www.smdailyjournal.

com
Wednesday • Sept. 19, 2012 • Vol XII, Edition 28
BIPARTISAN BILL
STATE PAGE 5
AP RANKING
NINERS NO. 1
SPORTS PAGE 11
APPLE CLOSES
ABOVE $700
BUSINESS PAGE 10
GOV. BROWN SIGNS WORKERS’ COMPENSATION FIXES
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
Foster City finished fiscal year
2012-13 with about $2.7 million
more than it expected due to
stronger sales and hotel tax collec-
tions, according to a quarterly finan-
cial report the City Council will
hear next week.
One-time development fees and
departmental belt-tightening has
left the city with more than $20 mil-
lion in available reserves, according
to the report.
The city’s general fund revenue
finished the fiscal year, which ended
June 30, at $31.7 million, more than
$2 million ahead of projections,
according to the staff report.
Property tax revenue was
$450,000 higher than expected and
sales tax revenue exceeded original
estimates by $670,000, according to
the report.
The Pilgrim-Triton and Gilead
Sciences Campus developments are
yielding significant one-time rev-
enue and will provide more revenue
for the city once the projects are
completed, according to the report.
The two projects have sent permit
revenue to the highest level the city
has ever seen, according to the
report.
Hotel taxes finished the year
$380,000 ahead of projections and
the city’s departments spent $1.3
million less than budgeted, accord-
ing to the report.
The report also details depart-
mental savings and shows the Parks
and Recreation Department saved
nearly $396,000 last year and the
police department saved another
$270,000.
The fire department’s budget saw
$90,000 in savings and the
Community Development
Foster City’s revenue jumps
Reserves higher than expected with strong sales and hotel taxes, one-time permit revenue
BILL SILVERFARB/DAILY JOURNAL
State Assemblyman Jerry Hill, D-San Mateo, speaks with Horrall Elementary School students Sam Msalam and
Adrian Mederos at the Mid-Peninsula Boys & Girls Club in San Mateo yesterday on the dangers of smoking.
DAILY JOURNAL FILE PHOTO
The former Stangelini’s Italian Deli & Hilltop Market in San Mateo has been
vacant for nearly two years.
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
A 7-Eleven has been approved to
replace the vacant Stangelini’s
Italian Deli & Hilltop Market in San
Mateo by city staff but Deputy
Mayor David Lim has requested a
series of public hearings to deter-
mine whether the land should be
kept as residential, as it is currently
zoned.
The deli was vacant for so long,
nearly two years, that the property
on North San Mateo Drive is now
zoned for multi-family residences.
A 7-Eleven or any other retail estab-
lishment proposed for the site is
considered a non-conforming use
since the land is zoned residential.
City staff approved 7-Eleven’s
zoning application Aug. 30 after
7-Eleven approval
met with scrutiny
Convenience store approved to
replace vacant Stangelini’s market
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
More restaurants could be coming
to the Burlingame Avenue area as
early as December after the City
Council directed staff to draft an
ordinance dropping the limit on the
number of full-service establish-
ments.
Since 1985, Burlingame has had a
restriction on the number of food
establishments around Burlingame
Avenue. In recent years, the council
City may lift restaurant restrictions
Burlingame officials express ending limits
to full-service establishments downtown
By Chris Cooney
BAY CITY NEWS STAFF
Gov. Jerry Brown has signed leg-
islation that creates tougher penal-
ties for stores that sell cigarettes to
minors, and the bill’s author,
Assemblyman Jerry Hill, is credit-
ing youth groups in San Mateo
County with spurring the new law.
Hill, D-San Mateo, said he intro-
duced Assembly Bill 1301 in 2011
after meeting with teenagers from
the Youth Leadership Institute of
San Mateo, who enlisted him to help
them curb sales of tobacco to under-
age teens.
“I’ve always been a proponent of
anti-smoking issues, especially
when it comes to young people,”
Hill said.
As a San Mateo city councilman
in the mid 1990s, Hill helped pass
an anti-smoking ordinance that pro-
hibited smoking in restaurants and
bars.
The ordinance was among the
toughest in the state at the time, he
said.
AB 1301 requires the state Board
of Equalization, which issues tobac-
co sales licenses to retailers, to sus-
pend a store’s tobacco license for 45
days if it is caught selling to a minor
three times in a five-year period.
A fourth violation would result in
a 90-day suspension, and a fifth
would cause the retailer’s tobacco
license to be permanently revoked.
Before AB 1301, retailers or
clerks caught selling tobacco prod-
ucts to minors were often just fined,
which had less of an effect than a
Law cracks down on stores
that sell tobacco to minors
See REVENUE, Page 23
See MARKET, Page 23
See BURLINGAME, Page 23 See LAW, Page 23
FOR THE RECORD 2 Wednesday • Sept. 19, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
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Actor Jeremy Irons
is 64.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1982
The smiley emoticon was invented as
Carnegie Mellon University professor
Scott E. Fahlman proposed punctuating
humorously intended computer mes-
sages by employing a colon followed
by a hyphen and a parenthesis as a hor-
izontal “smiley face.” :-)
“Start every day off with a
smile and get it over with.”
— W.C. Fields, American comedian (1880-1946)
TV host James Lip-
ton is 86.
Comedian Jimmy
Fallon is 38.
Birthdays
REUTERS
Water polo players warm up before their training in a public swimming pool in Sao Paulo , Brazil.
Wednesday: Cloudy in the morning then
becoming partly cloudy. Patchy fog in the
morning. Highs in the upper 50s to mid 60s.
West winds 10 to 20 mph.
Wednesday night: Partly cloudy in the
evening then becoming cloudy. Patchy fog
after midnight. Lows around 50. West
winds 10 to 20 mph.
Thursday: Cloudy in the morning then becoming partly
cloudy. Patchy fog in the morning. Highs in the upper 50s to
mid 60s. West winds 10 to 15 mph.
Thursday night: Partly cloudy in the evening then becoming
cloudy. Patchy fog after midnight. Lows around 50. West
winds 15 to 20 mph...Becoming 5 to 15 mph after midnight.
Friday: Cloudy in the morning then becoming partly cloudy.
Patchy fog. Highs in the 60s.
Local Weather Forecast
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are No. 10 Solid
Gold in first place; No. 05 California Classic in
second place; and No. 07 Eureka in third place.
The race time was clocked at 1:45.85.
(Answers tomorrow)
FLUID ISSUE LAPTOP GENTLY
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: The chef’s new restaurant was this —
TASTEFUL
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
TERIG
COSHA
FOCART
NICCIL
©2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
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2 2 8
5 9 22 36 49 36
Mega number
Sept. 18 Mega Millions
3 8 14 25 35
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
6 4 2 8
Daily Four
2 9 7
Daily three evening
In 1777, the first Battle of Saratoga was fought during the
Revolutionary War; although the British forces succeeded in
driving out the American troops, the Americans prevailed in a
second battle the following month.
In 1796, President George Washington’s farewell address was
published.
In 1881, the 20th president of the United States, James A.
Garfield, died 2 1/2 months after being shot by Charles
Guiteau; Chester Alan Arthur became president.
In 1934, Bruno Hauptmann was arrested in New York and
charged with the kidnap-murder of Charles A. Lindbergh Jr.
In 1945, Nazi radio propagandist William Joyce, known as
“Lord Haw-Haw,” was convicted of treason and sentenced to
death by a British court.
In 1957, the United States conducted its first contained under-
ground nuclear test, code-named “Rainier,” in the Nevada
desert.
In 1959, Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev, visiting Los
Angeles, reacted angrily upon being told that, for security rea-
sons, he wouldn’t get to visit Disneyland.
In 1960, Cuban leader Fidel Castro, in New York to visit the
United Nations, angrily checked out of the Shelburne Hotel in
a dispute with the management; Castro ended up staying at the
Hotel Theresa in Harlem.
In 1961, Barney and Betty Hill, a New Hampshire couple driv-
ing home from vacation, experienced what they later claimed
under hypnosis was a short-term abduction by extraterrestrials.
In 1962, the Western TV series “The Virginian” debuted on
NBC.
In 1970, the situation comedy “The Mary Tyler Moore Show”
debuted on CBS-TV.
Author Roger Angell is 92. Actress Rosemary Harris is 85.
Former Defense Secretary Harold Brown is 85. Actor Adam West
is 82. Retired MLB All-Star pitcher Bob Turley is 82. Actor
David McCallum (TV: “NCIS”) is 79. Singer-songwriter Paul
Williams is 72. Singer Bill Medley is 72. Singer Sylvia Tyson
(Ian and Sylvia) is 72. Singer Freda Payne is 70. Golfer Jane
Blalock is 67. Singer David Bromberg is 67. Actor Randolph
Mantooth is 67. Rock singer-musician Lol Creme (10cc) is 65.
Former NFL running back Larry Brown is 65. Actress Twiggy
Lawson is 63. TV personality Joan Lunden is 62. Singer-produc-
er Daniel Lanois is 61. Actor Scott Colomby is 60.
The unlucky S.S. Minnow on “Gilligan’s
Island” (1964-1967) was named after
Newton Minow (born 1926), former
chairman of the Federal
Communications Commission. Minow
gave a speech in 1961 denouncing televi-
sion as a “vast wasteland.”
***
“The Poseidon Adventure” was the top-
grossing film of 1972. Ernest Borgnine
(1917-2012) and Gene Hackman (born
1930) starred as passengers of a luxuri-
ous ocean liner trying to survive after the
ship gets hit by a tidal wave and capsizes.
***
The world’s largest expedition yacht in
the world, named the Octopus, is owned
by Paul Allen (born 1953), a co-founder
of Microsoft. The 416-foot yacht has two
helicopters and a submarine aboard.
Allen brought his yacht to the Thames in
London for the 2012 Olympics.
***
Presidential candidate Gary Hart (born
1936) dropped out of the 1988 election
one week after the National Enquirer
published a photo of the married man
with his mistress Donna Rice (born
1958) sitting on his lap. The photo was
taken while the couple was aboard a ship
called Monkey Business.
***
The largest ships in the Princess cruise
line are the Sapphire Princess and the
Diamond Princess. The identical ships
each carry 2,670 passengers and 1,200
crew.
***
Originally, the pilgrims traveling from
England for America in 1620 departed
on two ships — the Mayflower and the
Speedwell. However, the Speedwell
developed a leak and could not make the
voyage.
***
Captain Joseph Hazelwood (born 1946)
stood trial after the 1989 oil spill of the
Exxon Valdez oil tanker. He was accused
of causing the accident due to intoxica-
tion. A jury found that he was not drunk,
but he was fined $50,000 and 1,000
hours of community service for negli-
gently discharging oil.
***
Can you name the ships of the following
captains? Captain Jack Sparrow, Captain
Hook, Captain Ahab, Captain Stubing
and Captain Corcoran. See answer at
end.
***
Walt Disney originally wanted to have
live animals in the Jungle Cruise ride at
Disneyland until he realized he couldn’t
control the animals’ sleeping habits. The
python, hippos, gorillas and elephants
encountered on the cruise are run by
robotics.
***
The British shipping company White
Star Line built three huge ships: the
Olympic in 1911, the Titanic in 1912 and
the Britannic in 1914. The Titanic was
the largest passenger ship in the world at
the time of its launching.
***
After the Titanic ran into an iceberg in
1912, the ship’s orchestra was instructed
to play cheerful tunes to calm the pas-
sengers. The eight members of the
orchestra played while the ship sunk.
They went down with the ship.
***
The mutiny aboard the British Royal
Navy ship named the Bounty occurred in
1789. First mate Fletcher Christian
(1764-1793) led a mutiny against
Captain William Bligh (1754-1817)
sending the captain and half of the crew
adrift in a small launch. Bligh sailed the
23-foot boat 3,600 miles back to civiliza-
tion. The mutineers started a settlement
in Tahiti.
***
Answer: Jack Sparrow — the Black
Pearl, from the movie “Pirates of the
Caribbean: the Curse of the Black
Pearl” (2003). Hook — the Jolly Roger,
from “Peter Pan.” Ahab — the Pequod,
from the novel “Moby Dick “(1851).
Stubing — the Pacific Princess, from the
television series “The Love Boat” (1977-
1986). Corcoran — HMS Pinafore, from
the comic opera “HMS Pinafore.”
Know It All is by Kerry McArdle. It runs in
the weekend and Wednesday editions of the
Daily Journal. Questions? Comments? Email
knowitall@smdailyjournal.com or call 344-
5200 ext. 114.
1 6 7 19 36 16
Mega number
Sept. 15 Super Lotto Plus
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Wednesday • Sept. 19, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
One of two allegedly intoxicated motorists
who collided in a Menlo Park intersection
last month pleaded not guilty yesterday to
driving while intoxicated and leaving the
scene of a crime.
Yungee Kim, 41, of Sunnyvale, returns to
court Oct. 9 to set a preliminary hearing date.
Kim and fellow motorist Zaquis Jahrona
Coleman were arrested in the Aug. 11 crash
but Kim bailed out of custody that same
night. Coleman, 22, of East Palo Alto, plead-
ed not guilty a few days later.
Menlo Park police officers arrested both
defendants after responding to reports of a
hit-and-run crash near the
intersection of Bayfront
Expressway and Chrysler
Drive at about 2:30 a.m.
Saturday. Prosecutors say
Kim, who has a 2011 con-
viction for reckless driv-
ing, struck Coleman’s
vehicle nearly head on as
she made a left turn on
westbound Chrysler. A
witness wasn’t sure who had the green light
but said Kim fled the scene on foot without
contacting those inside the other car.
Coleman was uninjured but a 24-year-old
passenger sustained a compound fracture of
her left wrist. Coleman’s
alcohol level tested at .18
and .19, leading to her
arrest. Roughly two hours
later, officers found Kim
wandering in the 100
block of Constitution
Drive without any shoes
and falling down. In his
pocket were keys to the
car involved in the crash
and the vehicle is regis-
tered in his name, according to prosecutors.
Coleman’s trial is set for Nov. 13 and she
is free from custody on her own recogni-
zance.
Driver in collision pleads not guilty to DUI
BELMONT
Burglary. A home and vehicles were bur-
glarized on Farallon Drive before 6:54 p.m.
Wednesday, Sept. 12. The suspects went into
the garage through an unlocked door and
rummaged through the unlocked cars.
Theft. A bicycle was stolen from a home on
South Road before 2:51 p.m. Wednesday,
Sept. 12.
Hit and run. A vehicle was hit on Buena
Vista Avenue before 5:11 p.m. Tuesday,
Sept. 11.
Theft. A bicycle was stolen from a garage on
Davey Glen Road before 6:21 p.m. Sunday,
Sept. 9.
Reckless driver. A vehicle was reported
swerving while driving 80 mph on El
Camino Real and Davey Glen Road before
1:48 a.m. on Friday, Sept. 7.
Animal call. A dead raccoon was reported
near an entrance to a school on Ralston
Avenue before 8:21 a.m. on Friday, Sept. 7.
FOSTER CITY
Suspicious circumstances. A person report-
ed something was shot at their car while they
were driving on West Parkway and Tower
Lanes before 4:23 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 12.
DUI. A San Mateo man was arrested and
booked for driving under the influence
before 11:30 p.m. Monday, Sept. 10.
Theft. A Ford E250 with two orange ladders
was stolen from a parking lot on Beach Park
Boulevard before 4:28 p.m. Monday, Sept.
10.
Embezzlement. An employee was fired for
embezzling approximately $500,000 over the
last seven years on East Hillsdale Boulevard
before 11:38 a.m. Monday, Sept. 10.
Police reports
That’s tacky
A woman reported a neighbor glued her
door shut on the 500 block of El Camino
Real in Burlingame before 12:02 p.m. on
Sunday, Sept. 9.
Yungee Kim Zaquis
Coleman
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
The former Aragon High School water polo
coach accused of having an inappropriate
relationship with a female student will stand
trial on 10 sex crime charges, a judge ruled
Tuesday after a short preliminary hearing.
Joshua David Tatro, 25, of El Granada, has
pleaded not guilty to six felony counts of sex-
ual penetration, two counts of sending harm-
ful matter with an intent to seduce and two
counts of communicating with a minor to set
up a lewd act. However, he was held to answer
on all counts and will enter
a Superior Court plea Oct.
3, said Chief Deputy
District Attorney Karen
Guidotti.
He may also set a trial
date at that time.
Tatro is accused of a
relationship with a 17-
year-old water polo player
at Aragon High School
between October 2011 and May 2012. Police
began investigating them after being contact-
ed by school officials. He was arrested in
June.
Authorities say the relationship involved
sexual activity but not intercourse and numer-
ous cellphone photo exchanges of body parts.
Tatro had worked at the school for one year
as a water polo and swim coach. His arrest
came just after the end of the season and he
was not hired back.
Tatro remains fee from custody on $25,000
bail.
Former coach to trial for student relationship
Joshua Tatro
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LINCOLN, Neb. — The family of a
retired San Mateo firefighter who disap-
peared from an Amtrak train says it now
appears that he may have fallen from the
train somewhere in eastern Colorado or
western Nebraska.
Charlie Dowd’s family members had been
organizing searches in
Omaha and Lincoln for
the 69-year-old San
Mateo man because they
believed he may have
mistakenly gotten off the
train at one of those stops.
But Jen Dowd said
Tuesday Amtrak police
told the family a passenger on the
California-to-Chicago train saw Dowd
standing near a train door Thursday night.
Another passenger later found an exterior
door ajar around 11 p.m. Thursday.
Jen Dowd says the search for her father
will now focus on the 160 miles of track
between Fort Morgan, Colo., and McCook,
Neb.
Family says San Mateo man may have fallen from train
Charlie Dowd
4
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Wednesday • Sept. 19, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE
Advertisement
Police release video of
burglar breaking into home
Redwood City police are asking for the pub-
lic’s help in identifying a burglar who was cap-
tured on video breaking into a home last month.
The burglary occurred in the 1100 block of
Lyons Street at around 1 p.m. on Aug. 30,
according to Redwood City police.
Private security cameras filmed the burglar
ringing a front doorbell, and then entering the
home through a rear sliding-glass door that was
left unlocked. Electronic items and jewelry were
stolen, police said. The male suspect appears to
be between 16 and 21 years old and about 5 feet
7 to 5 feet 9 inches tall. He has a medium build,
black hair and brown eyes.
The video footage can be viewed online at:
http://vimeo.com/49685183.
Anyone with information about the suspect is
asked to contact Redwood City police Detective
Dave Stahler at (650) 780-7620. Callers wishing
to remain anonymous can call (800) 222-8477.
San Jose Police Chief Chris
Moore announces retirement
Embattled San Jose Police Chief Chris
Moore, who has been facing criticism for the
city’s surging crime and officers’ low morale,
says he is retiring.
Moore made his surprise announcement on
Monday. He became police chief in February
2011 after serving as acting chief for four
months. His last day will be on Jan. 31.
The 51-year-old’s announcement comes near-
ly a month after the police union delayed a
potential “vote of no confidence” against him
and Assemblywoman Nora Campos’ open letter
to the 30-year police veteran stating that the
city’s violence is “spiraling out of control.”
Local briefs
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
An Oakland man who induced a 17-year-
old girl to prostitute herself throughout the
state, sometimes up to five times a day, was
sentenced yesterday to 16 months in prison.
Gregory Anthony Maurice Saunders Jr.
faced up to two years after pleading no con-
test to a felony count of procuring of a person
for prostitution by false inducement. On
Tuesday, he received just shy that maximum
with credit for 88 days served before posting
$50,000 bail.
Chief Deputy District Attorney Karen
Guidotti said the sentence was good for the
circumstances.
South San Francisco police arrested
Saunders in October 2011 after stopping a
car driven by the girl. Police say in August
2011 Saunders met the
girl on International
Boulevard in Oakland and
became her boyfriend. A
month later, according to
the District Attorney’s
Office, he convinced her
to act as a prostitute and
posted ads on
MyRedBook.com.
Prosecutors say he set
the prices and the girl
serviced four to five customers daily, giving
all the money to Saunders. Saunders report-
edly bought a gun to protect her and the pair
traveled as far away as Southern California to
work. Authorities said the girl feared
Saunders would break up with her if she
stopped prostituting herself.
Man imprisoned
for pimping teen
Gregory
Saunders
By Judy Lin and Julie Watson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN DIEGO — Gov. Jerry Brown signed a
bipartisan bill Tuesday intended to reduce
workers’ compensation costs for California
businesses while increasing benefits to people
injured on the job.
His office said statewide changes were need-
ed because the cost of workers’ compensation
insurance has risen from $14.8 billion to $19
billion for California businesses in the past
two years. Supporters said by making the sys-
tem more efficient and limiting litigation, the
bill, SB863, will save businesses $1 billion
next year and allow increased payments to dis-
abled workers.
Opponents, including some chiropractors
and attorneys for injured workers, argued that
limiting litigation would mean fewer benefits
for people who are unable to return to work.
According to the insurance-run Workers’
Compensation Insurance Rating Bureau of
California, there were 527,000 workplace
injuries reported in 2011, about 174,000 of
which resulted in temporary and permanent
disability or death.
Brown — who was joined by business rep-
resentatives, labor leaders and legislative lead-
ers — said the bill is an example of what can
be achieved when Democrats and Republicans
work together. Democratic Sen. Kevin De
Leon, of Los Angeles, carried SB863 and law-
makers approved it with bipartisan support last
month.
“We’re saving hundreds of millions of dol-
lars for businesses, we’re getting workers back
to work faster and we’re getting them the kind
of medical care they need,” Brown said before
signing the bill inside a family-owned printing
shop in San Diego’s Barrio Logan neighbor-
hood. Later in the day, the governor promoted
the legislation at a Walt Disney Co. studio lot
in Burbank.
Rebecca Aguilera-Gardiner, who runs Diego
& Son Printing with her brother, said changes
in the bill “not only helps the worker, it helps
the small-business owner.” The shop started by
their father is celebrating its 40th anniversary
with banners that read, “Old fashion service
with the latest technology.”
SB863 will increase benefits to permanently
disabled workers by $860 million a year while
giving employers a break on insurance costs.
Brown signs workers’ compensation fixes
BAY CITY NEWS SERVICE
San Francisco will soon provide an alterna-
tive to PG&E after the city’s Board of
Supervisors Tuesday approved plans that will
allow residents to buy energy from fully
renewable sources at an increased price.
The supervisors voted 8-3 in favor of
CleanPowerSF, a $19.5 million program that
includes a five-year contract with Shell
Energy North America and also sets aside $2
million to study local options for creating
green energy for the city.
Supervisor David Campos said the legisla-
tion “provides consumers with a choice” in
where they get their power, while also setting
up the framework in which the city can even-
tually create its own energy.
San Francisco Public Utilities Commission
General Manager Ed Harrington told the
supervisors that CleanPowerSF is the city’s
“only chance” to meet its ambitious goals in
reducing greenhouse gases and increasing
energy efficiency.
The program, which Harrington said will go
into effect in spring 2013, will initially
include about 90,000 customers, or roughly a
quarter of the city’s residential ratepayers.
The program would cause an estimated
increase of $18 per month on the average util-
ity bill in the city, with a discount for low-
income residents, he said.
Supervisor John Avalos said, “There’s a
portion who I believe are willing to pay a
slightly higher rate” for clean energy, and the
legislation “will put teeth to our goals on cli-
mate change.”
However, other supervisors were uneasy
about forcing some of the city’s residents to
participate in the program. The ratepayers
selected for the system would have five
months to opt out of the program for free, then
would have to pay a $5 fee if they opt out
afterward.
Supervisor Mark Farrell said the program
“smells like coercion” and would “foist onto
consumers an increase of 20 to 30 percent” on
their monthly utility bill.
“The premise and numbers just don’t add
up right now,” Farrell said.
Farrell, Carmen Chu and Sean Elsbernd
were the only three supervisors to oppose the
legislation.
San Francisco approves plan to provide alternative to PG&E
REUTERS
Gov. Jerry Brown at a news conference at the Ronald Reagan State Building in Los Angeles.
6
Wednesday • Sept. 19, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Andrew Cunningham Sager III
Andrew Cunningham Sager III, died Aug.
12, 2012, due to a motorcycle accident near
La Honda.
Andrew was born Oct. 19, 1931 in
Cleveland, Ohio. Because of his love for
music, specifically the trumpet, he organized
the comedy “Uoomph Band” at Burbank
High School in California. He played with
the Bob Porters Swing Band, as well as the
Los Angeles Symphony, working with
Warner Brothers Studio Orchestra.
Andy joined the Navy in 1950 as a musi-
cian. He attended the Naval Conservatory of
Music, received his musician stripes, and
played in the U.S. Navy Band. He traveled
with The Three Blue Jackets as a trumpeter,
performing with the Navy Band and other
orchestras. Andy served on an aircraft carrier
with the 7th Fleet as a navigation novice and
main bugler on board the USS Philippine Sea
until 1954.
Andy spent most of his professional life in
architectural specification work, contract
sales and management in the automatic door
business at Stanley and Besam. As regional
manager and manufacture’s rep, he traveled
throughout the western states.
His passion for tennis, bicycling, sailing,
golfing and most recently motorcycling
demonstrated his zest for life.
“His quirky sense of humor and infectious
laugh leave us with great memories etched in
our hearts.”
He is survived by his immediate family:
wife Judith Reynolds Sager, Belmont;
daughter Wendy Sorensen, Laguna Woods;
son Andy (Julie), Laguna Hills; grandsons
Eric (Laura), Darrin, Drew and Austin; great-
grandchildren Ella and Hunter. In lieu of
flowers, choose your favorite charity.
