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a weekly publication Volume 1 • Issue 32 realstorypublishing.com September 12, 2012
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TEXAS
at Tulane
at Alabama
TEXAS A&M
AUBURN
at Arkansas
at Georgia
VANDERBILT
at LSU
MISSISSIPPI STATE
Sept. 15
Sept. 22
Sept. 29
Oct. 6
Oct. 13
Oct. 27
Nov. 3
Nov. 10
Nov. 17
Nov. 24
Ole Miss Football 2012
Beware the Thumb
Let’s get this straight from the
beginning - this is not an article
condoning a frefghter making an
insensitive Facebook post. By this
time, most of Lowndes County is
aware that a frefghter has resigned
afer making a harsh comment on his
Facebook page about his displeasure
with a mother’s reaction on a call to
which the Columbus Fire Depart-
ment had responded. His post was
inappropriate and the three individu-
als who hit the “like” button did not
demonstrate the best judgment.
Tis is also not an article about
social media or the First Amend-
ment. Tese are important issues;
however, they will be addressed if and
when any of the three parties who
were severely disciplined take their
complaint to the city’s Civil Service
Commission and beyond.
No, this article is about the men
who meted out such severe punish-
ment and at what point the citizens of
Columbus must stand up to City Hall
and stop our local government from
being a joke. Because, right now, Co-
lumbus is being run by people who
have no clue how to govern. Te city
is being run by a mayor who knows
very little about governance and even
less about interpersonal skills.
By every indication, the vote was
tied three to three on the matter of
discipline, when moral giant and eth-
ics lover Robert Smith broke the tie
to save Columbus from its impending
Facebook apocalypse. Tat’s right,
boys and girls, a man who beat up a
council person while he was at work
made the decision to suspend some-
body for thirty days. Yes, a Facebook
“like” thumb-image has more impact
on an employee’s livelihood than a
person whipping somebody’s a@@
while they are at work. And make
no doubt about it, Robert Smith
whipped Kabir Karriem’s a@@ while
Smith was working. And his punish-
ment for said ofense....drum roll,
please......NOTHING!
Tat’s right, happy campers.
Robert Smith, afer running crazy
wild that day because he had blown
the handling of the “bridge to no-
where” announcement and was
embarrassed about his own ignorance
on the matter, made a series of calls
that day to other government ofcials
raising holy terror. Apparently, Kabir
Karriem did not like it and went to
address the issue.
Te rest is “beat down” history.
And let’s be blunt and pull up our
big boy underwear. Te only reason
Smith was able to get away with such
a vulgar ofense is that many people
in Columbus hate Karriem. Tere, it
has been said. It is out in the open. If
you’re going to whip some butt, do
it to someone a lot of people do not
like.
But, here is the most unfortunate
part. Robert took the silence as a sign
of weakness. He took the silence to
mean that the community was weak
and cowardly. And from that day
forward, he has run wild and is func-
tioning under “Robert’s law,” which is
no law at all.
He has intimidated every city
employee and department head to
kowtow before him. Campers, if you
think, for one moment, any of the
department heads are going to stand
up to him, you are insane. Tey fear
Robert Smith because they want their
jobs. And if you think Police Chief
McQueen or Fire Chief Moore are
going to stand up to Robert, guess
again. Tey also want to keep their
jobs.
And disregard what these two
gentlemen say in public; every city
employee knows that Robert Smith
rules the day and that each depart-
ment does what he says. And what
makes this worse is the city attor-
ney also bows to his will. Te city’s
last line of legal defense shot in the
backside because no one stands up
to Robert Smith. Not even the town’s
legal representative.
In the end, this has nothing to
do with social media. Tis is about
a mayor who wants to control every
department, especially the fre and
police departments. And Robert
Smith has as much business being in
charge of the police department as
the man in the moon.
To be honest, there is no one to
stop Smith’s agenda - except for the
only people who matter - the citizens.
It is now up to the community to
stop Smith’s desire to run the police
department. If they don’t, it is over.
Robert Smith is the Chief of Police.
It’s that plain and simple.
On Tuesday, Sept. 4, Charlie
Box, Bill Gavin and assault victim
Kabir Karriem understood what was
happening. Tey should be com-
mended. Unfortunately, Gene Taylor
and Fred Stewart vote the way Robert
Smith tells them. It is sad but true.
As for Joe Mickens, who knows what
he was thinking? Maybe a political
activist told him how to vote. Who
knows?
In the end, this is not about
Facebook. Tis is about a man who
beat a councilman up and then passes
judgment on others to punish them
and cost them their livelihood. It
would be funny if it weren’t true. A
bully rules the day and everyone who
works for the city is paralyzed with
fear. Te only people who can save
the day are the citizens. Heaven help
Columbus if they don’t stand up and
stop the madness.
Te title of this article should be
“Violent Bully Mayor Breaks Tie To
Punish Employees Over A Facebook
Post.”
But I don’t think many people
would hit the “like” button for that
one.
Joseph B. St. John



2

editor’snote
by Joseph B. St. John
Editor-in-Chief
Beware the Thumb
contributors
Joseph B. St. John is the Editor-in-Chief
and Publisher. You can reach him at
jbstjohn@realstorypublishing.com. He is
a man who understands that everything
that appears bad is not bad and every-
thing that appears good is not good.
Melinda Dufe is a certifed personal
trainer, with additional expertise in
nutrition counseling and life coaching as
well as a bachelor’s degree in business.  
E-mail reaches her at mvpft@yahoo.com 
Meagan M. O’Nan is a trained and ex-
perienced life coach, award-winning au-
thor of the book, “Creating Your Heaven
on Earth,” blogger, poet and supporter
of the underdog. She has a life coaching
practice in Columbus. Meaganonan.org
Clare Mallory, L.Ac., M.Ac., holds a
master’s degree in Acupuncture and
Oriental Medicine.  She is the owner of
North Mississippi Acupuncture in Co-
lumbus.  Visit her website at 
www.claremallory.com
Whit Harrington is a Marine Corps
veteran who has a bachelor’s degree in
English (creative writing) from Texas
State University. He enjoys reading and
has been a working drummer for the
past eight years.
Brenda Minor is the Sales Manager at
Te Real Story. Please contact her for
more information on ad rates and sales.
brenda@realstorypublishing.com S
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A Ladi e s’ Bout i que
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op!
66 Brickerton Street,
Columbus
(662) 243-2434
3265 McCullough Bl vd.,
Belden
(662) 842-5505
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contents
20
A Long Time Rebel Fan Ex-
periences First
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Faculty Exhibition At MUW
Opens Sept. 12
9
Palmer Home In Top 100
Non-Profts
11
Portrait of the Artist: Stepha-
nie Jackson
regular features
2 .................. Editor’s Note
4 ............................ Politics
6 ................... Ask Meagan
7 . Points For Your Health
9 ........... From the Citizen
10 ........... Financial Focus
11 ................. Perspectives
11 ... Portrait of the Artist
15 .... Culturally Speaking
16 ......................... Recipes
18 .................... Crossword
23 .................... Classifeds
About the Cover
real story reader
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Beware the Thumb!!!
Editor’s note by Joseph B. St. John
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EDITORIAL
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
JOSEPH B. ST. JOHN
stjohnjb@realstorypublishing.com
SPORTS WRITER
JEREMIAH SHORT
jshort@realstorypublishing.com
FEATURE COLUMNISTS
RON PARLATO
rparlato@realstorypublishing.com
KATE SPENCER
kate@realstorypublishing.com
MEAGAN M. O’NAN
meagan@realstorypublishing.com
EMILY GAITHER SMITH
emilygsmith@gmail.com
CLARE MALLORY
clare@realstorypublishing.com
MELINDA DUFFIE
melinda@realstorypublishing.com
WRITERS
WHIT HARRINGTON
PAIGE CANIDA-GREENE
ABIGAIL HATHORN
RYAN MUNSON
ABBY MALMSTROM
GUEST FEATURE WRITER
DICK MAHONEY
dmahoney@realstorypublishing.com
ART & PRODUCTION
ART/LAYOUT DIRECTOR
RENEE REEDY
renee@realstorypublishing.com
PHOTOGRAPHERS
MARTIN HOWARD
RICK MANNING
RENEE REEDY
ADVERTISING
SALES MANAGER
BRENDA MINOR
brenda@realstorypublishing.com
662.251.1839
HOLLY JETER
holly@realstorypublishing.com
662.570.8766
DISTRIBUTION & CUSTOMER SERVICE
AMELIA MCPHERSON
amelia@realstorypublishing.com
PUBLIC AFFAIRS &
COMMUNITY RELATIONS
KATE SPENCER
Kate@realstorypublishing.com
Events@realstorypublishing.com
Classifdes@realstorypublishing.com
662-352-6091
PUBLISHER
JOSEPH B. ST. JOHN
CONTACT US:
ads@realstorypublishing.com
info@realstorypublishing.com
letters@realstorypublishing.com
classifeds@realstorypublishing.com
subscriptions@realstorypublishing.com
THE REAL STORY
P. O. Box 403
Columbus, MS 39703
Editorial 662.497.2914
Advertising 662.251.1839
Check for daily updates online:
http://realstorypublishing.com
Facebook.com/rspublishing
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4
politics
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During their Sept. 4 meeting, the
Lowndes County Board of Supervi-
sors was faced with a dispute over
heightened real and personal prop-
erty taxes on low-income housing.
Among others, part-owner of Colum-
bus Heights and Hargrove Estates,
Lewis Journey, complained about the
sudden tax increase on his properties
and questioned the legality of Sec-
tion 42, which is a federal program
that gives tax breaks to low-income
properties.
Te Columbus Heights devel-
opment previously paid $45,000;
their tax bill has now increased to
$105,056. On the issue of the newly
constructed Hargrove Estates, Tax
Assessor Greg Andrews rhetorically
asked, “How do you base income on a
three-month-old property?” referring
to the county making its tax evalua-
tion over the course of a year.
Te taxes assessments for the
properties, Columbus Heights and
Hargrove Estates, have been elevated
due to the dispute over whether or
not tax credits should be considered
income. According to Andrews, the
county, by law, bases its tax costs from
income gained by property. When
the developers of Columbus Heights
and Hargrove Estates turned in their
yearly numbers, they were not includ-
ing their tax cuts, which resulted in
the enormous boost in taxes once the
county realized the situation.
“Te Constitution says everyone
should be taxed equally. If you have
a home that costs $145,000, they’ve
[Columbus Heights and Hargrove
Estates low income housing] only
been paying about $500 per house,
where as an average homeowner is
paying $1,873 for their house. Does
that sound fair?” asked Andrews.
Te question is, are the tax
breaks reportable or does the federal
government not require reporting
of the tax breaks as part of the total
income?
Lowndes County Board of
Supervisors President Harry Sand-
ers commented, “Let’s let the courts
decide. We can’t be responsible for
bad investments.” With that com-
ment, discussion on the matter came
to an end.
Also on the agenda was a pre-
sentation by District Administrator
Karen McPherson of the State De-
partment of Health. Joining her were
Dr. Robert Curry, Nurse Manager
Rochelle Lee and Director of Ofce
Management Phyllis Welch.
McPherson asked about the fs-
cal year budget for 2013. “Our operat-
ing budget is $1.2 million and our
request for county appropriations is
$130,538. Tis represents the $84,000
in utilities. Te staf has made a lot
of efort in reducing costs by saving
on energy. Unfortunately, Lowndes
County remains the second-lowest
county in the state for funding par-
ticipation.”
Board President Harry Sanders
interjected, “Te only thing that we’re
required to do is furnish the ofce
with supplies. Is that right?”
“We’re not exactly sure what’s
required, except for building main-
tenance and upkeep. So this is our
request and I guess the law can be
interpreted diferently,” answered
McPherson.
“It [the law] says the Board of
Supervisors shall be authorized to pay
salaries, but it does not say we have to
do it. I just want to make that clear,”
stated Sanders.
Te State Department of Health
was in jeopardy of losing $9 million
in support from the state legislature,
due in part to the fact that many of
the new legislators are unfamiliar
with public health issues, which
include licensing inspected day
care facilities, hospitals, and nurs-
ing homes; restaurant inspections;
disease management, including polio,
mumps, measles, and whooping
cough; individual sewage systems;
and pandemic outbreaks.
“Regardless of economic status
to anyone, we provide services to all
citizens,” commented McPherson.
“Te support that we have been get-
ting from the legislature is per-capita
and is $8.72 per person to support
our eforts. In a comparison of four
neighboring states, Alabama ranked
at number eight, providing $70.19
per person; Arkansas ranked twelfh,
in providing $51.37 per person;
Louisiana ranked 14, at $49.70 per
person and Tennessee ranked at 17,
with $43.07 per person. We’re still far
behind other states and we do just
as much work as our neighboring
states.”
Te board tabled McPherson’s
request, which was for $130,538,
with Sanders stating, “We’ll take that
under advisement.”
Lowndes County Supervisors Address Tax, Health
Department Issues (Or Not)
By Whit Harrington
Te State Depart-
ment of Health was
in jeopardy of losing
$9 million in sup-
port from the state
legislature, due in
part to the fact that
many of the new
legislators are unfa-
miliar with public
health issues...
EDITORIAL
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
JOSEPH B. ST. JOHN
stjohnjb@realstorypublishing.com
SPORTS WRITER
JEREMIAH SHORT
jshort@realstorypublishing.com
FEATURE COLUMNISTS
RON PARLATO
rparlato@realstorypublishing.com
KATE SPENCER
kate@realstorypublishing.com
MEAGAN M. O’NAN
meagan@realstorypublishing.com
EMILY GAITHER SMITH
emilygsmith@gmail.com
CLARE MALLORY
clare@realstorypublishing.com
MELINDA DUFFIE
melinda@realstorypublishing.com
WRITERS
WHIT HARRINGTON
PAIGE CANIDA-GREENE
ABIGAIL HATHORN
RYAN MUNSON
ABBY MALMSTROM
GUEST FEATURE WRITER
DICK MAHONEY
dmahoney@realstorypublishing.com
ART & PRODUCTION
ART/LAYOUT DIRECTOR
RENEE REEDY
renee@realstorypublishing.com
PHOTOGRAPHERS
MARTIN HOWARD
RICK MANNING
RENEE REEDY
ADVERTISING
SALES MANAGER
BRENDA MINOR
brenda@realstorypublishing.com
662.251.1839
HOLLY JETER
holly@realstorypublishing.com
662.570.8766
DISTRIBUTION & CUSTOMER SERVICE
AMELIA MCPHERSON
amelia@realstorypublishing.com
PUBLIC AFFAIRS &
COMMUNITY RELATIONS
KATE SPENCER
Kate@realstorypublishing.com
Events@realstorypublishing.com
Classifdes@realstorypublishing.com
662-352-6091
PUBLISHER
JOSEPH B. ST. JOHN
CONTACT US:
ads@realstorypublishing.com
info@realstorypublishing.com
letters@realstorypublishing.com
classifeds@realstorypublishing.com
subscriptions@realstorypublishing.com
THE REAL STORY
P. O. Box 403
Columbus, MS 39703
Editorial 662.497.2914
Advertising 662.251.1839
Check for daily updates online:
http://realstorypublishing.com
Facebook.com/rspublishing
__________
Don’t miss an issue!
SUBSCRIBE TODAY!
$19.95 for 6 Months
$34.95 for 12 Months
Don’t Miss An Issue...
4
politics
S
e
p
t
e
m
b
e
r

