd of Camus.uk/philosophyLogicAnd ScientificMethod UCAS code: V503 BSc/Phil .  Essay: on any approved philosophical topic relevant to your studies. the role of probability and the testing of hypotheses. Berlin. and how (and to what extent) it can be used for forecasting. Probability and Decision Theory. adaptation. freedom of speech and the moral advantages and disadvantages of markets. the units of selection problem. metaphysics. ordinals and cardinals. also some central philosophical problems highlighted by the success and methods of modern science. These include the Copernican and Newtonian revolutions. classical utilitarianism and the social interest. the existentialism of Sartre. Philosophy of Economics: the nature of knowledge in economics. the problem of induction. logic and scientific method undergraduate prospectus 85 Philosophy option list Morality and Values: a discussion of selected topics in the history of moral and political philosophy. Topics to be discussed include: the “modern synthesis”. the nature of social collectives (are they merely the sum of the individuals comprising them?). as well as on the validity of scientific results in a pluralistic society. Set Theory and Further Logic: the course is structured in two parts: (a) Set Theory. including one or more of the following: Modal Logic. emotions and their role in thinking. the limits of autonomy and personal responsibility. Philosophy of Biology and Cognitive Science: an introduction to key issues in the philosophy of the biological and cognitive sciences. Problems of Analytic Philosophy: some of the main philosophical topics in philosophical logic. the analytical school of Russell. It may also be possible to take philosophical courses taught elsewhere in the School. Evidence and Scientific Method: this course focuses on philosophical issues that arise at the intersection of science and society. in particular on how evidence is used in socalled “evidence based policy” and “evidence based medicine”. and evolutionary psychology.  Economics option list Principles of Finance Introduction to Econometrics or Principles of Econometrics Advanced Economic Analysis Political Economy Economic Policy Analysis  Development Economics History of Economics: How Theories Change Industrial Economics International Economics Labour Economics Economic Theory and its Applications Monetary Economics Public Economics Usual standard offer: A level: grades A A A International Baccalaureate: Diploma with 38 points including 7 6 6 or 6 6 6 at Higher level Other qualifications are considered. social cognition. fitness.

you have your pick of philosophy courses and up to four courses in any other subject at LSE. Evidence and Scientific Method: this course focuses on philosophical issues that arise at the intersection of science and society. Other than that. introduces the basic system of modern formal logic. relations. It deals with precise. including propositional logic. BSc Philosophy.  Second and third years In these years. problems and topics in contemporary normative philosophy. functions and orderings. this degree is very flexible: the only two required courses are in your first year. Philosophy of the Social Sciences: a discussion of different views concerning the Ben Gershlick Leicester. you take a core philosophy of science course: either Philosophy of Science. not just how you would like them to be. how it is acquired.86 undergraduate prospectus Philosophy. the Darwinian revolution and various revolutionary changes in accepted theories of light. Russell’s Paradox. LSE has helped immensely with my personal development. how it is justified. and relevant philosophy – not outdated armchair philosophy. and looking at fundamental principles which underlie all subjects and subject areas. United Kingdom 3rd year. Logic and Scientific Method The BSc Philosophy. Scientific Revolutions or Evidence and Scientific Method. Logic and Scientific Method is an incredibly unique programme. the philosophy of language and the philosophy of mind. which is incredibly rewarding in terms of personal development. classical utilitarianism and the social interest. appropriateness and possible limits to the scientific approach to the study of society. plus further philosophy options and up to two outside options. In short. including their relation to central metaphysical and normative disputes. Reason. the basics of transfinite arithmetic. and individual rights and distributive justice. predicate logic and the theory of identity. firstly as there are so many opportunities to be involved with societies and departmental events. The diversity of the students means that every one has different educational and cultural backgrounds and frames of reference – and so it is a very interesting academic environment. These include the Copernican and Newtonian revolutions. and secondly as being in the centre of London at university means that you are at university in the real world. current. the Philosophy of the Social Sciences. logic and scientific method First year In your first year. If philosophy is about solving problems by looking at them uniquely then this diverse environment is inherently philosophical. The pedigree of the lectures is second to none – it is amazing to learn from leadinglights in the field. The logical and scientific element to it means that you are working out how things are. It also deals with the basis of collective and individual decision making. the role of probability and the testing of hypotheses. Scientific Revolutions: Philosophical and Historical Issues: an examination of certain basic methodological and philosophical problems as they arise from detailed historical study of episodes of apparently radical theory change in science (so-called scientific revolutions). Logic. Although potentially further study in philosophy of science is an option. the problem of induction. Problems in Analytic Philosophy: some of the main philosophical topics in philosophical logic. the nature of rational action and the role of values in social science. metaphysics. you take two compulsory core courses. Although I haven’t decided exactly what I’m going to do in the future but it will almost certainly be something in politics either from within government or in a lobbying role. Philosophy of Science: the nature of scientific reasoning and the principles of evaluating evidence. Set Theory and Further Logic: the course is structured in two parts: (a) Set Theory. In sum. (b) Extensions of and alternatives . The first of these. Philosophy option list Morality and Values: a discussion of selected topics in the history of moral and political philosophy. and how (and to what extent) it can be used for forecasting. it is real. The second course. It is specialised in that it is one of very few philosophy programmes which are analytic and practical. including: the axioms of set theory and their rationale. gives a critical introduction to some of the central problems and classic texts of philosophy. in particular on how evidence is used in socalled “evidence based policy” and “evidence based medicine”. ordinals and cardinals. infinity. also some central philosophical problems highlighted by the success and methods of modern science. as well as on the validity of scientific results in a pluralistic society. logical issues in a systematic way. Philosophy of Economics: the nature of knowledge in economics. the nature of social collectives (are they merely the sum of the individuals comprising them?). as I have enjoyed my degree so much. You also select two further courses from the range of options offered by other departments. Knowledge and Values.