As a public service, the Daily Journal
prints obituaries of approximately 200 words
or less with a photo one time on the date of
the family’s choosing. To submit obituaries,
email information along with a jpeg photo to
news@smdailyjournal.com. Free obituaries
are edited for style, clarity, length and gram-
mar. If you would like to have an obituary
printed more than once, longer than 200
words or without editing, please submit an
inquiry to our advertising department at
ads@smdailyjournal.com.
Obituary
By Terence Chea
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — A California State
University panel approved a plan Tuesday to
raise tuition by 5 percent early next year if
voters reject Gov. Jerry Brown’s tax initia-
tive and trigger a $250 million funding cut to
the 23-campus system.
The CSU board of trustees’ finance com-
mittee voted for the chancellor’s contin-
gency strategy to manage the potential fail-
ure of Proposition 30. The full board was
expected to approve the measure Wednesday
when it meets in Long Beach.
The Nov. 6 ballot measure would tem-
porarily boost the state sales and income
taxes to help close California’s budget
deficit and avoid deeper cuts to K-12
schools and colleges.
Under the resolution approved Tuesday,
CSU would raise tuition in the winter and in
spring 2013 if the tax measure fails. Tuition
for in-state undergraduates would increase
to $3,135 a semester or $6,270 a year. The
tuition increase would generate $116 million
a year.
CSU would also increase supplemental
tuition paid by out-of-state students by 7
percent, or $810 per year, to $11,970 a year
starting in fall 2013. That move would gen-
erate an expected $9 million a year.
The failure of Proposition 30 would trig-
ger deep midyear cuts to K-12 and higher
education while forcing CSU campuses to
cut course offerings, instructors and student
services, administrators said.
If Proposition 30 passes, CSU would
rescind a previously approved 9 percent
tuition increase that went into effect this fall.
Annual tuition would fall to $5,472.
If CSU freezes tuition this year, the sys-
tem would receive an additional $125 mil-
lion in state funding in 2013-14 — if
Proposition 30 passes — under legislation
Brown signed as part of the 2012-13 state
budget.
“If Proposition 30 doesn’t pass, we’re
going to cut $250 million out of our budget,
and we’re going to need some revenue to
replace that,” Chancellor Charles Reed told
the board. “If Proposition 30 passes, there’ll
be some light at the end of the tunnel. We
could roll back our tuition.”
CSU OKs plan to raise tuition if tax measure fails
By Alex Veiga
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES — Confidence among U.S.
homebuilders rose this month to its highest
level in six years and many expect the housing
recovery will strengthen in the next six
months.
The National Association of Home
Builders/Wells Fargo builder sentiment index
released Tuesday increased to 40 in
September. That’s up from 37 in August and
the highest reading since June 2006, just
before the housing bubble burst.
Any reading below 50 indicates negative
sentiment about the housing market. The
index hasn’t reached that level since April
2006, the peak of the housing boom.
Still, a measure of builders’ outlook for
sales in the next six months rose to 51. That’s
up from 43 in August and also the highest
level since June 2006.
Builders also reported seeing the best sales
level since July 2006. And turnout by prospec-
tive buyers returned to levels not seen since
May 2006.
The positive trends have helped bolster opti-
mism that the U.S. housing recovery will
endure.
“We think things have turned around and
this recovery is sustainable,” said Patrick
Newport, an economist with IHS Global
Insight. The rise in builder confidence means
that new-home construction is likely to
increase over the next six months, Newport
said.
The survey, which is based on responses
from 445 builders, has been trending higher
since October. After a dismal 2011, home-
builders have seen their fortunes begin to turn
around this year as the housing recovery has
steadily gained momentum.
Sales of both new and previously occupied
homes are running ahead of last year. Home
prices are increasing more consistently, in part
because the supply of homes has shrunk and
foreclosures have eased. And mortgage rates
remain near record lows, beckoning potential
buyers with good credit.
Still, the housing market remains depressed.
While the turnaround will continue next year,
a complete recovery in home construction
isn’t expected before 2016, Newport said.
The housing market isn’t expected to recov-
er fully until job growth improves and the
unemployment rate, now at 8.1 percent,
declines further.
Still, sales remain on the upswing at Taylor
Morrison, which builds homes in five U.S.
states and caters to entry-level and move-up
buyers, as well as seniors.
The Scottsdale, Ariz.-based company’s
sales are up 40 percent from last year, said
Graham Hughes, the builder’s vice president
of sales and marketing.
Hughes says the lower inventory of previ-
ously occupied homes for sale has helped
drive stronger demand for new homes.
Demand has been especially strong in markets
like Phoenix, where the builder’s sales are up
80 percent. That’s made it possible for Taylor
Morrison to hike prices there by an average of
15 percent.
Taylor Morrison expects to close out 2012
with 15 percent more employees than last
year. It also anticipates boosting payrolls by
another 10 percent next year.
“I’m definitely optimistic now,” Hughes
said. “We’ve turned the corner and we’re at
the bottom and starting to look up.”
Homebuilder confidence at six-year high
“I’m definitely optimistic
now. ... We’ve turned the corner and
we’re at the bottom and starting to look up.”
— Graham Hughes,Taylor Morrison vice president of sales and marketing
NATION 7
Wednesday • Sept. 19, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Jim Kuhnhenn and Ken Thomas
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SALT LAKE CITY — President Barack
Obama declared Tuesday night the occupant
of the Oval Office must “work for everyone,
not just for some,” jabbing back at Mitt
Romney’s jarring statement that as a candi-
date, he doesn’t worry about the 47 percent of
the country that pays no income taxes.
Romney neither disavowed nor apologized
for his remarks, which included an observa-
tion that nearly half of the country believe
they are victims and entitled to a range of
government support. Instead, Romney cast
his comment as evidence of a fundamental
difference with Obama over the economy,
adding the federal government should not
“take from some to give to the others.”
As the rivals sparred with seven weeks
remaining in a close race for the White
House, two GOP Senate candidates publicly
disavowed Romney’s remarks and
Republican officials openly debated the
impact that a series of controversies would
have on the party’s prospects of winning the
presidency.
Top Republicans in Congress declined
through aides to offer their reaction to
Romney’s remarks — just as they generally
refrained from commenting a week ago when
he issued a statement that inaccurately
accused the Obama administration of giving
comfort to demonstrators after they breached
the U.S. Embassy in Cairo.
The most recent controversy in a campaign
filled with them was ignited by the emergence
of a videotape, made last May, in which
Romney told donors at a
fundraiser that 47 percent
of Americans pay no
income taxes. They
“believe the government
has a responsibility to care
for them ... believe that
they are entitled to health
care, to food, to housing,
to you name it. That that’s
an entitlement.”
He said, “I’ll never convince them they
should take personal responsibility and care
for their lives.”
In a next-day interview on Fox, the network
of choice for conservatives, Romney said he
didn’t intend to write off any part of a deeply
divided electorate, including seniors who are
among those who often pay no taxes. Instead,
he repeatedly sought to reframe his remarks
as a philosophical difference of opinion
between himself and Obama.
“I’m not going to get” votes from
Americans who believe government’s job is
to redistribute wealth,” he said, adding that
was something Obama believes in.
He also said he wants to be president so he
can help hard-pressed Americans find work
and earn enough so they become income tax-
payers.
Romney didn’t say so, but the U.S. income
tax is designed to be progressive, so those
who earn the most theoretically pay the most.
Through programs as diverse as Social
Security, Medicare, health care and food
stamps, the government collects tax revenue
and pays it out in the form of benefits for
those who qualify.
Obama jabs Romney over his ‘47 percent’ remarks
Barack Obama
By Kasie Hunt and Steve Peoples
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — A bad stretch for Mitt
Romney just got worse, and Republican
insiders now are growing increasingly pes-
simistic about the GOP presidential nomi-
nee’s chances of winning the White House.
The latest heartburn for these insiders is
Romney’s refusal to back down from his
statement that nearly half of Americans
believe they are victims dependent upon gov-
ernment.
After his remarks, made to donors at a pri-
vate fundraiser in May, came to light in a
video, the candidate defended his position —
and did so again Tuesday. He told Fox News:
“I know some believe that government should
take from some to give to the others. I think
that’s an entirely foreign concept.”
Publicly, Romney’s campaign shrugs off
the criticism. Aides say Romney will try to
shift the debate back to the specifics of his
vision for the country in hopes of curbing
President Barack Obama’s momentum before
the first debate on Oct. 3 — and then seal the
deal.
But, at least this week, there are doubts in
GOP circles that he can prevail.
“This is a worst case scenario in some
respects,” Republican strategist Steve
Lombardo said a day after Romney’s remarks
roiled the campaign. Obama has been paint-
ing Romney as an out-of-touch elitist, and
Lombardo said the remarks “tend to reinforce
pre-existing perception.”
“Anytime that happens a campaign has to
worry,” Lombardo said.
The remarks were just the latest headache
for Romney seven weeks before Election Day
and with early voting well under way.
Romney critics and backers alike point to
his misstep-filled trip abroad in July as an
early signal of worry. Then came Romney’s
nominating convention, where Hollywood
actor/director Clint Eastwood stole the show
with a rambling conversation with an empty
chair representing the president.
Obama’s well-received convention fol-
lowed. And so did a boost for the president in
state and national polling.
Last week, Romney tried to use anti-
American unrest in the Middle East to seize
political advantage, only to be criticized for
prematurely assailing the commander in chief
before knowing all the facts, including that a
U.S. ambassador had died. Then there were
reports of infighting among his staff, and calls
from Republicans for Romney to do more
than just criticize Obama on the economy.
Republicans: Bad gets
even worse for Romney
REUTERS
Mitt Romney speaks to reporters in Los Angeles.
NATION 8
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By Mike Stobbe
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — We Americans already
know how fat we are. Can it get much worse?
Apparently, yes, according to an advocacy
group that predicts that by 2030 more than
half the people in the vast majority of states
will be obese.
Mississippi is expected to retain its crown
as the fattest state in the nation for at least two
more decades. The report predicts 67 percent
of that state’s adults will be obese by 2030;
that would be an astounding increase from
Mississippi’s current 35 percent obesity rate.
The new projections were released Tuesday
by Trust for America’s Health with funding
from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.
Trust for America’s Health regularly reports
on obesity to raise awareness, mostly relying
on government figures.
The group’s dismal forecast goes beyond
the 42 percent national obesity level that fed-
eral health officials project by 2030. The
group predicts every state would have rates
above 44 percent by that time, although it did-
n’t calculate an overall national average.
About two-thirds of Americans are over-
weight now. That includes those who are
obese, a group that accounts for about 36 per-
cent. Obesity rates have been holding steady
in recent years. Obesity is defined as having a
body-mass index of 30 or more, a measure of
weight for height.
Trust for America’s Health officials said
their projections are based in part on state-by-
state surveys by the Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention from 1999 through
2010.
Group: More than half in 39 states will be obese
Chicago teachers vote
to return to classroom
CHICAGO — Chicago’s teachers agreed
Tuesday to return to the classroom after more
than a week on the picket lines, ending a spite-
ful stalemate with Mayor Rahm Emanuel over
teacher evaluations and job security, two
issues at the heart of efforts to reform the
nation’s public schools.
Union delegates voted overwhelmingly to
suspend the strike after discussing a proposed
contract settlement that had been on the table
for days. Classes were to resume Wednesday.
Jubilant delegates poured out of a South
Side union hall singing “solidarity forever,”
cheering, honking horns and yelling, “We’re
going back.”
Most were eager to get to work and proud of
a walkout that yielded results.
“I’m very excited. I miss my students. I’m
relieved because I think this contract was bet-
ter than what they offered,” said America
Olmedo, who teaches fourth- and fifth-grade
bilingual classes. “They tried to take every-
thing away.”
Mayor Rahm Emanuel called the settlement
“an honest compromise” that “means a new
day and a new direction for the Chicago pub-
lic schools.”
“In past negotiations, taxpayers paid more,
but our kids got less. This time, our taxpayers
are paying less, and our kids are getting
more,” the mayor said, referring to provisions
in the deal that he says will cut costs.
Around the nation
By Felicia Fonseca and Jacques Billeaud
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PHOENIX — A judge in Arizona ruled
Tuesday that police can immediately start
enforcing the most contentious section of the
state’s immigration law, marking the first time
officers can carry out the so-called “show me
your papers” provision.
The decision by U.S. District Judge Susan
Bolton is the latest milestone in a two-year
legal battle over the requirement. It culminat-
ed in a U.S. Supreme Court decision in June
that upheld the provision on the grounds that it
doesn’t conflict with federal law.
Now, with the requirement finally in full
effect, both sides are anxious to see the out-
come.
The supporters want local police to use it
vigorously, but worry federal immigration
officials won’t respond to calls to come arrest
people.
“I am mulling what I will do if they don’t
respond,” said Maricopa County Sheriff Joe
Arpaio, who more than any other police boss
in the state pushed the bounds of immigration
enforcement. “I don’t feel comfortable letting
the illegal alien back on the street.”
Federal officials said they will check peo-
ple’s immigration status when officers call.
But they’ll only send an agent to arrest some-
one if it fits with their priorities, such as catch-
ing repeat violators and those who are a threat
to public safety and national security.
Meanwhile, civil rights advocates are
preparing for a battle.
Judge says police can enforce
Arizona immigration law now
Listed are 2011 obesity levels
followed by the Trust for America’s
Health projections for 2030. States
are listed in order from the highest
to lowest projections in 2030:
Mississippi, 35 percent, 67 percent
Oklahoma, 31 percent, 66 percent
Delaware, 29 percent, 65 percent
Tennessee, 29 percent, 63 percent
South Carolina, 31 percent, 63
percent
Alabama, 32 percent, 63 percent
Kansas, 30 percent, 62 percent
Louisiana, 33 percent, 62 percent
Missouri, 30 percent, 62 percent
Arkansas, 31 percent, 61 percent
South Dakota, 28 percent, 60
percent
West Virginia,32 percent,60 percent
Kentucky, 30 percent, 60 percent
Ohio, 30 percent, 60 percent
Michigan, 31 percent, 59 percent
Arizona, 25 percent, 59 percent
Maryland, 28 percent, 59 percent
Florida, 27 percent, 59 percent
North Carolina, 29 percent, 58
percent
New Hampshire, 26 percent, 58
percent
Texas, 30 percent, 57 percent
North Dakota, 28 percent, 57
percent
Nebraska, 28 percent, 57 percent
Pennsylvania,29 percent,57 percent
Wyoming, 25 percent, 57 percent
Wisconsin, 28 percent, 56 percent
Indiana, 31 percent, 56 percent
Washington,27 percent,56 percent
Maine, 28 percent, 55 percent
Minnesota, 26 percent, 55 percent
Iowa, 29 percent, 54 percent
New Mexico,26 percent,54 percent
Rhode Island,25 percent,54 percent
Illinois, 27 percent, 54 percent
Georgia, 28 percent, 54 percent
Montana, 25 percent, 54 percent
Idaho, 27 percent, 53 percent
Hawaii, 22 percent, 52 percent
New York, 25 percent, 51 percent
Virginia, 29 percent, 50 percent
Nevada, 25 percent, 50 percent
Oregon, 27 percent, 49 percent
Massachusetts, 23 percent, 49
percent
New Jersey, 24 percent, 49 percent
Vermont, 25 percent, 48 percent
California, 24 percent, 47 percent
Connecticut,25 percent,47 percent
Utah, 24 percent, 46 percent
Alaska, 27 percent, 46 percent
Colorado, 21 percent, 45 percent
District of Columbia, 24 percent, 33
percent
Obesity levels and projected growth
OPINION 9
Wednesday • Sept. 19, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Letters to the editor
I
n what is one of the more unusual cam-
paigns for office in recent years, one
member of the Sequoia Healthcare
District Board of Directors is running against
two others for one of their seats. If that board
member, Jack Hickey, wins, he will take a
seat of one of two board members up for
election, Katie Kane or Kim Griffin, and
leave his seat open. The board, of which
Hickey is often the opposition vote, could
then appoint either Kane or Griffin to
Hickey’s new vacant seat which has two
years left on it. Hickey would also have to
run for re-election in four years rather than
two as is the current schedule. If Hickey
were to lose, he would keep his current seat
and have to run again if he so chooses in two
years.
So why bother?
For Hickey, he sees this election as a way
to poll the public on whether it wants to see
the board and district dissolved. Hickey ran
on that platform 10 years ago when he won
his seat and has tried to get others to run on
that same agenda. The most recent effort, in
which Frederick Graham and Michael
Stogner ran with Hickey on his ticket in
2010, was largely unsuccessful since both
Graham and Stogner did not receive the votes
to join the board. By causing this election,
Hickey believes the $160,000 cost to the dis-
trict is money well spent since it would allow
the electorate to weigh in on what he consid-
ers to be the central concept of his tenure on
the board. Unfortunately, elections don’t
work this way and this particular election
will prove nothing since it will not bind the
district to abide by a particular vote of the
people as constructed in the mind of one can-
didate. It is not an official poll.
However, while Hickey has been a thorn in
the side of the district and the other elected
officials on the board, he has proven to be a
worthwhile board member who keeps a
watchful eye on district activities — particu-
larly when it comes to finances.
With that in mind, we endorse Hickey for
his current seat and Griffin and Kane for
their current seat — leaving the board as it
is. If Hickey is interested in polling the pub-
lic about the future of the board, he should
do so through the initiative process and gath-
er signatures for a ballot measure specifically
on that topic. Hickey said he has planned on
doing exactly that after this election and
before he retires. And we welcome that
opportunity to see what the district’s elec-
torate thinks about that topic.
The Sequoia Healthcare District Board of
Directors no longer operates and oversees a
public hospital and its role has shifted to one
that doles out community health care grants.
Is that the proper role of the district moving
forward? That is a valid question, and asking
voters specifically that may yield some inter-
esting results. However, this particular cam-
paign does not serve the same purpose and
could be, in fact, a waste of $160,000 of dis-
trict money.
Poll of Sequoia Healthcare District
Editor,
Regarding Jack Hickey’s letter “Poll of
Sequoia Healthcare District” in the Sept. 17
edition of the Daily Journal, a vote for Jack
Hickey on Nov. 6 is a vote that says one per-
son should have the power to waste $160,000
of taxpayers’ money to promote a political
agenda. Call the San Mateo County Elections
Office and that office will tell you it is, in
fact, an election, not a poll. Shockingly, Mr.
Hickey has set it up so he cannot lose that
election. He is not up for re-election, but he
filed for election to make it three running for
two seats on the Sequoia Healthcare District
board forcing the district to spend money it
would otherwise not have to spend. Even if
he loses, he keeps his seat. Mr. Hickey has
accomplished exactly zero in his 10 years on
the board except to game a system so he gets
his name in front of voters again and again,
even as he renders their vote meaningless.
If you would like to see what the rest of
the elected board has accomplished, visit
sequoiahealthcaredistrict.com where you will
see many of the district programs and servic-
es that would have benefited by the money
we must now spend on the election. It’s too
bad Mr. Hickey has set it up so your vote
means nothing to him, but you can support
community health care by rejecting the waste
of $160,000 of taxpayers’ money, rejecting
the power grab and not voting for him.
Kim Griffin, RN
Menlo Park
The letter writer is the president of the
Sequoia Healthcare District Board of
Directors.
A bad precedent for schools
Editor,
On Wednesday, the San Bruno Park
Elementary School District voted to let well-
heeled parents buy smaller classes for their
own kids.
Other public school districts do not allow
parents to fund classroom teachers at individ-
ual schools. Most educators would agree that
it is unfair, if not illegal, to base classroom
staffing at a school on how wealthy the par-
ents are.
Parents from Crestmoor Elementary
School donated more than $20,000 to hire
another classroom teacher at Crestmoor.
Parents are donating so that their kids can
have smaller classes and fewer split classes
than the other schools in the district.
Parent unhappiness with class size or split
classes isn’t surprising. It is appalling, how-
ever, that the school board has agreed to this.
Why does Crestmoor deserve the smallest
classes in the district? According to the
board, they deserve it because they had more
money.
I guess San Bruno has decided it isn’t real-
ly a “public” school district.
Chris Kiely
San Bruno
Sad
Editor,
The violent riots over this past week are
proof that there are those who can take some-
thing as benign as a video or paragraph,
interject their own close-minded outlook on
our world and literally blow things up. For
those who have hate in their hearts will find
it everywhere except where it truly lies.
Randy Swan
San Mateo
Media criticism of Romney
Editor,
Mitt Romney was outraged that the Obama
State Department’s first reaction to the
storming of our Egyptian Embassy was to
apologize to the rioters. Yet, the mainstream
media Obama cheerleaders, instead of asking
the president some tough questions could
only snarl at Romney’s words. But what
Romney did was once upon a time what lib-
erals seemed to champion: He spoke “Truth
to Power.”
Scott Abramson
San Mateo
BART/Caltrain merger
Editor,
Recent letter writers Mr. Frank George and
Mr. Andy Chow’s comments on a
BART/Caltrain merger forgot to consider (or
mention) the fact that Union Pacific Railroad
still conducts freight operations on the
Caltrain Peninsula line, most likely hauling
freight from the Port of Redwood City. This
is usually done in the late evening and coor-
dinated with Caltrain scheduling. I doubt that
UP would buy into Mr. George’s ultimate
transit solution.
Rick Zobelein
San Mateo
Griffin, Kane for Sequoia Healthcare
Editorial
Picture this
G
od may save the queen but the
French courts get kudos for protect-
ing the princess.
After a frenzy of controversy swirling
around a French magazine’s decision to print
nude photographs of the former Kate
Middleton, a court has ordered the outlet to
turn over the images. Thank goodness! Now,
can we go back to worrying about Libya?
Once news
broke that Prince
William’s bride
had something
more to blush
about courtesy of
an intrusive pho-
tographer whose
lens reached into
the private bal-
cony of their
vacation home,
headlines about
dead Americans
and Islamic radi-
cals were pushed to the side. The foreign
policy-deficient folks stateside might not
have a solid handle on all the political and
religious ingredients leading to the embassy
assaults but we sure understand a juicy scan-
dal. Throw in a nudie pic of a young woman,
particularly one otherwise known for her
class and elegance, and bam! A media sensa-
tion is born.
To be fair, atrocities like those perpetuated
in Benghazi on Sept. 11 got its fair share of
attention based on visual aids. Fuzzy photos
with blurred naughty bits may not have been
in play but there were certainly shocking
photos of an unconscious and discolored
Ambassador Chris Stevens. Then came the
D-quality film slandering Mohammed that
allegedly inspired the rioting. Even those
without a clue about Arab Spring could view
those images and connect some dots to con-
clude that what happened was very, very bad.
But then the Kate photo bomb dropped,
adding fuel to the already salacious fire
stirred by Prince Harry just a few weeks
back when he dropped trou in Las Vegas and
acted like the mischievous, single young man
he is. Unluckily for him — but more than
lucky for the voyeuristic gossip-mongers hid-
den inside every one of us — one of the lass-
es enjoying his company made use of her
cellphone camera to document the evening.
A swift call from grandma, though, and
Prince Harry was back in line and off to
serve in Afghanistan. So less exciting a story
to sell. No wonder the European tabloids ran
amok with Kate. And, frankly, no wonder
even the United States ran amok with cover-
age of the tabloids running amok. In other
punny words, there was a whole lot of amok-
raking.
On Tuesday, though, a French court
stepped in to restore order — not to mention
show the world not all the French are crazed
paparazzi with a hankering for stalking roy-
als — with an injunction against Closer, the
publication. Even eBay was ordered to
remove the topless spread.
Now can we go back to more weighty mat-
ters? No, not Libya — still too confusing and
depressing, particularly the realization that
anybody can upload a terrible flick on
YouTube and call themselves a director.
I mean the really crucial issues like
Michelle Obama’s nail polish color and Mitt
Romney’s infamous video dismissing the
non-taxpaying victims who won’t vote for
him. Honey Boo Boo, the latest Kardashian
self-promotion and Jessica Simpson’s weight
gain might make the cut while certainly the
latest incarnation of zombie-inducing drugs
is good for a mention. If a picture is worth a
thousand words, than the popular images
crowding the collective consciousness are
about as significant as a complimentary in-
flight magazine. If the airways and slick
tabloids can’t bank on photos of famous
folks who don’t look half bad in the buff, the
naked truth is they will just as easily promote
snapshots of human train wrecks.
Maybe someday the French courts can pro-
tect the public from those horrors, too.
Michelle Durand can be reached by email:
michelle@smdailyjournal.com or by phone:
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102.
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BUSINESS 10
Wednesday • Sept. 19, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 13,564.64 ?? +11.54 10-Yr Bond 1.812 -0.026
Nasdaq 3,177.80 -0.87 Oil (per barrel) 95.510002
S&P 500 1,459.32 -1.87 Gold 1,769.00
By Joshua Freed
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Glum economic news from FedEx left
stocks mixed on Tuesday.
The Dow Jones industrial average
posted a slight gain, but other indexes
fell. Declining stocks outnumbered
those that advanced. And seven of the
10 industries tracked by the Standard &
Poor’s 500 index declined.
European stocks fell. So did oil
prices.
FedEx said it sees a worldwide econ-
omy that has stalled. Investors pay close
attention to the company’s forecasts
because its package delivery business
spans the globe and offers a window
into how the economy is doing.