1
2
,

2
0
1
2



a

w
e
e
k
l
y

p
u
b
l
i
c
a
t
i
o
n
During their Sept. 4 meeting, the
Lowndes County Board of Supervi-
sors was faced with a dispute over
heightened real and personal prop-
erty taxes on low-income housing.
Among others, part-owner of Colum-
bus Heights and Hargrove Estates,
Lewis Journey, complained about the
sudden tax increase on his properties
and questioned the legality of Sec-
tion 42, which is a federal program
that gives tax breaks to low-income
properties.
Te Columbus Heights devel-
opment previously paid $45,000;
their tax bill has now increased to
$105,056. On the issue of the newly
constructed Hargrove Estates, Tax
Assessor Greg Andrews rhetorically
asked, “How do you base income on a
three-month-old property?” referring
to the county making its tax evalua-
tion over the course of a year.
Te taxes assessments for the
properties, Columbus Heights and
Hargrove Estates, have been elevated
due to the dispute over whether or
not tax credits should be considered
income. According to Andrews, the
county, by law, bases its tax costs from
income gained by property. When
the developers of Columbus Heights
and Hargrove Estates turned in their
yearly numbers, they were not includ-
ing their tax cuts, which resulted in
the enormous boost in taxes once the
county realized the situation.
“Te Constitution says everyone
should be taxed equally. If you have
a home that costs $145,000, they’ve
[Columbus Heights and Hargrove
Estates low income housing] only
been paying about $500 per house,
where as an average homeowner is
paying $1,873 for their house. Does
that sound fair?” asked Andrews.
Te question is, are the tax
breaks reportable or does the federal
government not require reporting
of the tax breaks as part of the total
income?
Lowndes County Board of
Supervisors President Harry Sand-
ers commented, “Let’s let the courts
decide. We can’t be responsible for
bad investments.” With that com-
ment, discussion on the matter came
to an end.
Also on the agenda was a pre-
sentation by District Administrator
Karen McPherson of the State De-
partment of Health. Joining her were
Dr. Robert Curry, Nurse Manager
Rochelle Lee and Director of Ofce
Management Phyllis Welch.
McPherson asked about the fs-
cal year budget for 2013. “Our operat-
ing budget is $1.2 million and our
request for county appropriations is
$130,538. Tis represents the $84,000
in utilities. Te staf has made a lot
of efort in reducing costs by saving
on energy. Unfortunately, Lowndes
County remains the second-lowest
county in the state for funding par-
ticipation.”
Board President Harry Sanders
interjected, “Te only thing that we’re
required to do is furnish the ofce
with supplies. Is that right?”
“We’re not exactly sure what’s
required, except for building main-
tenance and upkeep. So this is our
request and I guess the law can be
interpreted diferently,” answered
McPherson.
“It [the law] says the Board of
Supervisors shall be authorized to pay
salaries, but it does not say we have to
do it. I just want to make that clear,”
stated Sanders.
Te State Department of Health
was in jeopardy of losing $9 million
in support from the state legislature,
due in part to the fact that many of
the new legislators are unfamiliar
with public health issues, which
include licensing inspected day
care facilities, hospitals, and nurs-
ing homes; restaurant inspections;
disease management, including polio,
mumps, measles, and whooping
cough; individual sewage systems;
and pandemic outbreaks.
“Regardless of economic status
to anyone, we provide services to all
citizens,” commented McPherson.
“Te support that we have been get-
ting from the legislature is per-capita
and is $8.72 per person to support
our eforts. In a comparison of four
neighboring states, Alabama ranked
at number eight, providing $70.19
per person; Arkansas ranked twelfh,
in providing $51.37 per person;
Louisiana ranked 14, at $49.70 per
person and Tennessee ranked at 17,
with $43.07 per person. We’re still far
behind other states and we do just
as much work as our neighboring
states.”
Te board tabled McPherson’s
request, which was for $130,538,
with Sanders stating, “We’ll take that
under advisement.”
Lowndes County Supervisors Address Tax, Health
Department Issues (Or Not)
By Whit Harrington
Te State Depart-
ment of Health was
in jeopardy of losing
$9 million in sup-
port from the state
legislature, due in
part to the fact that
many of the new
legislators are unfa-
miliar with public
health issues...
5

politics
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In an uncharacteristically short
and relatively uneventful session,
the Columbus City Council met on
Tursday, Sept. 6 and to fnalize the
city’s Fiscal Year 2012-2013 Budget
and to set millage rates.
Te council did both, but not
before citizen Leon Speck stood be-
fore the assembled Councilmen and
Mayor to urge them not to dip into
the city’s $2.2 million cash reserves.
“Sooner or later, you are going to
have to raise the mills. I understand
that it’s an election year, but everyone
could bite the bullet.”
Ignoring Speck’s advice, the
Council instead voted to dip into the
reserves, in the amount of $326,115.
Te Council also voted to set
the millage rate for the coming year
at 40.13. Te Columbus Municipal
School Board had previously voted to
set their millage rate at 65.87, mean-
ing city residents will pay a total of
106 mills.
Council Approves Millage Rate, Dips
Into Cash Reserves
The Real Story Staff Report
Need For New Radio System Dominates Monroe County Supervisors Meeting
Issues with the radio system
used by the Monroe County Sherif’s
Department were the primary topic
of discussion at the Monroe County
Board of Supervisors meeting on
Friday, September 7, 2012.
Jim McCreary of Precision
Communications in Tupelo made
a presentation at the meeting. “Te
Sherif [Cecil Cantrell] set up a meet-
ing yesterday and talked about some
of the trouble spots and made some
changes to the system and the log
refected about six or seven incidents,
mainly with handhelds, and part of it
was in the Hamilton area at the south
tower,” began McCreary. “Te tower
covers a large area and what we’re go-
ing to do is put a diferent type of an-
tennae that has a wider beam width. I
think it’s shooting over the Hamilton
area, so we’re going to come lower
on the tower with the wide beam.
In my multiple communications
with Hytera, the [communications]
company, they realize that they’ve
had some frmware and sofware
issues. I’ve explained to them the
amount of problems we’ve had in the
county and they’ve ofered to donate
to the county ten mobile units and
ten handheld units to compensate.
Tey’re trying to get everyone from
analog to digital because they feel
like that’s part of the complication,”
fnished McCreary.
“All I care about is having a
radio that the deputies are safe with,”
commented Sherif Cecil Cantrell.
“I just want the deputies, when they
key up and they need help, that
somebody is here, because we don’t
have two people in cars. We have
one person. It’s a huge county and
we’ve got to be able to talk. Tat’s the
ofcers’ lifeline. Mr. Jim [McCreary]
has made a valiant efort to correct
the problems. Te only other thing
that concerns me is if we get back
to talking, and then we get back in
this mode, we’re going to be paying
Mr. Jim a lot of money to work on
our radios. People are looking to me
for answers and I don’t have all the
answers,” said Cantrell.
“Do you think he has the right
plan?” asked District 5 Supervisor
Robert Tomey.
“I think we’re moving in a posi-
tive direction,” responded Cantrell.
Te board then focused its time
on a quick approval of the items
regarding the budget, and handled
every matter on the agenda without
delay.
By Whit Harrington
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6

thewholeperson
Dear Meagan,
I started my own small business
about seven years ago. I have been
blessed to have had great success with
my product over the years. In the last
several years, business has decreased
and I am not sure how to get back
on top again. I just feel like I am in a
slump and need some tips on how to
move my business forward. Do you
have any ideas on what works in this
economy?
Sincerely,
Small Business Owner
Dear Small Business Owner,
Good for you and your success
over the years! Maintaining a suc-
cessful business is a challenge, but a
rewarding one. Take a look at what
your idea of success is now versus
what it was when you began your
business. As we change and grow
older, so do our ideas about success
and what we want out of life. Also,
consider letting go of the idea that the
economy is bad. If you feed what you
hear, you will create more of it. Lack
creates lack. Abundant thinking cre-
ates an abundant life, and abundance
is an extension of your daily choices.
As I have developed my own
business over the years, I feel like I
fnally stumbled upon a formula that
works for my own success and one
that can work for anyone who is will-
ing to give it a shot. Consider these
tips:
1. Passion – make sure you are
still passionate about your services
and your products. If you can’t stand
behind what you are doing 100%,
then fnd ways to make it work for
you again.
2. Balance – check out the
other areas of your life (relationships,
fnances, spiritual life, health, etc.)
and decide if each of those areas is
up to par with what you want them
to be. Get clear about what you want
outside of work and make it happen.
Doing your job and taking control of
your life is how success will develop
again for you.
3. Clarity – get very clear about
your goals for your business and your
ideal schedule. Do not make new
goals until your current goals are met.
Reach higher once you have met your
mark. Satisfaction from achieving a
goal can go a long way. Make deci-
sions that are in alignment with your
goals and stick to your schedule as
much as possible.
4. Breathe – take some time
of each week to give yourself some
breathing space. Incorporate a daily
spiritual practice that leaves you feel-
ing like anything is possible. Taking
time for you is the most important
thing when it comes to your success.
5. Adjust – life changes quickly,
and you have to be willing to change
with it. Adjusting your schedule and
moving with life is so important to
reaching your goals. What you want
and when you want it will change
as time goes on. Checking in with
yourself and your family to commu-
nicate is what will help you maintain
success.
No matter what else you do,
stay true to who you are in all of your
decisions and be sure that you want
to be where you are spending your
time. When we are not true with what
our heart wants, then it is easy to lose
track, get out of shape, and lose hope
in what is possible. Tere is a world of
possibilities out there, so do whatever
it takes to stay in an abundant frame
of mind. It’s worth it, and so are you.
Meagan O’Nan
How to Run a Successful Business
By Meagan O’Nan
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TN Williams Streetcar 5K
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One of the biggest things I do
for my patients (beyond acupuncture
itself, of course) is to help them un-
derstand how the food they eat afects
their health and how they feel.
Most people “know” that sugar
is “bad” for them, but very few people
really understand the full toll that
processed (white) sugar takes on the
body. It goes far, far beyond just mak-
ing a person overweight or “hyper.”
Consider the following:
• Immune Function: Te impact
sugar has on the immune system
is immediate and sustained; it far
outweighs any beneft than can be
achieved by using hand sanitizer.
• Organ, Bone and Digestive
Health: Te acid pH that sugar fosters
puts organs and bones at risk, as well
as creates a welcoming environment
for parasites.
• Arteries and Cholesterol: Sugar
damages arteries, leaving them in
need of the cholesterol that will patch
the original source of damage (sugar).
• Asthma: Asthma is aggravated
by sugar intake (intestinal imperme-
ability and infammation are ofen
implicated, and both are exacerbated
by sugar).
• Mood and Learning Ability:
Mood and learning are directly af-
fected by sugar because of the burden
the liver sustains in dealing with
sugar, which makes it less available to
produce the precursor amino acids
for neurotransmitter synthesis.
• Hormones: Te whole endo-
crine system takes a hit when insulin
spikes (from sugar), as it can disrupt
every other hormone in the body.
• Stress and Anxiety: Stress and
anxiety are notably increased by sugar
consumption because they cannot
be adequately governed by disrupted
hormones.
• Skin: Sugar causes wrinkles
by interfering with collagen produc-
tion and causing oxidation and free
radicals, which accelerate aging in all
cells.
• Weight Gain and all the dis-
orders associated with it: Tis needs
no explanation, as we are all aware
of sugar’s efect on weight. What we
should pay attention to on this point,
however, is all the conditions that
crop up as a result of the weight gain
- cardiovascular, neurologic, endo-
crinologic, emotional, behavioral,
reproductive, etc. Te list is long.
Sugar is a toxin, plain and
simple. It is not necessary for human
physiology and is highly addictive.
In my personal opinion, it should be
regulated in the same way alcohol is
regulated; we feed it liberally to our
kids (sugar is a “hidden” ingredient in
more foods than you would expect;
read labels for a week, and you will be
surprised) and then wonder why we
sufer as
adults.
As
scrump-
tious an
energy
boost as
it is, it takes a brutal toll on the body,
one that underlies many of our cur-
rent epidemics.
Whether you eat a lot of sugar
or just a little, please consider cut-
ting down on it - or substituting with
a healthy sugar alternative (which
means stevia or xylitol; not aspar-
tame, not Splenda and not saccha-
rin!). Any small adjustment you make
will put you on the path to better
health.
Remember - taking charge of
your health now will save you a ton of
time, money and misery in the long
run!
A Spoonful of Sugar
By Clare Mallory