housing. adaptation. Berlin. The programme includes a comparative dimension. Social policy and Criminal Justice Policy. local government. non-profit bodies like housing associations. As part of the programme you will study social policy from an international and comparative perspective. BSc Social Policy and Sociology allows students to focus on the connections between the making and implementation of social policies and contextual aspects of social structure and the key trends in social change. We examine the making of legislation. such as the allocation of health care resources. social security and personal social services (such as child protection and care for the elderly and people with disabilities). social exclusion. Intuitionistic Logic. non-governmental organisations (NGOs) and charities. the analytical school of Russell. social cognition. fitness. European Union Directives and international instruments. crime and deviance and urban regeneration. the units of selection problem. Others have entered professional fields such as law. It may also be possible to take philosophical courses taught elsewhere in the School. the limits of autonomy and personal responsibility. innateness and cognitive development. . the nature of species. emotions and their role in thinking. politics and pressure group activities. including the aesthetics of Schopenhauer and Nietzsche. expenditure decisions. processes and theories. Topics to be discussed include: the “modern synthesis”. and in many different kinds of organisation: central government agencies. for example. The skills you will develop by studying social policy are attractive to a range of employers. such as Acts of Parliament. and the taking of public Social policy is a diverse subject which examines the formation and implementation of policy across a broad range of fields. People in the Department are broadly interested in what we should do to ensure the wellbeing of ourselves and others. and French and East European Phenomenology. and evolutionary psychology. education. private businesses which have contracts to supply services. voluntary organisations and families do? Who gets what in our society and in other societies. and you will examine ethical considerations and the effectiveness of social provision. families. Many students go on to take our higher level MSc programmes including Social Policy and Planning. Another concern is how members of different groups within society – such as those defined by gender.  Philosophy and Public Policy: this course will focus on the application of normative analysis of policy questions. including race and diversity. Probability and Decision Theory. and informal networks of mutual aid such as those based on families and neighbourhoods. employers. Deontic Logic: the logic of vagueness. accountancy and personnel management or gone into the civil service.  Essay: on any approved philosophical topic relevant to your studies. the idea of the mind as a computer. freedom of speech. How far do we have a responsibility as individuals to provide for ourselves? What should governments. Health Policy. though they do not prepare you for a specific career. which includes. consciousness and attention. BSc Social Policy with Government enables students to broaden their understanding of political institutions. including health care. mind and brain. international organisations. There is a strong critical and evaluative component in the degree. education. and the moral advantages and disadvantages of markets. it can be studied in combination with other social science subjects. Social Policy and Development Degree structure You may take a single honours degree in social policy or combine your study with another subject as a joint or major/minor degree. including one or more of the following: Modal Logic. in UK central government and local authorities. the existentialism of Sartre. the voluntary sector as well as the international community. the traditional focus on Europe and other industrialised societies to consider developing and transitional contexts. such as: European Literature and Society (taught in the Language Centre but in consultation with Philosophy): Literary treatment of the major philosophical trends of the twentieth century. local authorities and health authorities. health policy and planning. the modularity of mind. Features of LSE courses Social policy is a vibrant subject at LSE. Philosophy of Biology and Cognitive Science: an introduction to key issues in the philosophy of the biological and cognitive sciences. why and what issues does it raise? You will study policies and measures at many different levels: local. It also covers issues that affect society in more general ways. Joint honours and major/ minor degree programmes Although social policy is in itself an interand multidisciplinary subject. criminal justice. but moves beyond. social class and ethnicity – are affected by policies and measures. the paradox of the absurd of Camus. international development. animal minds. looking at the influence of globalisation as well as national and local context. journalism. national and international. taught by many leading experts in the field.Social policy undergraduate prospectus 87 to classical Logic.

