You are on page 1of 4

9/17/12

Blogger's Digest - How Weblogs are becoming the new Reader's Digest - Microcontent News, a Co…
http://www.microcontentnews.com/articles/digests.htm 27 captures
12 Aug 02 - 9 Dec 06

Go

OCT

DEC

FEB Close Help

6
2001 2002 2004

 

SUBSCRIBE
Enter your e­mail address to receive Microcontent News!

SEARCH THE SITE

 

 

find it!

Subscribe!
powered by Bloglet

FEEDBACK

Tuesday, October 31, 2000 Blogger's Digest

I'd love to hear your thoughts. Drop me an email at john@corante.com!

ABOUT MICROCONTENT
This Corante Weblog covers the microcontent sector: weblogs, Webzines, email digests, and personal publishing.. as well as how weblogs combine to form the Blogosphere. I also cover the business side of microcontent, including text­ based microads and corporate blogging. For the back story of this magazine, there's more here

How Weblogs are becoming the new Reader's Digest by John Hiler My brother and I have a theory that everything has happened at least once before. Take this weblogs phenomena we've been focusing on recently. It all seems so New Economy that it could never have happened before... so much so that even I was amazed when we realized that it's all happened before. I was reading Starting and Running a Successful Newsletter or Magazine when I came across the following quote: In February 1922, DeWitt and Lila Wallace, both children of ministers, founded Reader's Digest. They started out with about $5,000 of borrowed money in a basement office under a Greenwich Village bar. They printed 5,000 copies of their first issue. Their idea was simply to give people something decent to read. DeWitt reasoned that people generally lack the time to search out and absorb the most interesting material from the thousands of magazines and newsletters available to them. He determined to sift out the best articles and then condense them for easy reading. He wrote this slogan: 'An article a day from leading magazines in condensed, permanent booklet form.' The idea holds up, even today. Some think it is well­suited for an electronic format, and Reader's Digest is about to give the Internet a try. Did you catch that? "People generally lack the time to search out and absorb the most interesting material from the thousands of magazines and newsletters available to them. [Reader's Digest] determined to sift out the best articles and then condense them for easy reading." Substitute "websites" for "magazines and newsletters" and "weblogs" for "Reader's Digest", and it becomes clear that Weblogs are an online reincarnation of the Digest format! Reader's Digest has been having trouble lately, so it might seem like the Digest format hasn't been successful. On the contrary, over the past eighty years, Reader's Digest has rode the Digest format to become the seventh biggest ARTICLE ARCHIVE

MICROCONTENT NEWS
Friday, December 6 The Art of Blogging ­ Part 2 Getting Started, How To, Tools, Resources
elearnspace

Wednesday, December 4 Conversations: Rolling a New Blog
Linux Journal

Livewire: Blogs may pierce the fogs of war
Reuters

Tuesday, December 3 Interview with Paul Bausch, Co­creator of Blogger and Co­ author of 'WeBlog'
kiruba.com

Monday, December 2 Cityblogs.com ­ Bringing the Power of Blogs to Local Event Listings
Cityblogs.com

Sunday, December 1 The Art of Blogging ­ Part 1 Overview, Definitions, Uses, and Implications
elearnspace

Friday, November 29 Linking, Thinking on AIDS Day
Wired News

Thursday, November 28 Telling All Online: It's a Man's World (Isn't It?)
New York Times

Friday, November 22 Remarks for a panel on weblogs and journalism at Revenge of the Blog, a conference organized by the Information Society Project at Yale Law School
lightningfield.com

web.archive.org/web/20021206231633/http://www.microcontentnews.com/articles/digests.htm

1/4

9/17/12

Blogger's Digest - How Weblogs are becoming the new Reader's Digest - Microcontent News, a Co…
magazine in the US: The Reader's Digest Association continues to employ thousands of people today. And their little magazine now has over 15 million paid subscribers in the U.S. and 28 million worldwide. It sells nearly a million copies of each issue on newsstands. The company went public in 1990. Revenues for the company were $3.1 billion dollars in 1995, and profits were around $80 million. The magazine accounts for only about 25% of the Reader's Digest company's overall revenues each year. The rest comes from a host of books, tapes and other products. To keep up with a changing audience, Reader's Digest is launching special issues aimed at selected audiences, reaching out to younger readers, and developing new ancillary products. I found the parallels between Blogs and Digest so striking that I did some further research into the history of Digests. The Encyclopædia Britannica had an excellent History of Publishing filled with historical information about Digest. The Britannica article blew my mind. Specifically, four points caught my attention: 1. The Digest form has a long history in the world of publishing. Reader's Digest wasn't just a fluke ­ it was the winner in a battle between publishers to dominate the Digest market. The forerunners [of Reader's Digest] in the United States were the Literary Digest (1890­1938), started by two former Lutheran ministers, Isaac K. Funk and Adam W. Wagnalls; the Review of Reviews (1890­ 1937), founded by Albert Shaw to condense material about world affairs; and Frank Munsey's Scrap Book (1906­12), "a granary for the gleanings of literature." The Literary Digest, in particular, with a circulation of more than 1,000,000 in the early 1920s, was something of an American institution. Both Blogs and Digest solve an age­old problem: helping consumers deal with information and content overload. 2. Digests wrestled with the copyright ownership of content creators  Reader's Digest struggled with copyright issues years before metasites like weblogs started pointing to content they didn't own: At first, permission to reprint was easy [for Reader's Digest] to obtain and was without charge; but after a while, and especially after competitors entered the field and sometimes

lightningfield.com

Thursday, November 21 From Weblog to Moblog
The Feature

Microcontent News

web.archive.org/web/20021206231633/http://www.microcontentnews.com/articles/digests.htm

2/4

9/17/12

Blogger's Digest - How Weblogs are becoming the new Reader's Digest - Microcontent News, a Co…
reprinted without permission, magazines began to regard the digests as parasitic. Payments were required, which rose steadily, and the major proprietors withheld their permission at various times.

The beauty of hypertext means that webloggers don't have to get copyright permissions just to point to an article. Plus, webloggers drive traffic to sites, which means that websites are more likely to be down with webloggers exploiting their content. Still, with sites like TicketMaster suing Tickets.com for linking to their pages, 'deep­linking' may not necessarily always be legal. This could become an issue for webloggers, as it was for Digests. 3. Reader's Digest built a 'formula' to serve as a filter for the artiles it chose to condense Reader's Digest had a very specific formula which they used to screen which articles they picked:
Each article [in Reader's Digest] ... satisfied three criteria: "applicability" (it had to be of concern to the average reader); "lasting interest" (it had to be readable a year later); and "constructiveness" (it had to be on the side of optimism and good works). Compare this formula to the one described by weblogger Rebecca Blood: Shortly after I began producing Rebecca's Pocket I noticed two side effects I had not expected. First, I discovered my own interests. I thought I knew what I was interested in, but after linking stories for a few months I could see that I was much more interested in science, archaeology, and issues of injustice than I had realized. More importantly, I began to value more highly my own point of view. In composing my link text every day I carefully considered my own opinions and ideas, and I began to feel that my perspective was unique and important. Rebecca built a formula for filtering news, just as Reader's Digest built a formula for filtering magazine articles. Most successful news blogs have a similarly distinctive formula. (We'll write more later on how you can define your own weblog formula). 4. Reader's Digest evolved from filtering content to creating it. This was the most fascinating insight for me. At first, Reader's Digest filtered the magazine articles out there... and then they actually started to create content:

web.archive.org/web/20021206231633/http://www.microcontentnews.com/articles/digests.htm

3/4

9/17/12

Blogger's Digest - How Weblogs are becoming the new Reader's Digest - Microcontent News, a Co…
Because articles of the sort [that Reader's Digest] wanted were in short supply, Wallace began to print original material in the Digest in 1933. To keep up the appearance of a digest, articles were commissioned and then offered to other magazines in exchange for the right to 'condense' and reprint them. Such articles, 'cooperatively planned' according to the Digest, 'planted' according to critics, were naturally welcome to many magazines with slender budgets, but they did lead to controversy. In 1944 The New Yorker, fearing that Reader's Digest was generating too big a fraction of magazine articles in the United States, attacked the system as 'a threat to the free flow of ideas and to the independent spirit. Right now, weblogs tend to point to other sites' content... but it could easily come to pass that bloggers start to increasnigly create their own content. Rather than be 'a threat to the free flow of ideas and to the independent spirit', an explosion in blog­driven content would achieve exactly the opposite! The Newsletter book closed its section on Reader's Digest with an analysis of the Digest market. It's clear the book's author doesn't see that the growth opportunity for Digests online lies in the Weblog market: Some Wall Street analysts argue that [Reader's Digest] has reached its limits and can't grow significantly in the future. Others argue just the opposite­­that the basic publishing premise is still viable, even more so for today's readers than for their grandparents. Time will tell.

Return to Articles

web.archive.org/web/20021206231633/http://www.microcontentnews.com/articles/digests.htm

4/4