thewholeperson
points for
your health
Senior News Line
By Matilda Charles
S
E
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N
E
WS
One of the best things you can
leave future generations of your fam-
ily is accurate genealogy information.
Creating a family tree isn’t as
difcult as it may sound. Start with
yourself, your siblings and your par-
ents. Accurate date and place of birth
information is crucial to any future
hunts. Go back as many generations
as you can, at least giving names if
you can’t also supply dates and place
of birth.
Write down stories about your
family members (this will also jog
your own memory of facts about the
past.) If there are “rumors,” make
notes of those as well. Even if you
can’t verify whether your mother’s
grandfather was a train engineer,
someone else might be able to at a
later date.
If you have a computer and are
comfortable roaming the Internet,
Ancestry.com is one of the best places
to start. On Ancestry, you can not
only research your family, but you
can create a family tree to save. Te
amount of information available is
amazing: old military records, city di-
rectories, birth and death certifcates,
photos uploaded by others, Census
through 1940 and so much more.
Tere is a fee to subscribe to Ances-
try, but if you join for six months and
do a little every week, you should
fnish in that time.
On Family Search (familysearch.
org) you will likely fnd information
that you can’t fnd anywhere else
(for example, some of it goes back
as far as Europe), but you have to be
careful. Use Family Search as a hunt-
ing ground and verify information
elsewhere.
If you’ve never done genealogy,
consider taking a class to get started.
Tis might be a good winter project,
with the end result benefting your
family for generations to come.
Matilda Charles regrets that
she cannot personally answer reader
questions, but will incorporate them
into her column whenever possible.
Write to her in care of King Features
Weekly Service, P.O. Box 536475, Or-
lando, FL 32853-6475, or send e-mail
to columnreply@gmail.com.
(c) 2012 King Features Synd., Inc.
Your Family Tree
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Fax: 662-327-0311
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8

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Te 2012 Faculty Exhibition
at Mississippi University for Wom-
en will open Wednesday, Sept. 12,
in the Eugenia Summer Gallery.
Te show, which will feature
the work of two new instructors,
as well as some surprises from
senior faculty members, runs
through Tursday, Oct. 4. Te
opening reception is Tursday,
Sept. 13, 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.
Artists include Ian Childers,
S.L. Dickey, Robert Gibson, Andy
Snyder, Alexander Stelioes-Wills
and Li Zheng.
Childers has been a profes-
sor of ceramics for one year at
MUW, and this will be
his frst faculty show. He
is including a range of
work created over the
past several years. His
ceramic vessels are ofen
elegant shaped, ampho-
ra-like bottle forms with
exaggeratedly thin necks.
Childers uses crystalline
glazes that create incredi-
bly smooth and refective
surfaces with intricate
crystal structure patterns
embedded in the glaze.
Te crystals spontane-
ously appear and grow
on the surface of the
vessel during the fring.
He also plans on showing
pieces representing his
installation pieces with
his slip-cast skull series, which
refect his interests and roots in
tattoo and grafti art. Childers will
conduct a Gallery Talk on Tues-
day, Oct. 2 at 12:10 p.m. in the
Eugenia Summer Gallery.
Dickey, who graduated from
MUW in 1990, will show a very
diferent kind of screen print, us-
ing the four color printing process
instead of spot color printing. In
spot color screen printing, each
color is a separate mixed ink, each
ink is fat and opaque and the
inks are printed in layers. In four
color process screen printing, all
the colors are created by combi-
nation of yellow, cyan, magenta
and black. Te challenge with this
process is getting the right balance
between transparency and opacity.
Te theme of the prints is “Trailer
Park Apocalypse,” which contrasts
mostly vintage images of trailers,
trailer parks and residents with
appropriations of renaissance and
baroque paintings of the end of
the world.
Gibson is once again showing
a large variety of works, but this
year he is putting special empha-
sis on watercolor paintings. Some
of the watercolors will be long
horizontal landscapes, memories
of Tennessee, which create deep
space with sparing, simple means.
He is also continuing the river
stone series that he exhibited at
the last faculty show. Like the last
showing of these works, the stones
are viewed from above, arranged
naturally and each painting is
based on a particular scriptural
passage. One of the major difer-
ences of these river stones paint-
ings is that in this year’s body of
work, each arrangement of stones
is based in part on the human
fgure. Professor Gibson is also
showing a continuation of mixed
media pieces, metal working and
jewelry.
Snyder is the new adjunct fac-
ulty member in photography and
foundations. He will show photo-
graphs from his graduate thesis,
which will include large school
photo prints created through grid
tiling of Polaroid
transfers, the process
of removing a Pola-
roid image from its
packaging and trans-
ferring it onto paper.
Te transfer process
alters the edge of the
image, sometimes
distorts the image
and ofen changes
the brightness and
intensity of the im-
age. Te 2009 MUW
graduate will present
an Artist Talk about
his work on Mon-
day, Sept. 17 in the
Stringer Auditorium
at 12:10 p.m.
Zheng is the
new graphic design
faculty member. She will exhibit
works mostly from her graduate
thesis, including website work and
handmade books. Zheng com-
pleted her master of fne arts in
graphic design from the Minneap-
olis College of Art and Design. She
has participated in various exhibi-
tions and received many awards,
including an honorable men-
tion in the 2011 Adobe Design
Achievement Award, a national
competition held in California.
Zheng’s Artist Talk will take place
on Tuesday, Sept. 25 at 12:10 p.m.
in the Stringer Auditorium.
Stelioes-Wills is showing
works that appeared in his solo
exhibition in Meridian last year.
He also is showing one large work,
a grid of 256 small paintings
(each 4”x4”), that was created this
past summer. Te grid will be a
large Sudoku board, a continua-
tion of work from the last faculty
show where he exhibited four 9x9
Sudoku boards made of 2” paint-
ings. In these visual versions of
Sudoku, the numerals are replaced
with a representation (usually
of a singular object); the blanks
are replaced with non-objective
paintings. In the 16x16 puzzle, the
theme of the work is David Foster
Wallace’s novel “Infnite Jest.” All
of the representations come out
of the themes and settings of the
novel that covers topics including
tennis academies, experimental
flm making, drug addiction, radio
rehab and espionage.
“Te Faculty Exhibition is an
extremely important institution; it
is part of our teaching mission and
part of our outreach missions. Te
exhibitions support our teaching
by creating authority, explain-
ing our biases and demonstrating
our aesthetics and values,” said
Stelioes-Wills, gallery director.
“Tese exhibitions also help with
departmental and gallery out-
reach. Many community people
come to the faculty show and it
helps demonstrate the level of
excellence practiced in the depart-
ment and at MUW in general.”
Te Eugenia Summer Gallery
is located on the southwest corner
of the MUW campus, directly east
of the Stark Recreation Center.
Te gallery is open 10 a.m. to 4
p.m., Monday through Friday.
Special To The Real Story
Faculty Exhibition At MUW Opens Sept. 12
MUW art faculty include Andy Snyder, seated from lef,
Dr. Beverly Joyce, Li Zheng and Alexander Stelioes-Wills;
standing, Robert Gibson, S.L. Dickey and Ian Childers.
(Photo by Chris Jenkins/MUW Ofce of Public Afairs)
First Responders Recognized
On Friday, Sept. 7, local frst
responders were recognized, in a
program held at the James Trot-
ter Convention Center, for their
brave and selfess eforts to keep
the citizens of the community
safe.
9

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Te Real Story would like to
ofer their condolences to Caledo-
nia Alderman Steve Honnoll on
the death of his mother, Lois. It is
times like these when we all must
pause and remember that all of us
share the same humanity.
May the peace of God be with
Steve and his family during these
troubling times.
The Real Story Ofers Their Condolences
to Caledonia Alderman Steve Honnoll
Joseph B. St. John
In honor of their 100th Anni-
versary celebration, Liberty Mutual
Insurance selected Palmer Home for
Children as one of the top 100 non-
profts supported by Liberty Mutual
employees. As part of their 100th An-
niversary celebration, Liberty Mutual
Insurance created the “100 Gifs” pro-
gram to commemorate the company’s
long-standing tradition of supporting
communities in the United States and
around the globe where their employ-
ees live and work.
Palmer Home President & CEO
Drake Bassett was on-hand to receive
the $10,000 award. “It is a privilege
to be recognized by employees of
one of the great companies in the
United States. We appreciate the col-
laboration between
business and non-
profts, and we will
quickly put these
funds to use.”
Since 1895,
Palmer Home for
Children has been a
leader in residential
child care with a
mission to provide
long-term care for
children who lack
an adequate fam-
ily structure. Based
in Columbus, MS,
Palmer Home is a
privately funded 501 (c) (3) public
charity. For more information, please
visit our website at www.palmer-
home.org.
Palmer Home In Top 100 Non-Profts
Special To The Real Story
Kenny Edwards, MD, an ortho-
pedic surgeon, has joined the medical
staf at Baptist Memorial Hospital-
Golden Triangle. He began his duties
on Aug. 8. He will be in practice at
Columbus Orthopaedic Clinic, 670
Leigh Drive, Columbus.
Originally from Crawford, Miss.,
Dr. Edwards completed medical
school and his surgical residency in
orthopaedics at Wright State Univer-
sity in Dayton, Ohio. Dr. Edwards
completed an accredited long-term
fellowship in spinal reconstruction
surgery at the Texas Back Institute in
Dallas Texas. He specializes in treat-
ing pain and disorders of the cervi-
cal, thoracic and lumbar spine. Dr.
Edwards has experience in perform-
ing artifcial disc replacement of the
neck and back, complex reconstruc-
tion, scoliosis correction, minimally
invasive spine surgery and operative
and non-operative management of
high-level traumatic spinal injuries.
“We are proud to have an
orthopedic spine surgeon of Dr.
Edwards’ caliber join our staf,” said
Baptist Golden Triangle Administra-
tor Paul Cade. “We are always excited
when a local physician decides to
return home to locate his practice,”
Cade added.
Orthopedic Spine Surgeon Joins Staf
At Baptist Golden Triangle
Special To The Real Story

fromthecitizen
Afer reading an article about
one of our faithful fremen, Brad
Alexander, in the Commercial
Dispatch’s 5 Sept. issue, I was totally
fabbergasted. What in the world is
wrong with our city’s leaders? How
can something as minor as a post on
a person’s Facebook wall need to be
handled by the Mayor/City Coun-
cil?   Does exercising one’s freedom
of speech justify forcing a 12-year
veteran of our Fire Department to re-
sign? No way! Tat’s way over the top.
   It gets worse. As I read yester-
day’s (6 Sept.) Opinion page article
proclaiming that the “punishment
doesn’t ft the crime,” my chin hit the
foor again. Our Police Chief and Fire
Chief actually recommended to the
Mayor/Council that one police ofcer
and two fremen be given a 30-day
suspension just for clicking on “like”
to the comments made by Mr. Alex-
ander. I think this whole thing should
have been resolved within the PD
and FD. I could not believe it got to
the Mayor/Council and they actually
went ahead and took action against
the three men. A letter of counseling
would have been sufcient from an
immediate supervisor and or Chief.
It should not have been a matter for
the Mayor/Council; they are mak-
ing a  laughingstock of themselves
(the  Mayor and the Councilmen
who voted for the punishment). It
doesn’t make the Chief of Police and
Fire Chief look too good either. If the
comment on Facebook was inappro-
priate it should have been dealt with
at the lowest level of management
and then just “delete the comments.”
It’s that easy. 
 Furthermore, the mayor was
given way less punishment for
fghting with a councilman on City
property while on duty. Why in the
world would he break a tie in favor of
this punishment knowing he actu-
ally deserved more for his ofense
with the councilman? I do give
credit to the three councilmen who
showed mature judgment in vot-
ing against the recommendations. I
don’t know Mickens and Taylor, but
I thought Fred Stewart was wiser
than this; what a big disappointment
he’s turned out to be - along with the
mayor. Te mayor should have told
Moore and McQueen to just “handle
it, handle it,” especially since there’s
not a standard operating policy about
the use of  Facebook and Twitter. Tat
standard should come down from the
top don’t you think?
  Tis should never have hap-
pened. I’m glad we have an election
coming up right around the corner. I
think there are three councilmen and
a Mayor who need to be replaced for
stunts like this, especially if they don’t
do some backtracking on this entire
matter. Don’t you agree?
Raymond Gross
At approximately noon on Tues-
day, Sept. 4, the Mississippi Univer-
sity for Women Police Department
was informed by a currently enrolled
student that on Aug. 16 she was the
victim of a sexual assault by a male
acquaintance. Te alleged assault
occurred in an on-campus residence
hall, although the acquaintance is not
a student.
Te investigation is active and
ongoing.
Students are reminded to ensure
personal safety by being conscious
of their surroundings, never walking
alone at night - if possible, trusting
their instincts, and reporting suspi-
cious activity to MUW Police.
To report an incident to the
campus police department, call 662-
241-7777. To report an emergency,
call 911.
MUW Announces On-campus Incident,
Issues Reminder To Students
Special To The Real Story
Exchange Club Meeting
Vietnam Veteran’s Rafe
Te Columbus Exchange Club held its weekly meeting on
Tursday, Sept. 6 at the Columbus Country Club. In addition
to a delicious lunch and stimulating presentations, the mem-
bers were treated to a display of solar-powered vehicles.
Charles Delk (lef) displays the .410
gauge shotgun that he won in a
Vietnam Veterans of America rafe
drawing held Sept. 1 at Prairie Arts
Festival. Te gun was presented to
Delk by Charles Underhill at Gary’s
Pawn & Gun on Sept. 6. Proceeds
from the rafe drawing will go to
beneft local veterans.
Cries of “Stella-a-a-a-a-a-
a!” echoed of of the buildings in
downtown Columbus, on Friday,
Sept. 7, as part of the 2012 Holly-
hocks Stella Shouting Contest.
Hundreds of spectators en-
joyed the sights and sounds as a
record 27 contestants channeled
their inner Brando and recreated
the iconic scene from the flm
version of “A Streetcar Named
Desire.”
“Te Priest and the Saint”
played rock -n- roll and blues clas-
sics as the crowd swelled, beer and
sodas fowed, and the aroma of
hot dogs flled the air.
Ten, at 6 p.m., emcee Steve
Rogers of WCBI, got the contest
underway, calling up each would-
be “Stanley” in turn.
As “Stella” (portrayed by
Leigh Allison Phillips) enticed
each candidate to give it their all, a
panel of judges made up of Mayor
Robert Smith, local writer Adele
Elliott, and 2010 Stella winner
Tom Easterling assessed their per-
formance.
Soon the
slate of con-
testants was
whittled down
to fve fnalists,
who then had
to reprise their
performance to
help the judges
decide on a
grand prize
winner.
In the end,
Charlton James,
the head of the
drama department
at the University
of North Alabama,
emerged victori-
ous. In recogni-
tion of his eforts,
xxxxxxx received a
prize package that
included a Ten-
nessee Williams-
inspired dinner in
Herriott’s apart-
ment above Holly-
hocks, two tickets
to “Te Rose Tattoo,” a round-trip
carriage ride, and much more.
Invited guests dined on a
meal of Shrimp Remoulade,
Crawfsh Etoufee Pasta, with a
choice of New Orleans-style Bread
Pudding or Praline Ice Cream, as
they enjoyed each others’ com-
pany. Aferwards, full sated, they
drifed of into the night, dream-
ing of next year’s event.
Herriott expressed heartfelt
thanks for all of the event spon-
sors, including: Better Brands,
Clark Beverage Group, Main
Street Columbus, Te Real Story,
Te Tennessee Williams Tribute,
and WCBI.
10
School is back in session.
If you have school-age children,
you’re probably busy getting them
acclimated to another year of
hitting the books. But the school
years go by quickly, so it won’t be
long before your kids are ready
to head of to college. Will you be
fnancially prepared to help them?
It’s certainly a challenge, espe-
cially given rising costs of higher
education. Consider these fgures
from the College Board: For the
2011-2012 school year, the average
cost (including tuition, fees, room
and board) was $17,131 per year
for an in-state student attending a
public, four-year college or uni-
versity. For a student attending a
private four-year school, the com-
parable average cost was $38,589
annually. And these numbers
are likely to increase in the years
ahead.
So, what can you do to help
meet the high costs of higher edu-
cation? For starters, you need to
save and invest — early and ofen.
And you’ll also want to choose
investments that are particularly
well-suited for college. Here are a
few suggestions:
• 529 plan - When you invest
in a 529 plan, all withdrawals will
be free from federal income taxes,
as long as the money is used for a
qualifed college expense for your
child, or even your grandchild.
(However, non-qualifed with-
drawals may be subject to federal,
state and penalty taxes.)  Contri-
bution limits are quite high so, in
all likelihood, you’ll be able to put
as much as you want into a 529
plan; although you generally can’t
exceed the annual gif tax exclu-
sion, which is $13,000 per benef-
ciary in 2012. Furthermore, if you
participate in your own state’s 529
plan, your contributions may be
tax deductible on your state taxes.
• Coverdell Education Sav-
ings Account — Depending on
your income level, you can con-
tribute up to $2,000 annually to
a Coverdell Education Savings
Account in 2012. Your Coverdell
earnings and withdrawals will
be tax-free, provided you use the
money for qualifed education
expenses. (Any non-education
withdrawals from a Coverdell
ESA may be subject to a 10 per-
cent penalty.) Unlike a 529 Plan,
in addition to college expenses,
Coverdell funds can be used
for kindergarten through 12th
grade expenses and you can place
Coverdell ESA contributions
into virtually any investment you
choose - stocks, bonds, certifcates
of deposit, etc.
• Zero coupon bonds — A
zero coupon bond is priced at a
discount to its principal or face
value. You receive the principal
value when the bond matures. So,
you could purchase a zero coupon
bond that matures in the year your
child is ready to go to college. Al-
though you won’t receive regular
interest payments throughout
the life of the zero coupon bond,
you’ll still be liable for the taxes on
this interest. So, before purchasing
a zero coupon bond, consult with
your tax advisor. 
Tese investments have
proven popular among many par-
ents and grandparents. However,
you’ll need to consult with your
fnancial advisor to determine
which college-savings vehicles are
appropriate for your needs. But
don’t wait too long — because,
before you know it, today’s grade-
schoolers will be packing for their
college dorms. 
Tis article was written for use by your
local Edward Jones Financial Advisor.
For questions, please contact Ryan Mun-
son at ryan.munson@edwardjones.com
Invest Early - and Wisely - for College

community
By Ryan Munson
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Stella Shouting Contest A Resounding Success
The Real Story Staff Report
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perspectives
I remember when I was grow-
ing up, we were all defned by reli-
gion and ethnicity. Everyone knew
who was Catholic, Protestant, and
Jew; and who was Polish, Italian, or
Irish. My two closest friends were
Protestant and Jewish; and with
me, the Catholic, we were the Tree
(Interfaith) Musketeers. We were just
kids, so serious discussions about
religion came much later, but at his
house Bruce explained what keeping
kosher meant. I went to his bar mitz-
vah, was stunned to hear my baseball
pal sing the ritual Hebrew passages
from the Torah without hesitation,
and even more stunned to see his
room flled to the rafers with gifs
from his family which, unlike ours,
was spread out in New York, Miami
Beach, and Los Angeles. 
What sticks with me most were
the stories that the third Musketeer,
Ned, told me about what went on
in his Presbyterian church on Sun-
days. Te sermons were all about
social justice, civil and human rights,
the role of the individual in society,
and what it means to be a moral
and ethical American. Even if only
a handful of them were actually so
progressive, they were as far difer-
ent from the fulminations of Father
Murphy as could be.  Tey were
reasonable, thoughtful, and relevant,
and with particular resonance in the
late Fifies. My parents were con-
servative, Rotary-attending, socially
timid Eisenhower Republicans, and
like most people, never saw the com-
ing cultural revolution. Ned and his
liberal Democrat family did, and they
and their church were outraged at the
injustices that would be addressed a
few years later.
Every Sunday, Father Murphy
stood at the pulpit in his resplendent
silk vestments, shot his enormous
cufs, clasped his hands and lifed his
eyes to the congregation. “Beloved
in Christ”, he always began, then
thundered away about sin – not the
Presbyterian sins of injustice, greed,
and inhumanity, but the Catholic
sins of sex, and the fery, sulfurous
hell which awaited anyone who com-
mitted them in thought, word, and
deed. Te world of Father Murphy
was one of sleaze, bestial desire, and
darkness. He was masterful at creat-
ing the images of the satyr-demon
Belial, fery red eyes blazing, goat-like
face twisted in polluting orgasm over
the sweet, milky-white body of a vir-
gin. Every Sunday we were warned,
threatened, and horsewhipped. Tere
was no letup. 
I had had enough by the age
of sixteen, and although I gave St.
Tomas and St. Augustine a close
reading during my freshman year
at Yale (they appealed to reason and
at least tried to prove the existence of
God), I lef of my sessions with the
Catholic chaplain, and soon lef the
Church entirely. 
As I went through the Sixties
and the issues raised by Ned and his
family exploded everywhere, I won-
dered where the Catholic Church had
been. Although many Catholic priests
joined the ranks of those who protest-
ed for equal rights and some semi-
defected into the Liberation Teology
movement, the Vatican was quiet, if
not censorious of those priests who
felt that their real calling was to min-
ister to the poor and ignored the true
clerical calling, to spread the word of
Christ and the Catholic Church. Any
threat to the status quo was a threat to
the Church, and its authoritarian rule
over two millennia always had been
not only a means of consolidating its
own wealth and power but to assure
the social stability which would be
conducive to its mission and message.
In recent years, the European
and American Catholic Church has
done very poorly. It has lost mem-
bers, and few Catholics pay attention
to the reactionary edicts from the
Vatican. Perhaps not surprisingly,
the Church has reverted back to its
roots – social conservatism and a
sin-based theology – and become
political.  By allying itself with funda-
mental Protestants (unheard of in my
day, when we were forbidden from
even setting foot in a non-Catholic
place of worship), the Church has
found strength in numbers. What
the Church saw as undisciplined,
wild-eyed, Southern Baptist der-
vishes, howling about their personal
relationship with Jesus Christ and
defying every theological and doctri-
nal principle of the Catholic Church,
became its partner.  Finally, it had
numbers on its side. Te fght against
abortion, divorce, the breakup of the
traditional family, feminism, same-
sex marriage, and contraception
would now be brought to the enemy
by a phalanx of believers, not just an
indiferent few.
In an article in the Guardian
(“Out of Date Catholic Church Must
Listen To Its Late Cardinal”; 9.4.12),
Catherine Pepinster laments the
passing of Cardinal Carlo Montini,
a reformer who throughout his life
argued for the modernization of the
Church. He did not advocate for fac-
ile accommodations to social trends,
nor did he ever back away from
the principles of Christian thought
espoused by the Church; he simply
argued for a rational debate on those
issues which were driving people
from it – the ordination of women,
gay rights, and contraception. Even in
325 A.D., in the very early days of the
Church, the Council of Nicaea con-
vened to debate even more weighty
issues of the Trinity and the divinity
of Christ. Why couldn’t it convene
such a convocation today?
Pepinster looked to the secular
successes of the Catholic Church – its
stand against Polish Communism
and apartheid and its backing of
El Salvador’s Cardinal Romero in
his stand against right-wing terror-
ism – and feels that it has lost its way
completely. It is now considered a
retrograde, antiquated, arch-conser-
vative, and corrupted organization
which has failed not only the poor
but the general faithful in its retreat
into narrow, parochial, and outdated
positions. In the best of times the
Church stood not only for the poor,
but for moral values which should
not change with the times. Its stand
on abortion, as much as it defed cur-
rent trends, was a stand against expe-
diency and selfshness. One should
at least consider – as St. Tomas or
St. Augustine would have done - the
value of life. It has now lost that
moral ground and descended into the
slime and coruscating contentious-
ness of gutter politics. We Catholics
(‘once a Catholic, always a Catholic’)
deserve better.  
Is The Catholic Church 200 Years Out of Date?
By Ron Parlato

arts
Many artists, both of the visual
and performing varieties, will go for
years – possibly their entire careers
– without being noticed. Te ones
who do receive acclaim are ofen the
benefciaries of: 1. Luck; 2. aggressive
marketing, and/or 3. talent.
Stephanie Jackson falls into
category #3.
Don’t be fooled, she has certainly
worked hard to get to where she is
today. She has availed herself of all of
today’s promotional outlets: Face-
book, Twitter, YouTube, and a very
informative website. And, of course,
there is a little luck in everything
thing that we do. But, man, this lady
is TALENTED!
Jackson, who recently re-located
to Starkville afer spending 17 years
in Oklahoma City, has already made
great strides in entrenching herself in
the cultural community of the Gold-
en Triangle. She has quickly become a
regular performer at Casa Bravo and
Central Station Grill in Starkville and
Café Aromas in Columbus.
Jackson, who began performing
publicly when she was 11, grew up
in a musical household. Her mother,
Martha Pipkin, was an opera singer
and a pianist, and she taught piano
to Jackson from the time she was a
young girl. She began playing guitar
in 1973. In addition to a number
of years of private lessons, Jackson
studied classical guitar under Bunyan
Webb, and participated in masters
classes with Andres Segovia and Leo
Brower.
When asked which musi-
cians inspired her, Jackson
cited John Mayer, Eric Clapton,
Michael Jackson – for his work
ethic; and Tommy Emmanuel.
In addition to classical
music, she also plays rock, pop,
Latin, jazz, and classics on clas-
sical guitar. When pressed to
name her favorite genre of mu-
sic to play, Jackson chose classic
rock, because “it’s what I grew up on.”
Jackson has taught college-level
guitar and music courses and has
traveled to various cities throughout
the country to participate in music
seminars, concerts, and recordings.
A prolifc songwriter, she has written
music for various artists, and four of
her 11 collections are entirely origi-
nal compositions. (stephaniejackson.
com)
In addition to the aforemen-
tioned club gigs, Jackson will be per-
forming in a holiday concert entitled
“Hymns and Carols for Christmas”
on November 30, at Carrier Chapel
on the Mississippi University for
Women campus. Te concert, which
will also feature Courtney Black-
well on cello and gospel and R & B
vocalist Stephanie Stubbs, begins at 7
p.m. Tickets are $10 in advance, $12
at the door. In addition, guests are
asked to bring a canned food item for
Helping Hands. For more details or
to purchase tickets, e-mail beverly.co-
lumbusarts@gmail.com or call (662)
328-2787.
In addition to her impressive
website, stephaniejackson.com, Jack-
son can also be reached on Facebook
(www.facebook.com/stephaniejack-
sonmusic.
Although you can hear this
talented musician’s recordings on her
website, as well as on iTunes and CD-
Baby, there’s no substitute for hearing
her live. Once you do, you will be
hooked!
Portrait of the Artist: Stephanie Jackson
The Real Story Staff Report
13 12
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Pet lovers are a breed apart. We
adore our “fur babies” with an inten-
sity that some humans fnd hard to
understand. It is so easy to fall head-
over-heels with a little bundle of fuff.
Who hasn’t had that moment of love
at frst sight? Hearing that frst weak
“mew” or tiny “yip” so ofen means
that we must have this sweetheart for
our very own. Tere are millions of
adoptees living with loving parents.
Tey are the lucky ones.
Tese babies are treated as roy-
alty. Tey are lavished with toys and
treats. We feed them well and make
sure they have their shots and fea
meds. At the frst sign of an illness
they are rushed to the vet. Tey may
have their own bed, but most prob-
ably sleep with their “mommies and
daddies”.
Passionate pet owners under-
stand the responsibility that comes
with these little parcels of love. Tey
understand that, along with check-
ups and grooming, spaying/neutering
is an important obligation to your pet
and to your community.
According to the Humane Soci-
ety of the United States, “in the U.S.
as a whole, there are an estimated
6-8 million homeless animals enter-
ing animal shelters every year. About
half of these animals are adopted, and
tragically, the other half are eutha-
nized. Tese are healthy, sweet pets
that would have made great compan-
ions.”
Te tragedy is that, according
to the Humane Society, these are not
necessarily “the offspring of homeless
‘street’ animals—these are too ofen
the puppies and kittens of cherished
family pets and even purebreds.”
Tere are so many reasons to
spay and neuter our pets. A few are:
both males and female pets who are
neutered live longer, healthier lives;
uterine infections, breast cancer and
testicular cancer are more common in
intact animals; neutered males make
calmer, better behaved companions
and spayed females will not go into
heat. A female who is not spayed will
go into heat four or fve days every
few weeks, with the accompanying
yowls, urinating around the house,
and attempts at sneaking out to “date”
unacceptable suitors. A complete list
of reasons can be found at http://
www.aspca.org/pet-care/spayneuter/
spay-neuter-top-ten.aspx. On this site
you can also fnd a listing of low-cost
spay and neuter programs. I found 13
listings in Mississippi. So, please do
not let the cost deter you.
We pet owners may sometimes
seem a bit obsessed. We may be ac-
cused of overindulging our “children”,
or perhaps failing to recognize that
they are not human at all.
But, we also have an obligation
to those that are not as fortunate
as ours are. Te streets are flled
with abused, hungry, and homeless
animals, which will never be loved or
cared for. Please remember to prevent
“littering”. It will mean that fewer
sweet, innocent creatures will suffer a
life of pain and sadness.

petcorner
By Sam Mazzotta
Paw’s
Corner
Paw’s
Corner
Save a Life
Adopt a Shelter
Pet today!
Gain a friend for life!
Columbus-Lowndes Humane Society
P.O. Box 85 • Columbus, MS 39703
662-327-3107
Surrendering and
Reclaiming Pets:
Mon-Fri 10am to 5pm
Adoptions:
Mon-Fri 10am-5pm
Sat 11am-3pm
BRUCE LEE
Domestic Short Hair,
male, brown tabby with
white feet, about
5-6mths old, owner
surrendered 7/6
POLO
Lab mix,
3 mths old,
black and white,
male, He was owner
surrendered 6/15
with his sibling Spud.
He loves to be cuddled.
DENZEL
Domestic Short Hair,
dark charcoal, male, about
5-6mths old, owner
surrendered 7/9/12.
He is a beautiful cat with an
unusual color.
TIDO
Terrier/Chihuahua mix
male, 10yrs old, black and
tan, owner surrendered
7/5. He is a lovey lap
dog that needs a mature
home without small children.
TEE
Tee: Terrier/Chihuahua mix,
male 2yrs old, white, owner surrendered 7/9. He is
the son of Tido and he is a great little dog. He is a bit
shy, but warms up fast.
DEAR PAW’S CORNER:
A number of cats in our area
disappeared this spring and summer,
and I noticed the rabbits that used
to plague our garden don’t come as
frequently. A neighbor told me he
saw a coyote crossing the street just
before dawn recently, and I suspect it
is the cause of many of these disap-
pearances. Please warn your readers
they need to protect their pets as wild
animals are encroaching on well-
populated neighborhoods. -- Pat C.,
Weston, Mass.
DEAR PAT:
Tat’s a very good point! As
wild creatures lose more and more
of their natural habitats, they are
being seen much more frequently in
the suburbs and even in urban areas.
Tis goes beyond nuisance animals
like raccoons and skunks: Black bears
frequently wander into back yards
in central Florida, and residents in
urban Allston, Mass., are sometimes
confronted by wild turkeys foraging
along city streets. And coyotes and
cougars have been reported in subur-
ban neighborhoods in many parts of
the United States.
Wild animals present a lot of
risk to pets (as well as humans). Be-
sides the threat of contracting rabies
or other diseases, some predators fnd
smaller pets to be easy, tasty prey.
Keep cats and small dogs in-
doors at night. If wild animals have
been reported in your area, don’t let
your pet out unaccompanied or off a
leash, even during the day when no
danger is apparent. Keep your pet’s
vaccinations up to date.
If you have pets, like rabbits,
that are kept outside, reinforce and
strengthen protective fencing around
their cages.
Send your questions or comments to
ask@pawscorner.com. If your question
or comment is printed in the weekly
column, you’ll receive a free copy of
“Fighting Fleas,” the newest booklet
from Paws Corner!
(c) 2012 King Features Synd., Inc.
Wild Animals Pose Threat to Pets
Please Don’t Litter
The Real Story Staff Report
Animal
Antics

arts
120 Hours of Tennessee Williams
The Real Story Staff Report
Speaking Speaking
Unless you have been out of
town or living under a rock for the
past week or so, you have surely
noticed a convergence of culture
lovers from throughout the Golden
Triangle and beyond. What has all
of the hubbub been about? Why, the
annual Tennessee Williams Tribute,
of course!
My Tribute experience began
on Wednesday, Sept. 5, with a talk by
noted Williams expert Dr. Kenneth
Holditch of New Orleans. Te Ecru,
Miss. native captivated the audience
with tales of his life and his interac-
tions with Tennessee.
Tat night, I attended a per-
formance of Williams’ “Te Rose
Tattoo.” Mississippi University for
Women’s Rent Auditorium served, as
always, as a magnifcent venue for a
Williams play. Te play was very well-
done, with stand-out performances
from several cast members. As with
most of Williams’ plays, “Tattoo” kept
the audience alternating between
laughter and shock, with the various
plot twists.
On Tursday, we were treated to
a fantastic Broadway-caliber produc-
tion of songs from Tennessee Wil-
liams plays, entitled “Te Tennessee
Williams Songbook”
at the Tribute’s Moon
Lake Party. Tony Award-
nominated vocalist
Alison Fraser could have
passed for 1930s starlet
Jean Harlow, as she was
resplendent in a gor-
geous gown and adorable
blond curls. She was ac-
companied by classically
trained piano virtuoso
Allison Leyton-Brown,
plus very talented local
musicians Chris Fowlkes,
Stephanie Jackson, and
Shondaleria Williams.
Fraser demonstrated that
she is as gracious as she
is talented, by mingling
with audience members
afer the performance.
Friday began with
a delightful
luncheon at the
historic ante-
bellum mansion Errolton, which fea-
tured not only delicious cuisine and
delightful classical music (provided
by Columbus’ own Suzuki Strings),
but was highlighted by the presenta-
tion of the frst “Tennessee Williams
Scholars Medal” to Dr. Kenneth
Holditch for his many years of work
in both founding and supporting a
number of Williams celebrations.
Presenter David Kaplan (Curator of
the Provincetown Tennessee Williams
Festival) brought tears to the eyes of
the attendees with his
heartfelt words about Dr.
Holdtich.
Afer a brief respite,
we headed to the heart of
downtown Columbus to
enjoy the annual Hol-
lyhocks “Stella” Shouting
Contest. Tis exciting
event realized a tremen-
dous crowd and a bevy of
able participants.
Saturday morn-
ing’s activities started
quite early, with the 2nd
Annual Streetcar Run,
with 174 hardy runners
competing in the 3.1
mile course. No, I was
not a participant – just
a spectator. However, it
was fun, all the same.
Other well-attended
and well-received Tribute events in-
cluded screenings of the flm versions
of Williams’ “Te Roman Spring of
Mrs. Stone” and “Te Rose Tattoo,”
each of which were accompanied by
lectures by Williams scholars.
TWT Chair Brenda Caradine
indicated that she is going to take a
well-deserved break before heading
to Provincetown to attend that city’s
celebration of the life and works of
American’s greatest playwright, afer
which she will begin work on the
2013 Tribute. I, for one, cannot wait!
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Te September 8, 2012 per-
formance of Tennessee Williams’
Tony Award-winning play, “Te
Rose Tattoo,” set the standard for
all other artistic endeavors that
will grace the Golden Triangle for
years to come. Led by the direc-
tion of Melanie Hintz, the cast and
crew captured the spirit of Tennes-
see in this production of the 1951
play that shocked the censors of
the era. Mixing humor and trag-
edy, the play moved seamlessly
through the days and years of the
Sicilian family, the Delle Roses.
Cherri Golden’s performance
of Serafna Delle Rose captured all
the elegance, mania and sexuality
that make the Italian immigrant’s
story so passionate. Unencum-
bered by the constraints seen at
many community theater produc-
tions, Ms. Golden set the stage on
fre with a performance worthy of
an arena greater than Columbus.
Mixing wit with profound emo-
tional sadness, Ms. Golden created
a character with such depth that
the audience could laugh with her
and at her simultaneously, without
feeling pity or remorse for their
action.
Her time on the stage with
the impeccable Daniel L. Talley
portraying the lovable but cunning
Sicilian Alvaro Mangiacavallo, was
magic. In only a matter of mo-
ments, the crowd was swept up in
the dialogue that was so rich in
metaphor and symbolism that one
felt they were being a voyeur in a
conversation between a grieving
widow and a lovable loser locked
in a moment that would shatter
each person’s preconceived notion
of reality.
Te direction of the play and
the actors never swayed from Ten-
nessee’s desire to show reality as it
is and not in the romantic notions
of the conformity of America’s
living room - a syrupy romantic
notion that lives today as strongly
as it did in the idealistic America
of Eisenhower. Tennessee not only
rejected the notion, but shattered
it for the whole world to see. And
Saturday night in Columbus, one
fery director and a handful of lo-
cal talent helped Tennessee set the
world straight once again - with
no comprise and no apologies.
In Tennessee’s world, there
was no greater madness than
living a life built on fantasy or in
existing in a reality framed by the
steady assurance that life is insane
and a person’s strength is mani-
fested by overcoming that insanity.
Time and time again in his plays,
he showed the folly of living in a
reality formed by disillusion. Te
overall symbolism of many of Wil-
liams’ works is that it is better to
face the harsh facts of our exis-
tence than to run from the dirty
underbelly of our own lives.
With force and zero trepida-
tion, Golden and Emily Morton,
who stunningly played her daugh-
ter, Rosa Delle Rose, did what
Tennessee did best, create women
who were full of power and
sexuality. Instead of playing it safe,
Golden and Morton showed the
audience the women of Williams’
literary world - women whose
sexuality was greater than that
of most of the men they would
encounter.
Te young Rosa was not
the foil of the masculine sailor,
Jack Hunter, played with the “ah,
shucks” charm that only Shane
Tubbs could provide. She was not
only his equal, she was the hunter.
She was the sexual storm. She was
the predator.
Williams also addressed the
pitfalls of such women as he did
with Stella in “A Street Car Named
Desire.” He confronted the fact
that these women also can fall un-
der the power of the man who can
meet their sexual needs. He dem-
onstrated that the power of the
orgasm can outweigh the power of
reason – a power strong enough
to keep Seraphina locked in her
house for three years. A power
so strong that you can’t see what
everyone else in town already
knows, that the love of her life was
a drug-dealing philander.
All of the women in “A Rose
Tattoo” were strong sexual charac-
ters. And in her short scene, Paige
Canida Greene played her charac-
ter, Estelle Hohengarten, with all
the gusto that last names suggests.
As usual, Williams was brilliant
in the small details. Strong sexual
women rule.
It may not be said ofen,
but on one Saturday in the play-
wright’s hometown his beliefs
came alive. He desired to tell the
universe that it is better to live in
the tattered dirty world of reality
than be snuggled in the warmth of
the insanity known as disillusion-
ment. He showcased his world
where women are strong and their
sexuality burns hotter than coals
on a winter night. A world where
reality triumphs and where the
female orgasm lived long before
Betty Friedan.
The Beautiful Scent of the Rose
Joseph B. St. John
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lifestyles
When Hurricane Katrina hit in
2005, I was living in Philadelphia,
Pa.; well, technically, I was living
in Conshohocken, Pa., but no one
has ever heard of that, so we’ll say
“Philly” to simplify things. I could
not reach any of my relatives in Ma-
con, Miss. by phone and, at the time,
I didn’t have regular Internet access.
Every NPR story was about New
Orleans, every newspaper story was
about New Orleans, and I literally
could not fnd any information about
Mississippi without texting friends
living in the state and fnally getting
in touch with my family three days
later.
At the time, I didn’t dwell on
the fact that most of the news cover-
age was in New Orleans; it’s a famous
city with famous current and former
residents. However, when Tropi-
cal Storm/Hurricane Isaac began to
cut a path in the same direction as
Katrina, and the Weather Channel
referred to Mississippi as the “land
mass between Mobile and New
Orleans,” I got ticked. I realize that,
on the national scene, Mississippi is
low on the priority list. We’re usually
highlighted for our low education
scores and high obesity rates. What
I’d like to know is who decided some
states were more important than
others?
If wildfres happen in Cali-
fornia, even though this is fairly
commonplace, it’s all over the news.
When the April 2011 tornadoes
ripped through Mississippi and Ala-
bama, more coverage was given to
Joplin, Mo., which sufered a simi-
lar fate just a few weeks later. Afer
experiencing a tornado passing .5
miles from our house and not know-
ing if we would make it out alive as
the howling engulfed us, I felt pretty
irritated that there wasn’t more
national news coverage of damage in
cities other than Tuscaloosa.
I realize that some parts of the
country think we’re still having race
riots and using outhouses down
here, but: (a.) Tat wouldn’t make us
less important as human beings, and
(b.) If they think that, they might
want to gaze into that mirror of
ignorance themselves. I worked with
extremely educated people in Penn-
sylvania who, nonetheless, asked me
if I knew any members of the Ku
Klux Klan, if I lived on a farm, and
if my parents graduated from high
school.
I was more than happy to tell
them that, no, I didn’t even know if
the Klan was still active; I was scared
of most types of farm animals,
especially cows, and did not care for
mud or dirt; and that both of my
parents had master’s degrees. Tis
seemed to disappoint most of them,
as I think they wanted some kind of
Daisy Duke person to mock for the
duration of my employment. Some
of these people went to Ivy League
schools, so I can safely say ignorance
knows no education level.
I’ve been living in Alabama
for almost six years now, but Mis-
sissippi will always be my home. I
sort of view it as my sister. I can say
anything I want to about her, but you
should tread very carefully if you’re
going to make a derogatory state-
ment. Land mass, indeed.
Posing As
An Adult
Posing As
An Adult
Hey, I’m From That Land Mass!
By Emily Gaither Smith
Recipes from
Good Housekeeping
Italian Spiced Shrimp
Quick and favorful, this healthful shrimp dish gets most of its favor from a
variety of Italian herbs and spices.
1 small onion
1 tablespoon fresh oregano leaves
1 cup long-grain white rice
1 3/4 cups hot water
1 tablespoon olive oil
1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper, to taste
2 cloves garlic, crushed with press
1 cup dry white wine
1 can no-salt-added diced tomatoes, drained well
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 pound 16- to 20-count shrimp, shelled and deveined, tail part lef on if you
like
8 leaves basil, sliced very thin, for garnish
1. Preheat oven to 400 F. While oven heats, fnely chop onion and oregano.
2. In 3-quart shallow baking dish, combine rice and water. Cover tightly with
foil and bake 20 minutes.
3. Meanwhile, in 5- to 6-quart saucepot, heat oil on medium. Add onion,
oregano and red pepper; cook 3 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add garlic
and cook 30 seconds or until golden, stirring. Add wine and heat to boiling;
reduce heat to medium-low and simmer 6 minutes or until wine is reduced by
half, stirring occasionally. Stir in tomatoes, 1/2 teaspoon salt and 1/2 teaspoon
black pepper. Remove from heat.
4. Arrange shrimp on top of rice in baking dish, in single layer. Pour tomato
mixture evenly over shrimp; cover tightly with foil and bake 15 minutes or
until shrimp turn opaque. Garnish with basil. Serves 6.
¥ Each serving: About 245 calories, 4g total fat (1g saturated), 93mg choles-
terol, 300mg sodium, 35g total carbs, 2g dietary fber, 16g protein.
Fried Calamari Fra Diavolo
Crispy golden-fried squid is served with a tomato dipping sauce that is ofen
as spicy as the devil (“fra diavolo” means “brother devil”). Or simply serve
with lemon wedges, if you prefer.
1 tablespoon olive oil
2 cloves garlic, crushed with side of chef ’s knife
1/8 teaspoon (up to 1/8) crushed red pepper
1 can (14 to 16 ounces) tomatoes
3/4 teaspoon salt
1 pound cleaned squid
2/3 cup all-purpose four
1 cup water
Vegetable oil for frying
1. In nonreactive 1-quart saucepan, heat olive oil over medium heat. Add gar-
lic and crushed red pepper; cook until garlic is golden, about 30 seconds. Add
tomatoes with their juice and 1/2 teaspoon salt, breaking up tomatoes with
side of spoon; heat to boiling. Reduce heat; cover and simmer 10 minutes.
Keep warm.
2. Rinse squid with cold running water and gently pat dry with paper towels.
Slice squid bodies crosswise into 3/4-inch rings. Cut tentacles into pieces if
large.
3. To make batter, in small bowl, with fork, mix four and water until smooth.
In 10-inch skillet, heat 1/2 inch vegetable oil over medium heat until very
hot. (A small piece of bread dropped into oil should sink, then rise to top and
begin bubbling.) In small batches, drop squid into batter. Allowing excess
batter to drip of, add squid to hot oil. Fry, turning to brown on all sides, until
golden, about 2 minutes.
4. With slotted spoon, transfer squid to paper towels to drain; sprinkle with
remaining 1/4 teaspoon salt. Serve with tomato sauce for dipping. Makes 4
frst-course servings.
„ Each serving: About 325 calories, 16g total fat (2g saturated), 264mg choles-
terol, 660mg sodium, 25g carbohydrate, 21g protein.
For thousands of triple-tested recipes, visit our website at www.goodhousekeep-
ing.com/recipefnder/.
(c) 2012 Hearst Communications, Inc.
All rights reserved
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We’re usually highlighted
for our low education
scores and high obe-
sity rates. What I’d like to
know is who decided some
states were more impor-
tant than others?

The Adventures Of The VIP: Fall In Love with Fall
“Clothes make the man. Naked
people have little or no infuence on
society.” (Mark Twain) I just love
clothes, especially vintage ones! Oh,
and I absolutely adore Mark Twain!
His writing style is so marvelous,
and he was such an adorable little old
man! If I had a time machine, I would
defnitely visit and chat with him for
hours.
It is that time of year again.
Labor Day has come and gone, and
fall is quickly approaching. Oh my
goodness, whatever shall we wear to
be fall fabulous? No worries, darlings!
Te VIP is here to deliver all the “how
to wear” tips that you need to fall in
love with fall.
VIP Tips For Falling in Love
With Fall:
• Hello, Blazers!: My favorite
thing about blazers is that they
are so easy-peasy, lemon-squeezy
to fnd. Blazers are always a fall
must-have because they can be
worn in a variety of ways! Be
“job interview-ready” by pair-
ing a blazer with vintage, pleated
trousers, a colorful silk top, and color
block pumps for a professional and
fashionable look. Be “weekend-ready”
by combining dark-washed denim
jeans and a colorful boyfriend or
oversized blazer with a graphic tee
or firty top and add ballet fats for
a comfy, yet adorable outft! Com-
fort does not equal unfashionable or
tacky!
• “Printy” Pant Princess: Be
a “printy” pant princess this fall!
(Why, yes, I did just create the word
“printy”; one day, I shall write a VIP
dictionary.) Pick up a pair of foral,
animal print, or polka dot jeans for
a fun way to fall in love with fall!
Wear wild printed pants with over-
sized sweatshirts, sneakers, and lots
of “arm candy” for a fabulous outft
that is keeping it real while keeping it
comfortable! Dress up printed jeans
by combining a frilly blouse with a
blazer, and adding a ravishing pair of
colorful t-strap heels and a chunky
necklace. Play around with patterns
to fnd your own VIP look!
• Mrs. Burgundy: “Burgundy
- A fall runway favorite: this rich,
intense color is as sexy as red, yet as
versatile and chic as basic black,” says
the September 2012 issue of InStyle
magazine. We may not be walking the
runways, but we can rock burgundy
like supermodels at work or play this
season by pairing this divine hue with
colors such as sky blue, forest green,
peony pink, or peach. When deciding
what shoes and accessories to wear
with a burgundy ensemble, remem-
ber that gold enhances the warm
undertones of burgundy. So, strap on
shimmery, gold stilettos and toss on
lots of glitzy, gold accessories to make
bystanders fall in love with your fall
look!
• Shoe Addict: Hi, my name is
Abby, and I’m a shoe addict. Tis
season, I am struggling to stay on
budget. It has seriously come down
to: a.) buy those darling color block
wedges or b.) buy gas for the Bug.
Indeed, I am carpooling with friends
and riding my bike - but oh,
how splendid my shoe collec-
tion is! Te VIP loves color
block wedges, Chelsea boots,
vibrant t-straps, cap-toe fats,
boots (over the knee and
leather), menswear pumps,
cut-out metallic heels, and slip-
pers (like Tom’s) for fall.
• Vest Perfection: “Safe
and stogy? No way. With smart styl-
ing, this piece will actually add just
the right amount of fair,” says August
2012 issue of “InStyle” Magazine.
Vests are the perfect layering piece
for every fashionista’s fall closet. A
vest can be paired with trousers or
shorts for a preppy look, cigarette
jeans for an edgy look, and a skirt
or strapless maxi dress for a firty
look!
• Let’s hear it for the boys!:
Two words, boys: leather jackets.
A leather jacket is defnitely a fall
must-have for men! It can give
of a laid-back vibe when com-
bined with a graphic t-shirt, faded,
distressed jeans, and loafers. For a
sexier statement, wear a white button-
down, black tie, pastel hue sweater,
and dark jeans with a leather bomber
jacket. Trust me, guys - wear a leather
jacket. You will have the girls scream-
ing, “Let’s hear it for the boys!”
I could go on and on about all
the wonderful fall must-haves, but I
really must get to peddling; however,
before I ride of into the sunset, I shall
conclude with a quote from Clin-
ton Kelly of TLC’s television series
“What-Not-To-Wear.” “Sometimes
comfort doesn’t matter. When a shoe
is freaking fabulous, it may be worth
a subsequent day of misery. Soak in
Epsom salt and take comfort in the
fact that you’re better than everyone
else.”
Be sure to check out my blog
@ www.vintageinspiredpassionista.
com to see other “Falling in Love with
Fall” outfts and inspiration for your
wardrobe!
Don’t forget to like me on Face-
book @ www.facebook.com/vintage-
inspiredpassionista to keep up with
special sneak peeks and VIP news
you can’t get anywhere else!
Also, follow me on Twitter @
Abbysauce_ and Instagram @Vin-
tagePassionista!
Stay Fabulous!
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The
Adventures
of the
V.I.P.
Abby
Hathorn
Many ghost encounters are
visits from people we have loved.
It is common to receive a message
from a mother, father, grand-
mother, or grandfather who still
watches over us, even from the
other side of the veil. We should
be comforted by these presences,
not frightened at all.
It is evident that those who
have passed on seem to retain a
profound interest in life on Earth.
And, why not? Just as people move
from one city to another, they
still remember and care about
the friends they lef behind. We
should think of a ghostly message
much like a letter, or phone call,
or e-mail from someplace slightly
farther than a few states away.
Sometimes, a house comes
“pre-loaded” with a protective
spirit. Tey may be partial to
children, or more protective of
women than of men. Just like the
rest of us, ghosts have preferences
and opinions.
But, what about the people
who love animals? Some women
and men seem to have greater love
for a pet than for others of their
own species. To these people, the
connection with an animal can
be deep and intense. Te loss of a
beloved pet is signifcant. Te grief
can be overwhelming.
Studies have shown that most
Americans believe they will be
reunited with their loved ones
in Heaven. Tis is also true for
animal lovers. Tey, too, have faith
that they will see the much loved
pet in the afer-life. Tat belief is
a great solace to a pet owner in
mourning.
One local story includes not
one, but two, ghostly pets, who
still appear with their owner al-
most two hundred years afer his
death.
John Pitchlynn, a Choctaw
Indian agent, arrived in the Co-
lumbus area in the late 1700s. He
was known for riding a beautiful
white horse, and for his love of a
little black dog. He was also mar-
ried to Sophia Folsom, a mixed-
race Choctaw woman, who was
devoted to him.
Pitchlynn died around 1835.
His grief-stricken, Choctaw wife
wanted him to be buried with
his white horse. However, the
horse was still alive. Cooler heads
prevailed. Some of the people in
Columbus convinced her that this
was not a good idea. Alas, Pitch-
lynn was buried alone.
But, eventually, even death
was not strong enough to separate
man and beasts. Tere are still
reports of John Pitchlynn riding
an elegant white horse through the
area around Columbus that was
once Choctaw Indian territory.
Te little black dog follows, along
for the fun.
Tose who love animals will
take comfort in the idea that we
will see those sweet spirits again.
We picture them crossing “Te
Rainbow Bridge,” the path that all
animals take to make their jour-
ney to the other side. Tere was
once a Disney movie named “All
Dogs Go To Heaven.” Animal lov-
ers know that all pets, and animals
in the wild, go to heaven. Tey
are there, waiting for us when we
make our transition to the Peace-
able Kingdom.
Transcending the Veil
The Real Story Staff Report
BUSH HOGGING
662.574.1570
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For the Week of September 17, 2012
Salome’s Stars
ARIES (March 21 to April 19) Your
ideas earn you the respect of your
colleagues. But you’ll have to present
some hard facts and fgures if you
hope to persuade those who make the
big decisions to support you.
TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) Keep
those bright Bull’s eyes focused on the
project at hand. Avoid distractions.
Tere’ll be lots of time for fun and
games later. Expect to get welcome
news this weekend.
GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) You
soon might have to decide about
moving a relationship from its cur-
rent status to another level. Don’t let
anyone infuence your decision. It
must be yours and yours alone.
CANCER (June 21 to July 22) You
fnally can get of that emotional
roller coaster and get back to focusing
on your goals without interruptions
through the rest of the week. A nice
change is due by the weekend.
LEO (July 23 to August 22) Trying to
make an impression on some people
runs into a bit of a snag at frst, but
it all works out. An old and almost
forgotten personal matter once again
needs attention.
VIRGO (August 23 to September 22)
A rise in your energy level helps you
fnish an especially demanding task.
Take some time now to spend with
family and friends before starting a
new project.
LIBRA (September 23 to October
22) Tis is a good time to re-establish
contact with trusted former associ-
ates who might be able to ofer good
advice regarding that career change
you’ve been contemplating.
SCORPIO (October 23 to November
21) Your resourcefulness combined
with a calm, cool approach help you
work your way out of a knotty situ-
ation and avoid a potentially serious
misunderstanding.
SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to
December 21) A calm, quiet period
allows you to recharge your energies.
But you’ll soon be ready to saddle
up and gallop of in pursuit of your
goals.
CAPRICORN (December 22 to
January 19) Family matters need your
attention. Check things out carefully.
Tere still might be unresolved ten-
sions that could hinder your eforts to
repair damaged relationships.
AQUARIUS (January 20 to February
18) It’s a good time to take a stand
and show as much passion on your
own behalf as you do when arguing
for the rights of others. You might be
happily surprised by the reaction.
PISCES (February 19 to March 20)
You bring sense and sensitivity to
a confusing situation. Tings soon
settle down, leaving you free to enjoy
a weekend of fun and relaxation with
friends and family.
BORN THIS WEEK: You have a tal-
ent for being able to perceive possibil-
ities where others see only problems.
(c) 2012 King Features Synd., Inc.