Options This list shows the range of social policy options available in the second and third years. Preparing for classes is a very important part of your work. Classes are in smaller groups where you will discuss issues related to lectures. Economy and Society. examines the distinct challenges of welfare provision faced by countries from across Europe and the developing world. BSc Social Policy and Economics allows students to develop economic technical expertise in a growing area of social policy analysis. some in alternate years. focusing on key developments in Britain since the nineteenth century.uk/socialPolicy UCAS code: L400 BSc/SocPol Programme requirement: GCSE Mathematics. Population. which provides an introduction to criminology and to key issues relating to crime and social policy. You will also receive feedback in the form of written comments on the essays that you write. and keep a record of progress which you discuss with your academic adviser each term. You choose your final two courses from the options available throughout LSE – at least one must be a social policy course. Second and third years There are two compulsory courses in the second year. gives you a framework for understanding how and why societies have developed a variety of institutional arrangements to provide for their social welfare needs. some courses include an assessed coursework component. as well as LSE100 teaching. J Baldock et al (Eds) Social Policy (3rd edition. 2006) H Dean Social Policy (Polity – Short Introductions Series. Apart from the long essay. Blackwell. Crime and Society. Additionally. Social Economics and Policy. You choose your final two courses from the options available throughout LSE – at least one must be a social policy course. Foundations of Social Policy. Blackwell. Comparative and International Social Policy. K Rowlingson and M May (Eds) The Student's Companion to Social Policy (3rd edition. but students are encouraged to choose courses that introduce them to one of several social science approaches that have relevance to the study of social policy. 2006) H Glennerster British Social Policy since 1945 (3rd edition. You will have an academic adviser who is responsible for guiding and assisting your learning and is there to help with any personal difficulties. Research Methods for Social Policy will give you a comprehensive introduction to methods of social research with a statistical emphasis. See page 33 for more information Applications 2011: 88 First year students 2011: 18 First year: Foundations of Social Policy LSE100 (Lent term only) Two of the following: Sociology and Social Policy Population. Principles of Social Policy examines the ends and means of social policies with reference to statutory and non statutory forms of provision within a comparative framework. Your second and third first year courses may be chosen from the following: Sociology and Social Policy. BSc Social Policy lse. grade C or above Usual standard offer: A level: grades A B B International Baccalaureate: Diploma with 37 points including 6 6 6 at Higher level Other qualifications are considered. offered within the Department of Social Policy. Oxford University Press. Harper Collins. 2007) N Timmins The Five Giants (Revised and updated edition. 2001) Plus: One outside option Second year: Principles of Social Policy Research Methods for Social Policy One social policy option LSE100 (Michaelmas term only)  Either one social policy option or one outside option Third year: Comparative and International Social Policy A Long Essay on an Approved Topic One social policy option Either one social policy option or one outside option First year The core course. 2007) T Newburn Criminology (Willan Publishing. You will also complete a long essay on a relevant topic. The third year core course. which will give you an introduction to demography and the consequences of demographic change for social policy. combines specific attention to the topic of crime and criminal justice within the broader framework of social policy. † If not already taken Teaching and assessment You will have weekly lectures and classes for each course component amounting to a minimum of eight contact hours per week. You may choose your fourth course from the wide range of options available in other departments. We monitor your attendance and contribution to classes. but within a comparative perspective. which will give you an introduction to sociology and applies sociological perspectives to social policy fields and issues. Economy and Society Social Economics and Policy Crime and Society Preliminary reading If you wish to gain further insight into the subject we suggest that you look at one or more of the following books: P Alcock. giving you the opportunity to explore an area which interests you in some depth. each course has an examination at the end of the year.88 undergraduate prospectus Social policy BSc Social Policy and Criminology. Some will be taught every year. This programme draws on the intellectual traditions of both departments in an integrated way. depending on demand. 2008) . which provides an introduction to economics and its application to social policy.ac.

Social Exclusion and Social Change Psychology of Crime and Criminal Justice  Demographic Description and Analysis A Long Essay on an Approved Topic BSc Social Policy and Criminology lse. Research Methods for Social Policy provides a comprehensive introduction to methods of social research in social policy. See page 33 for more information Applications 2011: 125 First year students 2011: 7 First year: Foundations of Social Policy Crime and Society BSc Social Policy and Economics lse. including an A in Mathematics International Baccalaureate: Diploma with 37 points including 6 6 6 at Higher level (to include Mathematics) Other qualifications are considered. providing the opportunity to explore an area that interests you in some depth. Foundations of Social Policy provides a framework for understanding the policy making process by examining changes in social welfare provision in response to particular social issues over the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Criminological Perspectives examines the major theoretical perspectives that inform our understanding of crime and the research that contributes to their formation and testing.Social policy undergraduate prospectus 89 Sociology and Social Policy † Population. The fourth course may be an approved paper selected from the range available in other departments. The third course will be an option from the range offered in the social policy options list. Options This list shows the range of social policy options available in the second and third years. † If not already taken   Sociology and Social Policy † Population.uk/socialPolicy UCAS code: LM42 BSc/SPCr Programme requirement: GCSE Mathematics. crime prevention and surveillance. Principles of Social Policy examines the ends and means of social policies with reference to statutory and non statutory forms of provision within a comparative framework. or from the available courses in other departments. Crime and Society offers an introduction to the main institutions of the criminal justice system and the policy context within which they operate. Comparative and International Social Policy examines the distinct challenges of welfare provision faced by countries at different stages of economic development. in comparison with other developed countries. Some will be taught every year. You can choose your third course from one of three social policy options. including Psychology of Crime and Criminal Justice. Social Exclusion and Social Change Demographic Description and Analysis Crime Control: Ideas and Controversies Sociology and Social Policy or Population. Economy and Society † Social Economics and Policy † Education Policy  European Social Policy Poverty. Economy and Society or Social Economics and Policy  One outside option LSE100 (Lent term only) Second year: Criminological Perspectives  Principles of Social Policy Research Methods for Social Policy Either one outside option or one social policy option LSE100 (Michaelmas term only) Third year: Comparative and International Social Policy Crime Control: Ideas and Controversies One social policy option Either a Long Essay on an Approved Topic or one outside option First year There are two compulsory courses. grade C or above Usual standard offer: A level: grades A B B International Baccalaureate: Diploma with 37 points including 6 6 6 at Higher level Other qualifications are considered.ac. Crime Control: Ideas and Controversies provides a critical understanding of contemporary crime control policy. or alternatively a long essay on an approved relevant topic. paying particular attention to issues such as policing and security. Second year There are three compulsory courses. youth and punishment. some in alternate years. Third year There are two compulsory courses. depending on demand. Economy and Society † Social Economics and Policy † Crime and Society † Education Policy European Social Policy Psychology of Crime and Criminal Justice Criminological Perspectives Poverty. drugs. See page 33 for more information Applications 2011: 140 First year students 2011: 3 .ac. You may choose your fourth course either from the range of options offered in social policy. and your fourth option from the wide range of courses available in other departments.uk/socialPolicy UCAS code: LLK1 BSc/SPE Programme requirement: A level at grade A in Mathematics Usual standard offer: A level: grades A B B.