FedEx reduced its fiscal-year profit
forecast sharply because its customers
used its express air delivery service less
in favor of slower and cheaper ground
service. FedEx’s stock fell $2.73, or 3.1
percent, to close at $86.55.
Apple climbed above $700 for the
first time, rising $2.13 to close at
$701.91. Apple shares have risen more
than 19 percent in the past three months.
The recent gain has been driven by
strong sales of the company’s iPhone
and related gadgets.
Stocks broadly have been on a strong
run. The S&P 500 is up 14 percent since
June 1.
“The market is at high levels, certain-
ly due for a pullback, and I suspect we’ll
probably see one,” said Peter Cardillo,
chief market economist at Rockwell
Global Capital.
The S&P 500 index fell 1.87 points to
close at 1,459.32. The Nasdaq closed
down 0.87 point at 3,177.80. The Dow
rose 11.54 points to 13,564.64.
Markets had rallied sharply last week
after the Federal Reserve announced
aggressive measures intended to kick-
start the economy. This week, investors
appear more focused on the weak
growth that caused the Fed to act in the
first place.
The Fed’s announcement was for
open-ended asset purchases, noted
Charlie Smith, chief investment officer
for Fort Pitt Capital Group in Pittsburgh.
“The feeling on the Street is, ‘OK,
what can they do next?’ and by defini-
tion there’s nothing more they can do
than what they announced,” he said.
That means investors may feel that
they’ve gotten all of the gains they’re
going to get after the Fed’s announce-
ment, he said.
Ed Hyland, managing director at JP
Morgan Private Bank, said it’s notewor-
thy that the market hasn’t pulled back
Stocks end mixed
Wall Street
Stocks that moved substantially or traded
heavily Tuesday on the New York Stock
Exchange and Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
FedEx Corp., down $2.73 at $86.55
The package delivery company said the global
economy is worsening and cut its forecast for
the fiscal year ending in May.
Schiff Nutrition International Inc., up $3.47 at
$24.37
The vitamin maker said that an acquisition and
growth of its key brands helped boost fiscal
first-quarter net income by 28 percent.
Advanced Micro Devices Inc.,down 39 cents at
$3.62
The maker of microprocessors for PCs
announced that its chief financial officer,
Thomas Seifert, is resigning.
Energizer Holdings Inc., up $7.30 at $75.22
In an effort to reduce costs, the maker of
batteries and flashlights said it plans to cut jobs
and lower its overhead.
Nasdaq
Apple Inc., up $2.13 at $701.91
The technology company’s stock closed above
$700 for the first time, a day after saying it had
over two million orders for its new iPhone 5.
Clearwire Corp., down 16 cents at $1.38
Time Warner Cable Inc., a New York cable
company, said it will sell its 7.8 percent stake in
the wireless infrastructure company.
Skullcandy Inc., down 24 cents at $12.45
The headphones and accessories maker named
Kyle Wescoat its senior vice president and chief
financial officer.
OCZ Technology Group Inc., down 33 cents at
$4.13
The flash memory maker said its co-founder,
president and CEO Ryan Peterson resigned.The
company did not say why he is leaving.
Big movers
By Barbara Ortutay
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Apple’s stock closed
above $700 for the first time on Tuesday,
the day after it announced that orders for
its iPhone 5 topped 2 million in the first
24 hours.
Shares closed at $701.91 Tuesday, up
$2.13 from Monday’s close. They rose as
high as $702.33 in afternoon trading
Tuesday.
The rally in Apple’s stock price puts
the company’s market value at $658 bil-
lion.
The $700 mark is somewhat of an arbi-
trary milestone for Apple’s stock, repre-
senting little more than a nice round
number and a record high trading level.
The company, after all, already enjoys
the distinction as the world’s most valu-
able public company ever, at least if one
ignores inflation. Google Inc., its Silicon
Valley neighbor, saw its stock price sur-
pass $700 in 2007. On Tuesday, Google’s
stock was trading at $712.28. But the
online search leader’s market capitaliza-
tion is well below Apple’s at $236.4 bil-
lion.
Apple started taking orders for the
iPhone 5 at 3 a.m. EDT Friday. Orders
during the first 24 hours more than dou-
bled what Apple had for its predecessor,
the iPhone 4S, over the same period last
October.
“This was despite somewhat lukewarm
reviews and some claiming it had ‘lack
of a wow factor,’ Sterne Agee analyst
Apple closes above $700 for first time
Yahoo closes $7.6B deal with Alibaba Group
SAN FRANCISCO — Yahoo has completed a long-await-
ed $7.6 billion deal with China’s Alibaba Group, generating
a windfall that could help ease the pain of Yahoo sharehold-
ers who have endured the company’s foibles during the past
few years.
After Yahoo distributes most of the proceeds to its share-
holders, its recently hired CEO Marissa Mayer will still
have an extra $1.3 billion to finance acquisitions or hire new
talent as she tries revive the company’s revenue growth.
Tuesday’s resolution comes four months after Yahoo Inc.
and Alibaba Group Holding Ltd. outlined the details of a
complex transaction that took more than two years of on-
again, off-again negotiations to hammer out. The deal will
give Alibaba greater autonomy as it prepares to pursue an
initial public offering of stock within the next three years,
while rewarding Yahoo for one of the few moves that has
gone right for the troubled company in the past few years.
Yahoo paid $1 billion for a 40 percent stake in Alibaba in
2005 and is now reaping a huge return. Alibaba is paying
$7.1 billion in cash and stock to buy back half of Yahoo’s
holdings. Another $550 million is being paid to Yahoo under
a revised technology and patent licensing agreement with
Alibaba.
Ford hopes its new Fusion will be Camry crusher
DEARBORN, Mich. — Ford hopes the redesigned Fusion
will finally trounce the Camry.
The Fusion has become Ford’s best-selling car since it
went on sale in 2005, and it’s one of the top sellers in the
country. But Ford hopes the sexier styling, improved fuel
economy and features like automatic parallel parking on the
2013 version will help it pass the perennial leader, the
Toyota Camry.
Ford is enlisting “American Idol” host Ryan Seacrest to
introduce the redesigned sedan alongside CEO Alan Mulally
in New York’s Times Square Tuesday. It also is holding
events in Los Angeles, Miami, San Francisco, and on the
lawn of its headquarters in Dearborn, Michigan.
Business briefs
<< San Mateo tennis barely beats Hillsdale, page 12
• Giants cut magic number to 7, page 14
Wednesday, Sept. 19, 2012
TAKING THE SHOW ON THE ROAD: SEQUOIA FOOTBALL TEAM MAKES ANNUAL ROAD TRIP, THIS TIME TO IDAHO >>> PAGE 15
PHOTO COURTESY OF CAROL LAPINSKI-ERDIE
The CSM defense reacts after recovering a DVC fumble Saturday.
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
One by the one, College of San
Mateo football players walked into
the team locker room last Saturday
flashing grins of the ear-to-ear vari-
ety.
It was a look of satisfaction — one
that said “Mission Accomplished.”
To a man, the Bulldogs knew they
would be tested against Diablo Valley
College and they passed that exam
with flying colors 34-29 for their
third win of the season.
“That was a good football team,”
said Tim Tulloch, CSM defensive
coordinator and assistant head coach.
“It’s more so, the focus for us is on
how we play. And we improved a lot
between Week 2 and Week 3 and you
can could see it in our offensive
goals, our defensive goals and our
special teams goals. We met a lot
more of our goals all the way around.
The effort was better. The tackling
was better. We were more explosive
with Jon (Willis) making plays.
There were a lot of areas where we
improved.”
Willis carried the Bulldogs on his
back. Against a DVC with the best
passing offense in the state, No. 3
showed his squad knows a thing or
two about offense. Willis rushed for
187 yards and two touchdowns on 16
carries with CSM as a team racking
up 385 yards on the ground.
But a lot of the credit for CSM’s
latest win should indeed go to the
defense. DVC came in averaging 521
yards of offense and 38 points per
game — putting those numbers up
against A-level defenses. But on
Saturday, the Vikings were held
under both those averages.
CSM passes DVC test
See BULLDOGS, Page 16
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Hillsdale High School’s first lesson as a
Bay Division volleyball team was a rather
brief one and it came courtesy of the
Burlingame Panthers.
In their first Peninsula Athletic League
game after capturing the Ocean Division title,
the Knights ran into a Burlingame team that
knew exactly when to kick it into overdrive.
Up 1-0 in the match, but down 13-6 in Game
2, the Panthers rode the serve of Isabell
Walker to a 25-16, 25-17, 25-19 win, leaving
Hillsdale wondering whatever happened to
their lone opportunity to make a real impres-
sion early in the PAL season.
“We were way ahead,” said Hillsdale head
coach Ricky Villareal of that second game.
“We just broke down a little bit and let up.
When we took the timeout, I think it was 13-
6 then 13-10, I said, ‘Girls, look at the points
you just gave away.’ We can’t be competitive
that way if we keep giving away points. We
had a great game against Crystal Springs and
this definitely wasn’t the team I saw today.”
“We’re the kind of team that just gets in
these weird moods and lose focus,” said
Burlingame outside hitter Morgan McKeever,
who had a huge hand in that second game
when the Panthers were in need of some lead-
ership. “But when we come together and say,
‘C’mon guys, we need to get the next point,’
we focus back in.”
The second game told the story of
Burlingame’s win. Hillsdale jumped out to a
big 13-6 advantage behind a couple of big
plays by Maggie McDonald. But instead of
stepping on the accelerator and stealing a
game against the favored Panthers, the
Knights let up — and for a couple of min-
utes, Dana Williams took over at the net. No.
25 recorded a trio of huge blocks at the tail
end of a 6-0 run that got the Panthers back
into the game 13-12.
“I didn’t like the defense at all,” Villareal
said. “I think we could have done better. If we
Panthers sweep Knights
NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL
Burlingame’s Tatum Novitsky contends with the block of Hillsdale’s Amanda King during the
Panthers’ three-set sweep in the PAL opener for both teams.
By Antonio Gonzalez
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
STANFORD — David Shaw came home
late Saturday night and his wife, Kori, already
wanted to watch the television replay of his
Stanford team’s 21-14 upset over Southern
California.
By the time Shaw woke up Sunday morn-
ing, more than 200 text messages had piled up
on his phone — some from people he didn’t
even know had his number. Not to mention the
countless calls and emails the second-year
head coach has received
since.
Indeed, almost every-
where Shaw looks he’s
reminded of the victory.
With a bye this week
before playing at
Washington (2-1) on Sept.
27, staying focused might
be the toughest test for the
No. 9 Cardinal (3-0, 1-0)
after a physical and formi-
dable win against Matt Barkley and the
favored Trojans caught everybody’s attention
in the Pac-12 this season.
“I don’t want to treat it like a national holi-
day,” Shaw said Tuesday. “We won a football
game. Great. We have another one in about 10
days.”
Suddenly, though, the stakes are even high-
er.
Stanford’s stampede past a program expect-
ed to contend for the national title — outgain-
ing the Trojans 417 to 280 in total yards, hold-
ing USC to 26 yards rushing and forcing
Barkley into two interceptions — has
reshaped expectations in what was supposed
to be a transitional year with Andrew Luck
and several other key contributors now on
NFL sidelines.
Stanford
moves on
See STANFORD, Page 16
David Shaw
See PANTHERS, Page 14
By Richard Rosenblatt
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — An efficient Alex
Smith and a rock-solid defense have
the San Francisco 49ers on top of
the AP Pro32 power rankings.
Smith threw for 226 yards and
two touchdowns and the 49ers shut
down the explosive Lions in a 27-19
win over the weekend, giving San
Francisco a sec-
ond win over a
playoff team
from last season.
The 2-0 Niners
moved up from
second in the
latest AP Pro32
regular-season
poll released
Tuesday, receiv-
ing 11 of the 12 first-place votes and
383 points from the media panel
who regularly cover the NFL.
Houston advanced two spots to
second with one first-place vote and
360 points, eight points ahead of
Green Bay, which started the season
on top. Atlanta is fourth, followed
by Baltimore and Philadelphia, up
six places after a second straight
one-point win.
“There isn’t much not to like
about the 49ers,” voter Dan Pompei
of the Chicago Tribune said in put-
ting the 49ers first for the second
week in a row. “At this point, the
only question is who is No. 2?”
That would be the Texans, win-
ners in each of their games by 20
points.
“The Texans have the NFL’s top
defense and a 2-0 record to show for
it,” reasoned Rick Gosselin of the
Dallas Morning News, the only
voter with Houston ahead of San
Francisco.
Everyone else went with the
49ers, who opened the season with a
big win at Green Bay before domi-
nating the Lions at home.
“Almost everyone has holes, but
49ers take top spot in AP NFL rankings
Alex Smith
See NINERS, Page 14
SPORTS 12
Wednesday • Sept. 19, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The Peninsula Athletic League girls’ tennis season is only
entering its second full week of league play, but it’s never too
early to start talking about the postseason: especially if you’re
a team hoping to grab one of the PAL playoff spots.
Both San Mateo and Hillsdale came into Tuesday’s show-
down with identical 1-2 records. A win by either team would
move it into sole possession of fourth place, with the possibil-
ity of moving into a tie for third, either of which will clinch at
spot in the playoffs.
Tuesday, San Mateo held a 3-2 lead in the team score with
the No. 3 singles and No. 1 doubles matches playing third sets.
San Mateo needed just a split to clinch the team match, while
Hillsdale needed to sweep both remaining matches.
In the end, it went San Mateo’s way as the No. 1 doubles
team of Megha Bindal and Lucy Hai-De rallied from a first-set
loss to post a 4-6, 6-4, 6-4 win to even the Bearcats’ record at
2-2 in Bay Division play.
“They’re competing and working as a team,” San Mateo
coach Ed Schuler said of his squad. “Now we have to build on
that.”
Bindal and Hai-De’s win was crucial as Hillsdale’s Ayako
Ota outlasted Chihiro Yoshiba at No. 3 singles, 6-4, 3-6, 6-1.
Bindal and Hai-De gave San Mateo a sweep of the three dou-
bles matches, with Robin Gore picking up the lone singles win
for the Bearcats at No. 4, where she won in straight sets, 6-3,
7-5.
Winning all the doubles matches, “was just the way it
worked,” Schuler said. “We have inexperienced singles people
and inexperienced doubles people.”
Hillsdale coach Jackie Nachtigal knows all about inexperi-
ence. She said she has 14 players on the team, about nine of
which know how to play tennis. The other five, Nachtigal said,
have not played tennis before.
The top of the Hillsdale ladder, however, is among the best
in the PAL. Mariko Iinuma is arguably the best singles player
in the PAL — perhaps even among high school players in San
Mateo County. The sophomore Iinuma came into the match
without having lost a singles match in regular-season play in
her one-plus years at Hillsdale. She was a perfect 14-0 playing
at No. 2 singles last year and she improved her record to 18-0
overall with a 6-0, 6-0 win over Lizzie Spiegel.
A thumper from the baseline, Iinuma eventually wore down
Spiegel, but Spiegel hung tough and engaged Iinuma in some
lengthy rallies.
Despite Iinuma’s talent, Nachtigal said she does not have any
airs about her. She willingly accepts coaching from her high
school coach, which is not always the case with top-notch ten-
nis talent.
“She asks me what strategy she can work on (during a
match),” Nachtigal said. “She cares and everybody (on the
team) likes her.”
Despite getting dominated, Schuler was proud of the way
Spiegel performed.
“The final score does not indicate how well she played,”
Schuler said of Spiegel. “Lizzie has improved a lot from last
year.”
Hillsdale’s No. 2 singles player, Irene Palisoc, also won in
straight sets, topping Lindsay Pantuso 6-3, 6-1.
The only other match that was as lopsided No. 1 singles was
the No. 3 doubles match, when San Mateo’s Deanna Chan and
Abbey Londa easily won in straight sets at love. Hannah
Popluck and Sarah Halpern completed the Bearcats’ doubles
sweep with a 7-5, 6-1 win over Mai Banh and Bella Mercado.
“All my girls were very aggressive. … We’re pretty even
(with San Mateo). I think next round, we’ll be better,”
Nachtigal said. “I’m training them a lot.”
Bearcats slip past Hillsdale
NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL
SanMateo’s RobinGore hits a return during her 6-3, 7-5 win.
Tigers 12, A’s 2
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
DETROIT — The Oakland Athletics may have only one
more big hurdle to clear before securing a surprising playoff
berth.
Their final trip of the regular season — 10 games against
Detroit, the New York Yankees and Texas — began Tuesday
night in ugly fashion.
Miguel Cabrera homered twice, including an eighth-
inning grand slam, and the Tigers had no trouble overcom-
ing an early injury to right-hander Max Scherzer in a 12-2
rout of the Athletics. Oakland came in three games behind
first-place Texas in the AL West, but leading the wild-card
race.
“Just got out of hand,” manager Bob Melvin said. “We’ve
just got to move on. Just one game.”
Cabrera matched a career high with six RBIs and now has
40 homers this season — also a career best. Prince Fielder
and Jhonny Peralta added home runs for the Tigers, who
remained three games behind the first-place Chicago White
Sox in the AL Central.
Scherzer left after two innings because of a fatigued
throwing shoulder. An MRI showed no structural damage.
“I didn’t have any pain in my shoulder — it was just like
my arm was dead,” Scherzer said. “MRI came back negative.
All the structural — it’s all good.”
Darin Downs (2-1) pitched 2 2-3 scoreless innings for the
win.
A’s start trip
with ugly loss
NFL Films President Steve Sabol dies at 69
NEW YORK — With the eye of an art history major, Steve
Sabol filmed the NFL as a ballet and blockbuster movie all in
one.
Half of the father-son team that revolutionized sports broad-
casting, the NFL Films president died Tuesday of brain cancer
at age 69 in Moorestown, N.J. He leaves behind a league big-
ger than ever, its fans enthralled by the plot twists and charac-
ters he so deftly chronicled.
“Steve Sabol was the creative genius behind the remarkable
work of NFL Films,” NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell said
in a statement from the league confirming Sabol’s death.
“Steve’s passion for football was matched by his incredible tal-
ent and energy. Steve’s legacy will be part of the NFL forever.
He was a major contributor to the success of the NFL, a man
who changed the way we look at football and sports, and a
great friend.”
Sabol was diagnosed with a tumor on the left side of his brain
after being hospitalized for a seizure in March 2011.
Sports brief
13
Wednesday • Sept. 19, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SPORTS 14
Wednesday • Sept. 19, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
cover the tips, our defense is good. We’re try-
ing to get used to a bit of rotational defense
and we’re still struggling at that. We’re trying
our best.”
Hillsdale re-established themselves for a
moment, taking a 16-12 lead. But it was then,
on a side-out that made it 16-13, that Walker
caught fire.
The Jane of all trades served up 10 straight
Burlingame points —assisting on four
McKeever kills to turn a three-point deficit
into a six-point advantage.
“I definitely like it,” Walker said of her run.
“Serving has always been one of my stronger
points and going on runs like that is great
because it helps the team out. It’s a good feel-
ing that you can help out and get those points
back and get the team back on track. That was
a really critical point. We just needed to get
our heads in the game. We needed to work
with each other and focus on getting those
points back.”
McKeever closed out that crucial second
game with a pair of aces.
In Game 1, No. 12 was at her offensive best.
Her steady play was good for six kills to pace
the Panthers’ 25-16 win.
“Sometimes I get frustrated if they’re dig-
ging me so I have focus and try to put it where
they’re not,” McKeever said.
Having deflated the Knights in Game 2,
Game 3 was a mere formality. McKeever and
Walker sat the entire set while the Panthers
were carried by Amanda Miller and Nicole
Cooper on offense. Libero Brittney Carias
was consistently solid throughout the match.
Her ace closed out the victory for Burlingame.
“Our hitting, our offense was really good,”
Walker said. “Offensively our passing was
nice. Our hits were strong.”
“We’re really excited,” McKeever said
about starting the PAL season with a win. “I
feel like we’re off to a great start. I’m excited
to see what we can do this season.”
Continued from page 11
PANTHERS
you have to look hard to find any with this
team,” commented Clark Judge of
CBSSports.com “... and, please, could we stop
the Alex Smith as `game manager’ talk? It’s
not only old; it’s inaccurate.”
New England, meanwhile, fell from the top
spot to seventh following a surprising 20-18
loss at home to Arizona.
“Week 2 mulligan,” ESPN’s Chris Berman
called it.
San Diego made the biggest jump, up eight
spots to ninth.
“Norv has this team believing,” said Rich
Gannon of CBS Sports/SiriusXM NFL Radio.
“More team speed on D doesn’t hurt either.”
A pair of winless teams took the biggest
tumbles - Kansas City dropped 10 spots to
No. 31 and New Orleans eight places to 22nd
after entering the season ninth.
“Think the Saints don’t miss suspended
head coach Sean Payton?” asked Newsday’s
Bob Glauber. “Perhaps an 0-2 start, something
they’d avoided since 2007, will convince.”
Added Pompei: “We knew they would miss
Sean Payton, but they may be the most disap-
pointing team in the NFL.”
Denver, which reached sixth last week after
Peyton Manning’s successful debut in a win
over the Steelers, fell back earth with a loss in
Atlanta on Monday night. Manning had three
interceptions in the first quarter in the 27-21
loss, and his Broncos dropped five spots to
11th.
“Manning will correct the interceptions and
the defense has pass rushers,” said Pat Kirwan
of SiriusXM NFL Radio/CBSSports.com in
ranking Denver fourth this week. “They will
be close to impossible to beat at home. Look
for more teams to use the `radar’ defense
against Manning that the Falcons employed.”
Jacksonville is 32nd and last.”Nine punts,
nine first downs - welcome to the NFL’s ver-
sion of the Mendoza Line,” quipped Ira
Kaufman of the Tampa Tribune.
Continued from page 11
NINERS
By Janie McCauley
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — Tim Lincecum
pitched San Francisco one win closer to an NL
West crown, and the Giants lowered their
magic number to clinch the division to seven
with a 6-3 victory over the Colorado Rockies
on Tuesday night.
Lincecum (10-14) struck out six and walked
two in 6 1-3 scoreless innings on a day the sec-
ond-place Los Angeles Dodgers were post-
poned by rain in Washington.
Marco Scutaro had three singles, drove in a
run and scored twice and Xavier Nady had two
RBI singles for the Giants (85-63), who moved
a season-high 22 games over .500. Pablo
Sandoval added two hits, including a double,
and Hunter Pence added a sacrifice fly.
Wilin Rosario hit a two-run homer off
Santiago Casilla in the eighth inning, matching
the Rockies’ rookie record of 25 set by Todd
Helton in 1998.
Angel Pagan extended his own San
Francisco record with an RBI triple in the
eighth, his major league-leading 14th. He
tipped his batting helmet from third base to
acknowledge the cheering crowd.
Following a walk to D.J. LeMahieu in the
second inning, Lincecum retired the next 11
batters in order before Dexter Fowler’s leadoff
walk in the sixth. What happened next is rarely
seen: Fowler was out at second on a fielder’s
choice as the ball bounced off his batting hel-
met on shortstop Brandon Crawford’s throw to
first attempting to get Charlie Blackmon for a
double play. Blackmon was then caught steal-
ing.
Lincecum improved to just 4-8 with a 3.67
ERA at home this season, but he sure looked
like his old stellar self for a significant stretch
on this cool September night — albeit with
three of Colorado’s best hitters out injured.
After beating the Rockies last Wednesday at
Coors Field, the two-time NL Cy Young Award
winner posted consecutive victories for the first
time since April 23 and 28. He also won his
third straight decision.
Rookie Hector Sanchez, who has caught
Lincecum most of the season, doubled, singled
and scored a run. With him behind the plate,
Buster Posey started at first base.
When Posey drew an intentional walk in the
third, many in the sellout crowd of 41,718
chanted “M-V-P! M-V-P!” He drew another
one in the seventh, drawing boos.
Fans jumped to their feet to give Lincecum a
standing ovation when he gave way to Jeremy
Affeldt in the seventh. Lincecum allowed an
infield single to pinch-hitter Josh Rutledge that
loaded the bases, then Affeldt got pinch-hitter
Jason Giambi to ground into an inning-ending
double play.
Lincecum became the seventh pitcher in San
Francisco history to win 10 or more games in
five straight seasons.
Sergio Romo allowed pinch-hitter Matt
McBride’s two-out RBI single in the ninth for
Colorado’s last run.
Giants continue to whittle away magic number
Giants 6, Rockies 3
SPORTS 15
Wednesday • Sept. 19, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
While coaching at Vista Murrieta
in Southern California, current
Sequoia coach Rob Poulos once
made an out-of-state road trip to
Colorado. When he took over the
job at Sequoia, it was something he
wanted implement for the
Cherokees.
“Program wide, we want [the
players] to see what it’s like at the
next level,” Poulos said.
And not just for the varsity play-
ers. With the varsity team having a
bye this weekend, the Sequoia jun-
ior varsity team will get the prime
time spot of 7 p.m. Friday night, its
first experience of playing under the
lights. The freshmen team then gets
to fill the 4 p.m. game-time slot usu-
ally occupied by the JV squad.
The Cherokees did not have an
out-of-state opponent during
Poulos’ first year in 2009, but has
made a long road trip each of the
last three years. Two years ago
Sequoia traveled to the San Diego
area to take on San Marcos, a 35-9
win. Last year, the Cherokees made
their first out-of-state foray, beating
Oregon’s Mazama of Klamath Falls
28-7.
