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SEPTEMBER 19-25, 2012
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Editorials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
INSIDE THIS ISSUE
Open space grows
Committee adopts ordinance
to acquire land. PAGE 2
COURTESY JOE SCARLATA
The tagging and releasing of butterflies, specifically
Monarchs, is something that the Stony Brook-Millstone
Watershed Association provides for attendees of the
Master Gardeners of Mercer Countys Insect Festival
each year.
BY HEATHER FIORE
The Hopewell Sun
nsects are everywhere, whether its
crawling on the sidewalk, buzzing
around the flowers, or trekking
through the grass. Its hard to ignore
the fact that theyre a contributing
part of our ecosystem, which is why
the Master Gardeners of Mercer County
have been hosting their annual Insect Fes-
tival for a decade now.
On Saturday, Sept. 8, nearly 700 people
gathered at the Mercer Educational Gar-
dens in Pennington to celebrate the 10th
Annual Insect Festival and learn more
about the various types of insects and
plants, according to Publicity Chair for the
Master Gardeners Carol Bencivengo.
It was breezy, with the sun in and out,
so it was a perfect day, she said. Every-
thing went well, and everybody had a good
time.
The festival, which drew hundreds of
Insect
Festival
I
please see FESTIVAL, page 5
2 THE HOPEWELL SUN SEPTEMBER 19-25, 2012
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BY HEATHER FIORE
The Hopewell Sun
The Hopewell Township Com-
mittee on Sept. 10 adopted an or-
dinance authorizing the town-
ships acquisition of 26 acres of
land, in conjunction with Mercer
County, to further preserve land
and open space in the township.
The property, which is com-
monly known as the Hunter
Tract, is located at 133 Pleasant
Valley Road. In its entirety, the
property spans approximately 50
acres, and contains open farm
fields, dense mature woodlands,
various barns, sheds and agricul-
tural outbuildings, as well as a
two-story historic farmhouse (all
of which are no longer operat-
ing).
The owner of the estate ap-
proached Mercer County, which
then approached Hopewell Town-
ship. As part of the deal, the
township will purchase 26 acres
52 percent of the property for
$400,000, while Mercer County
will receive 24 acres 48 percent
of the property for the same
price.
I think its a good deal, com-
mittee member Vanessa Sandom
said. I think the county has
asked us to participate, and it
makes sense. All of our boards
and committees have agreed with
that. Weve asked the county to
participate in the purchase of
open space frequently and theyve
come through.
By purchasing the land,
Hopewell Township increases its
amount of preserved open space,
and also expands the 1,200-acre
Baldpate Mountain Preserve,
which is located just south and
abuts the Baldpate Mountain and
Preserve.
I think its an ideal location,
and it has a lot of benefit to the
township, Sandom said. This is
not taxpayer money in the sense
that its not regularly taxed; this
Open space to grow in township
Committee adopts ordinance to acquire 26 acres of land
please see PROPERTY, page 9
SEPTEMBER 19-25, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 3
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Summertime...and the crops
are bountiful. Its time to put up
some food. At Howell Living His-
tory Farm, you can help.
The farm will be the site of a
canning and cooking program
held Saturday, Sept. 22, from 10
a.m. until 4 p.m. Not only can you
learn how to can and pickle your
garden favorites, but you can
sample some of the treats.
Throughout the day, farmers
may be canning and pickling sur-
plus garden crops like cucum-
bers, zucchini, tomatoes and
more. You can sample the results
and take home recipes and other
secrets that made canning a
mainstay of the 1900 farm.
A childrens craft program,
Pierced Pie Tin, will be offered
from 11 a.m. until 3 p.m. The craft
takes about 20 minutes to com-
plete and costs $3 per craft.
Groups (eight or more) must pre-
register.
Howell Farm is located on Val-
ley Road, just off Rt. 29 two miles
south of Lambertville. Parking
and admission are free. Hours are
10 a.m. until 4 p.m. Tuesday
through Saturday, and noon until
4 p.m. on Sundays.