which was a really exciting prospect. There’s just no excuse to be bored here! Through being at LSE I’ve been able to take advantage of a huge range of opportunities that I wouldn’t have had at other universities. Social Exclusion and Social Change Demographic Description and Analysis Crime Control: Ideas and Controversies A Long Essay on an Approved Topic Economics options Advanced Economic Analysis Political Economy Economic Policy Analysis   Development Economics History of Economics: How Theories Change Industrial Economics Adam Connell Wokingham. Some will be taught every year. and given LSE’s international nature. concepts and ideas. been able to meet people from a huge variety of different backgrounds. From healthcare and education to population change and even the economics of road congestion. watch lectures on subjects you didn’t even know existed as part of the hugely popular public events programme. Economy and Society Social Economics and Policy Crime and Society International Economics Labour Economics Economic Theory and its Applications Monetary Economics Problems of Applied Econometrics Principles of Finance BSc Social Policy with Government lse. During my time here I’ve been on a tour of the European Parliament in Brussels. I graduate in 2012 and I’ve been lucky enough to have been offered a place on a major company’s graduate scheme. grade C or above Usual standard offer: A level: grades A B B . The theories. There’s always something going on to grab your interest at LSE. The job has nothing to do with my degree discipline. some in alternate years. You can really immerse yourself in student life through student societies.uk/socialPolicy UCAS code: LL42 BSc/SocPGo Programme requirement: GCSE Mathematics. I knew that if I studied here I would be interacting with people who are global leaders in their fields. depending on demand. which just goes to show how valuable an LSE degree is whatever career path that you want to take. and experience the diversity of London’s culture. I chose to study social policy because of its relevance to the worlds of politics and economics. UK 3rd year.ac. Economics B Quantitative Methods (Mathematics)* and Quantitative Methods (Statistics)* One outside option LSE100 (Lent term only) Second year: Principles of Social Policy Microeconomic Principles I Either Macroeconomic Principles or Introduction to Econometrics Research Methods for Social Policy LSE100 (Michaelmas term only) Third year: Comparative and International Social Policy Public Economics One option from social policy or economics Either one option from social policy or economics or an outside option Social policy options This list shows the range of social policy options available in the second and third years. social policy offers a fresh perspective on the things we take for granted. BSc Social Policy with Government. Sociology and Social Policy Population. worked in the House of Commons. which I study in social policy influence the decisions taken daily by policymakers and politicians in governments across the world and have a massive impact upon people’s lives.90 undergraduate prospectus Social policy First year: (* half unit) Foundations of Social Policy Education Policy European Social Policy Psychology of Crime and Criminal Justice Criminological Perspectives Poverty. LSE is the world’s leading social science institution with a reputation that few other British universities can claim to have. which has really enhanced my experience here and given me an education in itself.

See page 33 for more information Applications 2011: 136 First year students 2011: 12 First year: Foundations of Social Policy Introduction to Political Science Introduction to Political Theory One outside option LSE100 (Lent term only) Sociology and Social Policy Population. Management and Globalisation Second year: Principles of Social Policy Research Methods for Social Policy One social policy option One government option LSE100 (Michaelmas term only) Third year: Comparative and International Social Policy One social policy option One government option Either one option from government or social policy or one outside option Social policy options This list shows the range of social policy options available in the second and third years. A level Sociology is not a requirement Usual standard offer: A level: grades A B B International Baccalaureate: Diploma with 37 points including 6 6 6 at Higher level Other qualifications are considered. Some will be taught every year. Some will be taught every year. Social Exclusion and Social Change Demographic Description and Analysis Crime Control: Ideas and Controversies A Long Essay on an Approved Topic Sociology options Theories and Problems of Nationalisation Political Sociology Gender and Society Crime. See page 33 for more information Applications 2011: 70 First year students 2011: 3 First year: Foundations of Social Policy Either Key Issues in Contemporary Societies: An Introduction to Contemporary Sociology or Key Concepts in Sociology: An Introduction to Sociological Theory Sociology and Social Policy One outside option LSE100 (Lent term only) Second year: Principles of Social Policy Research Methods for Social Policy Sociological Analysis One sociology option LSE100 (Michaelmas term only) Third year: Comparative and International Social Policy One social policy option One sociology option One outside option Social policy options This list shows the range of social policy options available in the second and third years. Nations and Empires Public Policy Analysis Key Themes in the History of Political Thought Democracy and Democratisation Theories and Problems of Nationalisation Government. Economy and Society Social Economics and Policy Crime and Society Education Policy European Social Policy Psychology of Crime and Criminal Justice Criminological Perspectives Poverty. some in alternate years. grade C or above. Politics and Public Policy in the EU BSc Social Policy and Sociology lse. Public Choice and Politics Politics of Economic Policy Concepts in Political Theory Politics and Institutions of Europe States. depending on demand. some in alternate years.uk/socialPolicy UCAS code: LL34 BSc/SPSoc Programme requirement: GCSE . Social Exclusion and Social Change Demographic Description and Analysis Crime Control: Ideas and Controversies A Long Essay on an Approved Topic Government options Mathematics.Social policy undergraduate prospectus 91 International Baccalaureate: Diploma with 37 points including 6 6 6 at Higher level Other qualifications are considered. Economy and Society Social Economics and Policy Crime and Society Education Policy European Social Policy Psychology of Crime and Criminal Justice Criminological Perspectives Poverty. Population. Deviance and Control Sociology of Health and Medicine Work.ac. depending on demand.