comicsandpuzzles
1. What famous route stretched from San Antonio, Texas to
Abilene, Kansas?

2. Who was Winnie the Pooh’s human friend?

3. What famous western movie and TV star was known as “The
Robin Hood of the Old West”?

4. What was the Japanese code signal to begin the attack on
Pearl Harbor?

5. What did Dr. John H. Pemberton of Atlanta, Georgia invent in
1886?
Answers on Page 21
Glenn’s
Shut up and WRITE!!
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events in the Golden Triange
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To apply, email
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sports
A Long Time Rebel Fan Experiences A First
By Stephanie Mullins
Tere was excitement, hesita-
tion, anticipation and a surge of emo-
tions as game time approached. Prep-
arations were underway for entering
Vaught-Hemmingway Stadium. Tis
was not just the anticipation of the
Rebels’ debut for the opening game
of the season: It was so much more,
deeper than words can describe,
vaster than perceived, even as an
eyewitness. It was forever a memory
that I will treasure. For the frst time,
I glimpsed one person’s deep passion
- his love, loyalty, and support for the
University of Mississippi and the Ole
Miss Rebels.
Rushing around, our boys were
fnding clothes to wear to Te Grove,
food was being packed, and last-min-
ute searches for tickets were under-
way. Commonplace among teenage
boys, “smack-talk” about the Rebels’
experiences, last year, produced an at-
mosphere among them of faint hope
for our current Rebel team, and who
would more than likely be participat-
ing in walk-through drills as they
were speaking. It was not going to be
tolerated, not on this day or any other
day. Previous history, with its tears
and exhaustion, embarrassing losses
and uncertainty, was no excuse for
lack of support. Even for one fan, one
member of the Rebel family, failure to
encourage our Rebels was taken per-
sonally. It was a dagger that pierced
and only fueled his passion to speak
to them in kindness: but revealed
what years of being a Rebel meant to
him. Words like, “You stand beside
your team, you pick them up when
they’re down and push them when
they don’t want to get up,” caused
them to apologize and hang their
heads in sorrow as they donned their
white shirts for the game.
Walking through Te Grove
was somewhat surreal. Although
this Rebel fan, himself an Ole Miss
alumnus, had such a vast knowledge
of the team and coaches that he
loved so much, he had never been
able to participate in the atmosphere
that so many Rebel fans equate with
their football game day experience.
His knowledge and caring support
was always needed during this time
before the games and he was unable
to attend Te Grove activities. While
casually walking, we pass so many
who yell out his name, shake hands,
and state their happiness to see him.
Some are surprised; others show a
sweet sense of respect in their eyes.
Tey know of his love and dedica-
tion and speculate what today may
feel like for him. He introduces me to
Trea Southerland (of Columbus) and
his son; kind words are exchanged.
As the man and little boy walk away,
his face becomes sof and saddens.
Tears fll his eyes and he presses his
lips together, trying to hold back his
emotions. Ten he explains that the
man was a former Ole Miss football
player who was very close to Chucky.
“He took it hard; it’s hard for him to
be back on campus and he doesn’t
come that ofen.” He speaks through
a cracking voice. My Rebel fan was
there and knows this experience
frst-hand. As trainers took Chucky
of the feld, my Rebel fan or “cousin,”
as Chucky ofen called him was there
with a towel over his shoulder seeing
what he could do to help his friend.
Holding his head up, he squeezed
my hand tight as we fnish making
our way through Te Grove. He is
deliberate in our direction, seeking
out a location he knows will be sparse
along the walk. Te goal is to shout a
cheer to spur on courage to face the
opponent. Our purpose is to stand
with the multitude and support our
Ole Miss champions walking down to
the stadium.
At the Walk of Champions, one
by one: Coach Freeze, other coach-
ing staf, and then the Rebel football
players hold out their hands to show
appreciation. Each coach and player
that catches a glimpse of this new
sideline supporter, a lone Rebel fan
among many, grabs him, embraces
him, laughs with him, and fst-bumps
him. Some hold on to him as whis-
pers are exchanged, each pulling back
with smiles, joyfully seeing the one
Rebel fan they had always come to
depend on standing
there, cheering for
them.
Many years ago,
during this same pre-
game time, the Rebel
fan was a student
trainer for fve years.
Te young, tall kid
was there to learn
and begin serving
his Rebel team. He
waited in anticipa-
tion for them to come
in one by one to get
taped and wrapped to
prevent injury. Ten
the moment came,
a position he had
dreamed and desired
became a reality. As
head trainer, this
lone Rebel fan, Tim
Mullins, served
them, cheered for
them, pulled them
up, and carried them
when hurt for the
past 15 years. He had pushed them
to get back in the game when they
were ready, afer they were taped up
and iced, if necessary. He was there
always pacing the sidelines, look-
ing for signs of injury. Dehydration,
attitudes that needed adjusting and
those who needed encouragement.
He was their trainer and friend, and
now he would be there sitting in the
stands, for the frst time, to watch
them. Like coming home, he feels
comfortable, easily walking through
the stands. Although he has never
sat in the stadium during a game, he
notices details from the handrails
to the new paint color on the stairs.
While watching the highlights from
previous games, memories fll his
mind as he knows every play that is
to occur, what injury they fought to
overcome to be successful on the play
and he remembers details of taping
them, bracing them, casting them so
they could be an OLE MISS REBEL.
To play the game they loved.
He stands and cheers with every
play. He doesn’t cheer like others in
the stands, shouting out numbers.
He calls them by name. He knows
their names, their struggles and their
weaknesses. He watches them walk
of the feld, sensing some disorder
and whispers, as if saying a prayer,
“You need to drink. You’re going to
cramp. Shortly, afer two plays, the
player does and is taken to get IV
fuids. He looks at me; I see some-
thing in his eyes I haven’t seen before,
a feeling of helplessness. He was
unable to prevent the cramps and
he feels responsible. Sitting in sec-
tion H, several rows away, not one
water bottle in his hand, and Tim
feels he should have prevented the
dehydration. He cares so deeply. And
so, with every cramp, every scored
point, every play, he yells encourage-
ment. “Way to go Coach. Get on to
him, Grant. Come on, Rebels, you
can do it. ‘L’ will watch him good
when he comes back.” He whispers
quietly to himself, so that only I can
hear. So please, when you play as an
OLE MISS REBEL and look into the
stands each week, know that there are
Rebel fans who have been here before
you, supporting you, praying for you.
And desperately urging you to get
in the game. Ole Miss is more than
a University, more than a job, more
than even a passion - it is a place
where my lone Rebel fan, Tim Mul-
lins, fostered love and compassion
for others, witnessed the impact of a
coach on a team, the importance of
perseverance through struggles, the
necessity of supporting each other,
and the downfalls that happen when
you don’t. Ole Miss impacted Tim in
more ways than I can imagine and
on Saturday my eyes and heart were
shown a small glimpse of that impact,
as we sat in the stands together for
the frst time. My prayer is that Ole
Miss and the experience of being a
Rebel will impact you, as it has Tim.
To be a person, coach, staf member,
or player who dedicates himself and
understands the importance of one’s
personal history. Your dedication to
each other and impact on people is
deeper than your own understanding.
It is a God-given opportunity.
Go Rebels!
Former Athletic Trainer gives Coach Hugh Freeze a
good luck hug during the walk of champions.
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Coman Taking A Short Detour
By Jeremiah Short
Trivia Answers: 1. Te Chisholm Trail. 2. Christopher Robin. 3. Cisco Kid. 4. Climb
Mt. Niitaka. 5. Coca Cola
For every incoming freshman
football player, enrolling in their frst
summer session is a special experi-
ence. Kivon Coman, a 2012 Mis-
sissippi State signee from Florence,
Ala., had that ripped away from him
shortly before the initial session, as
his A.C.T. score was fagged by the
NCAA Clearinghouse and he was
forced to take the test again. Al-
though Coman retook the test, the
score came in too late, and he decided
to spend a semester at Hargrave Mili-
tary Academy, taking the advice of
the Mississippi State coaching staf.
Showing maturity beyond his
age, Coman feels everything worked
out according to a plan. “I think God
had a plan for me to be here, and he
knows what he’s doing,” said Coman,
who is playing cornerback and safety
at Hargrave.
He added, “Tat’s the main thing
about it. For one, I don’t lose an eligi-
bility year; so, I still have four years.
And I get to come in the spring and
learn the playbook and everything
else. You get to see how everybody
plays, and it will be to my advantage.”
Other schools are still trying to
recruit the 6’1”, 205-pound safety, but
he is frmly committed to Mississippi
State - as he still maintains contact
with the Bulldog coaches. “I talk to
them almost every day; they are just
telling me to keep working and keep
doing what I’m doing,” Coman said.
Johnthan Banks, Mississippi
State’s all-SEC cornerback, has also
kept in contact with the future Bull-
dog. “John Banks hits me up every
other day to see what I’m up to and to
see if I’m still making it,” says Coman.
“We’ve made a strong bond. He’s
ready for me to get there so he can
show me a few things as he gets ready
for the draf.”
Fellow Bulldog signee Artimas
Samuels attends Hargrave as well. Co-
man and Samuels have developed a
bond. “Tat’s my best friend up here,”
Coman stated, regarding the relation-
ship that he has built with Samuels.
“He is my roommate up here and
everything we talk about is
football. He’s like my brother
now.”
Te talented safety
didn’t get a chance to see the
frst Mississippi State game,
but he has seen the new
uniforms and feels they add a
little “swag” to the team. Te
efect of a jersey, though, only
goes so far, according to him.
“Te jersey doesn’t make that
person; the person makes
that jersey.”
While Coman is looking
forward to fnally becoming
a Bulldog in January, he has
extra motivation to succeed.
Te 18-year-old recently had
a newborn daughter, Kyleigh,
who gives him a reason to get
up and “work every day.”
“I got a daughter that I got to
feed in the future, and that’s where
my mindset is right now.”
“Tyler Russell will never be an
SEC quarterback.” “He will never start
for Mississippi State.” “He can’t lead
a team.” “He isn’t tough enough, isn’t
durable enough.” “Te kid doesn’t ft
Mullen’s system.”
“Russell will be the best quar-
terback to come through Mississippi
State.” “He will be a great quarter-
back.” “He is the best quarterback to
come out of the Mis-
sissippi High School
ranks.” “Tat’s the
kid that beat South
Panola in the state
championship
game.”
If you aren’t
following, up to this
point, those were
some of the state-
ments made about
Tyler Russell the
past three years, ever
since he signed with
Mississippi State in
2009, as the most
heralded quarter-
back to set foot in
“Starkvegas.”
Russell was ex-
pected to start from
day one, considering the quarter-
backs, at the time, were an undersized
Tyson Lee and the run-frst Chris
Relf. Mississippi State Head Coach
Dan Mullen decided to redshirt Rus-
sell, though, due in part to the Merid-
ian product’s failure to adjust to the
college level.
As the 2009 season went along,
Russell did start to settle in better and
was considered the best quarterback
on the team by the end of the season.
Although there was a competition
with Relf in the spring of 2010, the
6’5”, 220-pound gunslinger was ex-
pected to easily win the battle. But, in
the words of ESPN commentator Lee
Corso: “Not so fast, my friend.”
Chris Relf fnished the spring as
the starter. It lef critics, like me, to
ask the question: “How do you enter
the of-season as a clear-cut starter
and fnish as the clear-cut back-up?”
Entering the frst game of the
2010 season versus Memphis, Rus-
sell was slated to get a few series for
experience. He made the most of
his opportunities—throwing for 256
yards and four touchdowns. ESPN
gave the former Mississippi Gatorade
player of the year a Heisman vote for
the efort. Te fan base was excited
and clamored for Russell to become
the starter.
Mullen didn’t acquiesce to the
fans, but Russell did split reps with
Relf; he only managed 19 pass-
ing yards in the game. I personally
blamed the loss on the forced quar-
terback controversy and infamously
asserted that Russell would “never”
be an elite SEC quarterback or live up
to everyone’s expectations. I took a lot
of heat for the comments at the time
and still do.
Russell threw three intercep-
tions in the next game of the season,
against LSU, and made me look
almost prophetic. Mullen made his
decision on a quarterback afer that
game, going with Relf as the starter.
He went on to have one of the better
seasons for a Mississippi State quar-
terback in recent memory - fnishing
the season with over 2,000 yards and
leading the team to a 9-4 record.
Te hype was now on Relf, and
Russell had to decide whether to
stick around or transfer to another
program. Obviously, he stuck around
and waited his turn behind the dual-
threat.
He didn’t have to wait as long as
most thought. Afer a strong start to
the season, Relf became inefective,
and Russell supplanted him midway
through a game against University of
Alabama-Birmingham. He brought
the Bulldogs back from a 3-0 defcit -
tossing three touchdowns. It has even
been said that his performance in the
game “saved” the 2011 season. I don’t
put any stock in that assessment, but
he was named the starter the next
week.
Russell started the next few
games, including games against South
Carolina, Alabama and Arkansas, but
he couldn’t lead the team to victory
in any of those key games. Mullen let
Relf start the fnal game of the season,
in addition to the bowl game.
Naysayers, like me, wondered if
he would even enter the 2012 season
as the starter, considering the stif
challenge he was sure to get from
fery back-up Dylan Favre, who
replaced him against Arkansas, and
2011 signee Dak Prescott.
Favre elected to leave
the program, though, and
Prescott became the only
other challenger for the
starting job.
While Prescott was the
natural ft for Mullen’s sys-
tem, Russell took a strangle-
hold on the starting position
during spring practice. I
think there was still doubt
about what he would do
once “the marbles dropped.”
Russell’s supporters
and detractors could agree
on one thing: we needed to
fnd out once and for all if
he was “the guy” to lead the
Bulldogs.
Afer a tune-up game
against the Jackson State Ti-
gers, the moment that everyone had
been waiting for had fnally arrived;
the Bulldogs usual early-season “lit-
mus test” against the Auburn Tigers.
Would Russell step up? Russell
did.
Enroute to a dominating victory
over Auburn, Russell connected on
a 30-yard strike to Marcus Green, a
13-yard bullet to Chad Bumphis, and
capped it of with a three-yard dump-
of to Green.
Now, with this breakout perfor-
mance, the quarterback that was once
known as the “the guy that beat South
Panola” could also be described by
the following term: legit SEC starting
quarterback.
Let the “Russell Era” Begin
By Jeremiah Short
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entertainment
sevendays
events@realstorypublishing.com
Thursday 9/13
Mother Goose’s Storytime at Columbus-Lowndes Public Library (314 7th Street North); 10
a.m. and 3:30 p.m.; Ages 3-5; 662-329-5300 *** Tampico Bay Courtyard Bar (1515 College
Street); 7 p.m.-12 a.m.; Age 18+ only, ID required; smoke free *** Farmer’s Market at The Hitch-
ing Lot (corner of 2nd Avenue and 2nd Street North) 6-10 a.m. *** Down on Main – Tupelo’s
free summer concert at Fairpark Amphitheater (71 Troy Street, Tupelo, Miss.); 6:00 p.m. ***
Business After Hours; Renee Reedy Photography & Cinematography (101 5th Street South
Columbus, Miss.); 5-7 p.m.; Free *** Columbus Arts Council and Columbus Community Theatre –
“Acting & Physical Theatre” workshops at Columbus Arts Council (501 Main Street); 6:30 – 10
p.m.; $15 per person; Call 662-328-2787 for more information. ***
Friday 9/14
Wee Babies at Columbus-Lowndes Public Library (314 7th Street North); 10:30 a.m.; Ages
0-4; 662-329-5300 *** Tampico Bay Courtyard Bar (1515 College Street) from 7 p.m-1:20
a.m. Age 18+ only, ID required; smoke free *** Live Music – Gary Burnside at Blue Canoe
(2006 North Gloster Street, Tupelo, Miss.); 9 p.m.; $5 cover charge ***
Saturday 9/15
Farmer’s Market at The Hitching Lot (corner of 2nd Avenue and 2nd Street North); 7-10 a.m.
*** Tampico Bay Courtyard Bar (1515 College Street); 7 p.m.-1:20 a.m. Age 18+ only, ID
required; smoke free *** Aberdeen - Picnic On The Grounds - A 175th celebration event
on Columbus Street; Aberdeen, Miss.; Call 662-369-9440 for more information. *** Boutique
Bonanza at The Summit Center (852 North Gloster Street, Tupelo, Miss.) from 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.;
Free *** Live Music – Bonfre Orchestra; The Stables (206 North Spring Street, Suite 3, Tupelo,
Miss.); 9 p.m.
Sunday 9/16
*** No Events Listed. ***
Monday 9/17
Farmer’s Market at The Hitching Lot (corner of 2nd Avenue and 2nd Street North); 4-6 p.m.
Tuesday 9/18
Live Music – American Aquarium at Blue Canoe (2006 North Gloster Street, Tupelo, Miss.);
8:30 p.m.; Free *** Columbus-Lowndes Development LINK Ribbon Cutting – Krispy Kreme
(Highway 45 North); 10 a.m. *** Columbus Arts Council – Tuesday Tunes, Live Music at Rosen-
zweig Arts Center (501 Main Street); 12 -1 p.m. Lunch can be purchased for $7 or bring your
own.
Wednesday 9/19
Friends of the Library “Table Talk” at Columbus-Lowndes Public Library (314 7th Street North)
every Wednesday in September. 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m.; Bring your lunch. *** Tampico Bay Court-
yard Bar (1515 College Street); 7 p.m.-12 a.m.; Age 18+ only, ID required; smoke free ***
Columbus-Lowndes Development LINK Quarterly Luncheon at MUW Hogarth Dining Center
– Pope Banquet Room (1100 College Street); 11:30 a.m. – 1 p.m.; $12.
To include your events contact Kate Spencer at
events@realstorypublishing.com
POPS BBQ
6767 Hwy 45 N, Columbus
662.243.2222
M -W 10am-8pm • Th - S 10am-9pm • Sunday 10am-8pm
You must try
Delore’s fried
MS Delta Farm
Raised Catfish!
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Best Brisket In Town!
W
e also
have ribs!
Courses begin September 17
• 38 course offerings
• A range of topics including Bridge, Es-
tate Planning, Natural Medicine,
Guitar, and Sign Language.
LIFE ENRICHMENT PROGRAM
AT MUW
662-329-7150
bmoore@ccl.muw.edu
Prayers and Squares Ministry
Prayers and Squares is a ministry that provides prayer quilts that
will be shared with individuals who are going through difculties
or illnesses. We welcome all quilters, skilled, or not so skilled,
men, women, and teenagers who would like to be involved in this
special ministry.
Columbus SDA Church
(Fellowship Hall)
301 Brooks Rd. (of Lehmberg Rd.)
Monday nights at 6:00 p.m.
Come join us for an enjoyable fellowship time together.
For more information
contact Diane Sturges at 662-329-4311
dianecooksturges@gmail.com
(We are also accepting donations of fabric)
COLUMBUS
Leigh Mall
662-328-4450
Mon-Sat 10am-9pm
Sun 1pm-6pm
STARKVILLE-SMOOTHIE
911 Hwy. 12 W., Ste. 206-B
662-323-4919
Mon-Sat 9:30am-8:30pm
Sun 12pm-6pm
20% OFF
with GNC Gold Card
Gold Card Days
1st thru 10th
of each month
Jo Ann M. Walk-Ferguson
Franchisee/Owner
Howard Ferguson
Owner
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Classic Car Care I
806 Hwy 45 North
Columbus
662.241.6177
Classic Car Care II
300 Alabama Street
Columbus
662.243.7771
Cattleman’s
Steak and Fish
301 Tuscaloosa Road • Columbus
662-327-2990
PICK UP YOUR COPY OF THE REAL
STORY AT ANY OF THESE STORES
Cracked Windshield???
Auto Glass
1519 E. Gardner Blvd
Columbus
662.329.1733
L
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C o l u mb u s L o c k & K e y
Commercial • Residential • Automotive
309 22 St. N (1 block North of Hwy 52, Columbus
662-329-1457
open 8 a.m. - 4 p.m. Mon - Fri
Thomas H. Cole
Certifed Master Locksmith
Ms. Shirley’s Ms. Shirley’s
662.243.2340
201-M Alabama Street
(Gateway Shopping Center)
“Where the food is slapping & snapping”
WALK-INS WELCOME!!!!
(Located inside Wal-Mart)
662.328.6789
Kids Cut $10.00
Adult Cut with Shampoo $15.00
Perfect Package (Shampoo, Cut & Styled) $21.50

Color Starts at $44.95
7 FOILS $24.95
14 FOILS $34.95
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
M-SAT 9AM-9PM
SUNDAY 10AM-6PM
Salon Manager-Amanda Smith
Stylist -Sarah Wingard Williams
www.smartstyle.com
PROFESSIONAL NAIL CARE FOR LADIES & GENTLEMEN
L - T NAILS
L - T NAILS
662.244.8888
• Acrylic Nails
• Sollar Nails
• Shellac
• Manicure
• Spa Pedicure
• Waxing
Mon - Sat: 9:30 a.m. - 7 p.m. • Sun: Closed
105 D Alabama St. Columbus, MS 39701
Walk-Ins Welcome • Gift Certifcates Available
~laæ,· ·«.¸.«æl, &~.~· ~« :.!»
A Quaint Cozy Restaurant and Market
513 MAIN STREET
Looking for a relaxing atmosphere, delicious cuisine, a sophisticated flare with attractive prices, CONTINENTAL MARKET & BISTRO offers that and so much more.
Continental Market & Bistro is your place for social lunches, business meetings, Garden Club meetings, girls night out, bunko, bridal showers & luncheons,
private wine and cheese tasting parties.
·.«t.«~«:æl .æ·l~ a v.st·»
·.«t.«~«:æl .æ·l~ a v.st·»
A few of the house originals:
Dana’s French Onion, Tomato Basil & Roasted
Garlic Potato Soups • Caprese • Salmon & Dill,
Shrimp & Asparagus Quiches • Butterkase Baby,
The Marilyn & The Duke Grilled Cheeses •
Summer & Holiday Chicken Salads •
Gorgonapple Salad • ShrimpA’Codo Salad •
Handmade Chocolates - “Two Bites of Heaven” •
One of a kind desserts
The Market offers gourmet
food items, wine accessories,
candles, comeback sauce, brie
condiments & bakers, creme
brulee mixes, lots of great
cookbooks and much, much
more.
MARKET HOURS BISTRO HOURS
TUESDAY - FRIDAY 10 AM-3PM 11AM-2-PM
SATURDAY 8 AM-3PM 8 AM-2PM
CONTINENTAL MARKET & BISTRO • 513 MAIN STREET COLUMBUS MS • 662-328-2021