The Farms Corn Maze will be
opening on Saturday, Sept. 22.
Check the website for hours of
operation.
Howell Farm is maintained
and operated by the Mercer Coun-
ty Park Commission. For more in-
formation, call the farm at (609)
737-3299 or visit websites at
www.howellfarm.org or
www.mercercounty.org.
Learn to pickle garden
favorites at program
Visit us online at
www.hopewellsun.com
4 THE HOPEWELL SUN SEPTEMBER 19-25, 2012
Registration for the Explo-
rations four courses closes on
Thursday, Sept. 20. The three six-
session courses are, American
Colonies, 1607-1770, on Mondays
starting Sept. 24, Enjoying
Shakespeare starting on Tues-
day, Sept. 25, and Basic Drawing
and Water Colors, starting Mon-
day, Oct. 8. Mythology: Gods,
Goddesses and Nature is a four-
session course beginning
Wednesday, Sept. 26. All classes
start at 1 p.m. Course fees are $30
for one course and $20 for each ad-
ditional course.
To sign up, send your name, ad-
dress, phone number, e-mail ad-
dress, name of the course or
courses desired, and a check
made out to HV Senior Founda-
tion to Rodney Newman, Treasur-
er, Hopewell Valley Senior Foun-
dation, 177 Shrewsbury Court,
Pennington, NJ 08534.
All course fees go to the
Hopewell Valley Senior Founda-
tion to pay for administrative
costs, class materials and class-
room space.
Any funds remaining after ex-
penses will be used to finance pro-
grams and projects benefitting
Hopewell Valley seniors. Explo-
rations is a volunteer organiza-
tion underwritten by the
Hopewell Valley Senior Founda-
tion and sponsored by Hopewell
Valley Senior Services.
Complete course descriptions
can be found on the Foundations
website, hvseniors.org.
Last chance approaches to register
for Explorations fall courses
Please recycle this newspaper.
SEPTEMBER 19-25, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 5
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Festival featured seven demonstration gardens
residents from municipalities all
over New Jersey and even Penn-
sylvania, offered a variety of ac-
tivities, demonstrations and
guides to educate people about
the many different parts of our
ecosystem and how they all work
together to co-exist and thrive.
Although the festival is usually
children-oriented, Bencivengo ex-
plained how the Master Garden-
ers sought to include more things
that would appeal to adults this
year.
There were just as many, if not
a few more, adults this year than
children, so it was enjoyed equal-
ly, she said. Theres usually more
children because we have a lot of
things there that are for them, like
educational games, gardens, walks
on the meadows and hayrides on
the Lawrence-Hopewell trail. But,
we have educational things for
adults as well as children.
Chair of the Master Gardeners
and co-chair of the Insect Festival
Committee Nancy Putnam ex-
plained how the idea of an Insect
Festival originated and why its
so successful year after year.
Theres a horticulturist that
gives courses to the Master Gar-
deners, and she told us that when
she first started, she thought all of
the work was going to be about
plants, but people called in most
about insects because people did-
nt know much about insects,
she said. People didnt know
about insects, and thats what
they wanted to know about. So, as
the Master Gardeners numbers
grew, we thought maybe thats
what we should do have an In-
sect Festival so people could learn
more about them.
At the festival, there were
seven demonstration gardens
Annual, Butterfly, Cottage, Herb,
Native Plant, Perennial, and
Weed ID where people were in-
formed about the topics and how
insects play a role in each. There
were also live showings of honey-
bees and native bees, and discus-
sions on the differences between
the two and how important they
are for pollination.
Popular events from previous
years that continued were the dis-
play of butterfly births, bugs ga-
lore (insect inspection and han-
dling), the insect puppet show, tat-
toos, crafts, a question and an-
swer session with Mercer County
Horticulturist Barbara Bromley,
and Monarch Butterfly tagging,
which is done by the Stony Brook-
Millstone Watershed Association
every year.
Manager of the Education De-
partment at Stony Brook-Mill-
stone Watershed Association
MaryAnn Polefka explained what
they brought to the festival this
year, other than the Monarch but-
terflies that they bring every year.