Last weekend, the Cherokees
played in the 2012 Idaho Classic, an
all-day event with four games
played at the Kibbie Dome, home of
the University of Idaho. Sequoia
was one of two California teams —
along with Sutter High in the Sierra
Mountain foothills — along with
three teams from Washington and
three teams from Idaho.
Playing the 2 p.m. game, Sequoia
beat Lewiston 21-13. Lewiston was
ranked No. 4 in the state in the large
school division.
“Ours was the only close game,”
Poulos said.
Dylan Anderson paced the
offense with four rushing touch-
downs, but it was the defense that
preserved the win for the
Cherokees.
“We stopped them three times
inside the 10 — once at 7, once at
the 4 and once at the 1-yard line,”
Poulos said. “I think [Lewiston]
would be competitive here (in the
PAL).”
Following their game, the
Cherokees cleaned up, had some
dinner and returned to the Kibbie
Dome to watch Washington state
champion Skyline dismantle Coeur
d’Alene 71-20, snapping Coeur
d’Alene’s 24-game winning streak.
Skyline’s Max Browne, who has
orally committed to USC, threw six
touchdown passes in the win.
While it would have been a prime
opportunity for Poulos to talk about
high-level football with his team,
instead the Cherokees just took in
the atmosphere.
“We wanted [the players] to enjoy
themselves,” Poulos said.
It was a whirlwind weekend for
the Cherokees. They met at the
Sequoia campus around 6:30 Friday
morning, flew in to Spokane, Wash.
and then bused the dozen or so
miles to Moscow, Idaho, home of
the University of Idaho.
Even during their brief stopover
in Spokane, the Sequoia entourage
got to take in the local sights. Once
the Cherokees arrived in Idaho, they
took a sightseeing trip up the Snake
River Canyon and took a tour of the
university.
This was all before meeting with
the other seven teams for a group
dinner.
After the slate of games Saturday,
the Cherokees headed for home
Sunday, taking a tour of Washington
State University before boarding a
flight back to the Peninsula.
None of this, however, could not
take place without a lot of effort
from the football program, as well
as the school administration. A form
must also be turned in to the Central
Coast Section office to make sure
the school Sequoia wants to play
meets all the necessary require-
ments and then it’s up to the
Cherokee program to raise the funds
necessary to make the trip.
“When I first put it out there (that
I wanted to make an annual road
trip) the school was supportive,”
Poulos said. “We had to lay out how
we would accomplish it.”
Poulos said all the fundraising the
football program does goes mostly
to finance this one trip a year, mean-
ing the piggy bank is empty every
year and the program has to raise all
the money from penny one. Poulos
said he tries to keep the trips under
$10,000 but, with an airline trip this
year, the costs went above that.
That’s when the Sequoia Boosters
stepped in and ponied up the money
for the airfare.
While the trip may be a blur, it
should be something these Sequoia
teams should remember the rest of
their lives. Poulos said following his
team’s win, he was approached by a
man wearing a 1960s Sequoia letter-
man jacket and Sequoia T-shirt.
Turns out he had graduated from
Sequoia and was now living in
Vancouver. He made the trip to
Idaho when he found out his alma
mater was playing in the 2012 Idaho
Classic.
“We have a number of kids who
had never flown before, a number of
kids who had never been out of state
before,” Poulos said. “The (whole)
experience was pretty cool.”
Sequoia makes most of Idaho road trip
PHOTO COURTESY OF ROB POULOS
The Sequoia football team takes a picture in a large AmericanFlyer slide
inSpokane, Wash.,one of the stops the Cherokees made on their road trip
toIdaho for a game against Lewiston in the 2012 IdahoClassic.
16
Wednesday • Sept. 19, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Perhaps more importantly, CSM survived
DVC’s initial offensive surge. After the Vikings
scored on the game’s first drive, they were shut
down all the way to the two minute mark of the
third quarter — by that time, the score was 29-
7 CSM.
“There’s never a time to panic,” Tulloch said.
“We have to do a better job of getting stops on
the first drive. That’s two games now where
they’ve started a little bit slow on defense. But
we’ve in that situation before. Some teams
panic, our guys were like, ‘Ah coach, we’re
fine.’And after that, we went lights out for 2 1/2
quarters and they made some plays.
“We felt in control. We knew if we executed
that we’d give them problems. And I tell you,
the plays that they did make, when you got back
and watch the tape, the majority of them we
have guys in position, the rush is there, the cov-
erage is there — great throw, great catch. You
know, when you play against excellent compe-
tition, they’re going to make some plays. That’s
an A-level offense right there.”
Key to that success was stopping a DVC
rushing attack that was averaging 91 yards a
game coming into Saturday.
“We said we were going to take the run
away,” Tulloch said. “If you’re to beat us,
you’re going to have to make plays in the
passing game and we’re going to be very
physical with the quarterback and very
physical with the receivers.”
CSM got 16 hits on quarterback Quinn
Kaehler Saturday, including three sacks.
Overall, on 94 DVC plays, CSM only missed
tackles on five.
This week, the Bulldogs go from the No. 1
passing team in the state to the No. 1 rushing
team in Modesto College, which comes in at 3-
0 after averaging 325 yards on the ground in
those three wins.
“We’re going to have our hand’s full,” Tulloch
said. “Extremely, extremely well-coached foot-
ball team. They’re disciplined. They give you a
lot of different looks. They attack you in a lot of
different ways. They try to test your discipline
and they give you all kinds of things you have to
defend. It’s going to be fun.”
Tulloch pointed out that Modesto presents
CSM with a unique opportunity to answer the
age-old question of how you would go about
beating yourself if you had the chance. Much
like the Bulldogs, Modesto relies on ball control
— rushing the ball and throwing quickly out of
the snap. CSM is No. 2 in the state as far as team
rushing with 320 yards per game.
“This is an undefeated A-level team that’s as
good as advertised,” Tulloch said of Modesto.
A quick glance at the schedule shows that the
remaining seven opponents on CSM’s calendar
are a combined 19-2.
That’ll change after Saturday with those six
team pretty much going after each other — San
Francisco is at Fresno, Butte is at Delta and
Foothill visits the Sequoias.
Continued from page 11
BULLDOGS
New quarterback Josh Nunes was hardly Luck-
like, except for a pair of game-changing scrambles
for first downs late that even left his coach
“shocked.” But Nunes did just enough with a pow-
erful running game led by Maxwell Award Player
of the Week Stepfan Taylor, a defense that bullied
and bruised Barkley and never allowed All-
American receiver Robert Woods and rising star
Marqise Lee to break free.
Shaw clicked over his television to another
channel later that night and no celebratory toast,
for one, because he’s “never had a drink of alcohol
in my life.” Also because he knows Washington is
the first stop in a difficult road schedule that also
includes games at No. 3 Oregon and No. 11 Notre
Dame this season.
“I live in a world of anxiety,” he joked.
Stanford has absorbed Luck’s departure better
than most imagined, similar to the way it did the
loss of 2009 Heisman Trophy runner-up Toby
Gerhart and coach Jim Harbaugh after the 2010
season. The win against USC certainly sent shock-
waves across the conference, and Stanford is no
longer surprising anybody anymore this year.
“They’ve been able to carry on and they’ve got
the combination of really good coaching and very
good talent. They can match up with anybody,”
said Oregon State coach Mike Riley, whose team
visits Stanford Stadium on Nov. 10. “I wasn’t
shocked by it. SC has been so hot, though, I was
surprised they didn’t get many points.”
Much of the sustained success can be attributed
to Stanford’s system.
In preparing for his team’s game next week,
Washington coach Steve Sarkisian said his staff’s
studies showed Stanford has the most 6-foot-4 or
taller players in the conference — and perhaps
anywhere. The Cardinal have cornered the market
on a specific type of athlete who fits that system,
Sarkisian said, and that has been evident on the
recruiting trail.
“Stanford has a unique style of football in their
big personnel groupings with multiple tight ends
and extra offensive linemen, and then their ability
to play stout up front on the defensive side of the
ball to keep the game close,” Sarkisian said. “The
moment you break down, they seem to take advan-
tage of it.”
One place Shaw and his staff won’t shy away
from the USC win: with recruits.
In a series between California’s two private Pac-
12 schools that dates to 1905, Stanford had never
won four in a row against USC until now. The tim-
ing couldn’t be any better, either.
During the bye, Stanford is hitting the recruiting
trail, as most programs always do with the extra
time. Three Stanford coaches just so happened to
be heading to Southern California this week.
NOTES: Backup RB Anthony Wilkerson, who
left the USC game with a lower leg injury, is
“probably out” against Washington, Shaw said. ...
Freshman RB Barry J. Sanders, son of the Hall of
Fame running back, will almost certainly redshirt
at this point, Shaw said. ... K Jordan Williamson,
who missed field goals of 47 and 23 yards and had
a 51-yarder blocked against USC, will remain the
starter. Shaw attributed the redshirt sophomore’s
misses to technique and consistency.
Continued from page 11
STANFORD
SPORTS 17
Wednesday • Sept. 19, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
East Division
W L Pct GB
Washington 89 57 .610 —
Atlanta 85 64 .570 5 1/2
Philadelphia 74 74 .500 16
New York 66 81 .449 23 1/2
Miami 66 83 .443 24 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Cincinnati 89 59 .601 —
St. Louis 78 70 .527 11
Milwaukee 75 72 .510 13 1/2
Pittsburgh 74 73 .503 14 1/2
Chicago 58 90 .392 31
Houston 48 100 .324 41
West Division
W L Pct GB
San Francisco 85 63 .574 —
Los Angeles 76 71 .517 8 1/2
Arizona 73 74 .497 11 1/2
San Diego 71 77 .480 14
Colorado 58 89 .395 26 1/2
Tuesday’sGames
Milwaukee 6, Pittsburgh 0
L.A. Dodgers at Washington, ppd., rain
Miami 4, Atlanta 3, 10 innings
Philadelphia at New York, ppd., rain
Cincinnati 3, Chicago Cubs 1
St. Louis 4, Houston 1
Arizona 3, San Diego 2
San Francisco 6, Colorado 3
East Division
W L Pct GB
New York 83 63 .568 —
Baltimore 83 64 .565 1/2
Tampa Bay 78 70 .527 6
Boston 68 81 .456 16 1/2
Toronto 66 79 .455 16 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Chicago 81 66 .551 —
Detroit 78 69 .531 3
Kansas City 66 81 .449 15
Cleveland 61 87 .412 20 1/2
Minnesota 61 87 .412 20 1/2
West Division
W L Pct GB
Texas 87 59 .596 —
Oakland 84 63 .571 3 1/2
Los Angeles 80 67 .544 7 1/2
Seattle 70 78 .473 18
Tuesday’sGames
Minnesota 6, Cleveland 5, 12 innings
Detroit 12, Oakland 2
Toronto at New York, ppd., rain
Boston 7,Tampa Bay 5
Chicago White Sox 3, Kansas City 2
Texas at L.A. Angels, late
Baltimore at Seattle, late
NL STANDINGS
AL STANDINGS
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
N.Y. Jets 1 1 0 .500 58 55
New England 1 1 0 .500 52 33
Miami 1 1 0 .500 45 43
Buffalo 1 1 0 .500 63 65
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Houston 2 0 0 1.000 57 17
Indianapolis 1 1 0 .500 44 61
Tennessee 0 2 0 .000 23 72
Jacksonville 0 2 0 .000 30 53
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Baltimore 1 1 0 .500 67 37
Cincinnati 1 1 0 .500 47 71
Pittsburgh 1 1 0 .500 46 41
Cleveland 0 2 0 .000 43 51
West
W L T Pct PF PA
San Diego 2 0 0 1.000 60 24
Denver 1 1 0 .500 52 46
Kansas City 0 2 0 .000 41 75
Oakland 0 2 0 .000 27 57
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
Philadelphia 2 0 0 1.000 41 39
Dallas 1 1 0 .500 31 44
Washington 1 1 0 .500 68 63
N.Y. Giants 1 1 0 .500 58 58
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Atlanta 1 0 0 1.000 40 24
Tampa Bay 1 1 0 .500 50 51
Carolina 1 1 0 .500 45 43
New Orleans 0 2 0 .000 59 75
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Green Bay 1 1 0 .500 45 40
Detroit 1 1 0 .500 46 50
Minnesota 1 1 0 .500 46 46
Chicago 1 1 0 .500 51 44
West
W L T Pct PF PA
Arizona 2 0 0 1.000 40 34
San Francisco 2 0 0 1.000 57 41
St. Louis 1 1 0 .500 54 55
Seattle 1 1 0 .500 43 27
Thursday’sGame
N.Y. Giants at Carolina, 5:20 p.m.
Sunday’sGames
Tampa Bay at Dallas, 10 a.m.
St. Louis at Chicago, 10 a.m.
San Francisco at Minnesota, 10 a.m.
Detroit at Tennessee, 10 a.m.
Kansas City at New Orleans, 10 a.m.
Cincinnati at Washington, 10 a.m.
N.Y. Jets at Miami, 10 a.m.
Buffalo at Cleveland, 10 a.m.
Jacksonville at Indianapolis, 10 a.m.
Philadelphia at Arizona, 1:05 p.m.
Atlanta at San Diego, 1:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Oakland, 1:25 p.m.
Houston at Denver, 1:25 p.m.
New England at Baltimore, 5:20 p.m.
Monday’sGame
Green Bay at Seattle, 5:30 p.m.
NFL
Rockies
12:45p.m.
CSN-BAY
9/20
@Colorado
6p.m.
CSN-CAL
10/6
Galaxy
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
10/21
@Portland
3:30p.m.
NBC
10/27
vs.Timbers
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
9/19
@Seattle
7p.m.
CSN-CAL
9/23
Dbacks
7:15p.m.
CSN-BAY
9/26
vs.FCDallas
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
9/29
@Rangers
5:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
9/25
@Yankees
4:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
9/21
@Tigers
4:15p.m.
CSN-CAL
9/19
Padres
6:15p.m.
CSN-BAY
9/22
@Yankees
10:05a.m.
CSN-CAL
9/23
@Tigers
10:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
9/20
Rockies
7:10p.m.
CSN-BAY
9/19
Padres
1:05p.m.
CSN-BAY
9/23
Padres
7:15p.m.
CSN-BAY
9/21
@Rangers
5:05
CSN-CAL
9/24
Dbacks
7:15p.m.
CSN-BAY
9/25
@Yankees
TBD
CSN-CAL
9/22
@Jets
10a.m.
FOX
9/30
vs.Seattle
5:20p.m.
NFL-NET
10/18
vs.Bills
4:25p.m.
CBS
10/7
@Arizona
5:30p.m.
FOX
10/29
vs.Giants
1:25p.m.
FOX
10/14
Bye
@ Vikings
10a.m.
FOX
9/23
@Broncos
1:05p.m.
CBS
9/30
vs.Jaguars
1:25p.m.
CBS
10/21
BYE
10/7
@Chiefs
1:15p.m.
CBS
10/28
@Falcons
10a.m.
CBS
10/14
vs.Tampa
1:05p.m.
FOX
11/4
vs.Steelers
1:25p.m.
CBS
9/23
EASTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
Kansas City 15 7 6 51 35 25
Chicago 15 8 5 50 40 33
New York 14 7 7 49 49 40
Houston 12 7 10 46 41 34
D.C. 13 10 5 44 45 39
Columbus 12 10 6 42 34 35
Montreal 12 15 3 39 44 49
New England 7 15 7 28 36 40
Philadelphia 7 13 6 27 26 31
Toronto FC 5 17 7 22 32 51
WESTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
x-San Jose 17 6 5 56 58 33
Seattle 13 6 9 48 44 29
Los Angeles 14 11 4 46 50 40
Real Salt Lake 14 11 4 46 38 33
Vancouver 10 12 7 37 29 38
FC Dallas 9 12 9 36 35 38
Colorado 9 18 2 29 36 43
Chivas USA 7 13 7 28 21 43
Portland 7 14 7 28 28 47
NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie.
x- clinched playoff berth
Wednesday, Sept. 19
Sporting Kansas City at New York, 1 p.m.
Chivas USA at Columbus, 4:30 p.m.
Portland at San Jose, 7:30 p.m.
Thursday, Sept. 20
D.C. United at Philadelphia, 5 p.m.
Saturday, Sept. 22
Sporting Kansas City at Montreal, 10:30 a.m.
New York at New England, 4:30 p.m.
Portland at Real Salt Lake, 5 p.m.
Columbus at Chicago, 5:30 p.m.
Toronto FC at Los Angeles, 7:30 p.m.
San Jose at Seattle FC, 7:30 p.m.
Saturday’s Games
Philadelphia at Toronto FC, 10 a.m.
Seattle FC at Portland, 12:30 p.m.
Columbus at New York, 4 p.m.
New England at D.C. United, 4:30 p.m.
Vancouver at FC Dallas, 5:30 p.m.
Montreal at Chicago, 5:30 p.m.
San Jose at Chivas USA, 7:30 p.m.
MLS STANDINGS
GIRLS’TENNIS
SanMateo4, Hillsdale3
SINGLES— Iinuma(H) d.Spiegel 6-0,6-0;Palisoc(H)
d. Pantuso 6-3, 6-1; Ota (H) d. Yoshiba 6-4, 3-6, 6-1;
Gore (SM) d. Bodin 6-3, 7-5. DOUBLES — Megha
Bindal-Lucy Hai-De (SM) d.Branting-Shayo 4-6,6-4,
6-4; Popluck-Halpern (SM) d.Banh-Mercado 7-5,6-
1;Chan-Londa(SM) d.Wong-Kelada6-0,6-0.Records
— San Mateo 2-2 PAL Bay; Hillsdale 1-3.
Menlo-Atherton7, Mills 0
SINGLES — LaPorte (MA) d.Chan 6-1,6-1; Andrew
(MA) d. Fung 6-0, 6-0; LaPlante (M)a d. Phan 6-0, 6-
0; Giordano (MA) d. Kobayashi 6-1, 6-3. DOUBLES
— Vitale-Scandalios (MA) d. Leon-Zhao 6-1, 6-0;
Volpe-Samuelian (MA) d. Wang-He 6-1, 6-1; Kelly-
Tiemann (MA) d. Lai-Lee 6-0, 6-0.
GIRLS’ GOLF
Presentation208, NotreDame-Belmont 260
At SharpParkG.C., par 36
NDB — Eble 47; Back, Pan 52; Pan 54; Hens 55;
Haghverdian 60.
P — Kim 37; Oliva 38; Federe 42; Cho 45; Maestas
46; Gallo 54.
MenloSchool 225, NotreDame-SJ 242
At SanJoseMuni, par 36
MS — Jessie Rong 38; Broderick 43; Schwab 45;
Costello 48; Henderson 51.
GIRLS’WATERPOLO
MenloSchool 14, Half MoonBay11
MenloSchool 3551— 14
Half MoonBay1226— 11
Goal scorers: MS — Dunn 7; Huneke 3; Meyer 2;
Miller,Flower.HMB— Zell 4;White3;Cohen2;Chee,
Clark. Records — Menlo School 2-0 PAL Ocean;
Half Moon Bay 0-2.
Mills 18, SanMateo2
Mills 4791— 18
SanMateo0101— 2
San Mateo goal scorers — Middlekauff 2.
GIRLS’VOLLEYBALL
SacredHeartPrepdef.Milpitas25-15, 25-5, 25-
16 (Highlights: SHP — Garrick 8 kills; Gannon 11
digs; Merten 19 assists, 6 aces). Records — Sacred
Heart Prep 14-2 overall.
Carlmont def.Terra Nova 25-11,25-17,25-19 (High-
lights: C —McDonough 10 kills; Bedard 9 kills, 12
digs; Tupou 28 assists, 7 digs, 6 kills). Records —
Carlmont 1-0 PAL Bay,5-8 overall;Terra Nova 0-4,0-
1.
MONDAY
GIRLS’TENNIS
SacredHeart Prep4, Menlo-Atherton3
SINGLES — Nordman (SHP) d. LaPorte 6-1, 6-7(5),
6-3; Andrew (MA) d. Sarwal 6-0, 6-0; LaPlante (MA)
d.Casey 6-3,6-3; K.Ackley (SHP) d.Samoelian 6-1,7-
5. DOUBLES — Westerfield-L. Ackley (SHP) d.
Volpe-Giordano 6-4,7-6(1);Ritchey-Schuman (SHP)
d.Vitale-Scandalios 6-4,6-4;Tiemann-Parsons (MA)
d. Parsons-Lynch 6-1, 6-2.
GIRLS’VOLLEYBALL
Crystal Springsdef.Fremont-Sunnyvale25-13,
25-19,25-16(Highlights:CS— Nora10kills,7aces;
Du 10 digs; Embury 20 assists). Records — Crystal
Springs 7-1 overall.
GIRLS’ GOLF
NotreDame-Belmont 259,
SacredHeart Cathedral 266
At PeninsulaC.C., par 37
NDB— Eble45;Hens,Pan50;Li 55;Back59;Burnett
60.
SHC — V. Hirano 50; Chan, Chu, McDonagh 53; D.
Hirano 57;Tong 64.
LOCAL SCOREBOARD
NFL
CINCINNATI BENGALS —Placed DE Jamaal An-
derson on injured reserve. Signed DE Wallace
Gilberry.
DENVERBRONCOS—Placed C Philip Blake on in-
jured reserve.Signed G Adam Grant to the practice
squad.Signed C C.J.Davis from the practice squad.
DETROITLIONS—Released CB Kevin Barnes. Re-
leased RB Stephfon Green from the practice squad.
Signed CB Conroy Black to the practice squad.
INDIANAPOLISCOLTS—Signed NT Nicolas Jean-
Baptiste and OT Tony Hills to the practice squad.
Released DT Chigbo Anunoby and OT Darrion
Weems from the practice squad.
JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS — Signed G Austin
Pasztor to the practice squad.
MIAMI DOLPHINS—Signed DT Andre Fluellen.
TRANSACTIONS
18
Wednesday • Sept. 19, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Janie McCauley
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SANTA CLARA — Vernon
Davis might get fewer style points
these days for his touchdown cele-
brations — and he’s perfectly fine
with that.
The emotional San Francisco tight
end learned from his blunder with
the goal post crossbar after scoring
in a Week 1 win against the Packers
at Lambeau Field. So, each time he
scored in Sunday night’s 27-19 vic-
tory against the Detroit Lions, Davis
opted to shoot jump shots over the
bar.
Complete with a perfect, pretty
follow-through.
“Very smart,” left tackle Joe
Staley said with a grin Tuesday. “I
was pretty certain he was going to
do that. I know he didn’t want to
embarrass himself twice, because
I’m pretty sure if he tried to dunk it
again I think he would have been
rejected again. ... He knows it. The
goal post told him that.”
Davis said ahead of time that he
might think
twice about
dunking the
football over the
goal post after
all the razzing
he took the pre-
vious week from
teammates.
He blew it
after his third-
quarter score in Green Bay, though
the touchdown was quite athletic as
he went to his knees to make the
reception on a 4-yard pass from
Alex Smith.
When the 6-foot-3 Davis leapt to
put the ball over the bar, it hit the
crossbar and bounced back onto the
field — and Davis came down, too.
He said he injured his left foot dur-
ing training camp and felt it on the
touchdown catch, thus giving him
less power in his legs when he
jumped in the celebratory move.
And, oh did he hear about it after-
ward.
Especially from Randy Moss and
Michael Crabtree, two former bas-
ketball players who still claim
they’ve got game. And from others
on the team plane home from
Wisconsin when the highlight — if
you can even call it that — was
shown on television.
Because of it, Davis found him-
self forced to address his athleticism
again after Sunday’s win over
another NFC power that put the
reigning NFC West champions at 2-
0 heading into this week’s game at
Minnesota.
“I think my vertical is leaving me
gradually,” he cracked afterward
Sunday. “I’m kidding. I can still
dunk it.”
The 28-year-old Davis has had
plenty of big moments on the field
so his missed dunk will soon be for-
gotten — outside the locker room,
anyway. He has been committed in
recent years to finding better ways
to channel his excitement on the
field.
He caught touchdown passes of
73 and 28 yards in the Niners’ 20-17
overtime loss in the NFC champi-
onship game to the eventual Super
Bowl champion New York Giants.
But he received a 15-yard unsports-
manlike conduct penalty after the
first touchdown for jumping onto a
camera box.
Davis also made a leaping 14-yard
touchdown catch under pressure
with 9 seconds remaining as San
Francisco stunned Drew Brees and
the favored New Orleans Saints 36-
32 in the NFC divisional playoffs.
He is counting on many more
such moments for the 49ers, who
have high expectations of reaching
the Super Bowl after coming so
close last year.
While Moss and Crabtree played
basketball, Davis said he switched
from basketball to football in high
school when he realized he wouldn’t
be a starter in hoops.
The Lions even took notice before
their unsuccessful visit to
Candlestick Park.
“I heard about it,” Detroit corner-
back Chris Houston said. “I might
remind him about it — let him know
that Calvin Johnson does it better.
That’s all good, though.”
San Francisco coach Jim
Harbaugh is all for his players being
themselves and showing off some
creativity when the situation calls
for it, as long as they stay healthy
and abide by the rules to avoid
penalties.
“There’s a couple of different
schools of thought on that one,”
Harbaugh said. “I like, me personal-
ly, celebrating all wins, all in their
own personalities is the way I think
about it.”