Recent graduates have gone on to work in the areas of teaching. addressing the social problems and ethical dilemmas that face a globalised post-modern society. and to pursue research degrees. study different methods of social research and undertake some research of your own. Others and Society: Perspectives on Social and Applied Psychology: introduces major perspectives on social and applied psychology: theories used to explain social perception. the role of economic knowledges in economic life. social processes and institutions. biotechnology: the new social. society and culture and in relation to the economy. political and cultural issues. compare different types of social life and societies. introduced to the classical traditions of the discipline. Sociology areas. but also our own lives. social and spatial exclusion. Our courses are available in all three years of the undergraduate programme. Cities and urbanism: the relationship between social. Founded in 1964. urban economies. including cities in global networks. LSE aims to be both a guardian of the discipline of sociology. communications both interpersonal and mediated. privatised control strategies and urban regeneration. including criminal organisations. politics and social organisations. McGraw-Hill. and brought into direct contact with the most advanced contemporary research and scholarship. the Institute is dedicated to consolidating and expanding the contribution of social psychology to the understanding and knowledge of key social. Social psychology is both an exciting area of research within psychology and a perspective on the whole of the discipline. Psychology at LSE looks at human behaviour in the contexts of evolution. development. marketing and personnel management. spatial and physical forms and processes in cities: urban development and urban governance. 2007) Features of LSE courses As a student of LSE you will be taught by some of the world’s leading sociologists. and a leader in the development of the social sciences into new intellectual Features of LSE courses Social psychology is not available as a single honours degree subject at undergraduate level. transnational urbanism. However. At LSE you will explore specific examples of social action. media. and the reconstruction of economic categories from within social research. bioscience. health and development. social work. values and expectations in a way which no other academic subject can rival. Economy culture and society: the nature of contemporary economic knowledges.92 undergraduate prospectus Social psychology Sociology Social psychology offered as outside options for students registered for degrees in other subjects. LSE Sociology embraces a theoretically and methodologically diverse range of approaches. mobility and morphology. biomedicine and genomics. predispositions. including a critical engagement with both economics and economic sociology. economic. courses are . Preliminary reading If you wish to gain further insight into the subject. focusing upon the following key areas: Biomedicine. local and central government. 2004) D Myers Social Psychology (9th Edition. practical social problems. The Institute of Social Psychology is a thriving centre for the study of social psychology and has an international reputation for its research led teaching in a variety of fields. Sociology helps us to understand not only the unparalleled changes that are occurring throughout the world and the changing patterns of relationships between peoples. legal and ethical challenges facing individuals and society in the era of biotechnology. Wadsworth Publishing Company. Societal Psychology: Theory and Applications: discusses major areas of application of social psychology to real-world issues. cognition and behaviour. crime and violence. journalism. Please note the content of these courses is currently under review. examine theories about the nature of social existence and change. political. Emphasis is put on the complexities of translating theory into practice and on the theoretical developments which are prompted by research on topical social issues. we suggest that you look at one or more of the following books: D Matsumoto and H Juang Culture and Psychology (3rd Edition. Options Self. urban environments. and their application to real. markets and cultures.

religious. asylum. you will be given feedback throughout the year. challenges and transformations in geo-politics.  Our teaching is informed by these commitments and by our own active research in these areas. cultural and governmental aspects of colonial and postcolonial societies. above all: work and employment. alumni and visitors. You will also have an academic adviser who will be available to offer general guidance and assistance with both academic and pastoral concerns. law and states of emergency. flight. Key Concepts in Sociology and Key Issues in Contemporary Societies. BSc Sociology lse. M Tyler and C Wallace An Introduction to Sociology: feminist perspectives (3rd edition.uk/sociology UCAS code: L301 BSc/Soc Programme requirement: A level Sociology is not a requirement Usual standard offer: A level: grades A B B International Baccalaureate: Diploma with 37 points including 6 6 6 at Higher level Other qualifications are considered. together with a focus on specific topics. 1992) C Jenks (Ed) Core Sociological Dichotomies (Sage. critical. citizenship and social justice: human rights in a national and global context. Durkheim and Weber: foundations of modern social thought (Sage. cosmopolitanism and supposed “civilisational” conflict. discrimination. Currently key themes are the optimum social. You will have an examination for most courses at the end of the year.ac. conservatism. Human rights. ethnic. 1988) J Elster Nuts and Bolts for the Social Sciences (Cambridge University Press. consumption and market society. Also substantive areas that group members in diverse ways. gender and sexual divisions. reparations for victims. state crimes. development and globalisation. human rights and human rights violations. culminating in a third year which has a focus on in-depth coverage of options drawing on current research and an Preliminary reading P Abbot. human rights in transitional justice. socialism. technology and economy. postconflict human rights. independent thought is the most transferable skill of all. You will also be expected to read widely in each subject in order to prepare for classes. LSE Sociology aims to provide a learning environment in which students have a firm grasp of the key dimensions of contemporary sociology. 2009) . and comparative and historical approaches. S Hall and B Gieben (Eds) Formations of Modernity (Polity Press. Many of the key issues in the discipline worldwide are contested and our teaching aims to equip students to understand and evaluate these disputes and adopt a position in relation to them. First year students on the joint programme will have a choice between the two first year compulsory sociology courses. and fundamental social and political change.Sociology undergraduate prospectus 93 Secondly. governance and citizenship in an era characterized by migration. and the overarching objective of the learning experience we provide to our students. 2004) Teaching and assessment You will have weekly lectures and classes for each course component in which you will discuss and contribute papers on questions raised in the lectures. cultural hybridity. is well represented. especially involving Brazil. ethnic violence and political repression. risk and regulation. South Africa and the United States. racism and ethnicity: the social. the Bengali diaspora. money and value. inequality and injustice. The Department believes in equal treatment based on merit and encourages a learning environment based on mutual respect and dialogue. multiculture. youth and identity. Rigorous. Degree structure You can take a single honours degree in sociology or study it as a joint subject with social policy. Polity Press. historical study of connections between race and ethnography. 1998) K Morrison Marx. social justice. populism and environmentalism. genocide. institutional and ideological bases of politics. representations of human rights violations. Some courses are examined partially or wholly by essays and/or projects. the significance of race in colonial government. engaged through clear empirical focuses. transnationalism. with progression from a first year which aims to provide a comprehensive foundation in the discipline. particularly war. Politics and society: the social. human rights and security war and terror human rights and nation-building. through a second year which allows advanced work on theories and methods. the comparative study of diasporas. See page 33 for more information Applications 2011: 340 First year students 2011: 31 See also BSc Social Policy and Sociology on page 91 The degree programme has a specific rationale. truth commissions and war crimes tribunals. The area encompasses the evolution and impact of political ideas. cultural and economic conditions for sustainable “multiculturalism”. 1989) A Giddens Sociology (6th edition. For coursework that does not contribute to the final degree mark. Race. national and cultural diversity of all its students. 2005) N Abercrombie et al Contemporary British Society (3rd edition. 2000) P Berger Invitation to Sociology: a humanistic perspective (Penguin. staff. Polity Press. The Department of Sociology at LSE welcomes and values the racial. the interaction of states and societies. Topics include nationalism. the relationship between cultural plurality and security. social movements and human rights. especially the study of labour movements and the left. the impacts of synthetic biology and molecularisation on racial discourses and identities. Comparative research. race. Routledge. creative and cultural industries. 1997) C F Seale (ed) Researching Society and Culture (Sage. and are encouraged to think critically and independently. Topics of central interest are political parties and social movements. including liberalism. as well as political and economic democracy. economic.

Management and Globalisation: contemporary perspectives on employment. First year: Statistical Methods for Social Research Key Concepts in Sociology: An Introduction to Sociological Theory Key Issues in Contemporary Societies: An Introduction to Contemporary Sociology One first year option in sociology or in another department LSE100 (Lent term only) Second year: Issues and Methods of Social Research Sociological Analysis One second or third year approved sociology option A further second or third year approved sociology option or an option in another department LSE100 (Michaelmas term only) Third year: Sociological Project (10. Sociological Analysis provides you  with an in-depth introduction to important uses and applications of theory and methodology within sociological analysis. the place of statistics in the social sciences. Key Issues in Contemporary Societies will provide an introduction to and overview of the most important current sociological research on contemporary societies in a comparative context. labour markets. The other course will be chosen from a selected list of options offered by other departments at LSE. Deviance and Control: crime and delinquency. mental illness and drug abuse as forms of deviancy . and justice for human rights violations Crime. violations of human rights such as genocide. Issues and Methods of Social Research will teach the key issues and quantitative techniques that you need to grasp in order to design and conduct sociological research. In the third year you complete a Sociological Project which is an essay of about 10. Political Sociology: power in liberaldemocratic and socialist societies Self. As the course develops. Social Suffering and Justice: dealing with key frameworks for thinking about human rights. Others and Society: perspectives on social and applied psychology Gender and Society: gender relations and inequality   Sociology of Health and Medicine: health. illness and the institution of medicine   Work. Statistical Methods for Social Research will introduce you to statistical methods and statistical reasoning. This allows you to study a topic of interest to you in depth.000 words on a subject approved by the Department. globalisation Sociology of Race and Ethnicity: dealing with key social divisions in the contemporary world. students will be introduced to a range of different conceptual approaches and qualitative methods. Options The following options are indicative of the range taught in the Department of Sociology. Remaining courses are chosen from options offered within or outside the Department. Second and third years There are two core courses in the second year. usually by carrying out a piece of empirical research of your own design. most of which are based on current research. and will introduce you to different approaches to conceptual analysis and development within our discipline. exploring the theory and history of racial and ethnic studies Societal Psychology: Theory and Applications: applying social psychology to real world situations Human Rights.94 undergraduate prospectus Sociology opportunity for every student to conduct sociological research in a chosen field. and the nature and purpose of statistical methods.000 word essay) Two approved second or third year sociology options One second or third year sociology option or one option in another department First year There are three compulsory courses. Key Concepts in Sociology will give you an understanding of the major sociological theories.