We bring live insects, she
said. Different types of grasshop-
pers, praying mantis, ant lions and
a whole bunch of insects.
The activities that were offered
included Bugs in Water, an area
where children could look through
microscopes at tiny organisms
FESTIVAL
Continued from page 1
please see GOAL, page 6
6 THE HOPEWELL SUN SEPTEMBER 19-25, 2012
20 Nassau Street, Suite 26A
Princeton, NJ 08542
609-751-0245
The Sun is published weekly by Elauwit
Media LLC, 20 Nassau Street, Suite 26A,
Princeton, NJ 08542. It is mailed weekly to
select addresses in the 08560, 08525 and
08534 ZIP codes. If you are not on the mail-
ing list, six-month subscriptions are avail-
able for $39.99. PDFs of the publication are
online, free of charge. For information,
please call 609-751-0245.
To submit a news release, please email
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welcomes suggestions and comments from
readers including any information about
errors that may call for a correction to be
printed.
SPEAK UP
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and to the point is best, so we look for letters
that are 300 words or fewer. Include your
name, address and phone number. We do not
print anonymous letters. Send letters to
news@hopewellsun.com, via fax at 609-751-
0245, or via the mail. Of course, you can drop
them off at our office, too. The Hopewell Sun
reserves the right to reprint your letter in any
medium including electronically.
PUBLISHER Steve Miller
GENERAL MANAGER & EDITOR Alan Bauer
VICE PRESIDENT OF SALES Joe Eisele
NEWS
MANAGING EDITOR Mary L. Serkalow
PRODUCTION EDITOR Kristen Dowd
HOPEWELL EDITOR Heather Fiore
OPERATIONS
DIGITAL MEDIA DIRECTOR Tim Ronaldson
ART DIRECTOR Tom Engle
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD Russell Cann
CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Barry Rubens
VICE CHAIRMAN Michael LaCount, Ph.D.
ELAUWIT MEDIA GROUP
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD Dan McDonough, Jr.
VICE CHAIRMAN Alan Bauer
G
ov. Christie last week said he
increased funding for schools
statewide by almost $200 mil-
lion. He also said that brought state
support for schools to its highest level
ever.
Now, while providing a quality edu-
cation requires more than just tossing
around dollars, theres no doubt that
local districts are grateful for the sup-
port. They remember all too well re-
cent years when state support was
slashed and tax-hike caps put in place.
Seeing more funds from the state no
doubt makes life a bit easier for all of
them.
When Christie slashed state funding
for schools shortly after taking office,
it indeed created hardship. But it also
made boards of education and admin-
istrators take a step back and rethink
how things are done.
One of the benefits weve seen is a
willingness and even encouragement
on the part of school districts to in-
volve the public in the budget process.
Thats not to say that some districts
werent actively courting public sup-
port before the budget cuts. But, when
everyone found themselves in the same
difficult situation, having to make
tough decisions about taxes and spend-
ing, it seemed like there was new em-
phasis on building public involvement.
We think school board member is
one of the toughest jobs around. Try-
ing to balance the mandate of provid-
ing children with a quality education
with keeping taxes as low as possible is
not easy.
But school boards responded. They
not only opened up the budget process,
they began to seek out creative ways to
save and raise money. They created
partnerships with other districts, for
example. Some are even looking at in-
volving corporate partners who want
to advertise on school property.
Yes, the added state money is wel-
come. But lets also remember that the
sharp budget cuts from a few years
ago, though painful at the time, also led
to improvements.
in our opinion
Education dollars
Theres more money for schools, but the budget cuts also led to progress
Doing things differently
The governor talked about increased
state support for schools. No doubt
that was good news for school board
members and administrators. But lets
not overlook the progress that came
from the budget cuts a few years ago.
(back by popular demand for the second
year); an insect hunt on paths that cut
through the restored meadow; a mural paint-
ing of the restored meadow for children; and
the Bee Waggle Dance, where children
mimicked the way the honeybees communi-
cate with one another about the location of
blooming flowers.