Notes: 49ers LB Aldon Smith was
the passenger in a car accident last
Friday night in Santa Clara County
when the driver swerved to avoid
hitting a deer. He sustained a cut
beneath his right eyebrow. “I’m all
right,” he said. “I feel good. We
walked away from it. I’m moving
forward.” ... WR and return man Ted
Ginn Jr. said he believes his right
ankle will be strong enough that he
could play for the first time this year
Sunday at Minnesota. “I hope so,”
he said. “It’s better.”
49ers Vernon Davis goes with celebratory jump shot
Vernon Davis
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The “process” for the College of
San Mateo women’s water polo
team has begun.
And the initial returns are fair to
say the least —especially for a team
as young as the 2012 Lady
Bulldogs.
“It’s very promising because the
lesson learned are very small.
Consequential, but small,” said
CSM head coach Randy Wright,
whose team went 3-2 during the first
stretch of the very young season.
“You are able to make adjustments
and changes and figure it out. We’re
not talking dynamics — Offense,
Defense 101. No, there’s a firm
understanding of what we’re trying
to achieve. It’s just finishing off
plays and making sure that execu-
tion is a primary focus.
“It’s process here,” he said. “You
cannot skip steps within a process.
You can’t get to ‘Z’ without going
through the other 25 letters. As
much as I want to push the envelope
because I think we’re there, I find
myself having to take a deep breath,
take two steps back and saying,
‘Don’t skip steps because this team
needs to go step by step.’ They need
to learn the process.”
The process began last week with
a game against Merced.
“Thursday was a coin flip,”
Wright said. “It was the first game
with a bunch of new faces. You’re
hoping that it comes together but
you can’t expect it to gel. You’re
hoping that they’ll recognize the
difference in level of play from high
school to community college. So
those are two major issues that you
just have no control over. You just
wait and see what goes on.”
What went on was the full spec-
trum of what makes this year’s CSM
team exciting and torturous at the
same time.
Offensively, the Bulldogs jumped
out to a 5-2 lead.
“We have the potential to have
some really good play,” Wright said.
“More so that ever, I think we have
a horizontal game. We have some
girls that can just move. The type of
center that we possess is one of
mobility. Our ability to play in the
horizontal, I noticed that right
away.”
But with the good came the bad
— and a major theme in CSM’s ini-
tial stretch of games. The Bulldogs
turned the ball over 18 times and
squandered numerous golden scor-
ing opportunities. Merced capital-
ized on their chances and despite 10
saves by Daria Kekuewa, CSM fell
10-7.
“It wasn’t necessarily turnovers,”
Wright said. “I would have never
believed scoring eight goals on
Merced in the first quarter was real-
istic, but it very well could have
been that way. But we paid for it.”
It didn’t get easier for CSM. Right
after that defeat, the Bulldogs took
on powerhouse Diablo Valley
College. And despite holding them
0-0 in the first quarter and keeping
that score for the first two minutes
of the second, the Vikings wore
down CSM with their depth and
won 14-4.
“They’re just going to keep com-
ing at you, at you, at you,” Wright
said. “They just swim, man. You just
have to stay on it.”
But the key to the very young
Bulldogs in 2012 will be their abili-
ty to learn and adapt quickly to the
junior college game. And in many
ways, they did just that following
their two losses.
CSM followed that 10-goal beat-
down by DVC with an 8-4 win over
Ohlone — a team predicted as one
of the favorites in the Coast
Conference.
Jasmine Zaldiver had a hat trick.
Erica Staben and Miya Oto scored
twice, and Sinclaire Cheong tallied
a goal — Kekuewa had 11 saves.
The Bulldogs took that momen-
tum and totally blitzed Modesto.
But despite winning 10-8, Wright
said his young squad continued to
miss valuable scoring opportunities.
“My problem with that, with a
young team is, they had the oppor-
tunity to bury a team,” Wright said,
“so when we play them in October
again that team shows up at CSM
again and that team says, ‘We don’t
want any part of this team.’ We
could have put the nail in the coffin
early on in the season they would
have never wanted to play us again.”
Next up, the Bulldogs head over
to Cabrillo College for another
weekend tournament where they’re
scheduled to face West Valley,
Merced and Cuesta College.
“This team is just raw,” Wright
said. “And the learning curve and
the learning potential is just enor-
mous. And you can see it every day.
It’s scary.
“Our conference looks pretty
tough. And getting two maybe three
teams into the NorCal tournament is
feasible. It can happen. So far,
we’ve won the games we needed to
win and we’ve played good in the
games that I didn’t really expect to
win.”
CSM water polo still a work in progress
FOOD 19
Wednesday • Sept. 19, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Michael Felberbaum
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
RICHMOND, Va. — A beer created
by the brewmaster at the Anheuser-
Busch brewery in Williamsburg is part
of a Budweiser limited-edition sampler
pack this fall, the company announced
Tuesday.
The beer named for the 23185 ZIP
code was part of a promotion called
“Project 12,” in which brewmasters at
12 of its breweries created
s m a l l -
b a t c h
b e e r s
u s i n g
yeast that
is directly
descended
from the
o r i g i n a l
Budweiser
r e c i p e
from 1876.
A f t e r
b e i n g
pared to
six, con-
sumer feed-
back this sum-
mer helped pick
the three beers — from the Los
Angeles, St. Louis and Williamsburg
breweries — to be included in the sam-
pler 12-pack that will be available
nationwide at the end of October.
The Batch No. 23185 beer was devel-
oped over a couple of weeks in conjunc-
tion with brewmasters in Florida and
Georgia, said Williamsburg brewmaster
Daniel Westmoreland.
After a few different ideas, what ended
up ended up filling the bottles that will
soon hit shelves is a light amber lager
aged on wood from bourbon barrels and
spiced with vanilla.
“Having this package coming out with
Williamsburg on it (and the)
23185 (ZIP code) on it
is not only a good
thing for
Wi l l i ams bur g,
but for the state,”
Wes t mor el and
said.
Westmoreland,
who has been a
Budweiser brew-
master for more
than 30 years,
said he was excit-
ed that beer
drinkers enjoyed
the lager enough
to make it to the
top three.
Peter Kraemer, a fifth-generation
brewmaster who leads Anheuser-
Busch’s brewing operations in North
America, said the project was an oppor-
tunity for the company’s brewmasters to
have “fun experimenting with new
ingredients, flavors and brewing
processes to bring beer lovers some new
options inspired by our flagship beer.”
The promotion also helps the brewer
capitalize on the craft brew craze that
specializes in smaller brews with more
unique flavors.
With more than 2,125 breweries
nationwide, craft brewers make up a
nearly $9 billion industry, according to
the Brewers Association, the trade group
representing the majority of U.S. brew-
ing companies. And the industry, which
sold about 11.5 million barrels of beer in
2011, has seen volumes grow 13 percent
compared with 2010. By comparison,
the overall U.S. beer market is estimated
to be a $96 billion industry and sold
nearly 200 million barrels of beer last
year.
But Westmoreland said by no means is
the company trying to compete with
craft brews, but is seeking to connect
with beer drinkers to find out what they
like in certain beers and what types of
beers they’d like to see available in
stores.
Joining the Williamsburg-tagged beer
are: Batch No. 91406, a deep-amber
lager using caramel malt, from the com-
pany’s Los Angeles brewery; and Batch
No. 63118, a golden pilsner from the St.
Louis brewery that used hops similar to
those commonly used there in the late
1800s.
Beer made at brewery
part of Budweiser promo
Famous culinary
school stressing
science in kitchen
By Michael Hill
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
HYDE PARK, N.Y. — The basics of a culinary education
are getting a little less basic at the Culinary Institute of
America.
Recognizing that for the chefs of tomorrow well-honed
knife skills and a mastery of the mother sauces won’t be
enough, the culinary school is pumping up its curriculum with
a host of science lab-worthy tools and techniques.
“Today’s chef compared to a chef 30 years ago needs to
know so much more,” CIA president Tim Ryan said recently.
“The industry, the profession, is so much more complicated.”
Basic cooking lectures at times sound more like a chemistry
lesson, covering the culinary uses of xanthan gum, or the
physics of why oil and water won’t mix. And just this month,
the school was approved to offer a new major in culinary sci-
ence, a field encompassing food science and culinary arts.
A recent class covered dessert making via liquid nitrogen.
Chef Francisco Migoya carefully dunked strawberries into a
smoking container of the super-cold liquid, then shattered
them with a mallet and ground the shards into a fine berry dust
for use in an ice cream dish. Frozen borage petals were added
for garnish.
It’s true: the famous French chef Auguste Escoffier never
studied ion-dipole attraction and James Beard never had to
consider the complex and sometimes outlandish creations of
molecular gastronomy. But science has crept into cooking in
so many ways, from cooks using lab centrifuges to separate
ingredients to high-end restaurants that serve aerated foie gras.
The trend, sometimes referred to as modernist cuisine, is
See SCIENCE, Page 20
FOOD 20
Wednesday • Sept. 19, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
EXPIRES: September 30, 2012
JACK’S RESTAURANT & BAR: SAN BRUNO
1050 Admiral Court, Suite A
San Bruno, CA 94066
Phone: (650) 589-2222 | Fax: (650) 589-5042
iLoveJacks.com
loosely defined as the movement to incorpo-
rate scientific principles into the cooking and
presentation of food.
And the movement has stars, like Chicago’s
Grant Achatz and Spain’s Ferran Adria, who
made gorgonzola balloons and vanishing ravi-
oli for a select few at his former restaurant,
elBulli. Practitioners even have a manifesto:
“Modernist Cuisine: The Art and Science of
Cooking,” a 2,438-page text published last
year by Nathan Myhrvold, the first chief tech-
nology officer at Microsoft, which includes
tips for preserving truffles in carbon dioxide.
Ryan recalled that Achatz once told him he
picked up a lot of his knowledge not in the
classroom, but on the Internet. But Ryan
stressed that scientific skills are increasingly
necessary not only in multi-star restaurants,
but in the corporate kitchens and research labs
many of his school’s graduates will work in.
Freshmen being put through their paces
preparing fish and carrots on a recent weekday
morning in a kitchen classroom already were
getting the message. While any line cook
knows to finish off a sauce with butter, chef
Elizabeth Briggs wants her students to know
why. They have to have a detailed understand-
ing of what’s going on inside the pot.
“It’s emphasized in this class it’s the differ-
ence between a chef and a cook,” said Janelle
Turcios of Pittsburgh, working a range as she
made a vin blanc sauce.
The emphasis on science is signaled most
dramatically with the new bachelor of profes-
sional studies degree in culinary science.
Beginning in February, students pursuing the
degree will be able to take courses such as
Dynamics of Heat Transfer, Flavor Science
and Perception, and Advanced Concepts in
Precision Temperature Cooking.
Chef Jonathan Zearfoss said they are not
just teaching “magic tricks” or molecular gas-
tronomy. He and Chris Loss, director of menu
research and development at the CIA, tried to
design a course of study that will teach the
scientific underpinnings of food production.
“A traditional kitchen is like a pirate
ship. We like our flames, we like our
noise, we have our scars,” Zearfoss said
with a smile. “We’d like to create a
kitchen that’s more like a yacht.”
To Loss, a strawberry is not just something
to be sliced or dipped, but something with
cells and enzymes that can be manipulated for
best taste and presentation. Loss explained
that the strawberries smashed in the kitchen
classroom have more surface area and thus
more flavor. And ice cream made in liquid
nitrogen is smoother than the stuff on the
supermarket shelves because ice crystals
don’t have time to form.
Other schools are stressing the link between
food and science, too.
The International Culinary Center in New
York City now offers a concentration in culi-
nary technology stressing scientific principles
and hands-on experience with high-tech tools
like those used for sous-vide.
The food science department at the
University of Massachusetts at Amherst began
offering a concentration in culinary science
about five years ago to meet a demand from
culinary students with associate’s degrees
who wanted more science background for the
job market, said department head Eric Decker.
And Drexel University has offered a bachelor
of science in culinary science since 2007.
More subtly, the CIA is tweaking the mas-
ter-apprentice relationship that has been a
hallmark of professional kitchens since the
days of suspending iron pots over wood fires.
The traditional way for a trainee to respond to
a request is, “Yes, chef.” Now school adminis-
trators want to make it closer to, “Why, chef?”
They want students to come up with hypothe-
ses, test them, and discover the best methods.
Provost Mark Erickson explains that in
some cases, those traditional beliefs can be
improved, like the practice of simmering
stock slowly at around 185 F to make it clear
and tasty. Erickson said tests show simmering
at a rolling boil at about 210 F produces a
more flavorful, if cloudier, stock.
George Vollkommer, a CIA junior from
Chicago, said it’s a bit scary to go from “Just
do it because I told you” to bringing scientific
inquiry into the kitchen. But Vollkommer also
is excited to move beyond tradition and
explore contemporary food preparation meth-
ods such as sous vide and quick freezing.
“It’s trying to balance these new techniques
with being able to execute them properly.
Some of them are very technically advanced
to perform, even dangerous,” he said. “If you
look at liquid nitrogen, you can lose a hand
doing that.”
Continued from page 19
SCIENCE
The Kathy Matheson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PHILADELPHIA — How much does
Brian Dwyer love pizza?
Let us count the ways: He holds the
Guinness World Record for largest collection
of pizza memorabilia; he has a caricature of
himself, eating pizza, tattooed on his back
with the phrase “Totally saucesome!”; and he
is the driving force behind Pizza Brain, which
he describes as the nation’s first pizza muse-
um.
The quirky but unassuming establishment
that Dwyer just opened with three partners in
Philadelphia is part art gallery, part eatery. It’s
a place to enjoy a slice or two of artisan pie
while gawking at pizza-related photos,
records, knickknacks and videos.
“We thought it was a funny idea, and we
started doing some research,” Dwyer said.
“And when we discovered that nowhere on
earth was there a physical place, a monument
built to pizza, we said, ‘This is going to be
huge.’”
He was right: Hundreds of people turned
out for the Sept. 7 grand opening of Pizza
Brain, which occupies a pair of rowhouse
storefronts in the city’s Fishtown neighbor-
hood.
One wall is covered with framed pizza-
related photos and magazine covers; another
boasts dozens of vinyl records, like the sound-
track to “Mystic Pizza” and a holiday album
from Domino’s. Display boxes are scattered
throughout the eclectic space — including
built into the floor — to show off pizza-bear-
ing figurines from Homer Simpson and
Spider-Man to the Tasmanian Devil and
Pillsbury Doughboy. A cluster of small TVs
plays pizza-related shows, while a huge pizza
mural surrounds the back patio.
Dwyer, 28, said he had a nominal assem-
blage of mementoes a couple of years ago
when friends decided to create an art exhibit
called “Give Pizza Chance.” Reaction was so
positive that he continued collecting, becom-
ing the world-recorder holder with 561 items
in July 2011. He now owns a Teenage Mutant
Ninja Turtles “Pizza Drop” arcade game and
Star Trek Enterprise pizza cutter.
A few months later, Dwyer quit his super-
market job to work on Pizza Brain full time.
He and his team bought the rowhouses and
raised some dough online — more than
$16,500 — through the crowd-funding web-
site Kickstarter. Grassroots publicity and
social media created major local buzz.
Dwyer said he was caught completely off-
guard by the overwhelming response. At the
same time, he added that it’s not surprising
so many people identify with pizza, which
he calls “the great equalizer” and “the only
food synonymous with the word ‘party’.”
“I think that’s why pizza is so powerful —
it’s inherently communal,” Dwyer said.
“Pizza is one of the few things that everyone
can agree on.”
But only a sliver of the ever-growing
memorabilia collection is on view. Dwyer
values curation over quantity and plans to
rotate exhibit items at Pizza Brain, noting
the beauty of the project is that it’s not stag-
nant.
“I think, at the end of the day, it’s this big
art installation masquerading around as a
pizza shop,” Dwyer said.
Speaking of which, what about the pizza?
The menu offers pies with an array of artisan
ingredients and offbeat toppings, including
beef brisket, pulled pork and meatloaf; one
pizza made with gruyere, mozzarella,
caramelized onions and fresh thyme tastes
like French onion soup.
Philly pizza museum serves up slices, memorabilia
Hundreds of people turned out for the Sept. 7 grand opening of Pizza Brain, which occupies
a pair of rowhouse storefronts in the city’s Fishtown neighborhood.
FOOD 21
Wednesday • Sept. 19, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL


Open for Dinner
Wednesday to
Sunday
5PM to 9PM
Borel Shopping Center
59 Bovet Road San Mateo
650-525-1941
Now Serving
Fresh Homemade Pasta
with our Family Sauces.
Charlie “The Meatball" Esposto
loves it, so will you!
By Jim Romanoff
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
If you boil down the concept of breaking
the Yom Kippur fast to its culinary essence,
two basic rules become clear — make it easy
to prepare and make it easy on the stomach.
That’s because one of the major aspects of
this holy day of atonement, which comes at
the end of the Jewish new year celebration, is
a 25-hour fast. The day is spent in prayer and
contemplation. And when it’s finally time to
eat, nobody wants to be rushing into the
kitchen to make a complicated meal (or sitting
and waiting for it when you’re starving).
Plus, after an extended period of not eating,
you want to ease the stomach back into satiety
with a light meal.
Many families treat this meal, literally, as a
breakfast and eat the kind of foods you might
find at a Sunday brunch. So it’s no surprise
that all kinds of gentle dairy dishes, like eggy
noodle or potato kugels and cheese blintzes,
are served. Many of the convenient deli
favorites such as smoked fishes and bagels
with cream cheese show up, as well.
Meat guru Bruce Aidells, author of “The
Great Meat Cookbook,” which comes out next
month, had a childhood steeped in this tradi-
tion. His grandfather was president of their
conservative synagogue and his grandmother
owned and ran a Jewish deli in the Boyle
Heights section of Los Angeles.
Aidells recalls Yom Kippur “breakfasts”
that included deli foods such as smoked
salmon and cheese strudel, as well as a stan-
dard dish that was always served consisting of
boiled potatoes and sour cream. He remem-
bers that his own mother went much more
directly toward convenience and would pre-
pare something as simple as tuna fish salad or
even, in a pinch, kosher hot dogs.
For Noah and Rae Bernamoff, owners of
The Mile End Jewish-style delicatessen in
Brooklyn and authors of a new cookbook
bearing the same name, memories of the deli
play an important role in their respective Yom
Kippurs as well.
The two met at Montreal’s McGill
University in 2003 at a Sabbath dinner and
quickly realized they shared a passion for rit-
ual, history and tradition, particularly as it
related to the foods of their Jewish upbring-
ing.
Both grew up in a delicatessen culture, he in
Montreal and she in New York. In a phone
interview, Rae recalled Yom Kippur break-
fasts replete with smoked fishes, cheeses and
baked goods from the legendary Russ &
Daughters of Houston Street in Manhattan.
After college, while Rae was working at the
Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York and
Noah was in law school, the two began the
process that would turn their passion into a
profession.
Noah, with a nostalgia for the great Jewish
restaurants of his childhood, such as
Schwartz’s and Beauty’s Luncheonette, had
been distracting himself from a second year of
law school by trying to re-create smoked meat
(Montreal’s excellent take on pastrami) using
a Weber grill on his Brooklyn rooftop. By the
next year, he and Rae had signed a lease on a
small storefront in the Boerum Hill section of
Brooklyn as a location for their now wildly
successful restaurant, which features hand-
made Jewish deli and home-style dishes.
For Yom Kippur, the Bernamoffs offer take-
out platters of house-cured and smoked
salmon along with a wide selection of hand-
crafted deli favorites, such as egg, chicken or
whitefish salad. Twice-baked challah from
“The Mile End Cookbook” is a perfect dish
for Yom Kippur. The French toast-like dish
can be assembled ahead of time, then baked
just before serving.
If your stomach is up to it, you can serve it
with some of their light and mild veal and
turkey breakfast sausage patties, which also
can be prepared ahead. Just be sure to substi-
tute margarine for the butter in the topping of
the twice-baked challah if you are serving the
two dishes together and keeping kosher.
VEAL AND TURKEY
BREAKFAST SAUSAGE
At Mile End, these kosher-style sausage
patties are called “breakfast burgers.” Veal is a
great substitute for pork in a recipe such as
this. The patties also can be prepped the night
before and cooked in the morning. The recipe
calls for 1 pound each of lean veal and turkey,
but 2 pounds of just one of the meats can be
substituted.
This recipe calls for grinding the meat for
the patties yourself. This can be done using
either a grinder (such as those that attach to a
stand mixer) or a food processor.
Start to finish: 4 hours
Servings: 8
1 1/2 pounds lean veal (such as tenderloin
or leg cutlets)
1 pound lean turkey (such as tenderloin)
2 teaspoons kosher salt, plus more if need-
ed
1 tablespoon packed light brown sugar or
maple syrup
2 teaspoons ground black pepper, plus more
if needed
3/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper
1/2 teaspoon nutmeg
2 teaspoons chopped fresh sage
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme
5 teaspoons chopped fresh rosemary
Canola oil, to fry
Cut both meats into 1-inch pieces, then
combine in a large bowl. Add all remaining
ingredients except the canola oil. Toss well to
coat, then cover and refrigerate for at least 3
hours or overnight.
If using a meat grinder, place the pieces in
the freezer until needed. If using a food
processor, place the blade and bowl in the
freezer.
When ready to cook, use the cold grinder to
grind the chilled meat according to your
grinder’s directions for a coarse grind. If
using a food processor, place half of the meat
in the chilled processor bowl and pulse until
coarsely, but thoroughly chopped, about 8 to
ten 1-second pulses. Repeat with the second
batch of meat.
In a large skillet over medium-high, heat
just a splash of oil. Pinch off a small piece of
the ground meat, then flatten and cook until
browned on both sides. Taste to check for sea-
soning and adjust as needed.
Divide the ground meat into 8 portions and
form them into patties. At this stage, the pat-
ties can be refrigerated for up to 4 days or
frozen for 2 months.
Heat just enough oil to coat the pan or skil-
let, then cook the patties, flipping once, until
they are browned and cooked through, about 8
to 10 minutes.
Nutrition information per serving (values
are rounded to the nearest whole number):
200 calories; 60 calories from fat (30 percent
of total calories); 7 g fat (1 g saturated; 0 g
trans fats); 95 mg cholesterol; 2 g carbohy-
drate; 31 g protein; 0 g fiber; 590 mg sodium.
(Recipe adapted from Noah and Rae
Bernamoff’s “The Mile End Cookbook,”
Clarkson Potter, 2012)
Think breakfast when breaking Yom Kippur
Veal is a great substitute for pork in a recipe for kosher-style sausage patties.
WORLD
22
Wednesday • Sept. 19, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Patrick Quinn
and Christopher Torchia
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
KABUL, Afghanistan — Islamic militants
sought Tuesday to capitalize on anger over an
anti-Islam video that was produced in the
United States, saying a suicide bombing that
killed 12 people in Afghanistan was revenge
for the film and calling for attacks on U.S.
diplomats and facilities in North Africa.
The attempt by extremists across the region
to harness Muslim fury over a film that deni-
grates the Prophet Muhammad posed new
concern for the United States, whose
embassies and consulates have been targeted,
and in some cases breached, during riots and
protests over the past week.
At the same time, Western leaders wel-
comed statements by Middle East govern-
ments that condemned the violence against
diplomatic facilities on their soil, even as they
expressed anger over the video. Some of
those governments replaced autocratic
regimes in popular uprisings that swept the
region, allowing for greater leniency toward
protest.
At least 28 people have died in violence
linked to the film in seven countries, includ-
ing U.S. Ambassador Christopher Stevens
and three other Americans killed in a Sept. 11
attack on the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi,
Libya. The toll also includes 12 protesters
killed in riots over the film last week.
Some officials in Libya have said the attack
on the consulate was planned in advance by
militants. However, the White House said
Tuesday the assault appeared to have been
sparked by anger over the film, though the
investigation continues.
The crisis has become a major foreign pol-
icy challenge for Washington in the final
weeks of a presidential election campaign
that has largely focused on economic chal-
lenges. The uproar over the video,
“Innocence of Muslims,” which was made by
an Egyptian-born American citizen and post-
ed on YouTube, reflects seemingly intractable
tension between Western principles of free
speech and Islamic beliefs that brook no
insult directed at the prophet.
The crisis offered fresh impetus for Islamic
militants who have long plotted and carried
out attacks on Western targets.
Tuesday’s attack in Kabul, the Afghan cap-
ital, was carried out by a suicide bomber who
rammed a car packed with explosives into a
mini-bus carrying foreign aviation workers to
the airport. At least 12 people died, including
eight South Africans, three Afghans and a cit-
izen of Kyrgyzstan.
A spokesman for the Afghan militant
group, Hizb-i-Islami, claimed responsibility
for the dawn attack and said it was carried out
by a 22-year-old woman named Fatima.
Suicide bombings carried out by women are
extremely rare in Afghanistan, where few if
any Afghan women drive cars.
“The anti-Islam film hurt our religious sen-
timents and we cannot tolerate it,” spokesman
Haroon Zarghoon told the Associated Press.
“There had been several young men who
wanted to take revenge, but Fatima also vol-
unteered and we wanted to give a chance to a
girl ... to tell the world we cannot ignore any
anti-Islam attack.”
Militants claim Afghan attack is revenge for film
By Abdullah Shihri
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
RIYADH, Saudi Arabia — YouTube
said Tuesday that it was stopping users in
Saudi Arabia from viewing an anti-Islam
video that has sparked protests across the
Muslim world, after the kingdom’s press
agency reported that the ruler had banned
all access to the film and the site
appeared to be blocked there.