Message from 2 Disabled students. BSc 68 Graduate careers 24. BSc 63 Equality 1 EU students. BA. BSc 58 Economics and Economic History. LSE 42 Extended project 33 F Faith Centre 16 Fee status 38 Fees 27 Financial support 27 Food and drink 14 G Gap year 30 GCSEs 34. maintenance 27 H Halls of Residence 12 Hardware. BA 70 I Information Technology 19 International Baccalaureate 33 International qualifications 33 International Relations. BSc 71 International students 36 Interviews 35 . IT 21 Health and safety 1 Health centre 16 HEFCE. BSc 50 Admissions policy 38 Advanced Diplomas 33 Advice and counselling 17 Adviser: Male Students 17 Women Students 17 Age (on entry) 32 Alumni 26 Anthropology and Law. see also individual degree and course entries Executive Education.Index undergraduate prospectus 95 Index A A level subjects 32 About LSE 6 About the prospectus 1 Academic adviser 22 Academic guidance 22 Academic integrity 8 Academic support services 19 Access to learning fund 29 Accommodation 12 Accounting and Finance. see also individual degree and course entries Environment and Development. BSc 59 Email an alum 23 Employability 18 English language requirements 34 Entrance exam 35 Entrance requirements 30. BA 47 Anthropology. BSc 68 Government and History. BSc 51 C Calendar 8 Cambridge Pre-U 33 Campus map inside back cover Campus tours 23 Careers 18 Catering 14 Chaplain 16 CHOICE 23 Computing facilities 19 Contacting us 38 Cost of living 10 Counselling and advice 16 D Data protection 38 Dates of terms 1 Dean of Undergraduate Studies 22 Deferred entry 30 Degree programmes and codes 3 Degrees. Social 48 Anthropology. BSc 55 Economics. LSE 6 Dental service 16 Departmental tutor 22 Direct entry to second year 30 Director. BSc. BSc 73 International Relations and History. see also individual degree and course entries General Course 42 General Studies 32 Geography. BSc 54 Economic History with Economics. BA 64 Geography with Economics. long-term medical conditions 16 Disability Equality Scheme 16 Drink and food 14 E Econometrics and Mathematical Economics. BSc 44 Actuarial Science. BSc 65 Government. BSc 67 Government and Economics. dyslexia. BSc 62 Environmental Policy with Economics. financial support 29 Examination 8. RAE 9 History. Social 48 Appeals 36 Applying to LSE 30 Assessment 8 AS subjects 32 Athletics Union 15 B Beaver. BSc 60 Economic History. see also individual degree and course entries Graduate studies 26 Grant. BSc 56 Economics with Economic History. The 15 Bursary 28 Business Mathematics and Statistics.

study at LSE 23 Visit Day 36 Visits. LLB 77 Lectures 6. visit and discover LSE 23 Message from the Director 2 Moodle 21 N National Scholarships Programme 28 Nursery 16 O Offers of admission 36 Older students 37 Online learning 21 Open Days 23 Orientation 36 Overseas students: Information 36 Qualifications 33 Student finance 27 P Peking University (Summer School) 42 Personal tutor (academic adviser) 22 Philosophy and Economics. BSc 68 Private accommodation 12 Programme regulations 8 Programmes 3. BSc 85 Politics and Philosophy. BSc 80 Map: Campus inside back cover London inside back cover flap Mathematics and Economics. LSE 23 W Welfare 16 What we study 4 Who chooses LSE? 4 Why choose LSE? 4 Widening participation 23 Work. Dean of 22 University of London International Programmes 41 University of London Union 15 V VCE A level 33 Videos. Adviser to 17 . see also individual degree and course entries for UCAS codes 43 ULU 15 Undergraduates. BA 48 Social Anthropology. BSc 94 Software (IT) 21 Sports facilities 15 Statistics with Finance. BSc 82 Medical Centre 16 Meet.96 undergraduate prospectus Index K Key skills certificate 32 L Language Centre 21 Language studies 74 Law. BSc 84 Philosophy. Student 23 U UCAS 30. BSc 81 Mathematics with Economics. Student 23 Social Anthropology. part-time 18 Women Students. BSc 89 Social Policy and Economics. Logic and Scientific Method. BSc 91 Social psychology 92 Societies 15 Sociology. number of 5 Undergraduate Studies. BSc 89 Social Policy with Government. BSc 88 Social Policy and Criminology. BSc 48 Social Policy. BSc 52 Student Counselling 16 Student finance 27 Students’ Centre 17 Student services 16 Student Shadowing scheme 23 Students’ Union 14 Student Mentoring Scheme 17 Student Tutoring 23 Study skills 22 Subjects and courses 43 Subject combinations 33 Summer schools (LSE) 42 Summer School (Widening participation) 23 Sustainability 15 T Teaching and Learning Centre 22 Teaching methods 6 Term dates 1 Tuition fees 27 Tutoring. maintenance 27 London. BSc 90 Social Policy and Sociology. living in 10 London map inside back cover flap LSE100 6 LSE Bursary 28 LSE CHOICE 23 LSE degrees 6 LSE Open Days 23 LSE Students’ Union 14 M Maintenance grant 27 Maintenance loan 27 Male Students. see also individual degree and course entries Q Qualifications 32 R Regulations 8 Research Assessment Exercise 9 Retakes 33 S Scholarships 28 Second year entry 30 Shadowing. Adviser to 17 Management. see teaching and assessment for individual degree and course entries Library 19 Life at LSE 10 Living costs 10 LLB Bachelor of Laws 77 Loan.