Unique to this years festival was the dis-
play of live bats by Conserve Wildlife Foun-
dation of New Jersey, as well as hayrides
along the Lawrence-Hopewell Trail by the
Mercer County Equestrian Center.
We have hayrides on the Lawrence-
Hopewell Trail because we are now a hub,
Putnam said. Our site is located on the
trail and we want to point that out to peo-
ple you can ride your bike to us, walk and
connect over to Rosedale Park.
Aside from the three organizations list-
ed above, other activities and demonstra-
tions were set-up by other local and state
organizations that volunteered to partici-
pate, including Rutgers Universitys Ento-
mology faculty; Mercer County Soil Con-
servation; Mercer County Mosquito Con-
trol; New Jersey Department of Agricul-
ture Beneficial Insect Rearing Laboratory;
and Mercer County 4H.
The festival was a blooming success
once again, and Putnam explained the
overall goal of the Insect Festival.
Were interested in educating the public
about how you can do gardening without ap-
plying lots of chemicals and to help people
understand that there are good insects, Put-
nam said. So, if you understand why some
of the things are eating up your plants, you
dont have to spray them with chemicals,
you can find other insects to help.
Aside from educating visitors how and
why insects do what they do and how to
control and handle them, Putnam dis-
cussed the other main point of the Insect
Festival.
Overcoming the fear of insects as
well, she said. Children generally love in-
sects, but their parents dont, so we try to
appeal to children, and through the chil-
dren help the parents begin to learn more
about the importance of insects and over-
all environment.
Since the Master Gardeners continue to
have a steady attendance to their festival,
they try to think of new and innovative
ideas for the year to come. However, all
members of Master Gardeners who partic-
ipate and volunteer on the festival enjoy
the work that they are able to accomplish
and knowledge that they are able to con-
stantly spread.
Its a lot of work to prepare, but its a lot
of fun, Putnam said. We like doing it be-
cause we learn so much during preparing,
and to be able to share that knowledge is
very rewarding. You realize that theres so
much people dont know about insects and
by introducing them to things that they
havent known before, theyre very helpful
and we feel like were doing a good job.
GOAL
Continued from page 5
Goal of festival is to educate public about insects
This information was provided
to The Sun by the Hopewell Town-
ship Police Department:
On Aug. 20 at 4:30 p.m., Detec-
tive Kevin Zorn charged a 26-year-
old male with forgery and theft.
The man deposited a forged check
in the amount of $7,496.21 into his
own checking account and then
withdrew $3,700 from the Wells
Fargo Bank account. This case
will be forwarded to the Mercer
County Prosecutors Office for re-
view.
On Sept. 4 at 11:05 a.m., Officer
Frank Tulko responded to Route
31 near Tree Farm Road for the
report of a motor vehicle crash. A
Honda Accord, driven south-
bound by an 18-year-old male,
veered into the northbound lane
and sideswiped a Nissan Quest
being driven northbound by a 55-
year-old male. Both men suffered
minor injuries to their arms and
were treated on scene by
Hopewell Valley Emergency Serv-
ices personnel. The 18 year-old
male was issued a summons for
failing to maintain traffic lane.
On Sept. 4 at 1:16 p.m., Officer
Frank Tulko responded to a Neds-
land Avenue address for the re-
port of a theft. Sometime between
10:30 a.m. and 1 p.m., two portable
generators valued at $1,400 were
taken from the rear of the home.
The generators were described as
a yellow and black 6600 Watt Po-
laris Pro and a blue and black
Devilbliss GB5000. A blue pickup
truck with scrap in the rear bed
was seen in the area around the
time of this theft.
On Sept. 4 at 4:08 p.m., Officer
William Gaskill observed a car
traveling along Reed Road at 44
mph in a 25 mph zone. Officer
Gaskill spoke with the driver, a
57-year-old male, who was found
to have outstanding arrest war-
rants out of Bucks County,
Lawrence Township and Hamil-
ton Township. He was placed
under arrest and transported to
police headquarters for process-
ing where he was charged with
speeding and driving while sus-
pended. These charges will be
heard in municipal court. He was
later lodged at the Mercer County
Correction Center awaiting extra-
dition to Bucks County.