The online video sharing site said that
it was preventing “Innocence of
Muslims” from being seen on its site in
Saudi Arabia after being notified by the
government there that the clip is breaking
the country’s laws.
Google Inc., YouTube’s owner, has
blocked access to the video in Libya and
Egypt following violence there, and in
Indonesia and India because it says the
video broke laws in those countries.
The Saudi Press Agency said that the
kingdom had sent a request to Google to
“veil” all links containing the video,
which was produced in the United States
and which ridicules the Prophet
Muhammad.
The agency said King Abdullah had
directed that all websites and links that
accessed the video should be blocked. An
Associated Press reporter in Saudi Arabia
reported that the online video sharing site
was inaccessible that evening.
YouTube blocked in
Saudi Arabia to help
stop anti-Islamfilm
REUTERS
An Afghan protester shouts slogans near burning tires during a demonstration in Kabul,
Afghanistan.
DATEBOOK 23
Wednesday • Sept. 19, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 19
2012 Housing Hero Awards. 3 p.m.
to 4:30 p.m. Redwood Shores Library,
Community Room, 399 Marine
Parkway, Redwood City.The Behavioral
Health and Recovery Services Change
Agent Housing Committee will
present Housing Hero Awards to
honor individuals who help find stable
housing for people with co-occurring
mental illness and substance use
disorders. Free and open to the public.
For more information call 573-2306.
Parent Information Meetings for
2013 Sister City Goodwill Baseball
All Star Team. 7 p.m. San Mateo Senior
Center, 2645 Alameda de las Pulgas,
San Mateo. All boys and girls who will
be 11 or 12 years old in August of 2013
are eligible to try out for the 2013 All
Star Team.Will compete against a team
from Toyonaka, Japan, San Mateo’s
sister city. Details of the program and
dates for tryouts will be discussed at
the information meetings.
Opportunities to act as host families
will also be discussed. For more
information call 303-5881.
Club Fox Blues Jam: Sean Carney. 7
p.m. Club Fox, 2209 Broadway,
Redwood City. $5. For more
information call 369-7770.
Princeton Review SAT/ACT Combo
Results Session. 7 p.m. Belmont
Library, 1110 Alameda de las Pulgas,
Belmont. No registration required.
Parents are encouraged to attend. For
more information email
conrad@smcl.org.
‘Admist Latvians During the
Holocaust’ byEdwardAnders. 7 p.m.
The Lane Room of the Burlingame
Public Library, 480 Primrose Lane,
Burlingame. Edward Anders will talk
about his life in Latvia during the
Holocaust. Free. For more information
call 558-7444, ext. 2.
Foster City Village Evening Update
Meeting. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Foster City
Library, Crane Room, 650 Shell Blvd.,
Foster City. Light refreshments. Foster
City Village invites the public to attend
an evening focus meeting to update
seniors and others on the Village
progress. Free. For more information
call 378-8541.
Argentine Tango and Bachata
Classes. 7:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. Boogie
Woogie Ballroom, 551 Foster City Blvd.,
Suite G, Foster City. For more
information call 627-4854.
THURSDAY, SEPT. 20
Recovery Happens Picnic. 11 a.m. to
2 p.m. Flood Park, 215 Bay Road, Menlo
Park. Free. For more information and
to RSVP call 573-3437 or visit
kasheridan@smcgov.org.
Burlingame Lions Club Membership
Drive. Noon. 990 Burlingame Ave.,
Burlingame. Join the Lions Club for
lunch and see what they are all about.
Free. For more information call 245-
2993.
San Mateo Chapter 139 AARP
Meeting. Noon. Beresford Recreation
Center, 2720 Alameda de las Pulgas,
San Mateo. Please bring donations of
school supplies to this business
meeting. Free. For more information
call 345-5001.
Great Houses of San Francisco. 2
p.m. to 3 p.m. Filoli, 86 Cañada Road,
Woodside. Author Erin Feher will speak
about many private architectural
treasures in San Francisco. The
presentation will include photographs
from the Bourn’s Webster Street home.
The Bourns were prominent San
Franciscans, builders of Filoli and
owners of the Empire Gold Mine. $25
for members. $30 for non-members.
For more information and for tickets
visit filoli.org or call 364-8300.
Facebook Class. 3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m.
Little House Activity Center, 800
Middle Ave., Menlo Park. Free. For more
information visit www.penvol.org.
SufiTalks: Teachings of an American
Sufi Sheikh. 5:30 p.m. Sofia University,
1069 E. Meadow Circle, Palo Alto. Dr.
Robert Frager will speak and answer
questions. Free. For more information
contact kristen.sato@sofia.edu.
Fall Retreat Keynote Speech. 7 p.m.
Sofia University, 1069 E. Meadow Circle,
Palo Alto. Reverend Deborah L.
Johnson will speak. Free. For more
information contact
kristen.sato@sofia.edu.
Australian Author of ‘Entice’ to
Discuss Book. 7 p.m. Kepler’s Books
1010 El Camino Real, Menlo Park.
Jessica Shirvington will sign copies
and talk about her book. Free and
open to the public. For more
information call 324-4321.
Richard Douglass presents MOAH
lecture series: Coins and Coin
Collections: What do do with them.
7 p.m. Museum of American Heritage
Lecture Series, 351 Homer Ave., Palo
Alto. Expert coin collector Richard
Douglas presents a fascinating and
practical lecture on the do’s and don’t’s
of coin collecting.The lecture will focus
on how to treat coins, the collectability
and conservation of coins and how to
predict their future worth. Participants
may bring 1 or 2 coins per person for
him to assess. Free for MOAH
members. $10 for non-members. For
more information call 321-1004.
Tango, Bachata and Salsa Classes. 7
p.m. to 9 p.m. Boogie Woogie Ballroom,
551 Foster City Blvd., Suite G, Foster
City. For more information call 627-
4854.
FRIDAY, SEPT. 21
Fall Harvest Book Sale. 11 a.m. to
4:30 p.m. San Mateo Public Library, first
floor, Oak Meeting Room, 55 W. Third
Ave., San Mateo.Those who attend can
pick from a wide selection for bargain
prices. Books will be sorted into 35
categories. Credit cards accepted.
Admission is free. For more
information call 522-7802.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
license suspension on a store’s profits, Hill
said.
The stricter AB 1301 was signed into law by
Brown over the weekend.
Hill said it was the young people he worked
with — some of whom spoke before the
Legislature — that generated the momentum
for the new law’s passage.
“The nice thing is, it was really the young
people who were the driving force,” he said.
Hill joined members of the Youth
Leadership Institute, San Mateo County
Friday Night Live, the San Mateo County
Sheriff’s Office and various other groups yes-
terday at the Mid-Peninsula Boys & Girls
Club to celebrate the new law.
Continued from page 1
LAW
Department saved another $225,000, accord-
ing to the report.
The city has used its reserve to balance the
budget in recent years but has adopted a
spending plan that should realize a balanced
budget in two years, if revenue projections pan
out.
The city’s structural deficit is roughly $1.6
million.
Foster City mandates its reserve be at least a
third of its budget but the reserve now is more
than 60 percent of the budget, well over the
city’s mandate.
The city collected nearly $16.3 million in
property taxes for FY 2012, up more than 22
percent from last year. Consumers also spent
more in the city last year, $4.3 million, as the
report shows sales tax collections were up
17.5 percent over last year’s take of $3.7 mil-
lion.
Revenue from the city’s hotels rose to $1.7
million, 29 percent higher than the previous
year.
The Foster City Council will hear the quar-
terly report at its next meeting, 6:30 p.m.,
Monday, Sept. 24, City Hall, 620 Foster City
Blvd., Foster City.
Continued from page 1
REVENUE
developer, Portfolio Development Partners, held
a community outreach meeting at the Martin
Luther King Jr. Center in February.
Portfolio was granted a zoning code amend-
ment, since the building is now considered non-
conforming, to re-establish a grocery store use
on the site.
Lim requested a hearing regarding the possi-
ble termination and removal of the non-con-
forming use at 501 N. San Mateo Drive, near the
Burlingame border, after hearing from neigh-
bors near the site who complained about the
potential for increased crime, traffic and the
oversaturation of convenience stores in the area.
Lim suspects neighborhood residents would
be more favorable to a use similar to
Stangelini’s rather than a 7-Eleven, which stays
open 24 hours a day and sells alcohol and ciga-
rettes.
An official with Portfolio would not comment
to the Daily Journal yesterday on the issue.
The initial plan was to restore the property as
a grocery store but Josh Amoroso with Portfolio
previously told the Daily Journal that housing
was also a possibility for the site.
Lim and other councilmembers have received
numerous emails from neighbors near the site in
the past week saying they had concerns about a
7-Eleven popping up in the area.
The Planning Commission is scheduled
to hold a public hearing in October on the
use of the property and the City Council is
tentatively scheduled to hear the matter at
its Nov. 19 meeting.
If the council finds the 7-Eleven to be a non-
conforming use for the site, the developer will
have a minimum of two years and maximum of
up to five years to maintain a non-conforming
use on the site. After that, the use would revert
to residential.
Lim is seeking to have the hearings soon since
the developer has not invested any serious
money in improvements to the property, Lim
said.
Lane Kashiwahara and his wife attended the
community meeting at the King Center in
February and left it with the impression that a
“neighborhood market” was proposed for the
site.
“City employees assured us that there would
be additional information and notices sent out
related to this project. As you know, we received
no further communication,” Kashiwahara wrote
Lim in an email.
The Kashiwahara’s contend a 7-Eleven would
“sacrifice the integrity of the neighborhood and
its charm.”
There are plenty of other markets in the area,
they wrote, that already serve alcohol and ciga-
rettes.
Lim is seeking a review of the non-conform-
ing use since the deli’s use was authorized more
than 20 years ago.
Now is the time to determine whether the
non-conforming use is proper, so as to minimize
the impact on the property owners, Lim wrote
City Manager Susan Loftus when making his
request for a public hearing.
“The surrounding community deserves a pub-
lic hearing to weigh in on whether the current
non-conforming use should remain in the com-
munity,” Lim wrote to Loftus.
Continued from page 1
MARKET
has allowed for additional restaurants to open
when there was demand. Most recently, such a
request was made in June. At that time,
Councilman Michael Brownrigg suggested
the city consider doing away with the limits.
On Monday, the council seemed in favor of
doing so for full-service restaurants.
“They [restricted the number of restaurants]
in 1985 for a reason. But, maybe this is the
year to take them away for a reason,” said
Mayor Jerry Deal, who added he would not
want the change to allow for more quick serv-
ice-type restaurants. Brownrigg said lifting
the restrictions could help create the down-
town vibrancy the city is working toward. For
example, the city’s downtown streetscape is
hoped to generate more energy. Allowing a
European-style restaurant experience, he said,
would encourage people to stay longer and
frequent more local businesses.
Councilwoman Cathy Baylock wanted to
move forward cautiously. She explained the
rule was partially introduced in the ’80s due to
parking problems. People sat at restaurants
longer thus taking up space. Baylock was will-
ing to entertain allowing more full-service
restaurants, which she said are oftentimes bet-
ter funded and less apt to close quickly leav-
ing empty storefronts.
Deal understood parking concerns but said
he would rather see shops, new restaurants
and a parking problem than empty storefronts.
Vice Mayor Ann Keighran questioned
whether the city should reevaluate the overall
mix of businesses in the downtown. She was
interested to have the downtown and econom-
ic development subcommittees work with
local businesses about it. Similarly,
Councilwoman Terry Nagel was curious if the
city should be discussing changes to the
restaurant regulations in the Broadway area.
Those discussions, Community Development
Director Bill Meeker said, are ongoing at the
committee level.
The first restriction on the number of restau-
rants came in April 1985, according to a staff
report. It was set to match the number of
places open at the time and intended to only
last for two years. Prior to the 1987 sunset
date, however, the rule was amended to
become permanent. The number of restaurants
was increased in 2009, 2010 and in June.
Currently, 47 food establishments are allowed.
That number includes limited-service and full-
service restaurants. The council, however, was
interested in lifting the restrictions for full-
service restaurants only.
Under the possible timeline, Meeker said
the rule change could go before the Planning
Commission Oct. 8, at the earliest. If it moves
forward from there, the council could intro-
duce it Oct. 15 and hold a public hearing Nov.
5. If approved, the restriction could be lifted as
early as Dec. 5.
Continued from page 1
BURLINGAME
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2012
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Someone or something
could light a fre under your creative capabilities and
ignite a brilliant new idea. Act on it immediately and
enhance your success.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- If you aren’t pleased
with your present fnancial status, try to improve
things. You’ll likely be surprised at what your actions
generate.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- You won’t want to let
an associate undertake something that you know you
can do better. Thus, should it become necessary for
you to assert yourself, don’t hesitate to do so.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- It’s a mistake to
depend too heavily on another’s help in order to fulfll
an ambitious objective. If you can’t rustle up the
support you need, make sure you have the resources
to go it alone.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- There is someone
within your peer group who has a facility for stirring
things up. For harmony’s sake, it would be best not to
identify too closely with this individual.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- In your attempt to
gratify a personal interest, you should be careful not
to alienate anybody in the process. If you’re perceived
as being too self-serving, it could hurt your image.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -- If your feelings over-
ride your intellect, you’re not likely to perform too
well. Strive to evaluate critical conditions from a logi-
cal perspective rather than from an emotional one.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) -- The control of a project
that you’re closely identifed with is about to shift.
You’ll be much happier working under the new
powers-that-be than you were with the previous.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- Watch out if you’re op-
erating in close proximity to a strong-willed individual.
Don’t let him or her push you around and make deci-
sions for you that do not serve your best interest.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- The type of attitude you
adopt will either make things more diffcult or easier,
depending upon which you choose. Don’t blow
anything out of proportion.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) -- Don’t take a chance on
anything that could end in disaster if you make even
a slight error. Even if the odds appear to be tilted in
your favor, play it close to the vest.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Failing to fnd any produc-
tive expression for your mental and/or physical ener-
gies could put you in an irritable mood. Try to avoid
all insignifcant or senseless involvements.
COPYRIGHT 2012 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
COMICS/GAMES
9-19-12
TUESDAY’S PUZZLE SOLVED
PREVIOUS
SUDOkU
ANSWERS
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifeds
kids Across/Parents Down Puzzle Family Resource Guide


Each row and each column must contain the numbers 1
through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes, called
cages, must combine using the given operation (in any
order) to produce the target numbers in the top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in the
top-left corner.
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1 Tractor preceders
6 Striped animal
11 Concert windup
12 Shop equivalent (2 wds.)
13 Acid in milk
14 Funny feeling
15 Old cattle town
16 Look intently
17 Towel off
18 Airline to Stockholm
19 Cute legs, slangily
23 Tree anchor
25 Wish granter
26 Travel guide
29 Singing cowpoke
31 Half a dangerous fy
32 Parseghian
33 -- -de-lis
34 Charged particle
35 Crowned heads
37 Warden’s fear
39 Vow
40 Desk item
41 Waikiki setting
45 Exiled Roman poet
47 Candy base
48 Diminish
51 Power sources
52 Old jalopies
53 Everest guide
54 Smelting residue
55 Morning show
DOWN
1 Biscayne Bay city
2 Pop a top
3 Soapsuds
4 Charles Lamb
5 Wine category
6 Territory
7 Surface
8 Maude portrayer
9 Lo- -- graphics
10 Bandage brand
11 Pour forth
12 Tints
16 Drummed, as raindrops
18 Kind of mate
20 Debate side
21 Sushi bar soup
22 Observed
24 Lummoxes
25 Pita sandwich
26 Warm-water shark
27 Pavarotti piece
28 Huff and puff
30 Wreck
36 Spooky specters
38 Made much of
40 ATM codes
42 Mall for Plato
43 Half-woman, half-bird
44 Bear in the sky
46 Notch shapes
47 London district
48 Type of screen
49 Blow it
50 -- Paulo, Brazil
51 Denver hrs.
DILBERT® CROSSWORD PUZZLE
fUTURE SHOCk®
PEARLS BEfORE SWINE®
GET fUZZY®
24 Wednesday• Sept. 19, 2012
THE DAILY JOURNAL
25 Wednesday • Sept. 19, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
105 Education/Instruction
CALVARY
PRESCHOOL
OPEN
ENROLLMENT
Little Learners: age 2.5-3.5
Big Explorers: age 3.5-5
calvarypreschoolmillbrae.com
(650)588-8030
106 Tutoring
TUTORING
English Language & Literature
History & Social Studies
Grades 7-12
Essay Writing
Reading Comprehension
(650)579-2653
TUTORING
Spanish, French,
Italian
Certificated Local
Teacher
All Ages!
(650)573-9718
110 Employment
ASSISTANT MANAGER,
AQUATIC CENTER
STUDENT UNION, INC. - SJSU
FT-EXC. BENEFITS
$3800-$5500
FOR APPLICATION CALL
(408)924-6378, M-F 9AM-5PM
www.union.sjsu.edu
AA/EOE/ADA EMPLOYER
CASHIER - PT/FT, will train. Apply at
AM/PM @ 470 Ralston Ave., Belmont
RESTAURANT -
Cooks, Cashiers, Avanti Pizza. Menlo
Park. (650)854-1222.
110 Employment
DRIVERS NEEDED!
Palo Alto & Redwood
Make Xtra money!!
Delivering phone books.
Must hv license,
transprtation w/ auto
Insurance. Call now!!
1-888-430-7944
www.deliveryofphonebooks.com
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
IRISH HELP AT HOME
Caregivers wanted.
High Quality Home Care.
Qualified, Experienced
Caregivers for Hourly and Live in
placements in San Mateo.
Inquire at: (650)347-6903
www.irishhelpathome.com
JEWELRY SALES
FUN! No Nights! Benefits & 401K!
(650)367-6500 FX:(650)367-6400
jobs@jewelryexchange.com
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
TAXI DRIVER wanted. Pay cash every-
day. (650)766-9878
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
RESTAURANT -
Experienced line cook, Night / Week-
ends. Apply in person,1201 San Carlos
Ave., San Carlos.
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251691
The following person is doing business
as: J & M Painting, 815 Humboldt St.,
#207, SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Jona-
than Brandan, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on
/s/ Jonathan Brandan /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/02/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/29/12, 09/05/12, 09/12/12, 09/19/12).
CHILD FIND NOTICE
The San Mateo County SELPA
is seeking children and young
adults from birth to age 21 who
may need special education
services, including highly mobile
(such as migrant or homeless)
children with disabilities and chil-
dren who are suspected of hav-
ing a disability and are in need
of special education. If you be-
lieve your child may have any of
these special needs, please con-
tact your local school district or
the SELPA Office at (650) 802-
5464.
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 515368
AMENDED ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE
FOR CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Douglas Mark Brenner
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Douglas Mark Brenner filed a
petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
Present name: Douglas Mark Brenner,
Douglas Mark McShane, Douglas M.
Brenner
Proposed name: Douglas Mark McShane
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on October 18,
2012 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2E, at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 09/05/2012
/s/ Beth Freeman/
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 09/05/2012
(Published, 09/12/12, 09/19/12,
09/26/12, 10/03/12)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251781
The following person is doing business
as: Soccer Pro RC, 2737 El Camino Re-
al, REDWOOD CITY, CA 94061 is here-
by registered by the following owner:
Norma P. Zapien, 37168 Walnut St.,
Newark, CA 94560. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Norma P. Zapien /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/09/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/29/12, 09/05/12, 09/12/12, 09/19/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251589
The following person is doing business
as: Playful Planner, 724 Fiesta Drive,
SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Megan
Sandoval, same address. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Megan Sandoval /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/27/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/29/12, 09/05/12, 09/12/12, 09/19/12).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252012
The following person is doing business
as: Hillsdale Market, 212 E. Hillsdale
Blvd., SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Man-
ubhai B. Tandel, 336 Alden St., Red-
wood City, CA 94063. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on September. 1, 2012
/s/ Manubhai B. Tandel /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/27/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/29/12, 09/05/12, 09/12/12, 09/19/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251771
The following person is doing business
as: Shy July, 274 Harbor Way, SOUTH
SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Shy
July, LLC, CA. The business is conduct-
ed by a Limited Liability Company. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on
/s/ Jimmy Zhirong Yu /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/09/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/29/12, 09/05/12, 09/12/12, 09/19/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252092
The following person is doing business
as: Pak Chiropratic 520 S. El Camino
Real, Ste. 520, SAN MATEO, CA 94402
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Jin Pak, 2250 Monroe St. #283,
Santa Clara, CA 95050. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 09/01/2012
/s/ Jin Pak /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/30/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/05/12, 09/12/12, 09/19/12, 09/26/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252093
The following person is doing business
as: The Animal Connection II, 1429 Bur-
lingame Ave., BURLINGAME, CA 94010
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Peter Weaver, 980 Teresita Blvd.,
San Francisco, CA 94127. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Peter Weaver /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/30/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/05/12, 09/12/12, 09/19/12, 09/26/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252089
The following person is doing business
as: Angry Bicycle Press, 301 Hillcrest
Road, SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is here-
by registered by the following owner:
Wendy Diane Walter, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
/s/ Wendy D. Walter /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/30/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/05/12, 09/12/12, 09/19/12, 09/26/12).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252125
The following person is doing business
as: Alban Interior Plant Service, 215 2nd
Ave. Apt. 233, SAN MATEO, CA 94401
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Moises Ubaldo Alban Lozano,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 10/01/2012.
/s/ Moises Ubaldo Alban Lozano /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/04/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/05/12, 09/12/12, 09/19/12, 09/26/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252242
The following person is doing business
as: BN Jabba Consulting, 144 Oakdale
Street, REDWOOD CITY, CA 94062 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Barbara N. Jabba, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 07/01/2012.
/s/ Barbara N. Jabba /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/10/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/12/12, 09/19/12, 09/26/12, 10/03/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251918
The following person is doing business
as: Twin Star Flowers, 2323 Flores St.,
#203, SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Rox-
anne Baumann, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on
/s/ Roxanne Baumann /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/20/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/12/12, 09/19/12, 09/26/12, 10/03/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252137
The following person is doing business
as: The Chateau, 1422 Bellevue Ave.,
BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: 1422 Bel-
levue Avenue, LP, CA. The business is
conducted by a Limited Partnership. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 07/30/2012.
/s/ Carl Goldstone /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/05/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/12/12, 09/19/12, 09/26/12, 10/03/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252179
The following person is doing business
as: Law Center, 1660 S. Amphlett Blvd.,
Ste. 116, SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Andrew M. Agtagma, A Law Corporation,
CA. The business is conducted by a Cor-
poration. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
08/12/2003.
/s/ Andrew M. Agtagma /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/06/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/12/12, 09/19/12, 09/26/12, 10/03/12).
26 Wednesday • Sept. 19, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252306
The following person is doing business
as: JJB Link Logistics Company Limited,
1200 Corporate Center Dr. Ste 350,
MONTEREY PARK, CA 91754 is hereby
registered by the following owner: James
J. Boyle & CO, CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 03/09/2007
/s/ Greg Kodama /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/14/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/19/12, 09/26/12, 10/3/12, 10/10/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252333
The following person is doing business
as:Express Yourself! Photo Booth Rent-
al, 250 S. B St. SAN MATEO, CA 94401
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Margaret Kling 1393 Jenevein
Ave., San Bruno, CA 94066. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on
/s/ Margaret Kling /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/17/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/19/12, 09/26/12, 10/3/12, 10/10/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252342
The following person is doing business
as: Mike’s Garage Sales, 525 5th Ave,
SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Michael
Joseph Hutton, same adress. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on
/s/ Michael Joseph Hutton /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/17/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/19/12, 09/26/12, 10/3/12, 10/10/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252334
The following person is doing business
as: Pita Gyros, 44 Hilsdale Mall, SAN
MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Feti Karadogan,
4333 Beresford St. Apt. 5, SAN MATEO,
CA 94403. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on
/s/ Feti Karadogan /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/17/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/19/12, 09/26/12, 10/3/12, 10/10/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252202
The following person is doing business
as: Pomdoro, 1530 Edinburgh St., SAN
MATEO, CA 94402 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Sarah O’Connell,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 09/01/2012.
/s/ Sarah O’Connell /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/07/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/19/12, 09/26/12, 10/3/12, 10/10/12).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252287
The following person is doing business
as: Dreams Cosmetics, 130 Produce
Ave., Ste. F, SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO,
CA 94080 is hereby registered by the
following owner: Empire Enterprise Corp,
CA. The business is conducted by a Cor-
poration. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
N/A.
/s/ Geoffrey Au /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/12/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/19/12, 09/26/12, 10/3/12, 10/10/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252252
The following person is doing business
as: Berto’s Garden Maintenance, 915 S.
Claremont St., SAN MATEO, CA 94402
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Julio Heredia-Faustor, 231 Victo-
ria Rd., Burlingame, CA 94010. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on
/s/ Julio Heredia-Faustor /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/11/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/19/12, 09/26/12, 10/3/12, 10/10/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251959
The following person is doing business
as: WRB Rapid Services, 2000 Crystal
Springs Rd., #2614, SAN BRUNO, CA
94066 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Gary Mirzoyev, same ad-
dress. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
08/22/2012.
/s/ Gary Mirzoyev /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/22/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/19/12, 09/26/12, 10/3/12, 10/10/12).
