You are on page 1of 3

9/17/12

Cambrian Explosion dot com - The coming Permian Extinction in the dot com sector - Microcontent …

Tuesday, February 1, 2000 Cambrian Explosion dot com
The coming Permian Extinction in the dot com sector
by John Hiler I've been reading a book by Stuart Kauffman (Dartmouth '61) called At Home in the Universe. In this book, Kauffman applies the latest thinking in complexity theory to the subject of technology innovation. Specifically, Kauffman spends a great deal of time talking about a particular period of time called the "Cambrian Explosion". During this era, over half a billion years ago, multi­celled organisms first evolved, giving rise to thousands of new species in a short time as life began to fill the seas and replace simple single­celled organizations. In other words, Nature threw biological spaghetti against the wall and saw what stuck. The parallels with the Internet are quite striking. We'll let Kauffman describe the Cambrian Explosion in his own words:

"Soon after multicelled forms were invented, a grand burst of evolutionary novelty thrust itself outward. One almost gets the sense of multicellular life gleefully trying out all its possible ramifications, in a kind of wild dance of heedless exploration. As though filling in the Linnean chart from the top down, body plans rapidly spring into existence in a burst of experimentation, then diversify further. The major variations arise swiftly, founding phyla, followed by ever finer tinkerings to form the so­called lower taxa: the classes, orders, families, and genera. Later, after the initial burst, after the frenzied part, many of the initial forms became extinct, many of the new phyla failed, and life settled down to the dominant designs, the remaining 30 or so phyla, Vertebrates, Arthropods, and so forth, which captured and dominated the biosphere." ­ Stuart Kauffman, At Home in the Universe, p. 191. It's stunning how clearly the Cambrian Explosion maps onto innovation in Internet business models. In the Cambrian Explosion, we witnessed the birth of entirely new phylas of biological life, based on different principles like backbones (e.g. vertebrates) or jointed exoskeletons (e.g. insects). These were all totally new biological innovations. Similarly, Amazon, AOL, Yahoo, and eBay ­ as inevitable as they seem now ­ were all innovative business models when they first exploded out of their respective basements, garages and dorm rooms. The next generation of startups was filled with copycats ­ drugstore.com and Lycos come to mind ­ but also included brilliantly innovative phyla­class business models such as Hotmail, Priceline, and GeoCities. The Multicellular Revolution gets really interesting during the Permian Extinction that followed the Cambrian Explosion: "But in the Permian extinction some 245 million years ago, about 300 million years after the Cambrian, a very different progression unfolded. About 96 percent of all species became extinct, although members of all phyla and many lower taxa survived." ­ Stuart Kauffman, At Home in the Universe, p. 199. This provides a wonderful biological analogy to an inevitable rationalization in the dot com sector. Hundreds of million of years will be compressed into maybe four or five, as the Permian extinction starts hitting various Internet sectors in late 2000 and through the first two years of the millennium. There are several ways that we can predict when the Permian extinction is going to hit:
web.archive.org/web/20021002120042/http://www.microcontentnews.com/articles/cambrian.htm 1/3

9/17/12

Cambrian Explosion dot com - The coming Permian Extinction in the dot com sector - Microcontent …

1. The phyla­level innovation in business models will begin to slow­down as second and third­ generation businesses start to become refinements on old ideas rather than new ideas themselves. We believe that we're still in the Cambrian Explosion phase where phyla­level innovation continues as dot coms find new ways to both create value for their customers, and capture value from them. Prime examples include the reverse auction of a Priceline and the cooperative buying model of a Mercata. 2. When the IPO market dries up in certain sectors, under­capitalized companies that have yet to hit a successful revenue model will no longer be able to sustain their Cambrian­style experimentation. For this reason, we believe that the Permian Extinction will hit first in capital­ intensive sectors, such as B2C e­commerce etailers, that need large amounts of cash to build their business.  Kauffman also discusses the world after the Permian Extinction: "In the vast rebound of diversity that followed, very many new genera and many new families were founded, as was one new order. but no new classes or phyla were formed. The higher taxa filled in from the bottom up.. . . . The record seems to indicate that during postextinction rebounds most of the diversity arises rather rapidly and then slows." ­ Stuart Kauffman, At Home in the Universe, p. 200.
http://www.microcontentnews.com/articles/cambrian.htm Go AUG OCT APR Close 24 captures 2 Interestingly, Kauffman believes that a Permian Extinction doesn't spell the end of the road for 18 May 02 - 15 Jan 07 2001 2002 2003 innovation. Rather, innovation shifts from phyla­level innovation to innovation in the lower taxa. We're already starting to see this in some of the more mature Internet sub­sectors, such as Web Portals, B2C hard goods e­commerce, and free e­mail services that operate similar businesses, with a subtle twist differentiating them.

What does this all provide, beyond just a convenient metaphor and a biological reminder that the dot com revolution won't last forever? A couple of thoughts come to mind: 1. One thing is clear ­ if you sat down during the Cambrian Explosion and tried to make sense of all of the organisms that appeared, you would quickly succumb to information overload. The only recourse is to build a comprehensive framework to make sense of all of these data points, just as Linnean taxonomy provides a framework for classifying biological life. Of course, the Cambrian Explosion of the Internet is no different. Without a Linnean framework to categorize startups into appropriate categories, the stacks of dot­coms business plans on our desks will confuse and overwhelm us. To combat this problem, my brother and I have developed a set of Linnean­style taxonomies for e­commerce and New Media business models (see InternetVerticals.com). We've also created other frameworks focusing on how companies have evolved different mechanisms to create value for customers, as well as capture value from them. 2. A crucial feature of the multicellular Cambrian Explosion was phyla­level innovation in biological form. The equivalent in the Internet Cambrian Explosion is phyla­level innovation in business models, i.e. the different ways in which dot coms create and capture value. Watch this rate of innovation carefully ­ a slowing in the absolute increase in ideas may signal an upcoming Permian Extinction in that sector. The B2C e­commerce aggregator sector is a good example of this ­ the rate of innovation slowed down well in advance of the recent market chill. 3. Life doesn't end with a Permian Extinction. There will be lots of opportunity available after a consolidation ­ it will just be classes, order, or family­level tinkering, more at the margins than at the core. Private Equity investors in this phase should focus on companies offering incremental feature sets, or look for the next multicellular­level innovation to spark another Cambrian Explosion (next­generation nanotechnology, biogenetics, or artificial intelligence are all potential Cambrian triggers).
web.archive.org/web/20021002120042/http://www.microcontentnews.com/articles/cambrian.htm 2/3

9/17/12

Cambrian Explosion dot com - The coming Permian Extinction in the dot com sector - Microcontent …

As Observers and Players in the Internet industry, we're being afforded the opportunity to witness an Explosion compressed by a factor of well over 50 million times, as the three hundred million years of the Multicellular Cambrian Explosion are compressed into an Internet equivalent only four or five years in length. The trick will be to pick out the Internet versions of the winners of the last Explosion ­ the digital equivalents of phyla like Vertebrates and the Arthropods. If any of us can pick dot coms which do half as well as humans and spiders have done over the last half billion years, we'll be well positioned to survive the coming Permian Extinction.
Return to Articles

web.archive.org/web/20021002120042/http://www.microcontentnews.com/articles/cambrian.htm

3/3