On Sept. 1 at 2:33 a.m., Officer
Joseph McNeil stopped a car
along Route 29 after observing it
weaving in and out of its lane. Of-
ficer McNeil spoke with the driv-
er, a 48-year-old female, who pro-
vided a false name and different
birthdates to him. Further inves-
tigation found the woman to be
an unlicensed driver and she was
placed under arrest. A passenger
in the car, a 48-year-old male, was
found to have an outstanding traf-
fic warrant out of Lawrence
Township and was placed under
arrest. Both were transported to
police headquarters for process-
ing. The man posted bail on the
outstanding warrant and was
later released. The woman was
charged with obstructing the ad-
ministration of law, hindering ap-
prehension, failure to maintain
lane, and being an unlicensed
driver. She was later released and
her case will be heard in munici-
pal court.
SEPTEMBER 19-25, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 7
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Big orange pumpkins and Indi-
an corn are in abundance at How-
ell Living History Farm, where
visitors can take their pick of the
crop on Saturday, Sept. 29.
Pumpkin picking will be of-
fered at the 130-acre historical
farm, operated by the Mercer
County Park Commission. Be-
sides picking pumpkins and Indi-
an corn for their doorsteps, win-
dowsills and centerpieces, visi-
tors can help sort pumpkins for
the Farms pigs, cattle and chick-
ens, the chief consumers of
pumpkins, historically.
A childrens craft program,
Mosaic Necklace, will be held
from 11 a.m. until 3 p.m. Cost is $2.
Throughout the day, visitors
can purchase pumpkin pie and
baked goods and pick-your-own
pumpkins and Indian corn.
Howell Farm is located on Val-
ley Rd., just off Rt. 29, two miles
south of Lambertville. Hours are
10 a.m. until 4 p.m. Tuesday
through Saturday, and noon until
4 p.m. on Sundays. Parking and
admission are free. For more in-
formation, call the Mercer Coun-
ty Park Commission at (609) 737-
3299, or visit websites at
www.howellfarm.org or
www.mercercounty.org. For infor-
mation about the Farms Corn
Maze, call (609) 397-2555 (week-
ends) and (609) 737-3299 (week-
days).
Please recycle this newspaper.
Pick a pumpkin at Howell Farm on Sept. 29
police report
Visit us online at
www.hopewellsun.com
WEDNESDAY SEPT. 19
eBooks @ Your Library: 7 to 8:30
p.m. at Hopewell Branch of the
Mercer County Library System.
Learn how to download eBooks
to your computer, a compatible
eReader or compatible mobile
device. This hands-on workshop
includes an overview and demon-
stration of eLibraryNJ, a down-
loadable eBooks service. Partici-
pants will learn about tools need-
ed to locate and download
eBooks. You are encouraged to
bring your own laptop and/or
eReader to follow along using the
librarys wireless network. A limit-
ed number of library laptops may
be reserved at the time of sign
up. All participants must be expe-
rienced and comfortable with the
computer, keyboard and mouse.
Registration is required.
Story Time: Ages 2 to 5; siblings
welcome. 11 to 11:45 a.m. at
Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. Action
rhymes, songs and felt board
activities. Age-appropriate craft
follows story time. Parental
supervision required.
Manga Club: Ages 12 and older. 6 to
7 p.m. at Hopewell Branch of the
Mercer County Library System.
Join for discussions, snacks,
movies and other activities about
anime, manga, graphic novels
and superheroes.
THURSDAY SEPT. 20
Story Time: Ages 2 to 5; siblings
welcome. 11 to 11:45 a.m. at
Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. Action
rhymes, songs and felt board
activities. Age-appropriate craft
follows story time. Parental
supervision required.