NOTICE OF PETITION TO
ADMINISTER ESTATE OF
Mary A. Marshall
aka Mary Albertina Marshall
Case Number 122657
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, con-
tingent creditors, and persons who may
otherwise be interested in the will or es-
tate, or both, of: Mary A. Marshall aka
Mary Albertina Marshall. A Petition for
Probate has been filed by Marilyn M.
Moon in the Superior Court of California,
County of San Mateo. The Petition for
Probate requests that Marilyn M. Moon
be appointed as personal representative
to administer the estate of the decedent.
The petition requests the decedent’s will
and codicils, if any, be admitted to pro-
bate. The will and any codicils are avail-
able for examination in the file kept by
the court.
The petition requests authority to admin-
ster the estate under the Independent
Administration of Estates Act. (This au-
thority will allow the personal representa-
tive to take many actions without obtain-
ing court approval. Before taking certain
very important actions, however, the per-
sonal representative will be required to
give notice to interested persons unless
they have waived notice or consented to
the proposed action.) The independent
administration authority will be granted
unless an interested person files an ob-
203 Public Notices
jection to the petition and shows good
cause why the court should not grant the
authority.
A hearing on the petition will be held in
this court as follows: October 2, 2012 at
9:00 a.m., Dept. 28, Superior Court of
California, County of San Mateo, 400
County Center, 1st Floor, Redwood City,
CA 94063. If you object to the granting
of the petition, you should appear at the
hearing and state your objections or file
written objections with the court before
the hearing. Your appearance may be in
person or by your attorney. If you are a
creditor or a contingent creditor of the
decedent, you must file your claim with
the court and mail a copy to the personal
representative appointed by the court
within four months from the date of first
issuance of letters as provided in Pro-
bate Code section 9100. The time for fil-
ing claims will not expire before four
months from the hearing date noticed
above. You may examine the file kept by
the court. If you are a person interested
in the estate, you may file with the court
a Request for Special Notice (form DE-
154) of the filing of an inventory and ap-
praisal of estate assets or of any petition
or account as provided in Probate Code
section 1250. A Request for Special No-
tice form is available from the court clerk.
Attorney for Petitioner:
Alexandra Gadzo, #209127
Gadzo Law, P.C.
2600 El Camino Real, Suite #412
Palo Alto, CA 94306
(650)321-3050
Dated: 08/30/12
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
on September 5, 12, 19, 2012.
SUMMONS
(CITACION JUDICIAL)
CASE NUMBER: CIV508028
NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: (Aviso Al
Demandado): WELLS FARGO BANK,
N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO
WELLS FARGO BANK SOUTHWEST,
N.A. F/K/A WACHOVIA MORTGAGE,
FSB, F/K/A WORLD SAVINGS BANK,
FSB; and/or WELLS FARGO BANK,
N.A., AND F/K/A WACHOVIA MORT-
GAGE, FSB; WASHINGTONMUTUAL
BANK, a Federal Association, A/K/A
WASHINGTON MUTUAL, INC., A/K/A
J.P.MORGAN CHASE; NDEx West,
L.L.C., a Texas Limited Liability Compa-
ny; LILIAN LUM; RENE WAN LO; DAN-
IEL C. YEE; and DOES 1-20, Inclusive,
YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAIN-
TIFF: (Lo esta demandando el deman-
dante): JAMES LUM
NOTICE! You have been sued. The
court may decide against you without
your being heard unless you respond
within 30 days. Read the information be-
low.
You have 30 calendar days after this
summons and legal papers are served
on you to file a written response at the
court and have a copy served on the
plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not pro-
tect you. Your written response must be
in proper legal form if you want the court
to hear your case. There may be a court
form that you can use for your response.
You can find these court forms and more
information at the California Courts On-
line Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your
county law library, or the courthouse
203 Public Notices
nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing
fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver
form. If you do not file your response on
time, you may lose the case by default,
and your wages, money, and property
may be taken without further warning
from the court.
There are other legal requirements. You
may want to call an attorney right away.
If you do not know an attorney, you may
want to call an attorney referral service.
If you cannot afford an attorney, you may
be eligible for free legal services from a
nonprofit legal services program. You
can locate these nonprofit groups at the
California Legal Services Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the Califor-
nia Courts Online Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by
contacting your local court or county bar
association. NOTE: The court has a stat-
utory lien for waived fees and costs on
any settlement or arbitration award of
$10,000 or more in a civil case. The
court’s lien must be paid before the court
will dismiss the case.
AVISO! Lo han demando. Si no re-
sponde dentro de 30 dias, la corte puede
decidir en su contra sin escuchar su ver-
sion. Lea la informacion a continuacion.
Tiene 30 dias de calendario despues de
que le entreguen esta citacion y papeles
legales para presentar una respuesta por
escrito en esta corte y hacer que se en-
tregue ena copia al demandante. Una
carta o una llamada telefonica no lo pro-
tegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene
que estar en formato legal correcto si de-
sea que procesen su caso en la corte.
Es posible que haya un formulario que
usted pueda usar para su respuesta.
Puede encontrar estos formularios de la
corte y mas informacion en el Centro de
Ayuda de las Cortes de California
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/),
en la biblio teca de leyes de su condado
o en la corte que le quede mas cerca. Si
no puede pagar la cuota de presenta-
cion, pida al secretario de la corte que le
de un formulario de exencion de pago de
cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a
tiempo, puede perder el caso por incum-
plimiento y la corte le podra quitar su su-
eldo, dinero y bienes sin mas adverten-
cia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es re-
comendable que llame a un abogado in-
mediatamente. Si no conoce a un abo-
dado, puede llamar a de servicio de re-
mision a abogados. Si no puede pagar a
un abogado, es posible que cumpia con
los requisitos para obtener servicios le-
gales gratuitos de un programa de servi-
cios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede
encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro
en el sitio web de California Legal Serv-
ices Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), en el Centro
de Ayuda de las Cortes de California,
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/)
o poniendose en contacto con la corte o
el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO:
Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar
las cuotas y costos exentos por imponer
un gravamen sobre cualquier recupera-
cion de $10,000 o mas de valor recibida
mediante un acuerdo o una concesion
de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil.
Tiene que pagar el gravamen de la corte
antes de que la corte pueda desechar el
caso.
The name and address of the court is:
(El nombre y direccion de la corte es):
San Mateo County Superior Court, Hall
of Justice, 400 County Center, Redwood
City, CA 94063-1655
The name, address, and telephone num-
ber of the plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff
without an attorney, is: (El nombre, direc-
cion y numero de telefono del abogado
del demandante, o del demandante que
no tiene abogado, es):
John H. O’Reilly #072145
244 Kearny St., #900
San Francisco, CA 94108
(415)392-2860
Date: (Fecha) Aug. 29, 2011
John C. Fitton, Clerk, Deputy (Adjunto)
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
September 5, 12, 19, 26, 2012.
SUMMONS
(CITACION JUDICIAL)
CASE NUMBER: CIV511223
NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: (Aviso Al
Demandado): BRUCE E. ROBINSON
YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAIN-
TIFF: (Lo esta demandando el deman-
dante): PRIDE ACQUISITIONS LLC
NOTICE! You have been sued. The
court may decide against you without
your being heard unless you respond
within 30 days. Read the information be-
low.
You have 30 calendar days after this
summons and legal papers are served
on you to file a written response at the
court and have a copy served on the
plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not pro-
tect you. Your written response must be
in proper legal form if you want the court
to hear your case. There may be a court
form that you can use for your response.
You can find these court forms and more
information at the California Courts On-
line Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your
county law library, or the courthouse
nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing
fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver
form. If you do not file your response on
time, you may lose the case by default,
and your wages, money, and property
may be taken without further warning
from the court.
There are other legal requirements. You
may want to call an attorney right away.
If you do not know an attorney, you may
want to call an attorney referral service.
If you cannot afford an attorney, you may
be eligible for free legal services from a
203 Public Notices
nonprofit legal services program. You
can locate these nonprofit groups at the
California Legal Services Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the Califor-
nia Courts Online Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by
contacting your local court or county bar
association. NOTE: The court has a stat-
utory lien for waived fees and costs on
any settlement or arbitration award of
$10,000 or more in a civil case. The
court’s lien must be paid before the court
will dismiss the case.
AVISO! Lo han demando. Si no re-
sponde dentro de 30 dias, la corte puede
decidir en su contra sin escuchar su ver-
sion. Lea la informacion a continuacion.
Tiene 30 dias de calendario despues de
que le entreguen esta citacion y papeles
legales para presentar una respuesta por
escrito en esta corte y hacer que se en-
tregue ena copia al demandante. Una
carta o una llamada telefonica no lo pro-
tegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene
que estar en formato legal correcto si de-
sea que procesen su caso en la corte.
Es posible que haya un formulario que
usted pueda usar para su respuesta.
Puede encontrar estos formularios de la
corte y mas informacion en el Centro de
Ayuda de las Cortes de California
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/),
en la biblio teca de leyes de su condado
o en la corte que le quede mas cerca. Si
no puede pagar la cuota de presenta-
cion, pida al secretario de la corte que le
de un formulario de exencion de pago de
cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a
tiempo, puede perder el caso por incum-
plimiento y la corte le podra quitar su su-
eldo, dinero y bienes sin mas adverten-
cia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es re-
comendable que llame a un abogado in-
mediatamente. Si no conoce a un abo-
dado, puede llamar a de servicio de re-
mision a abogados. Si no puede pagar a
un abogado, es posible que cumpia con
los requisitos para obtener servicios le-
gales gratuitos de un programa de servi-
cios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede
encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro
en el sitio web de California Legal Serv-
ices Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), en el Centro
de Ayuda de las Cortes de California,
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/)
o poniendose en contacto con la corte o
el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO:
Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar
las cuotas y costos exentos por imponer
un gravamen sobre cualquier recupera-
cion de $10,000 o mas de valor recibida
mediante un acuerdo o una concesion
de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil.
Tiene que pagar el gravamen de la corte
antes de que la corte pueda desechar el
caso.
The name and address of the court is:
(El nombre y direccion de la corte es):
San Mateo County Superior Court, Hall
of Justice, 400 County Center, Redwood
City, CA 94063-1655
The name, address, and telephone num-
ber of the plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff
without an attorney, is: (El nombre, direc-
cion y numero de telefono del abogado
del demandante, o del demandante que
no tiene abogado, es):
Michael W. Reich, Esq. #268525
Baker, Sanders, Barshay, Grossman,
Fass, Muhlstock & Neuwirth, LLC
4300 Redwood Highway, Ste. 100
San Rafael, CA
(877)741-7370
Date: (Fecha) January 20, 2012
John C. Fitton, Clerk, Deputy (Adjunto)
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
September 12, 19, 26, October 3, 2012.
SUMMONS
(CITACION JUDICIAL)
CASE NUMBER: 12628116
NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: (Aviso Al De-
mandado): Kuniko Nakano, an Individual;
Tachibana Japanese Restaurant, INC.
dba Tachibana Sushi Bar & Grill, a Cali-
fornia corporation; and does 1 through
50, inclusive,
You are being sued by plaintiff: (Lo esta
demandando el demandante): Kwok
Hang Ng; an individual, Hui Lan Chen
Ng, an individual
NOTICE! You have been sued. The court
may decide against you without your be-
ing heard unless you respond within 30
days. Read the information below.
You have 30 calendar days after this
summons and legal papers are served
on you to file a written response at the
court and have a copy served on the
plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not pro-
tect you. Your written response must be
in proper legal form if you want the court
to hear your case. There may be a court
form that you can use for your response.
You can find these court forms and more
information at the California Courts On-
line Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your
county law library, or the courthouse
nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing
fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver
form. If you do not file your response on
time, you may lose the case by default,
and your wages, money, and property
may be taken without further warning
from the court.
There are other legal requirements. You
may want to call an attorney right away.
If you do not know an attorney, you may
want to call an attorney referral service.
If you cannot afford an attorney, you may
be eligible for free legal services from a
nonprofit legal services program. You
can locate these nonprofit groups at the
California Legal Services Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the Califor-
nia Courts Online Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by
contacting your local court or county bar
203 Public Notices
association. NOTE: The court has a stat-
utory lien for waived fees and costs on
any settlement or arbitration award of
$10,000 or more in a civil case. The
court’s lien must be paid before the court
will dismiss the case.
AVISO! Lo han demando. Si no re-
sponde dentro de 30 dias, la corte puede
decidir en su contra sin escuchar su ver-
sion. Lea la informacion a continuacion.
Tiene 30 dias de calendario despues de
que le entreguen esta citacion y papeles
legales para presentar una respuesta por
escrito en esta corte y hacer que se en-
tregue ena copia al demandante. Una
carta o una llamada telefonica no lo pro-
tegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene
que estar en formato legal correcto si de-
sea que procesen su caso en la corte.
Es posible que haya un formulario que
usted pueda usar para su respuesta.
Puede encontrar estos formularios de la
corte y mas informacion en el Centro de
Ayuda de las Cortes de California
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/),
en la biblio teca de leyes de su condado
o en la corte que le quede mas cerca. Si
no puede pagar la cuota de presenta-
cion, pida al secretario de la corte que le
de un formulario de exencion de pago de
cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a
tiempo, puede perder el caso por incum-
plimiento y la corte le podra quitar su su-
eldo, dinero y bienes sin mas adverten-
cia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es re-
comendable que llame a un abogado in-
mediatamente. Si no conoce a un abo-
dado, puede llamar a de servicio de re-
mision a abogados. Si no puede pagar a
un abogado, es posible que cumpia con
los requisitos para obtener servicios le-
gales gratuitos de un programa de servi-
cios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede
encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro
en el sitio web de California Legal Serv-
ices Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), en el Centro
de Ayuda de las Cortes de California,
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/)
o poniendose en contacto con la corte o
el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO:
Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar
las cuotas y costos exentos por imponer
un gravamen sobre cualquier recupera-
cion de $10,000 o mas de valor recibida
mediante un acuerdo o una concesion
de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil.
Tiene que pagar el gravamen de la corte
antes de que la corte pueda desechar el
caso.
The name and address of the court is:
(El nombre y direccion de la corte es):
Superior Court of Alameda-Unlimited
Civil Jurisdiction
1225 Fallon St.
Oakland, CA 94612
The name, address, and telephone num-
ber of the plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff
without an attorney, is: (El nombre, direc-
cion y numero de telefono del abogado
del demandante, o del demandante que
no tiene abogado, es):
Randall P. Choy, ESQ., SB#83194
Charlie W. Yu, ESQ., SB#268233
595 Market St.,
SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94105
(415)778-0800
Date: (Fecha) May 4, 2012
E. Baker, Deputy (Adjunto)
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
August, 24, 31, September 7, 14, 2012.
210 Lost & Found
FOUND - Evan - I found your iPod, call
(650)261-9656
FOUND- LITTLE tan male chihuahua,
Found on Davit Street in Redwood
Shores Tuesday, August 28th. Please
call (650)533-9942
LOST - 2 silver rings and silver watch,
May 7th in Burlingame between Park Rd.
& Walgreens, Sentimental value. Call
Gen @ FOUND!
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST CHIHUAHUA/TERRIER mix in
SSF, tan color, 12 lbs., scar on stomach
from being spade, $300. REWARD!
(650)303-2550
LOST, SUNGLASSES at Bridge Point
Shopping Center. Reward,
(650)726-9160
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
294 Baby Stuff
B.O.B. DUALLIE STROLLER, for two.
Excellent condition. Blue. $300.
Call 650-303-8727.
BABY BJORN potty $10 (650)595-3933
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
DEX SAFE Sleeper Ultra bed rail $10
(650)595-3933
295 Art
WALL ART, from Pier 1, indoor/outdoor,
$15. Very nice! (650)290-1960
27 Wednesday • Sept. 19, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
296 Appliances
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
MIROMATIC PRESSURE cooker flash
canner 4qt. $25. 415 333-8540
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24” wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SMALL SLOW cooker. Used once, $12
(650)368-3037
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
WASHER AND Dryer, $200
(650)333-4400
WATER HEATER $75, (650)333-4400
297 Bicycles
BIKE RACK Roof mounted, holds up to
4 bikes, $65 (650)594-1494
298 Collectibles
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 FIGURINES - 1 dancing couple, 1
clown face. both $15. (650)364-0902
67 OLD Used U.S. Postage Stamps.
Many issued before World War II. All
different. $4.00, (650)787-8600
ANTIQUE TRAIN set from the 40's com-
plete set in the box $80 OBO (650)589-
8348
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BAY MEADOWS BAG - mint condition,
original package, $20., (650)365-3987
298 Collectibles
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $90. OBO, (650)754-
3597
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
CHILDHOOD COMIC book collection
many titles from the 70's & 80's whole
collection $50 OBO (650)589-8348
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
FIVE RARE Non-Mint 1954 Dan Dee
Baseball Cards (Lemon, Wynn, Schoen-
dienst, Mitchell, Hegan), Each $20, All
$95, (650)787-8600
GAYLORD PERRY 8x10 signed photo
$10 (650)692-3260
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MARK MCGUIRE hats, cards, beanie
babies, all for $98., (650)520-8558
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
ORIGINAL SMURF FIGURES - 1979-
1981, 18+ mushroom hut, 1 1/2 x 3 1/2”,
all $40., (650)518-0813
POKEMON CARDS - 1000, excellent
condition, $30., (650)365-3987
POSTER - New Kids On The Block
1980s, $12., call Maria, (650)873-8167
RARE BASEBALL CARDS
Five Non-Mint 1954 Dan Dee Baseball
Cards (Lemon, Wynn, Schoendienst,
Mitchell, Hegan), All $95, (650)787-8600
ROCK MEMORABILIA Rolling Stones
Tour Guide, From ‘70s. $50 obo
(650)589-8348
SPORTS CARDS - 50 Authentic Signa-
tures $60 all, (650)365-3987
STACKING MINI-KETTLES - 3
Pots/cover: ea. 6” diam. Brown speckle
enamelware, $20., (650)341-3288
VINTAGE HOLLIE HOBBIE LUNCH-
BOX with Thermos, 1980s, $25., Call
Maria 650-873-8167
298 Collectibles
VINTAGE TEEN BEAT MAGAZINES
(20) 1980s $2 each, Call Maria 650-873-
8167
WANTED:
OLDER PLASTIC MODEL KITS.
Aurora, Revell, Monogram.
Immediate cash.
Pat 650-759-0793.
YUGIOH CARD - 2,000, some rare, 1st
Edition, $60 all, (650)365-3987
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
AMERICAN FLYER train set $75 OBO
SOLD!
ANTIQUE ELECTRIC train set with steel
engine full set from the 50's $75 OBO
(650)589-8348
BILINGUAL POWER lap top
6 actividaes $18 SOLD!
PLASTIC TOY army set from the 70's
many pieces $50 (650)589-8348
TONKA BULL Dozer from the 50's or
60's $50 obo (650)589-8348
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE WASHING machine, some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
CHINA CABINET - Vintage, 6 foot,
solid mahogany. $300/obo.
(650)867-0379
302 Antiques
J&J HOPKINSON 1890-1900's walnut
piano with daffodil inlay on the front. Ivo-
ries in great condition. Can be played as
is, but will benefit from a good tuning.
$600.00 includes stool. Email
frisz@comcast.net for photos
STICKLEY STYLE solid oak Mission
Chair, SOLD!
303 Electronics
3 SHELF SPEAKERS - 8 OM, $15.
each, (650)364-0902
32” TOSHIBA Flat screen TV like new,
bought 9/9/11 with box. $300 Firm.
(415)264-6605
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
LSI SCSI Ultra320 Controller + (2) 10k
RPM 36GB SCSI II hard drives $40
(650)204-0587
NIGHT STANDS $20, obo (650)952-
3063
PROSCAM 36" color TV with cabinet
and 2 glass doors like new $90 obo
(650)952-3063
304 Furniture
2 DINETTE Chairs both for $29
(650)692-3260
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
4 DRAWER metal file cabinet, black, no
lock model, like new $50 (650)204-0587
AFGAN PRAYER rug beautiful original
very ornate $100 (650)348-6428
ALASKAN SEEN painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
CHANDELIER WITH 5 lights/ candela-
bre base with glass shades $20.
(650)504-3621
COFFEE TABLE - 30” x 58”, light oak,
heavy, 1980’s, $40., SOLD!
COFFEE TABLE set (3piece) mint con-
dition, dark wood, coffee table 53x24x16
high, end tables 27x22x22, $99.00,
(650)578-9208
COMPUTER DESK from Ikea, $40
(650)348-5169
COUCH-FREE. OLD world pattern, soft
fabric. Some cat scratch damage-not too
noticeable. 650-303-6002
DESK SOLID wood 21/2' by 5' 3 leather
inlays manufactured by Sligh 35 years
old $100 (must pick up) (650)231-8009
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DISPLAY CASE wood & glass 31 x 19
inches $30. (650)873-4030
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLES (2) - One for $5. hand
carved, other table is antique white mar-
ble top with drawer $40., (650)308-6381
END TABLES (2)- Cherry finish, still in
box, need to assemble, 26”L x 21”W x
21”H, $100. for both, (650)592-2648
FOLDING PICNIC table - 8’ x 30”, 7 fold-
ing, padded chairs, $80. (650)364-0902
FUTON DELUXE plus other items all for
$90 650 341-2397 (U haul away)
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
HAWAIIAN STYLE living room chair Re-
tton with split bamboo, blue and white
stripe cushion $99 (650)343-4461
KITCHEN TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36”x58” with one leaf 11 1/2”. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
LOVE SEAT. Like New. Olive/green.
33" High, 60" wide, 42" deep. Very com-
fortable. $20.00 or B/O (650)578-1411
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
NIGHT STANDS $35, (650)952-3063
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36” Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
RATTAN PAPASAN Chair with Brown
cushion excellent shape $45 (650)592-
2648
RECLINER CHAIR very comfortable vi-
nyl medium brown $70, (650)368-3037
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
SMALL STORAGE/ Hutch, Stained
Green, pretty. $40, (650)290-1960
304 Furniture
SOFA/LOVESEAT SET, mint condition,
7-ft sofa, 58 inch loveseat, brown, 6
matching pillows $99.00, (650)578-9208
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STIFFEL LAMPS (2) mint condition,
brass base, beige shade, includes easy
tap on/off $50.00, (650)578-9208
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
VANITY ETHAN Allen maple w/drawer
and liftup mirror like new $95
(650)349-2195
VINTAGE UPHOLSTERED wooden
chairs, $25 each or both for $40. nice
set. (650)583-8069
VINTAGE WING back chair $75,
(650)583-8069
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five availa-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
6 BOXES of Victorian lights ceiling & wall
$90., (650)340-9644
BEDSPREAD - queen size maroon &
pink bedspread - Fairly new, $50. obo,
(650)834-2583
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
COCKTAIL GLASSES - beautiful, rich,
smokey hue, oak tree design, wide base,
set of 12, $25., (650)341-8342
DINING ROOM Victorian Chandelier
seven light, $90., (650)340-9644
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
ICE CREAM MAKER - 4 qt. electric,
never used, still in box, Elite Cuisine by
Maxi-Matic, $40., San Mateo, (650)341-
5347
IRONING BOARD $15 (650)347-8061
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
SUNBEAN TOASTER excellent condi-
tion (415)346-6038
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GOLD Lame' elbow length-
gloves sz 7.5 $15 New. (650)868-0436
308 Tools
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10”,
4 long x 20” wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN ARC-WELDER - 30-250
amp, and accessories, $275., (650)341-
0282
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
FMC TIRE changer Machine, $650
(650)333-4400
GENERATOR 13,000 WATTS Brand
New 20hp Honda $2800 (650)333-4400
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
SCNCO TRIM Nail Gun, $100
(650) 521-3542
STADILA LEVEL 6ft, $60
(650) 521-3542
TABLE SAW 10", very good condition
$85. (650) 787-8219
309 Office Equipment
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER Smith Corona
$60. (650)878-9542
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
10 PLANTS (assorted) for $3.00 each,
(650)349-6059
14 PLAYBOY magazines all for $80
(650)592-4529
14 SEGA genius games 2 controllers
$20 SOLD!
300 HOME LIBRARY BOOKS - $3. or
$5. each obo, World & US History and
American Novel Classic, must see to ap-
preciate, (650)345-5502
3D MOVIE glasses, (12) unopened,
sealed plastic, Real 3D, SOLD!
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes $100,
(650)361-1148
5 PHOTOGRAPHIC CIVIL WAR
BOOKS plus 4 volumes of Abraham Lin-
coln books, $90., (650)345-5502
7 UNDERBED STORAGE BINS - Vinyl
with metal frame, 42” X 18” X 6”, zipper
closure, $5. ea., (650)364-0902
310 Misc. For Sale
9 CARRY-ON bags (assorted) - extra
large, good condition, $10. each obo,
(650)349-6059
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $25. each,
(650)212-7020
AMERICAN HERITAGE books 107 Vol-
umes Dec.'54-March '81 $99/all
(650)345-5502
ARTIFICIAL FICUS Tree 6 ft. life like, full
branches. in basket $55. (650)269-3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BEADS - Glass beads for jewelry mak-
ing, $75. all, (650)676-0732
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BOOK “NATIONAL Geographic” Nation-
al Air Museums, $15 (408)249-3858
BOOK SELECTION, Mystery, Romance,
Biography, many authors, hard cover,
paperbacks, many authors, mint condi-
tion. 50 cents each (650) 578-9208.
BROADWAY by the Bay, Chorus Line
Sat 9/22; Broadway by Year Sat. 11/10
Section 4 main level $80.00 all.