Clare Market St Philips – Medical Centre. Portugal Street UR T MO UT H POR LCH LAK COW K I N G S W A Y CLM . East Building and NAB Three Tuns Ground floor. Columbia House Mezzanine Café Mezzanine floor. Portsmouth Street POR SHF STC SPH TW1 TW2 TW3 32L COW Cowdray House. Old Building A UG TR LS EE T CA RE Y New Academic Building NAB AR DI STR NIA EET 50L Entrance to LSE Research Lab (floors 4 and 5) PO S RT S Sardinia House SAR NSC P EET T OR STR MAIN LIBRARY LRB Lionel Robbins Building AN GE ST RE ET George IV pub Between L and K on the corner of Portsmouth Street Graham Wallas Room Old Building Hong Kong Theatre Ground floor. Old Building SU Shops Ground floor. New Academic Building New Theatre East Building Old Theatre Ground floor.New Ent ran ce L O INC L INN N’S FIE LD S 32L Café 54 Ground floor. Portugal Street Lionel Robbins Building. Portsmouth Street Lakatos Building. Houghton Street King’s Chambers. Old Building Plaza Café John Watkins Plaza Quad Café Basement. Aldwych The Anchorage Clare Market. King’s Chambers Student Services Centre Ground floor. Aldwych East Building. Staff Dining Room Fifth floor. Clement’s Inn Tower Two. Sheffield Street Tower One. Aldwych Columbia House. Clare Market Vera Anstey Room Between ground and first floor. Lincoln’s Inn Fields New Court Carey Street New Students’ Centre Old Building. New Academic Building Fourth Floor Restaurant and Café Bar Fourth floor. Clare Market Senior Common Room. Houghton Street Parish Hall. Portugal Street CO KGS JO HN TW3 ALD ANC CMK CLM COL CON EAS KGS KSW 50L Aldwych House. Sheffield Street Peacock Theatre. Clement’s Inn Tower Three. Old Building Shaw Library Sixth floor. Houghton Street Clement House. Clement’s Inn 32 Lincoln’s Inn Fields Student Common Room Ground floor. Old Building ET SHF STRE F IE L D SHEF Ram p OLD Old Building Clare ANC Market Tower One Lif P T OR KSW CMK EAS East Building TW1 Tower Two ta nd A UG LS CL EM E INN NT’ S St TRE ep s Peacock Theatre PEA ET CLA RE MA RKE T TW2 Tower Three HOUGHTON STREET GR PAR STC St Clement’s PL WA AZ TK A INS entrance hidden from view entrance disabled access CON Connaught House COL Columbia House ALD Clement House disabled lift bridge bridge A L D W Y C H LCH LAK LRB NAB NCT NSC OLD PAR PEA Lincoln Chambers. Aldwych Connaught House. Clement House LSE Garrick Ground floor. Portugal Street 20 Kingsway 50 Lincoln’s Inn Fields. Library and LSE Research Lab New Academic Building. Old Building 1 Portsmouth Street Sheffield Street St Clement’s.

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being offered to students. UK universities experience industrial action by staff which may prevent the full range of services. LSE seeks to ensure that intellectual freedom and freedom of expression within the law is secured for all our members and those we invite to the School. the School will use its best endeavours to provide alternative facilities. It is a charity and is incorporated in England as a company limited by guarantee under the Companies Acts (Reg No 70527). including teaching. Published by: Academic Registrar’s Division. If services are affected by industrial action or other events beyond the School’s control.ac.uk Cert no. LSE Photographer Printer: Belmont Press Acknowledgments: Thanks to all the students who gave permission for us to publish their photographs in this prospectus. advancement and dissemination of knowledge. lse. LSE Design and maps: LSE Design Unit Photography: Nigel Stead. Please recycle this publication after use. Students should be aware that the School will not issue refunds of fees where industrial action or other events beyond the School’s control affect teaching or other services. TT-COC-002168 . On rare occasions. Freedom of thought and expression is essential to the pursuit.©2012 Registered address: The London School of Economics and Political Science Houghton Street London WC2A 2AE The London School of Economics and Political Science is a School of the University of London.

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