PJ Story Time: Ages 2 to 5; siblings
welcome. 6:30 to 7:15 p.m. at
Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. Action
rhymes, songs and felt board
activities. Age-appropriate craft
follows story time. Parental
supervision required.
Toddler Rock: Ages 18 months to 3.
10 to 10:30 a.m. at Hopewell
Branch of the Mercer County
Library System. Singing, dancing
ad rhymes. Play with musical
instruments, puppets, parachutes
and more.
FRIDAY SEPT. 21
Pat McKinleys Toddler Tunes:
Ages newborn to 5. Adult super-
vision required. Sing and dance
to classic childrens songs played
on live guitar.
SUNDAY SEPT. 23
Hopewell Presbyterian Church:
Worship service at 10:30 a.m.
Intergenerational Sunday School
from 9 to 10:15 a.m. Coffee fellow-
ship from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
80 West Broad St., Hopewell.
Hopewell United Methodist
Church: Worship service at 10
a.m. Teen/adult education from 9
to 9:45 a.m. Sunday school at 10
a.m. Youth group at 6:30 p.m. 20
Blackwell Ave., Hopewell.
St. Alphonsus Roman Catholic
Church: Mass at 7:30, 9 and 11:15
a.m. 54 East Prospect St.,
Hopewell.
Word Christian Fellowship Interna-
tional: Worship service at 10 a.m.
Sunday school at 10:30 a.m. 44
Van Dyke Road, Hopewell.
MONDAY SEPT. 24
Yoga: 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. at Hopewell
Branch of the Mercer County
Library System. Bring yoga mat
or large towel. Registration
required; call (609) 737-2610.
Tai Chi: 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. at
Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. Learn
this ancient art to promote good
health and relaxation. No regis-
tration required.
Story time: 10:30 a.m. at Hopewell
Public Library. For toddlers and
pre-schoolers. Stories, songs and
fingerplays. Registration is not
required.
Hopewell Township Committee
regular meeting: 7 p.m. at the
Hopewell Municipal Building, 201
Washington Crossing-Pennington
Road. Open to the public. Visit
www.hopewelltwp.org to confirm
time, for agenda or for more
information.
TUESDAY SEPT. 25
Yoga: 5 to 6 p.m. at Hopewell Branch
of the Mercer County Library Sys-
tem. Bring yoga mat or large tow-
el. Registration required; call
(609) 737-2610.
New Jersey Writers Society Sup-
port Group: 6 to 8:30 p.m. at
Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
CALENDAR PAGE 8 SEPTEMBER 19-25, 2012
WANT TO BE LISTED?
To have your meeting or affair listed in the Calendar or Meetings,
information must be received, in writing, two weeks prior to the
date of the event.
Send information by mail to: Calendar, The Sun, 108 Kings Highway
East, Haddonfield, NJ 08033. Or by email:
news@hopewellsun.com. Or you can submit a calendar listing
through our website (www.hopewellsun.com).
We will run photos if space is available and the quality of the photo
is sufficient. Every attempt is made to provide coverage to all
organizations.
108 Kings Highway East | Haddonfield, NJ 08033
856-427-0933
sales@elauwit.com | www.elauwit.com
Cherry Hill
Haddonfield
Marlton
Medford
Moorestown
Mt. Laurel
Shamong
Tabernacle
Voorhees
Washington Twp
Now Enrolling For Fall
please see CALENDAR, page 9
SEPTEMBER 19-25, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 9
Please Join Dr. Roderick Kaufmann &
1r:u.crcu 1crarccq ssc.:arcs
in Welcoming
1r. }. S.crr 1cuu:uq
&
1r. 1arsau 'a:aa
Dr. Henning will be at our Hillsborough office.
Dr. Vaidya will be at our Monroe and Pennington offices.
Please Call Today to Make Your Appointment
with Dr. Henning or Dr. Vaidya.
307 Omni Drive
Hillsborough
908-281-6633
5 Centre Drive, Suite 1A
Monroe Twp.
609-655-4544
Pennington Point West
2 Tree Farm Road
Ste. A-110, Pennington
609-737-4491
www.artsparksstudio.com email : info@artsparksstudio.com
(609) 466-5437
33 Railroad Place, Hopewell Borough right across from Railroad Station
Find Your Inner Art Spark at
Art Classes
Parties
Workshops
Camps
Register Now for Fall Classes
Ages 18 months 10 years
Learn! Explore! Create! Get Messy! Grow!
is open space money. This is ex-
actly what were supposed to be
doing with our open space money.
Voters have told us that they want
us to purchase and preserve prop-
erty in the town, and this expands
the site in the area that will be
preserved.
According to the ordinance, the
property was recently valued be-
tween $2.2-$2.3 million.
Now that the committee has
adopted the ordinance, it has to
be scheduled for the county free-
holder agenda for them to ap-
prove, which will most likely be
toward the end of the month.
PROPERTY
Continued from page 2
Property valued between $2.2 and $2.3 million
County Library System. All are
welcome to attend enjoy the
challenges of becoming better
writers, defeating writers block
and perfecting the craft. No reg-
istration necessary.
Story Time: Ages 2 to 5; siblings
welcome. 2 to 2:45 p.m. at
Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. Action
rhymes, songs and felt board
activities. Age-appropriate craft
follows story time. Parental
supervision required.
Baby Time with Miss Kelley: Ages
newborn to 2; siblings welcome. 11
to 11:30 a.m. at Hopewell Branch
of the Mercer County Library Sys-
tem. Learn new ways to interact
with your child. Enjoy music and
movement. Adult supervision
required.
CALENDAR
CALENDAR
Continued from page 8
Alcoholics Anonymous
of South Jersey
(856) 486-4444
PSA
Narcotics Anonymous
of New Jersey
(800) 992-0401
PSA
NEED SUPPORT?
Compassionate
CounseIing and
Psychotherapy for
InfertiIity
Depression
Anxiety
Trauma
Post-Traumatic Stress
Chronic Pain
Grief & Loss
ReIationships
Major Life Transitions
Stress Management
Addiction & Recovery
The Foundation of Morris Hall/St. Lawrence Inc. PRESENTS
WITH SPECIAL GUESTS
JODI BENSON SAL VIVIANO
Saturday, September 29, 2012 8:00pm
Patriots Theater at the Trenton War Memorial
Tickets: $35-$85 Visit www.thewarmemorial.com or call 609-791-9451
Patron tickets, including a Champagne Reception with Peter Nero, Ms. Benson and Mr. Viviano
can be purchased by calling 609-896-9500, ext. 2215, or jmiller@slrc.org.
PROFESSIONAL WEBSITES.
PEASANT PRICES.
classified
T HE HO P E WE L L S U N
SEPTEMBER 19-25, 2012 PAGE 10
W H A T Y O U N E E D T O K N O W
All ads are based on a 5 line ad, 15-18 characters per line. Additional lines: $9, Bold/Reverse Type: $9 Add color to any box ad for $20. Deadline: Wednesday - 5pm for the following week.
All classified ads must be prepaid. Your Classified ad will run in all 10 of The Sun newspapers each week! Be sure to check your ad the first day it appears.
We will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, so call us immediately with any errors in your ad. No refunds are given, only advertising credit.
L I NE
ADS
Only
$
20per week
H O W T O C O N T A C T U S
Call us: 609-751-0245 or email us: classifieds@elauwitmedia.com
Hopewell Sun Lawrence Sun
Montgomery Sun Princeton Sun
Robbinsville Sun West Windsor Sun
BOX
ADS Only
$
25per week List a text-only ad for your yard
sale, job posting or merchandise.
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 9/30/12.
$1,000 OFF
UP TO
Any new
complete roofing
or siding job
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 9/30/12.
10% OFF
UP TO
Any
roofing
or siding job
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 9/30/12.
FREE
ROOF AND
GUTTER
INSPECTION
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 9/30/12.
FREE
GUT TERS
With any new roof
and siding job
Virtual Home
Remodeler
www.tricountyexteriors.com
609-882-S800
BOOF LBAHINO?
WE CAN REPAIR IT!
"We'llfixyourdripinjustonetrip!"
Lic.#13VH06774500
WE OFFER:
NewShingleRoofsSeamlessGutters Skylights
SidingSlateRoofRepairsRubberRoofs
Windows&DoorsCappingSoffits
Licensed Insured ResidentiaI & CommerciaI
FBBB BSTImATBSI
NO mONBY DOWN
0 FINANCINO
ASH FOB DBTAILS.
TBI-CO0NTY BNTBBIOBS
CIeaning
MiIa's CIeaning Service
Reliable, Affordable
Free estimates
Call Mila
609-620-0849
Email:
mila.iaskevich@gmail.com
Concrete Masonry
Swim Pool Closing
On|y $250
Since 1955 Only Pools
908-359-3000
Home Improvement
1oo pooped 1o scoop?
We provide weekly scooper service s1or1ing o1
$
I3/week
saving our planet, one pile at a time
856-665-6769
www.alldogspoop.com
GET $10.00 OFF YOUR FIRST SERVICE!
Locally owned and operated.
Pet Care
BIG BOYS INC
Nasoo - 8estorat|oo
8r|ck - Po|ot|og
Steps - Fo0odat|oo - 0h|moey
609-672-4145
Free st|mates
Roofing
CHECK OUT THE SUN CLASSIFIEDS!
ReaI Estate For Rent
FOR RENT
2 garages with loft & elec-
tricity
Skillman, NJ
1680 sq ft - $550/month
1280 sq ft - $350/month
Dave - (908) 305-6861
Prime Office Space for
Lease/Rent
Shoppes at Pennington
Best Location in Area
Suites from 100 to 1550 sq.
ft.
Complete Custom Fit out
Great Location- Great
Services
Currently under construc-
tion
Act now for best selection
Call Gene
609-731-4568
www.shoppesatpenning-
ton.com
Place your
classified today!
856-427-0933
Auto Services
* MD Mobile Windshield Repair *
Nationally Certified
Top Quality Lifetime Warranty
Repairs + Replacement
Contact & Inquiries:
609-462-3692
www.mdglassrepair.com
Call (609) 504-6732
or email
owner@marlenaagency.com
Excellent pedigree german
shepherd puppies for sale.
Also 1.5 year old
gold medalist male.
Pets For SaIe
Fall Clean Up
Snow Contracts
Full Line of Landscape Services
Fully Licensed & Insured
609-516-0259
Blue Garden Landscaping
20% OFF ANY COMPETITORS PRICE
Big FIREWOOD
De||ver & Dump
Sa|e $190
908-359-3000
Landscaping
THINK
ABOUT
IT
This space
could be yours!
Hmmmm
To advertise
call us at
856
427
0933.
CLASSIFIED SEPTEMBER 19-25, 2012 - THE HOPEWELL SUN 11
5700 ASBURY AVENUE
Deep "RARE" south-end corner on
40x100 lot. This 1st floor property
is located on a great block only
steps away from one of the finest
beaches in Ocean City. This prop-
erty features 4 LARGE bedrooms
and 2 full baths, central air, gas
heat, carport with parking for 6
cars, out-door shower, newer
roof, freshly painted cedar siding,
newer carpets, and much much
more. The exterior is profession-
ally landscaped. What a great in-
vestment opportunity! Sold
mostly furnished! Priced to sell!
Ocean City New Jerseys #1 Real Estate Team!
The Team You Can Trust!
Matt Bader
Cell 609-992-4380
Dale Collins
Cell 609-548-1539
Let the Bader-Collins Associates make all of your Ocean City
dreams come true! If you are thinking about BUYING, SELLING or
RENTING, contact us for exceptional service and professionalism.
3160 Asbury Avenue Ocean City, NJ 08226
Office: 609-399-0076 email: bca@bergerrealty.com
2 MONTHS FREE
OMEGA
SELF STORAGE
300 Lawrence Station Road
Lawrenceville, NJ 08648
609-584-1133

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