(650)578-9208
CLEAN CAR Kit, unopened sealed box,
7 full size containers for leather, spots,
glass, interior, paint, chamois, $25.00
(650)578-9208
COMFORTER - King size, like new, $30
SSF, (650)871-7200
DELONGHI-CONVENTION ROTISSER-
IE crome with glass door excellent condi-
tion $55 OBO (650)343-4461
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good con-
dition $50., (650)878-9542
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
FOLDING LEG table 6' by 21/2' $25
(415)346-6038
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10), (650)364-
7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HYPO ALERGETIC Pillows (2) Great for
those with alergies, easy to clean,
$10.00 both, (650)578-9208
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
INFLATED 4'6" in diameter swimming
pool float $12 (415)346-6038
JAMES PATTERSON books 2 Hard
backs at $3 ea. (650)341-1861
JAMES PATTERSON books 5 paper
backs at $1 ea. (650)341-1861
MENU FROM Steam Ship Lurline Aug.
20 1967 $10 (650)755-8238
MIRROR, ETHAN ALLEN - 57-in. high x
21-in. wide, maple frame and floor base,
like new, $95., (650)349-2195
NATURAL GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM
- Alkaline, PH Balance water, with anti-
oxident properties, good for home or of-
fice, brand new, $100., (650)619-9203.
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OLD 5 gal. glass water cooler bottle $20
(650) 521-3542
OUTDOOR SCREEN - New 4 Panel
Outdoor Screen, Retail $130 With Metal
Supports, $80/obo. (650)873-8167
PICTORIAL WORLD History Books
$80/all (650)345-5502
PROFESSIONAL BEAUTY STYLING
STATION - Complete with mirrors, draw-
ers, and styling chair, $99. obo,
(650)315-3240
PUNCH BOWL - 10 cup plus one extra
nice white color with floral motif, $25.,
(650)873-8167
QUEEN SIZE inflatable mattress with
built in battery air pump used twice $40,
(650)343-4461
QUEEN SIZE inflatable mattress with
built in battery air pump used twice $40,
(650)343-4461
SESAME STREET toilet seat excellent
condition $12 650 349-6059
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes), factory sealed, $10. (650)365-
3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SPECIAL EDITION 3 DVD Set of The
Freeze. English Subtitles, new $18
(650)871-7200
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
STUART WOODS Hardback Books
4 @ $3.00 each. (650)341-1861
VAN ROOF rack 3 piece. clamp-on, $75
(650)948-4895
28 Wednesday • Sept. 19, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
310 Misc. For Sale
TIRE CHAINS - brand new, in box, never
used, multiple tire sizes, $25., (650)594-
1494
TIRE CHAINS - used once includes rub-
ber tighteners plus carrying case. call for
corresponding tire size, $20.,
(650)345-5446
TOILET SINK - like new with all of the
accessories ready to be installed, $55.
obo, (650)369-9762
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WALL LIGHT fixture - 2 lamp with frost-
ed fluted shades, gold metal, never used,
$15., Burl, (650)347-5104
311 Musical Instruments
2 ORGANS, antique tramp, $100 each.
(650)376-3762
3 ACCORDIONS $110/ea. 1 Small
Accordion $82. (650)376-3762.
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
HOHNER CUE stick guitar HW 300 G
Handcrafted $75 650 771-8513
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
312 Pets & Animals
PET MATE Vari Kennel 38" length by 24"
wide and 26" high $90 SSF
(650)871-7200
PETMATE DOG CARRIER - XL size,39
1/2” L x 27” W x 30” like new, $95. firm,
SSF, SOLD!
REPTILE CAGE - Medium size, $20.,
(650)348-0372
SMALL DOG wire cage; pink, two doors
with divider $50. (650) 743-9534.
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
WILL PAY Cash for vintage designer
handbags. Louis Vuitton, Chanel, Gucci,
etc. (650)593-0757
316 Clothes
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
A BAG of Summer ties $15 OBO
(650)245-3661
BATHROBE MEN’S navy blue plush-ter-
ry and belt. Maroon piping trim, 2 pock-
ets. Medium. $10., (650)341-3288
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. size made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
BLOUSES SWEATERS and tops. Many
different styles & colors, med. to lrg., ex-
cellent condition $5 ea., have 20,
(650)592-2648
COWBOY BOOTS size 9 Black - superb
condition $40 (650)595-3933
COWBOY BOOTS size 9 Silver.gray
good condition $30 (650)595-3933
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
GEORGE STRAIT Collection Resistol
oval shape, off white Hat size 7 1/8 $40
(650)571-5790
HARDING PARK mens golf dress shirts
(new) asking $25 (650)871-7200
LADIES BOOTS, thigh high, fold down
brown, leather, and beige suede leather
pair, tassels on back excellent, Condition
$40 ea. (650)592-2648
316 Clothes
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES JACKET size 3x 70% wool 30%
nylon never worn $50. (650)592-2648
LADIES PLUS Clothing - mint condition,
Fancy/plain sweaters, tops, dresses, out-
fits, summer and winter. $4.00 each,
(650)578-9208
LEATHER COAT medium size (snake
skin design) $25 (650)755-8238
MEN'S SUIT almost new $25.
650-573-6981
NEW BROWN LEATHER JACKET- XL
$25., 650-364-0902
REVERSIBLE, SOUVENIR JACKET
Weatherproof 2-tone tan.; Inner: navy
fleece, $15. (650)341-3288
SNOW BOOTS, MEN'S size 12. Brand
New, Thermolite brand,(with zippers),
black, $18. (510) 527-6602
TUXEDOS, FORMAL, 3, Black, White,
Maroon Silk brocade, Like new. Size 36,
$100 All OBO (650)344-8549
VINTAGE 1930 Ermine fur coat Black full
length $35 650 755-9833
VINTAGE 1970S Grecian Made Size 6-7
Dresses $35 each, Royal Pink 1980s
Ruffled Dress size 7ish $30, 1880s Re-
production White Lace Gown $150 Size
6-7 Petite, (650)873-8167
WESTERN/COWBOY SHIRTS
7 pearl snap front, snap pockets XL and
XXL, $12 - $15 (650)595-3933
WOMEN’S SUMMER 3 pc.SUIT:
blue/white stripe seersucker, size 12,
$10., (650)341-3288
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
FLUORESCENT LIGHT Fixture, New in
Box, 24”, $15 (650)341-8342
PLYWOOD - good plywood, 4x8, various
sizes, 1/4”to 3/4”, $25., (650)851-0878
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
TILES, DARK Red clay, 6”x6”x1/2” 6
Dozen at 50¢ ea (650)341-8342
WHITE STORM/SCREEN door. Size is
35 1/4" x 79 1/4". Asking $50.00. Call
SOLD!
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $40., (650)368-3037
13 ASSORTED GOLF CLUBS- Good
Quality $3.50 each. Call (650) 349-6059.
BACKPACK - Large for overnight camp-
ing, excellent condition, $65., (650)212-
7020
BASKETBALL RIM, net & backboard
$35/all 650-345-7132 Leave message.
BOY’S BICYCLE with Helmet. Triax,
Good Condition, SOLD!
COLEMAN "GLO-MASTER" 1- burner
camp stove for boaters or camping. Mint
condition. $35.00 (650)341-3288
COMPLETE PORTABLE BASKET-
BALL SYSTEM - by Life Time, brand
new, $100., Pacific, SOLD!
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16” wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOLF BALLS - Many brands, 150 total,
good buy, San Mateo, $30., (650)341-
5347
GOLF CLUBS Driver, 7 wood, putter, 9
irons, bag, & pull cart. $99
(650)952-0620
PING CRAZ-E Putter w/ cover. 35in.
Like New $75 call(650)208-5758
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
TREADMILL PROFORM 75 EKG incline
an Staionery Bike, both $400. Or sepa-
rate: $150 for the bike, $350 for the
treadmill. Call (650)992-8757
318 Sports Equipment
TWO YOGA Videos. Never used, one
with Patrisha Walden, one by Rebok with
booklet. Both $6 (650)755-8238
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
335 Garden Equipment
CRAFTSMAN 4 HP ROTARY LAWN-
MOWER - 20” rear discharge, extra new
grasscatcher, $85., (650)368-0748
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
381 Homes for Sale
BANK OWNED
HOMES
Free list with
Photos & Maps
of Bank Foreclosures
www.PeninsulaDistresshomes.com
Get a Fantastic Deal
on a Home
or
Free recorded message
(866) 262-8796
ID# 2042
Receive a Free
Hot List of Homes
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650) 591-4046
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49-59 daily + tax
$294-$322 weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
‘93 FLEETWOOD Chrome wheels Grey
leather interior 237k miles Sedan $ 2,500
or Trade, Good Condition (650)481-5296
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
HONDA ‘10 ACCORD LX - 4 door se-
dan, low miles, $19K, (650)573-6981
JEEP 2001 CHEROKEE LTD, 94K 4
wheel Drive, $7,525, (650)591-0063
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
625 Classic Cars
DATSUN ‘72 - 240Z with Chevy 350, au-
tomatic, custom, $3,600 or trade.
(415) 412-7030
635 Vans
NISSAN ‘01 Quest - GLE, leather seats,
sun roof, TV/DVR equipment. Looks
new, $15,500. (650)219-6008
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘83 Shovelhead
special construction, 1340 cc’s,
Awesome! $5,950/obo
Rob (415)602-4535.
645 Boats
BANSHEE SAILBOAT - 13 ft. with ex-
tras, $750., (650)343-6563
650 RVs
‘73 Chevy Model 30 Van, Runs
good, Rebuilt Transmission, Fiber-
glass Bubble Top $1,795. Owner
financing.
Call for appointments. (650)364-1374.
CHEVROLET RV ‘91 Model 30 Van,
Good Condition $9,500., (650)591-1707
or (650)644-5179
655 Trailers
TENT TRAILER - Good Condition
Sleeps 6. Electric, Water Hook-ups,
Stove, $1,700 obo, (650)345-7750
670 Auto Service
MB GARAGE, INC.
Repair • Restore • Sales
Mercedes-Benz Specialists
2165 Palm Ave.
San Mateo
(650)349-2744
ON TRACK
AUTOMOTIVE
Complete Auto Repair
foreign & domestic
www.ontrackautomotive.com
1129 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)343-4594
People you can trust;
service you can trust
NORDIC MOTORS, INC.
Specializing in Volvo, Saab,
Subaru
65 Winslow Road
Redwood City
(650) 595-0170
www.nordicmotors.com
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
'91 TOYOTA COROLLA RADIATOR.
Original equipment. Excellent cond. Cop-
per fins. $60. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
2 SNOW/CABLE chains good condition
fits 13-15 inch rims $10/both San Bruno
650-588-1946
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
67-68 CAMERO PARTS - $85.,
(650)592-3887
CAMPER/TRAILER/TRUCK OUTSIDE
backup mirror 8” diameter fixture. $30.
650-588-1946
MAZDA 3 2010 CAR COVER - Cover-
kraft multibond inside & outside cover,
like new, $50., (650)678-3557
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
31 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 82,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
Attorneys
BUSINESS
TRANSACTIONS
Robert Preskill, Esq.
Tech & Media Contracts
Franchise and Licensing
Call (415) 377-3919
robert@preskilllaw.net
CBN# 221315
Attorneys
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Attorneys
Attorneys
* BANKRUPTCY *
Huge credit card debt?
Job loss? Foreclosure?
Medical bills?
YOU HAVE OPTIONS
Call for a free consultation
(650)363-2600
This law firm is a debt relief agency
Beauty
GRAND OPENING SPECIALS:
Facials , Eyebrow Waxing ,
Microdermabrasion
Full Body Salt Scrub &
Seaweed Wrap
Le Juin Day Spa & Clinic
155 E. 5th Avenue
Downtown San Mateo
(650) 347-6668
KAY’S
HEALTH & BEAUTY
Facials, Waxing, Fitness
Body Fat Reduction
Pure Organic Facial $48.
1 Hillcrest Blvd, Millbrae
(650)697-6868
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR NANJAPA DDS
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
UCSF Dentistry Faculty
Cantonese, Mandarin &
Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
Food
AYA SUSHI
The Best Sushi
& Ramen in Town
1070 Holly Street
San Carlos
(650)654-1212
29 Wednesday • Sept. 19, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Food
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
FIND OUT!
What everybody is
talking about!
South Harbor
Restaurant & Bar
425 Marina Blvd., SSF
(650)589-1641
GOT BEER?
We Do!
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
GULLIVER’S
RESTAURANT
Early Bird Special
Prime Rib Complete Dinner
Mon-Thu
1699 Old Bayshore Blvd. Burlingame
(650)692-6060
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEAL’S COFFEE
SHOP
Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner
Senior Meals, Kids Menu
www.nealscoffeeshop.com
1845 El Camino Real
Burlingame
(650)692-4281
SUNDAY CHAMPAGNE
BRUNCH
Crowne Plaza
1221 Chess Dr., Hwy. 92 at
Foster City Blvd. Exit
Foster City
(650)570-5700
SUNSHINE CAFE
Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner
1750 El Camino Real
San Mateo
(Borel Square)
(650)357-8383
Food
THE AMERICAN BULL
BAR & GRILL
19 large screen HD TVs
Full Bar & Restaurant
www.theamericanbull.com
1819 El Camino, in
Burlingame Plaza
(650)652-4908
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
Sunnyvale
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Fitness
DOJO USA
World Training Center
Martial Arts & Tae Bo Training
www.dojousa.net
731 Kains Ave, San Bruno
(650)589-9148
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
General Dentistry
for Adults & Children
DR. ANNA P. LIVIZ, DDS
324 N. San Mateo Drive, #2
San Mateo 94401
(650)343-5555
JANET R. STEELE, LMFT
Marriage & Family Therapist
Behavior, Chronic Pain or
Illness, Trauma & PTSD, Family,
Couples, Teens, and Veterans
Welcome!
(650)380-4459
Health & Medical
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STRESSED OUT?
IN PAIN?
I CAN HELP YOU
Sessions start from $20
Call 650-235-6761
Will Chen ACUPUNCTURE
12220 6th Ave, Belmont
www. willchenacupuncture.com
TOENAIL FUNGUS?
FREE Consultation for
Laser Treatment
(650)347-0761
Dr. Richard Woo, DPM
400 S. El Camino Real
San Mateo
Home Care
CALIFORNIA HOARDING
REMEDIATION
Free Estimates
Whole House & Office
Cleanup Too!
Serving SF Bay Area
(650)762-8183
Call Karen Now!
Insurance
AARP AUTO
INSURANCE
Great insurance
Great price
Special rates for
drivers over 50
650-593-7601
ISU LOVERING
INSURANCE SERVICES
1121 Laurel St.,
San Carlos
BARRETT
INSURANCE
www.barrettinsuranceservices.net
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
HEALTH INSURANCE
Paying too much for COBRA?
No coverage?
.... Not good!
I can help.
John Bowman
(650)525-9180
CA Lic #0E08395
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues,Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$48 per Hour
New Customers Only
For First 20 Visits
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
Massage Therapy
GRAND OPENING
ASIAN MASSAGE
$50 for 1 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
GRAND OPENING!
CRYSTAL WAVE SPA
Body & Foot Massage
Facial Treatment
1205 Capuchino Ave.
Burlingame
(650)558-1199
HAPPY FEET
Massage
2608 S. El Camino Real
& 25th Ave., San Mateo
(650)638-9399
$30.00/Hr Foot Massage
$50.00/Hr Full Body Massage
SUNFLOWER MASSAGE
Grand Opening!
$10. Off 1-Hour Session!
1482 Laurel St.
San Carlos
(Behind Trader Joe’s)
Open 7 Days/Week, 10am-10pm
(650)508-8758
TRANQUIL
MASSAGE
951 Old County Road
Suite 1
Belmont
650-654-2829
YOU HAVE IT-
WE’LL BUY IT
We buy and pawn:
• Gold • Jewelry
• Art • Watches
• Musical Instrument
• Paintings • Diamonds
• Silverware • Electronics
• Antique Furniture
• Computers • TV’s • Cars
Open 7 days
Buy *Sell*Loan
590 Veterans Blvd.
Redwood City
(650)368-6855
Needlework
LUV2
STITCH.COM
Needlepoint!
Fiesta Shopping Center
747 Bermuda Dr., San Mateo
(650)571-9999
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes • Multi-family •
Mixed-Use • Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
O’DOWD ESTATES
Representing Buyers
& Sellers
Commission Negotiable
odowdestates.com
(650)794-9858
Seniors
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
STERLING COURT
ACTIVE INDEPENDENT &
ASSISTED LIVING
Tours 10AM-4PM
2 BR,1BR & Studio
Luxury Rental
650-344-8200
850 N. El Camino Real San Mateo
sterlingcourt.com
30 Wednesday • Sept. 19, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Attorneys
* BANKRUPTCY *
Huge credit card debt?
Job loss? Foreclosure?
Medical bills?
YOU HAVE OPTIONS
Call for a free consultation
(650)363-2600
This law firm is a debt relief agency
BUSINESS
TRANSACTIONS
Robert Preskill, Esq.
Tech & Media Contracts
Franchise and Licensing
Call (415) 377-3919
robert@preskilllaw.net
CBN# 221315
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Beauty
GRAND OPENING SPECIALS:
Facials , Eyebrow Waxing ,
Microdermabrasion
Full Body Salt Scrub &
Seaweed Wrap
Le Juin Day Spa & Clinic
155 E. 5th Avenue
Downtown San Mateo
(650) 347-6668
KAY’S
HEALTH & BEAUTY
Facials, Waxing, Fitness
Body Fat Reduction
Pure Organic Facial $48.
1 Hillcrest Blvd, Millbrae
(650)697-6868
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR NANJAPA DDS
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
UCSF Dentistry Faculty
Cantonese, Mandarin &
Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
Food
AYA SUSHI
The Best Sushi
& Ramen in Town
1070 Holly Street
San Carlos
(650)654-1212
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
Food
FIND OUT!
What everybody is
talking about!
South Harbor
Restaurant & Bar
425 Marina Blvd., SSF
(650)589-1641
GOT BEER?
We Do!
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
GULLIVER’S
RESTAURANT
Early Bird Special
Prime Rib Complete Dinner
Mon-Thu
1699 Old Bayshore Blvd. Burlingame
(650)692-6060
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEAL’S COFFEE
SHOP
Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner
Senior Meals, Kids Menu
www.nealscoffeeshop.com
1845 El Camino Real
Burlingame
(650)692-4281
SUNDAY CHAMPAGNE
BRUNCH
Crowne Plaza
1221 Chess Dr., Hwy. 92 at
Foster City Blvd. Exit
Foster City
(650)570-5700
SUNSHINE CAFE
Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner
1750 El Camino Real
San Mateo
(Borel Square)
(650)357-8383
THE AMERICAN BULL
BAR & GRILL
19 large screen HD TVs
Full Bar & Restaurant
www.theamericanbull.com
1819 El Camino, in
Burlingame Plaza
(650)652-4908
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
Sunnyvale
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Fitness
DOJO USA
World Training Center
Martial Arts & Tae Bo Training
www.dojousa.net
731 Kains Ave, San Bruno
(650)589-9148
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
General Dentistry
for Adults & Children
DR. ANNA P. LIVIZ, DDS
324 N. San Mateo Drive, #2
San Mateo 94401
(650)343-5555
JANET R. STEELE, LMFT
Marriage & Family Therapist
Behavior, Chronic Pain or
Illness, Trauma & PTSD, Family,
Couples, Teens, and Veterans
Welcome!
(650)380-4459
Health & Medical
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STRESSED OUT?
IN PAIN?
I CAN HELP YOU
Sessions start from $20
Call 650-235-6761
Will Chen ACUPUNCTURE
12220 6th Ave, Belmont
www. willchenacupuncture.com
TOENAIL FUNGUS?
FREE Consultation for
Laser Treatment
(650)347-0761
Dr. Richard Woo, DPM
400 S. El Camino Real
San Mateo
Home Care
CALIFORNIA HOARDING
REMEDIATION
Free Estimates
Whole House & Office
Cleanup Too!
Serving SF Bay Area
(650)762-8183
Call Karen Now!
Insurance
AARP AUTO
INSURANCE
Great insurance
Great price
Special rates for
drivers over 50
650-593-7601
ISU LOVERING
INSURANCE SERVICES
1121 Laurel St.,
San Carlos
BARRETT
INSURANCE
www.barrettinsuranceservices.net
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
HEALTH INSURANCE
Paying too much for COBRA?
No coverage?
.... Not good!
I can help.
John Bowman
(650)525-9180
CA Lic #0E08395
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues,Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$48 per Hour
New Customers Only
For First 20 Visits
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
GRAND OPENING
ASIAN MASSAGE
$50 for 1 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
GRAND OPENING!
CRYSTAL WAVE SPA
Body & Foot Massage
Facial Treatment
1205 Capuchino Ave.
Burlingame
(650)558-1199
HAPPY FEET
Massage
2608 S. El Camino Real
& 25th Ave., San Mateo
(650)638-9399
$30.00/Hr Foot Massage
$50.00/Hr Full Body Massage
SUNFLOWER MASSAGE
Grand Opening!
$10. Off 1-Hour Session!
1482 Laurel St.
San Carlos
(Behind Trader Joe’s)
Open 7 Days/Week, 10am-10pm
(650)508-8758
TRANQUIL
MASSAGE
951 Old County Road
Suite 1
Belmont
650-654-2829
Massage Therapy
YOU HAVE IT-
WE’LL BUY IT
We buy and pawn:
• Gold • Jewelry
• Art • Watches
• Musical Instrument
• Paintings • Diamonds
• Silverware • Electronics
• Antique Furniture
• Computers • TV’s • Cars
Open 7 days
Buy *Sell*Loan
590 Veterans Blvd.
Redwood City
(650)368-6855
Needlework
LUV2
STITCH.COM
Needlepoint!
Fiesta Shopping Center
747 Bermuda Dr., San Mateo
(650)571-9999
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes • Multi-family •
Mixed-Use • Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
O’DOWD ESTATES
Representing Buyers
& Sellers
Commission Negotiable
odowdestates.com
(650)794-9858
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
STERLING COURT
ACTIVE INDEPENDENT &
ASSISTED LIVING
Tours 10AM-4PM
2 BR,1BR & Studio
Luxury Rental
650-344-8200
850 N. El Camino Real San Mateo
sterlingcourt.com
WORLD 31
Wednesday • Sept. 19, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Edith M. Lederer
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
UNITED NATIONS — Hovering
over this month’s annual gathering
of world leaders at the United
Nations is the international commu-
nity’s failure to end the escalating
war in Syria that is starting to spill
over into a fragile and divided
region.
The Syrian conflict has bitterly
divided the most powerful members
of the Security Council, paralyzing
the only U.N. body that can impose
global sanctions and authorize mili-
tary action.
It frustrated former U.N. secre-
tary-general Kofi Annan, who quit
his high-profile role as special
envoy to the country last month,
giving reasons that amounted to
scathing criticism of world powers
for failing to unite to stop the chaos
in the Arab state.
There will be a flurry of meetings
on the sidelines of the VIP gathering
at the General Assembly that begins
Sept. 25, including a ministerial
meeting of the Security Council’s
five veto-wielding members and lots
of behind-the-scenes discussions
among the more than 130 heads of
state and government coming to
New York. But frustrated diplomats
don’t expect any breakthrough on
Syria, and outside observers agree.
This “means we’re heading into a
very dark time in Syria — more vio-
lence and a slow grinding conflict
that’s going to test everyone’s limits
on non-intervention,” Andrew
Tabler, a senior fellow and Syria
expert at the Washington Institute
for Near East Policy, told the
Associated Press in an interview
Monday.
“I think it’s the elephant in the
room in the sense that it’s a light-
ning rod issue,” Tabler said. “It’s a
crisis the U.N. is unable to deal
with. And so, basically what hap-
pens is that you’re going to have a
lot of speeches ... but unless you get
the Security Council agreeing I
don’t see anything happening.”
Since the Syrian conflict began in
March 2011, the division among the
five powerful permanent council
nations has deepened.
The United States, Britain and
France have tried unsuccessfully to
get the council to put pressure on
President Bashar Assad’s govern-
ment to halt the fighting and pull
back its heavy weapons.
Russia, Syria’s key protector, and
China, which is supporting
Moscow, are demanding equal pres-
sure on the opposition and say the
West’s real goal is regime change,
which could lead to a takeover of
Syria by Islamist radicals.
Syrian war looms over U.N. meeting of world leaders
REUTERS
Free Syrian Army fighters walk through the rubble in Bustan Al-Basha
district in Aleppo.
Swedish doctors claim
pioneering uterus transplant
STOCKHOLM — Two Swedish
women are hoping to get pregnant
after undergoing what doctors are
calling the world’s first mother-to-
daughter uterus transplants.
Specialists at the University of
Goteborg said they performed the
surgery over the weekend without
complications but added that they
won’t consider it successful unless
the women give birth to healthy chil-
dren.
“That’s the best proof,” said
Michael Olausson, one of the sur-
geons.
One of the unidentified women
had her uterus removed many years
ago because of cervical cancer,
while the other was born without a
womb. Both are in their 30s.
They will undergo a year of obser-
vation before doctors attempt to help
them get pregnant via in vitro fertil-
ization, in which embryos created
with eggs from their own ovaries
will be implanted in their wombs.
Around the world
32 Wednesday • Sept. 19, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL