You are on page 1of 25

 

     

Urban Consultation June 2012  Believing in the City 
  Dave Close   Following Nehemiah: The STAR Project and  working with vulnerable people 

David Close  Following Nehemiah: The STAR Project and working with vulnerable people 

Following Nehemiah: The STAR Project and working with vulnerable people 
Until last year I was leading the STAR Project, a church community partnership project in the  North End of Paisley.  ‐ Right  now,  I’m  working  with  Streetspace/PEEK/WTG/living  in  Ruchill/trying  to  discern God’s call  

 

  The STAR Project is a Christian organization delivering grass-roots community work in   the North End of Paisley which is: Responsive to individuals Holistic     This work comprises diverse individual and group activities for: Adults Families Children and Young people  
 

It’s a community where many people are disconnected, diminished and resigned to nothing  changing.    STAR  strives  for  a  future  where  people  value  themselves  and  others,  active  in  fulfilling relationships in a more connected and resilient community. 
 

Community Profile  The  North  End,  between  Paisley  Town  Centre  and  Glasgow  Airport,  is  a  multiply  deprived  community of 3‐4,000, though one which has made real progress recently, evidenced by the  2009  Scottish  Index  of  Multiple  Deprivation  (datazones  in  our  community  have  improved  since  2004  by  an  average  of  338  places).    While  this  gives  us  real  encouragement  needs  remain stark with areas ranking in the worst 5% in health and crime, for example.   Fear of  crime is also a key issue:  in a 2005 local community survey the primary complaint was of  anti‐social  behaviour.    Community  profiles  (Glasgow  Centre  for  Population  Health  2008)  show  income  deprivation  and  percentage  of  working  age  unemployed  are  65%  and  68%  higher  than  the  national  average.    This  increases  an  individual  and  community  sense  of  exclusion and powerlessness.  Health data also evidence a community of isolated, struggling  people:  prescriptions  for  anxiety/depression  are  23%  above  Scottish  average,  hospital  admissions for alcohol misuse are 186% higher, 43% higher for drug related problems and  88% higher for mental illness.      People are not finding fulfilment in relationships to each other or society and struggle with  deeply negative self‐perceptions.  The prevalence of substance abuse inevitably worsens the  experience  of  exclusion;  chaotic  lifestyles  work  against  successful  engagement  even  with  support services and people become radically disconnected.    
   

Project Outcomes  Therefore our work will seek to achieve the following outcomes:  • People will grow in self‐esteem and readiness for new experiences.  • People will be less isolated and develop healthier relationships.  • People will grow in reflectiveness, creativity, and spirituality.   • People will develop improved coping skills and connections to support agencies. 
 

 

Urban Consultation June 2012 ‐ Believing in the City 

David Close 

David Close  Following Nehemiah: The STAR Project and working with vulnerable people 

By  starting  where  people  are  and  supporting  them  along  their  own  road  of  growth  STAR  helps people build the personal and community resources to live fuller lives.      Following Nehemiah  Neh Ch1 focussing on Nehemiah’s grief at the reports of the city and his determination to  rebuild the city.    Terry Jones, Toxteth Tabernacle, foundational text – rebuild the city that the temple, God’s  dwelling with us, might then be rebuilt too.  You could think about STAR’s engagement as following down a similar line but rather than  focus  on  the  city  or  community  as  a  whole  I  want  to  look  at  engaging  with  people  as  individuals.  What does it mean to rebuild the walls in individual lives?  Three things the walls do for the city:  • • • Make the city safe  Give the city status/dignity  Make  a  (permeable)  boundary:  what  is  city  and  what  is  not  city  can  thereby  engage with one another.  Walls must have gates… 

What does this mean for individuals and how do we do it?  • • •   Safety: without which engagement, exploration, taking risks, and change are all  unlikely.  Dignity or worth in relationship: shame cripples, excludes and isolates – the very  opposite of shalom.   A sense of self: which makes loving relationship possible   

 

Urban Consultation June 2012 ‐ Believing in the City 

David Close 

David Close  Following Nehemiah: The STAR Project and working with vulnerable people 

WALLS = SAFETY  1. Concentration in schemes of people who have suffered trauma ‐ at least 60% of people  who engaged in WSW groups yr1, and at least 80% of 121 support, had been victims of  domestic abuse as children, as adults or both.    Of course there is trauma everywhere but the concentration in poor communities is so high  and  the  lack  of  other  resources  that  might  mitigate  or  aid  resilience  tends  to  be  more  marked  too.  People  tend  to  end  up  in  these  communities  when  trauma,  violence  or  loss  have damaged them or because they have grown up in the context of such brokenness they  are more vulnerable to damaging experiences.  Indicators  of  deprivation  are  many  and  varied –  often  carrying  overtones  of  blame  or  just  desserts  –  see  Eric  Pickles  recent  “it’s  time  problem  families  took  the  blame”  and  incentivising councils to “target” them but 120,000 figure came from a report whose  criteria 
meant these families were poor, poorly educated, sick or disabled, there was no link here with anti‐ social behaviour or truanting.  My experience is that you have overwhelming concentrations of 

brokenness and vulnerability.   At STAR we found broken relationships at the root of most anti‐social behaviour, substance  abuse,  depression,  and  self‐destructive  or  self‐excluding  behaviours.    When  relationships  with  family,  friends  and  neighbours  are  broken  or  abusive  people’s  life  progress  is  hugely  impeded but here the competencies to build and restore positive relationships are largely  lacking.    Crucially  the  psychological  safety  resulting  from  strong  relationships  is  rare  producing  a  deep  resistance  to  positive  change.    So  the  first  reason  for  helping  people  to  build some safety in their lives is because they are so radically vulnerable – David/John.  2. Asking people to make change (inc to follow Christ) is asking them to take a risk  If  people  do  not  feel  safe  they  will  defend  themselves.    To  this  extent  it  is  irrelevant  whether, in fact, they are safe or not: it is whether they feel safe that determines how they  will  behave.    If  someone  has  all  their  ‘barriers’  raised  it  is  very  difficult  to  effectively  help  them  and  they  are  reluctant  to  take  any  kind  of  risks.    In  this  situation  change  is  very  unlikely,  regardless  of  how  urgently  it  is  needed  and  regardless  of  how  easily  it  can  be  achieved.      We  must  take  account  of  psychological  safety  too.  Psychological  safety  is  necessary  to  be  able to direct one’s attention and focus, to know oneself, to feel effective in the world, or to  be able to exercise self‐control and self‐discipline.  Losing the ability to self‐protect is one of  the most shattering losses that occurs as a result of traumatic experience and it manifests as  an inability to protect one’s boundaries from the trespass of other people. Also lost is the  sense of self‐efficacy, the basic sense of experiencing oneself as having the ability to relate  to the world on one’s own terms (without abusing power and without being abused by it).     

 

Urban Consultation June 2012 ‐ Believing in the City 

David Close 

David Close  Following Nehemiah: The STAR Project and working with vulnerable people 

Think  about  a  professional  support  worker,  of  whatever  kind…  In  order  for  a  worker  and  client  to  achieve  their  ‘outcomes’  they  need  to  feel  sufficiently  safe  with  one  another  to  forego  defensive  behaviour  and  employ  their  respective  resources  in  tackling  the  issue  at  hand.    Of  course,  a  client  (or  worker)  may  be  more  or  less  concerned  for  their  safety  according  to  their  temperament,  experience  and  circumstances.    So  the  worker  must  use  their discretion regarding how much work needs to be done to make a client feel safe but it  is very easy to underestimate this and we should therefore err on the side of caution.  It is  easy, for example, to underestimate how vulnerable we ourselves feel in any given situation  as the emotional centres of our brains respond to fear by bypassing the cognitive functions  and  determine  our  behaviour  before  we’ve  thought  more  rationally.    We  then  tend  to  explain  our  actions  retrospectively  with  some  other  rationale  (often  justifying  or  blaming)  because  we  don’t  like  to  think  of  ourselves  acting  this  way.    If  we  can  so  easily  and  consistently  miss  our  own  sense  of  being  unsafe  and  its  consequences  then  it  is  all  the  simpler to misunderstand other people’s.    It is easy to forget the significance of the fact that when people come to us for support they  do  so  because  they  are  not  coping  with  something  themselves.    Our  culture  generally  stigmatizes needing help and valorizes the person who has everything under control.  So as  well as whatever struggle the person is facing, often painful and confusing in itself, they are  also beset by a sense that they are less than they should be because they are seeking help.   It  is  not  surprising,  then,  that  people  are  defensive.    Not  least  because  this  stigma  has  so  often been a feature of church life…    Religions have consistently promoted the idea that we need to achieve certain standards to  be righteous.  Our problem, as human beings, is that we are fallen (in whatever sense each  religion  understands  this).    If  we  can  change  from  our  current  state  to  achieve  the  prescribed  quality  of  living  then  we  will  please  God,  or  become  like  God  or  even  become  God.  Churches often appear to send the same message.    The glory of the gospel, though, is that God has solved the problem for us.  Our efforts to  change  have  never  succeeded  but  Jesus  on  the  cross  changes  everything:  we  no  longer  stand condemned because of our inability to change but are counted as righteous simply by  standing with, and trusting in, him.    Wonderfully, when we stand in this relationship of trust, when we stand in safety, we find  that we begin to change.  Slowly, and sometimes painfully, we grow into the quality of living  which we could not achieve alone.  Love motivates us, and the safety of belonging enables  us, where duty, insecurity and fear had left us floundering.    3. We want to care for people and to help them to explore – explore faith, the claims of  Christ – but how do these sit together?    This is a common balance in missionary engagements with poor urban communities, isn’t it?   But if someone comes to us seeking care or help, how ready are they to do any exploring? 

 

Urban Consultation June 2012 ‐ Believing in the City 

David Close 

David Close  Following Nehemiah: The STAR Project and working with vulnerable people 

At  STAR  we  found  that  people  were  almost  always  wrestling  with  dual  impulses  as  they  came to us –to engage and to disengage – and felt both very strongly. SLIDE  Why  is  this?  Una  McCluskey,  of  York  University,  suggests  understanding  attachment  helps  us.    A  child’s  experience  of  key  relationships  (usually  primarily  with  their  parents)  from  their  earliest days onward lays down ‘internal models of the experience of relationship.’1  In other  words  we  learn  in  infancy  what  to  expect  from  and  how  to  respond  to  relationships  with  other people and this profoundly shapes, and continues to shape, our engagement with the  world  around  us.    McCluskey  identifies  that  when  adults  approach  someone  for  help  or  support,  for  example meeting  with a  social  worker,  they  are,  on  some level,  seeking  care.   She writes:    One’s  expectations  of  how  one  is  going  to  be  cared  for  have  been  laid  down  quite  early in relation to the actual experiences of care one has received.2    Care‐seekers  who  have  a  history  of  inadequate  caregiving  will  present  their  care‐ seeking needs in ways that are difficult to identify and respond to.  Care‐seekers who  continually  fail  to  reach  the  goal  of  care‐seeking  experience  feelings…  ‐  anger,  depression and despair – and develop adaptive strategies to cope with these feelings,  including avoidance of care‐seeking, ambivalence in care‐seeking and disorganization  in care‐seeking.3    So when people seek help they are very frequently wrestling with strong impulses that tell  them they shouldn’t need help, don’t deserve help or can never find help.  These may be  expressed  in  apologies  for  bothering,  worries  that  you  don’t  have  time,  a  sense  of  hopelessness  that  you  can’t  help  them  or  in  barely  contained  anger  and  aggression.    As  a  consequence they are very alert to any signal which seems to confirm their fear that help is  unavailable  (or  withheld)  and  they  are  primed  to  withdraw  again  or  escalate  into  further  anger and aggression.    These  signals  are  found  in  the  interpersonal  environment  and  are  at  that  moment  more  important  than  anything  else  about  the  service  you  provide:    you  could  have  the  best  ‘solution’  in  the  world  for  that  client’s  need  but  if  the  interaction  at  that  point  triggers  withdrawal into isolation or anger then it will make no difference at all.    McCluskey  also  points  to  the  idea  of  instinctive  systems  as  developed  in  the  extended  attachment  theory  of  Heard  and  Lake4  and  examines  the  activity  of  these  systems  in  the  kind of ‘support engagement’ we are considering.  She argues, in the context of social work  support  of  adults,  (and  with  much  more  care  and  depth  than  I  can  show  here)  that  as  a  client engages, the active system at work in them is that of care‐seeking.  If this is met by 
                                                            
1 2

 Heard & Lake (1997) quoted in McCluskey, Una. (2005) To be met as a person,  Karnac   McCluskey (2005), p249  3  Ibid, p241  4  For example, Heard, Dorothy and Lake, Brian (1997) The challenge of attachment for care‐giving,  Routledge. 

 

Urban Consultation June 2012 ‐ Believing in the City 

David Close 

David Close  Following Nehemiah: The STAR Project and working with vulnerable people 

effective care‐giving then it ‘closes down’ and the exploratory system can swing into action  – in other words, the client can begin to actively engage with the issue they have come to  work on and thus make progress towards resolving it.      If effective care‐giving is not forthcoming then the care‐seeking system remains active and  overrides the exploratory system. “Help me! Help me! What aren’t you helping me?”  The  client will continue to engage in care‐seeking behavior rather than engaging with the issue.   If  care‐seeking  continues  to  be  unmet  (with  effective  care‐giving)  then  it  is  likely  to  be  infiltrated by the system for self‐defence and fight‐or‐flight behavior kicks in.      What  happens  when  care‐seeking  is  activated  is  that  the  exploratory  system  is  overridden.  In order to engage the client in exploratory work care‐seeking must be  assuaged by effective caregiving.5    So if we do not effectively respond to the care‐seeking behavior of clients they will not be  able to receive or work with any suggestion we offer even for the need they have presented  –  not  because  of  a  lack  of  will  or  motivation  but  because  we  are  programmed  by  life  to  attend first to a deeper need.  If we are hoping that they will engage in deeper reflection or  exploration of the claims of Christ then, if the initial invitation is one of care then we need to  be  honest  and  realistic  about  how  far  a  person  is  from  such  exploration  unless  we  can  adequately give care – unless we can enable them to feel safe and understood.       

                                                            
5

 McCluskey (2005), p79 

 

Urban Consultation June 2012 ‐ Believing in the City 

David Close 

David Close  Following Nehemiah: The STAR Project and working with vulnerable people 

WALLS = DIGNITY/WORTH IN RELATIONSHIP  1. It is a truth largely unacknowledged that you are utterly precious.  “Angie” In the first three years we knew her she learnt to teach belly‐dancing, did stand‐up  comedy, backing singer, drummer in a band, acted in a play with a mixed cast of disabled  and  able‐bodied  actors  at  the  Citizens,  extra  in  a  film  with  Sean  Pertwee  and  Christopher  Lee,  worked  as  a  life  drawing  model,  run  a  10k  and  a  half  marathon…  she’s  an  amazing  woman.  When we were talking once about why she does so many amazing things she told  me  that  the  main  reason  is  that  she  hopes  it  will  make  her  children  like  her  more.    Her  children  live  with  their  dad  (who  psychologically  and  physically  abused  Angie  for  many  years)  and  all  she  wants  is  for  them  to  love  her  more.    She  recently  saw  an  advert  in  the  paper looking for volunteers to join an expedition to the Arctic.  She told me she had applied  for it with the notion that surely having an arctic explorer for a mum would be pretty cool…  Nehemiah wept for the disgrace of his people because the walls were in ruins.  The dignity  and  status  of  the  city  were  lost.    The  dignity  and  worth  of  individual  people  are  under  intense  attack  in  late  modern  western  cultures  –  even  while  they  appear  to  valorize  and  esteem the individual.  Because most of what is counted and acclaimed as worthy is about  consumption  and  acquisition  people  who  are  poor  are  further  than  anyone  from  the  key  attributes that confer dignity upon us.  “Because you’re worthless” cf Lamentations 4 : 1‐2 How the gold has lost its luster, the fine  gold become dull! The sacred gems are scattered at every street corner.   How  the  precious  children  of  Zion,  once  worth  their  weight  in  gold,  are  now  considered as pots of clay, the work of a potter’s hands! 2   Francois  Lyotard  and  Syndrome,  the  baddie  from  The  Incredibles,  agree  that  when  everyone is special, then no one is…  Our apparent obsession with the value and potential of  every  individual  quickly  reveals  itself  as  narcissistic  and  undermining  the  true  worth  of  others and, in fact, ourselves.  1 John “Dear friends, let us love one another…”  So at STAR we started from the conviction  that the person who walks through the door is utterly precious and should be treated that  way.  Experiencing this is often a shock for people but can be transformative.  “STAR is like a  cup of hot chocolate and marshmallows in front of an open fire”  To be Christ‐like means we are inclusive even when that is costly, because he turned no one  away regardless of the cost.   The  people who smell, the people who are loud, the people  who  are  angry  and  bitter,  the  people  who  are  fine  one  day  and  deranged  the  next,  the  people who repeatedly let themselves and us down, all these have a place in STAR.  It is not  that we take no account of what people do but that what they do does not define who they 

 

Urban Consultation June 2012 ‐ Believing in the City 

David Close 

David Close  Following Nehemiah: The STAR Project and working with vulnerable people 

are  and,  crucially,  does  not  define  their  worth.    We  aim  to  accept  and  support  people  without  condition  or  qualification;  an  inclusiveness  and  responsiveness  which  goes  far  beyond  equal  opportunities  or  any  other  policy  and  defines  how  we  value  people.    This  value,  in  itself,  becomes  the  first  resource  in  enabling  people  to  develop  self‐worth  and  hope and therefore to make change.    2. Rejection sows death  Roy  Baumeister  (FSU)  conducted  experiments  around  the  experience  of  rejection.    The  theory  being  tested  was  that  when  people  experience  rejection  they  will  respond  with  resentment or anger – the idea of the disaffected and therefore antagonistic or anti‐social  underclass.    He  is  clear  too  that  they  expected  the  theory  to  be  borne  out  by  the  experiments.  What they discovered was that there was no pattern of anger resulting from  the  experiences  of  rejection  –  what  actually  resulted,  consistently,  was  a  loss  of  self‐ regulation.  In response to rejection people’s ability or inclination to look after or manage  themselves  was  consistently  undermined.    Rejection  undoes  people.    If  we  have  counter‐ balancing experiences of acceptance then we can withstand and recover from rejection.  If  not, it becomes a defining and self‐reinforcing pattern that leads only downwards.  3. Acceptance sows life and hope  Remember Angie? Such an amazingly gifted woman – all those gifts couldn’t change things  for her… but a cup of tea could... Acceptance and care has reshaped how Angie sees herself  and begun to restore the relationships with her children.  Cup of hot chocolate – bar of chocolate  Acceptance communicates a commitment to the person and a confidence in who that  person is.6    Acceptance is often talked about as being about love…  I want to suggest that it is actually,  first of all, about truth. When we take up an attitude of acceptance we communicate to the  other  person  that  we  are  ready  to  deal  with  reality  –  whatever  that  may  look  like.    If  we  cannot accept the person, as they are, then in a sense we are not prepared to deal with the  reality in front of us and can go no further.  If we show acceptance we communicate and  help to realize worth, hope, freedom and understanding.  We let them know that it is safe to  be honestly and openly themselves.    A  biblical  example  of  acceptance  as  truth  could  be  the  practice  of  lament.    Lament  gives  sometimes  angry  expression  to  the  reality  of  pain  and  suffering  which  we  experience.    It  needs to be said because it is true.  It is said, too, because we know that the way things are 
                                                            
6

 Hughes (2007), p68 

 

Urban Consultation June 2012 ‐ Believing in the City 

David Close 

David Close  Following Nehemiah: The STAR Project and working with vulnerable people 

is not the way things should be or the way God wants them to be.  Lament accepts painful  reality  but  holds  this  reality  within  an  understanding  that  there  is  more:  “Lament  has  a  purpose  and  endpoint  beyond  the  simple  expression  of  pain:  reconciliation  with  and  a  deeper love of God.  As a form of prayer lament is both transformative and subversive.”7        What do we mean by acceptance? To accept the person does not mean that we accept all  and any of their behaviours.  I do not accept a project user kicking my door, verbally abusing  or hitting me.  I do accept their desire to hit me or kick my door.  I accept it because it is the  reality  before  me  and  because  I  want  to  achieve  something  with  this  person  that  goes  beyond this moment of anger (or shame or machismo or whatever has produced the desire  to hit me).  I accept it because the fact that they think I don’t care (or whatever) does not  change their worth. It is not a true statement about me and so I do not need to be defensive  about  it.    It  is  true,  though,  that  this  client  is  feeling  that  I  don’t  care;  and  that  feeling  is  something that, if accepted, we can look at together and use to explore and make progress.    When we accept someone’s words or feelings or beliefs we are not accepting that they are  true of the world, simply that they are truly felt or believed by that client at that moment.   We are simply agreeing to stand with that person in the place that they are.  Sometimes we  are so keen to see people reach a different place that we forget to start the journey with  them and run off ahead leaving them on their own.  It is liberating to allow ourselves to not  feel we have to change everything in an instant but can start by simply accepting how things  are to begin with.      Acceptance  sees  under  the  behavior  and  communicates  that  the  relationship  will  remain  regardless  of  the  conflicts  and  separations.    When  there  are  breaks  in  the  relationship there is always a commitment to repair the break.8    Remind  you  of  anyone?    Frequently  the  church’s  response  to  evil  and  suffering  has  been  either to judge and condemn, leaving people further alienated.  This is not acceptance. Or  we  simply  ignore  sins  and  form  a  community  that  doesn’t  talk  or  think  about  such  unpleasantness.  Actually  this  isn’t  accepting  people  either.  Neither  is  Christ‐like.    Jesus  models  engagement  with  people  that  affirms  the  good,  challenges  the  bad  and  contains  both of these within a personal commitment which goes beyond good or bad: relationship  which permits both parties to be honest about and work with failure as well as success.  This  kind of relationship only becomes possible when people know that we accept them and are  committed to them as they are.  And only God knows who they will become and how…    It  is  worth  noting  that  what  we  are  describing  as  acceptance  is  often  equated  with  being  non‐judgmental.    I  think  it  is  important  to  stress  the  positive  idea  of  actively  accepting  a  person rather than refraining from the action of judging.  Simply to not judge can mean that  I  don’t  care:  that  you  or  your  actions  don’t  matter.    To  accept  a  person  is  a  positive  commitment  to  them  and  holds  to  the  truth  that  actions  do  matter  but  can  be  included  within a relationship which is bigger than them.
                                                            
7 8

 From ‘Raging with Compassion’ Swinton, John (2007), Eerdmans.   Ibid. 

 

Urban Consultation June 2012 ‐ Believing in the City 

David Close 

David Close  Following Nehemiah: The STAR Project and working with vulnerable people 

10 

WALLS = RECIPROCAL RELATIONSHIP   It could be argued that I’m spending all my time focussing on building up the self when isn’t  excessive devotion to ourselves, in fact, the root of the problem?  Isn’t this sin? pride?  But a  secure sense of self is actually necessary for love – this is one aspect of Jesus telling us to  love others as we love ourselves.  Alison/Jean – constantly finding a narrative of grievance  or sexual availability because these are the only ways she feels confident engaging with the  world around.  1. The gate called Beautiful…  The walls of the city marked the boundary of the city – made it clear what is city and what is  not city.  But in so doing they also facilitated the traffic or engagement between the two.  If  city  walls  have  no  gates  then  the  city  dies.    Nehemiah’s  account  of  rebuilding  the  walls  is  largely described in terms of the various gates.  Thus the wall both separates and joins the  city to the surrounding world.  Similarly we strive to help people to come to understand themselves as both different from  other  people  and  fundamentally  linked  in  mutual  belonging  to  the  other  people  in  their  lives. The person who has lost any sense of self as distinct and worthy, who is wide open to  abuse  and  exploitation,  obvious  or  subtle,  must  grow  to  find  that  they  are  an  individual  person  with  autonomy  and  agency.    The  person  who  is  so  defended  that  they  admit  no  other, whether through narcissistic self‐importance or utterly humiliated defeat, must grow  to find themselves in their belonging to others.  Volf  describes  the  life  of  the  Trinity  in  these  kind  of  terms:    “The  Father  is  the  Father  not  only because he is distinct from the Son and the Spirit but also because through the power  of self‐giving the Son and the Spirit dwell in him.  The same is true of the Son and the Spirit.”  And he goes further to suggest that the goal of the whole history of salvation is to “make  human beings, created in the image of God, live with one another and with God in the kind  of communion in which divine persons live with one another.”  2. The person called beautiful  The  objective  in  many  forms  of  psychotherapy  is  to  achieve  with  and  for  the  patient  a  coherent autobiographical narrative.  Trauma and shame have broken of parts of our lives  which feel irreconcilable with who we want/need/can accept ourselves to be – my sense of  self, my story of myself is fragmented.  This story which people tell themselves, containing  their  own  understanding  of  their  past,  present  and  future  experiences,  shapes  all  of  their  interactions with family, community, work or any other area of responsibility.  Working with  people to co‐create a new telling of this story which is less fragmented, less conflicted, and  more  coherent  can  liberate  people  to  live  in  new  ways.    How  does  this  reflect  the  way  in 

 

Urban Consultation June 2012 ‐ Believing in the City 

David Close 

David Close  Following Nehemiah: The STAR Project and working with vulnerable people 

11 

which we see God make a people for himself whose sense of self is established by the story  they tell of themselves (all those hebrew festivals of remembering), who are called by name  and  whose  name  is  changed  (Abram  to  Abraham,  Jacob  to  Israel,  Simon  to  Peter,  Saul  to  Paul) as who they know themselves to be changes thanks to a God who doesn’t take away  the past but tells a new story with us.    So we’ve thought about the significance of enabling people to feel safe, of accepting them  as they are, and of discovering with them a new sense of self.  Why do these things matter?  Because they enact the gospel, in two senses:  • • They make real in people’s live the movement of the gospel, the nearness of the  Kingdom  They  make  the  gospel  intelligible  and  accessible  (feasible  to  be  accessed)  to  people  who  would  otherwise  be  distant  from  and  defended  against  the  possibility or hope of relationship with God.   

 

 

Urban Consultation June 2012 ‐ Believing in the City 

David Close 

David Close  Following Nehemiah: The STAR Project and working with vulnerable people 

12 

Handout  
  The STAR Project is a Christian organization delivering grass‐roots community work in the    Responsive to individuals  Holistic    North End of Paisley which is:         This work comprises diverse individual and group activities for    Adults      Families  Children and Young people   
 

In a community where many people are disconnected, diminished and resigned to nothing  changing,    STAR  strives  for  a  future  where  people  value  themselves  and  others,  active  in  fulfilling relationships in a more connected and resilient community. 
 

Following Nehemiah 
WALLS EQUAL SAFETY  1. So many hurts…      2. Asking people to make change (inc to follow Christ) is asking them to take a risk 
   

3. We want to care for people and to help them to explore – explore faith, the claims of  Christ – but how do these sit together?    WALLS EQUAL DIGNITY (WORTH IN RELATIONSHIP)  1. It is a truth largely unacknowledged that you are utterly precious.    2. Rejection sows death      3. Acceptance sows life and hope  WALLS EQUAL RECIPROCAL RELATIONSHIP   1. The gate called Beautiful… 
    2. The person called beautiful 

 

 

Urban Consultation June 2012 ‐ Believing in the City 

David Close 

David Close  Following Nehemiah: The STAR Project and working with vulnerable people 

Following Nehemiah: The STAR Project and working with vulnerable people 
Until last year I was leading the STAR Project, a church community partnership project in the  North End of Paisley.  ‐ Right  now,  I’m  working  with  Streetspace/PEEK/WTG/living  in  Ruchill/trying  to  discern God’s call  

 

  The STAR Project is a Christian organization delivering grass-roots community work in   the North End of Paisley which is: Responsive to individuals Holistic     This work comprises diverse individual and group activities for: Adults Families Children and Young people  
 

It’s a community where many people are disconnected, diminished and resigned to nothing  changing.    STAR  strives  for  a  future  where  people  value  themselves  and  others,  active  in  fulfilling relationships in a more connected and resilient community. 
 

Community Profile  The  North  End,  between  Paisley  Town  Centre  and  Glasgow  Airport,  is  a  multiply  deprived  community of 3‐4,000, though one which has made real progress recently, evidenced by the  2009  Scottish  Index  of  Multiple  Deprivation  (datazones  in  our  community  have  improved  since  2004  by  an  average  of  338  places).    While  this  gives  us  real  encouragement  needs  remain stark with areas ranking in the worst 5% in health and crime, for example.   Fear of  crime is also a key issue:  in a 2005 local community survey the primary complaint was of  anti‐social  behaviour.    Community  profiles  (Glasgow  Centre  for  Population  Health  2008)  show  income  deprivation  and  percentage  of  working  age  unemployed  are  65%  and  68%  higher  than  the  national  average.    This  increases  an  individual  and  community  sense  of  exclusion and powerlessness.  Health data also evidence a community of isolated, struggling  people:  prescriptions  for  anxiety/depression  are  23%  above  Scottish  average,  hospital  admissions for alcohol misuse are 186% higher, 43% higher for drug related problems and  88% higher for mental illness.      People are not finding fulfilment in relationships to each other or society and struggle with  deeply negative self‐perceptions.  The prevalence of substance abuse inevitably worsens the  experience  of  exclusion;  chaotic  lifestyles  work  against  successful  engagement  even  with  support services and people become radically disconnected.    
   

Project Outcomes  Therefore our work will seek to achieve the following outcomes:  • People will grow in self‐esteem and readiness for new experiences.  • People will be less isolated and develop healthier relationships.  • People will grow in reflectiveness, creativity, and spirituality.   • People will develop improved coping skills and connections to support agencies. 
 

 

Urban Consultation June 2012 ‐ Believing in the City 

David Close 

David Close  Following Nehemiah: The STAR Project and working with vulnerable people 

By  starting  where  people  are  and  supporting  them  along  their  own  road  of  growth  STAR  helps people build the personal and community resources to live fuller lives.      Following Nehemiah  Neh Ch1 focussing on Nehemiah’s grief at the reports of the city and his determination to  rebuild the city.    Terry Jones, Toxteth Tabernacle, foundational text – rebuild the city that the temple, God’s  dwelling with us, might then be rebuilt too.  You could think about STAR’s engagement as following down a similar line but rather than  focus  on  the  city  or  community  as  a  whole  I  want  to  look  at  engaging  with  people  as  individuals.  What does it mean to rebuild the walls in individual lives?  Three things the walls do for the city:  • • • Make the city safe  Give the city status/dignity  Make  a  (permeable)  boundary:  what  is  city  and  what  is  not  city  can  thereby  engage with one another.  Walls must have gates… 

What does this mean for individuals and how do we do it?  • • •   Safety: without which engagement, exploration, taking risks, and change are all  unlikely.  Dignity or worth in relationship: shame cripples, excludes and isolates – the very  opposite of shalom.   A sense of self: which makes loving relationship possible   

 

Urban Consultation June 2012 ‐ Believing in the City 

David Close 

David Close  Following Nehemiah: The STAR Project and working with vulnerable people 

WALLS = SAFETY  1. Concentration in schemes of people who have suffered trauma ‐ at least 60% of people  who engaged in WSW groups yr1, and at least 80% of 121 support, had been victims of  domestic abuse as children, as adults or both.    Of course there is trauma everywhere but the concentration in poor communities is so high  and  the  lack  of  other  resources  that  might  mitigate  or  aid  resilience  tends  to  be  more  marked  too.  People  tend  to  end  up  in  these  communities  when  trauma,  violence  or  loss  have damaged them or because they have grown up in the context of such brokenness they  are more vulnerable to damaging experiences.  Indicators  of  deprivation  are  many  and  varied –  often  carrying  overtones  of  blame  or  just  desserts  –  see  Eric  Pickles  recent  “it’s  time  problem  families  took  the  blame”  and  incentivising councils to “target” them but 120,000 figure came from a report whose  criteria 
meant these families were poor, poorly educated, sick or disabled, there was no link here with anti‐ social behaviour or truanting.  My experience is that you have overwhelming concentrations of 

brokenness and vulnerability.   At STAR we found broken relationships at the root of most anti‐social behaviour, substance  abuse,  depression,  and  self‐destructive  or  self‐excluding  behaviours.    When  relationships  with  family,  friends  and  neighbours  are  broken  or  abusive  people’s  life  progress  is  hugely  impeded but here the competencies to build and restore positive relationships are largely  lacking.    Crucially  the  psychological  safety  resulting  from  strong  relationships  is  rare  producing  a  deep  resistance  to  positive  change.    So  the  first  reason  for  helping  people  to  build some safety in their lives is because they are so radically vulnerable – give example.  2. Asking people to make change (inc to follow Christ) is asking them to take a risk  If  people  do  not  feel  safe  they  will  defend  themselves.    To  this  extent  it  is  irrelevant  whether, in fact, they are safe or not: it is whether they feel safe that determines how they  will  behave.    If  someone  has  all  their  ‘barriers’  raised  it  is  very  difficult  to  effectively  help  them  and  they  are  reluctant  to  take  any  kind  of  risks.    In  this  situation  change  is  very  unlikely,  regardless  of  how  urgently  it  is  needed  and  regardless  of  how  easily  it  can  be  achieved.      We  must  take  account  of  psychological  safety  too.  Psychological  safety  is  necessary  to  be  able to direct one’s attention and focus, to know oneself, to feel effective in the world, or to  be able to exercise self‐control and self‐discipline.  Losing the ability to self‐protect is one of  the most shattering losses that occurs as a result of traumatic experience and it manifests as  an inability to protect one’s boundaries from the trespass of other people. Also lost is the  sense of self‐efficacy, the basic sense of experiencing oneself as having the ability to relate  to the world on one’s own terms (without abusing power and without being abused by it).     

 

Urban Consultation June 2012 ‐ Believing in the City 

David Close 

David Close  Following Nehemiah: The STAR Project and working with vulnerable people 

Think  about  a  professional  support  worker,  of  whatever  kind…  In  order  for  a  worker  and  client  to  achieve  their  ‘outcomes’  they  need  to  feel  sufficiently  safe  with  one  another  to  forego  defensive  behaviour  and  employ  their  respective  resources  in  tackling  the  issue  at  hand.    Of  course,  a  client  (or  worker)  may  be  more  or  less  concerned  for  their  safety  according  to  their  temperament,  experience  and  circumstances.    So  the  worker  must  use  their discretion regarding how much work needs to be done to make a client feel safe but it  is very easy to underestimate this and we should therefore err on the side of caution.  It is  easy, for example, to underestimate how vulnerable we ourselves feel in any given situation  as the emotional centres of our brains respond to fear by bypassing the cognitive functions  and  determine  our  behaviour  before  we’ve  thought  more  rationally.    We  then  tend  to  explain  our  actions  retrospectively  with  some  other  rationale  (often  justifying  or  blaming)  because  we  don’t  like  to  think  of  ourselves  acting  this  way.    If  we  can  so  easily  and  consistently  miss  our  own  sense  of  being  unsafe  and  its  consequences  then  it  is  all  the  simpler to misunderstand other people’s.    It is easy to forget the significance of the fact that when people come to us for support they  do  so  because  they  are  not  coping  with  something  themselves.    Our  culture  generally  stigmatizes needing help and valorizes the person who has everything under control.  So as  well as whatever struggle the person is facing, often painful and confusing in itself, they are  also beset by a sense that they are less than they should be because they are seeking help.   It  is  not  surprising,  then,  that  people  are  defensive.    Not  least  because  this  stigma  has  so  often been a feature of church life…    Religions have consistently promoted the idea that we need to achieve certain standards to  be righteous.  Our problem, as human beings, is that we are fallen (in whatever sense each  religion  understands  this).    If  we  can  change  from  our  current  state  to  achieve  the  prescribed  quality  of  living  then  we  will  please  God,  or  become  like  God  or  even  become  God.  Churches often appear to send the same message.    The glory of the gospel, though, is that God has solved the problem for us.  Our efforts to  change  have  never  succeeded  but  Jesus  on  the  cross  changes  everything:  we  no  longer  stand condemned because of our inability to change but are counted as righteous simply by  standing with, and trusting in, him.    Wonderfully, when we stand in this relationship of trust, when we stand in safety, we find  that we begin to change.  Slowly, and sometimes painfully, we grow into the quality of living  which we could not achieve alone.  Love motivates us, and the safety of belonging enables  us, where duty, insecurity and fear had left us floundering.    3. We want to care for people and to help them to explore – explore faith, the claims of  Christ – but how do these sit together?    This is a common balance in missionary engagements with poor urban communities, isn’t it?   But if someone comes to us seeking care or help, how ready are they to do any exploring? 

 

Urban Consultation June 2012 ‐ Believing in the City 

David Close 

David Close  Following Nehemiah: The STAR Project and working with vulnerable people 

At  STAR  we  found  that  people  were  almost  always  wrestling  with  dual  impulses  as  they  came to us –to engage and to disengage – and felt both very strongly. SLIDE  Why  is  this?  Una  McCluskey,  of  York  University,  suggests  understanding  attachment  helps  us.    A  child’s  experience  of  key  relationships  (usually  primarily  with  their  parents)  from  their  earliest  days  onward  lays  down  ‘internal  models  of  the  experience  of  relationship.’ 1     In  other words we learn in infancy what to expect from and how to respond to relationships  with  other  people  and  this  profoundly  shapes,  and  continues  to  shape,  our  engagement  with  the  world  around  us.    McCluskey  identifies  that  when  adults  approach  someone  for  help or support, for example meeting with a social worker, they are, on some level, seeking  care.  She writes:    One’s  expectations  of  how  one  is  going  to  be  cared  for  have  been  laid  down  quite  early in relation to the actual experiences of care one has received. 2    Care‐seekers  who  have  a  history  of  inadequate  caregiving  will  present  their  care‐ seeking needs in ways that are difficult to identify and respond to.  Care‐seekers who  continually  fail  to  reach  the  goal  of  care‐seeking  experience  feelings…  ‐  anger,  depression and despair – and develop adaptive strategies to cope with these feelings,  including avoidance of care‐seeking, ambivalence in care‐seeking and disorganization  in care‐seeking. 3    So when people seek help they are very frequently wrestling with strong impulses that tell  them they shouldn’t need help, don’t deserve help or can never find help.  These may be  expressed  in  apologies  for  bothering,  worries  that  you  don’t  have  time,  a  sense  of  hopelessness  that  you  can’t  help  them  or  in  barely  contained  anger  and  aggression.    As  a  consequence they are very alert to any signal which seems to confirm their fear that help is  unavailable  (or  withheld)  and  they  are  primed  to  withdraw  again  or  escalate  into  further  anger and aggression.    These  signals  are  found  in  the  interpersonal  environment  and  are  at  that  moment  more  important  than  anything  else  about  the  service  you  provide:    you  could  have  the  best  ‘solution’  in  the  world  for  that  client’s  need  but  if  the  interaction  at  that  point  triggers  withdrawal into isolation or anger then it will make no difference at all.    McCluskey  also  points  to  the  idea  of  instinctive  systems  as  developed  in  the  extended  attachment  theory  of  Heard  and  Lake 4   and  examines  the  activity  of  these  systems  in  the  kind of ‘support engagement’ we are considering.  She argues, in the context of social work  support  of  adults,  (and  with  much  more  care  and  depth  than  I  can  show  here)  that  as  a  client engages, the active system at work in them is that of care‐seeking.  If this is met by 
                                                            
1 2

 Heard & Lake (1997) quoted in McCluskey, Una. (2005) To be met as a person,  Karnac   McCluskey (2005), p249  3  Ibid, p241  4  For example, Heard, Dorothy and Lake, Brian (1997) The challenge of attachment for care‐giving,  Routledge. 

 

Urban Consultation June 2012 ‐ Believing in the City 

David Close 

David Close  Following Nehemiah: The STAR Project and working with vulnerable people 

effective care‐giving then it ‘closes down’ and the exploratory system can swing into action  – in other words, the client can begin to actively engage with the issue they have come to  work on and thus make progress towards resolving it.      If effective care‐giving is not forthcoming then the care‐seeking system remains active and  overrides the exploratory system. “Help me! Help me! What aren’t you helping me?”  The  client will continue to engage in care‐seeking behavior rather than engaging with the issue.   If  care‐seeking  continues  to  be  unmet  (with  effective  care‐giving)  then  it  is  likely  to  be  infiltrated by the system for self‐defence and fight‐or‐flight behavior kicks in.      What  happens  when  care‐seeking  is  activated  is  that  the  exploratory  system  is  overridden.  In order to engage the client in exploratory work care‐seeking must be  assuaged by effective caregiving. 5    So if we do not effectively respond to the care‐seeking behavior of clients they will not be  able to receive or work with any suggestion we offer even for the need they have presented  –  not  because  of  a  lack  of  will  or  motivation  but  because  we  are  programmed  by  life  to  attend first to a deeper need.  If we are hoping that they will engage in deeper reflection or  exploration of the claims of Christ then, if the initial invitation is one of care then we need to  be  honest  and  realistic  about  how  far  a  person  is  from  such  exploration  unless  we  can  adequately give care – unless we can enable them to feel safe and understood.       

                                                            
5

 McCluskey (2005), p79 

 

Urban Consultation June 2012 ‐ Believing in the City 

David Close 

David Close  Following Nehemiah: The STAR Project and working with vulnerable people 

WALLS = DIGNITY/WORTH IN RELATIONSHIP  1. It is a truth largely unacknowledged that you are utterly precious.  Example – Angie.  Nehemiah wept for the disgrace of his people because the walls were in ruins.  The dignity  and  status  of  the  city  were  lost.    The  dignity  and  worth  of  individual  people  are  under  intense  attack  in  late  modern  western  cultures  –  even  while  they  appear  to  valorize  and  esteem the individual.  Because most of what is counted and acclaimed as worthy is about  consumption  and  acquisition  people  who  are  poor  are  further  than  anyone  from  the  key  attributes that confer dignity upon us.  “Because you’re worthless” cf Lamentations 4 : 1‐2 How the gold has lost its luster, the fine  gold become dull! The sacred gems are scattered at every street corner.   How  the  precious  children  of  Zion,  once  worth  their  weight  in  gold,  are  now  considered as pots of clay, the work of a potter’s hands! 2   Francois  Lyotard  and  Syndrome,  the  baddie  from  The  Incredibles,  agree  that  when  everyone is special, then no one is…  Our apparent obsession with the value and potential of  every  individual  quickly  reveals  itself  as  narcissistic  and  undermining  the  true  worth  of  others and, in fact, ourselves.  1 John “Dear friends, let us love one another…”  So at STAR we started from the conviction  that the person who walks through the door is utterly precious and should be treated that  way.  Experiencing this is often a shock for people but can be transformative.  “STAR is like a  cup of hot chocolate and marshmallows in front of an open fire”  To be Christ‐like means we are inclusive even when that is costly, because he turned no one  away regardless of the cost.   The  people who smell, the people who are loud, the people  who  are  angry  and  bitter,  the  people  who  are  fine  one  day  and  deranged  the  next,  the  people who repeatedly let themselves and us down, all these have a place in STAR.  It is not  that we take no account of what people do but that what they do does not define who they  are  and,  crucially,  does  not  define  their  worth.    We  aim  to  accept  and  support  people  without  condition  or  qualification;  an  inclusiveness  and  responsiveness  which  goes  far  beyond  equal  opportunities  or  any  other  policy  and  defines  how  we  value  people.    This  value,  in  itself,  becomes  the  first  resource  in  enabling  people  to  develop  self‐worth  and  hope and therefore to make change.    2. Rejection sows death 

 

Urban Consultation June 2012 ‐ Believing in the City 

David Close 

David Close  Following Nehemiah: The STAR Project and working with vulnerable people 

Roy  Baumeister  (FSU)  conducted  experiments  around  the  experience  of  rejection.    The  theory  being  tested  was  that  when  people  experience  rejection  they  will  respond  with  resentment or anger – the idea of the disaffected and therefore antagonistic or anti‐social  underclass.    He  is  clear  too  that  they  expected  the  theory  to  be  borne  out  by  the  experiments.  What they discovered was that there was no pattern of anger resulting from  the  experiences  of  rejection  –  what  actually  resulted,  consistently,  was  a  loss  of  self‐ regulation.  In response to rejection people’s ability or inclination to look after or manage  themselves  was  consistently  undermined.    Rejection  undoes  people.    If  we  have  counter‐ balancing experiences of acceptance then we can withstand and recover from rejection.  If  not, it becomes a defining and self‐reinforcing pattern that leads only downwards.  3. Acceptance sows life and hope  Remember Angie? Such an amazingly gifted woman – all those gifts couldn’t change things  for her… but a cup of tea could... Acceptance and care has reshaped how Angie sees herself  and begun to restore the relationships with her children.  Cup of hot chocolate – bar of chocolate  Acceptance communicates a commitment to the person and a confidence in who that  person is. 6    Acceptance is often talked about as being about love…  I want to suggest that it is actually,  first of all, about truth. When we take up an attitude of acceptance we communicate to the  other  person  that  we  are  ready  to  deal  with  reality  –  whatever  that  may  look  like.    If  we  cannot accept the person, as they are, then in a sense we are not prepared to deal with the  reality in front of us and can go no further.  If we show acceptance we communicate and  help to realize worth, hope, freedom and understanding.  We let them know that it is safe to  be honestly and openly themselves.    A  biblical  example  of  acceptance  as  truth  could  be  the  practice  of  lament.    Lament  gives  sometimes  angry  expression  to  the  reality  of  pain  and  suffering  which  we  experience.    It  needs to be said because it is true.  It is said, too, because we know that the way things are  is not the way things should be or the way God wants them to be.  Lament accepts painful  reality  but  holds  this  reality  within  an  understanding  that  there  is  more:  “Lament  has  a  purpose  and  endpoint  beyond  the  simple  expression  of  pain:  reconciliation  with  and  a  deeper love of God.  As a form of prayer lament is both transformative and subversive.” 7        What do we mean by acceptance? To accept the person does not mean that we accept all  and any of their behaviours.  I do not accept a project user kicking my door, verbally abusing  or hitting me.  I do accept their desire to hit me or kick my door.  I accept it because it is the 
                                                            
6 7

 Hughes (2007), p68   From ‘Raging with Compassion’ Swinton, John (2007), Eerdmans. 

 

Urban Consultation June 2012 ‐ Believing in the City 

David Close 

David Close  Following Nehemiah: The STAR Project and working with vulnerable people 

reality  before  me  and  because  I  want  to  achieve  something  with  this  person  that  goes  beyond this moment of anger (or shame or machismo or whatever has produced the desire  to hit me).  I accept it because the fact that they think I don’t care (or whatever) does not  change their worth. It is not a true statement about me and so I do not need to be defensive  about  it.    It  is  true,  though,  that  this  client  is  feeling  that  I  don’t  care;  and  that  feeling  is  something that, if accepted, we can look at together and use to explore and make progress.    When we accept someone’s words or feelings or beliefs we are not accepting that they are  true of the world, simply that they are truly felt or believed by that client at that moment.   We are simply agreeing to stand with that person in the place that they are.  Sometimes we  are so keen to see people reach a different place that we forget to start the journey with  them and run off ahead leaving them on their own.  It is liberating to allow ourselves to not  feel we have to change everything in an instant but can start by simply accepting how things  are to begin with.      Acceptance  sees  under  the  behavior  and  communicates  that  the  relationship  will  remain  regardless  of  the  conflicts  and  separations.    When  there  are  breaks  in  the  relationship there is always a commitment to repair the break. 8    Remind  you  of  anyone?    Frequently  the  church’s  response  to  evil  and  suffering  has  been  either to judge and condemn, leaving people further alienated.  This is not acceptance. Or  we  simply  ignore  sins  and  form  a  community  that  doesn’t  talk  or  think  about  such  unpleasantness.  Actually  this  isn’t  accepting  people  either.  Neither  is  Christ‐like.    Jesus  models  engagement  with  people  that  affirms  the  good,  challenges  the  bad  and  contains  both of these within a personal commitment which goes beyond good or bad: relationship  which permits both parties to be honest about and work with failure as well as success.  This  kind of relationship only becomes possible when people know that we accept them and are  committed to them as they are.  And only God knows who they will become and how…    It  is  worth  noting  that  what  we  are  describing  as  acceptance  is  often  equated  with  being  non‐judgmental.    I  think  it  is  important  to  stress  the  positive  idea  of  actively  accepting  a  person rather than refraining from the action of judging.  Simply to not judge can mean that  I  don’t  care:  that  you  or  your  actions  don’t  matter.    To  accept  a  person  is  a  positive  commitment  to  them  and  holds  to  the  truth  that  actions  do  matter  but  can  be  included  within a relationship which is bigger than them.

                                                            
8

 Ibid. 

 

Urban Consultation June 2012 ‐ Believing in the City 

David Close 

David Close  Following Nehemiah: The STAR Project and working with vulnerable people 

10 

WALLS = RECIPROCAL RELATIONSHIP   It could be argued that I’m spending all my time focussing on building up the self when isn’t  excessive devotion to ourselves, in fact, the root of the problem?  Isn’t this sin? pride?  But a  secure sense of self is actually necessary for love – this is one aspect of Jesus telling us to  love others as we love ourselves.  Example – J: constantly finding a narrative of grievance or  sexual  availability  because  these  are  the  only  ways  she  feels  confident  engaging  with  the  world around.  1. The gate called Beautiful…  The walls of the city marked the boundary of the city – made it clear what is city and what is  not city.  But in so doing they also facilitated the traffic or engagement between the two.  If  city  walls  have  no  gates  then  the  city  dies.    Nehemiah’s  account  of  rebuilding  the  walls  is  largely described in terms of the various gates.  Thus the wall both separates and joins the  city to the surrounding world.  Similarly we strive to help people to come to understand themselves as both different from  other  people  and  fundamentally  linked  in  mutual  belonging  to  the  other  people  in  their  lives. The person who has lost any sense of self as distinct and worthy, who is wide open to  abuse  and  exploitation,  obvious  or  subtle,  must  grow  to  find  that  they  are  an  individual  person  with  autonomy  and  agency.    The  person  who  is  so  defended  that  they  admit  no  other, whether through narcissistic self‐importance or utterly humiliated defeat, must grow  to find themselves in their belonging to others.  Volf  describes  the  life  of  the  Trinity  in  these  kind  of  terms:    “The  Father  is  the  Father  not  only because he is distinct from the Son and the Spirit but also because through the power  of self‐giving the Son and the Spirit dwell in him.  The same is true of the Son and the Spirit.”  And he goes further to suggest that the goal of the whole history of salvation is to “make  human beings, created in the image of God, live with one another and with God in the kind  of communion in which divine persons live with one another.”  2. The person called beautiful  The  objective  in  many  forms  of  psychotherapy  is  to  achieve  with  and  for  the  patient  a  coherent autobiographical narrative.  Trauma and shame have broken of parts of our lives  which feel irreconcilable with who we want/need/can accept ourselves to be – my sense of  self, my story of myself is fragmented.  This story which people tell themselves, containing  their  own  understanding  of  their  past,  present  and  future  experiences,  shapes  all  of  their  interactions with family, community, work or any other area of responsibility.  Working with  people to co‐create a new telling of this story which is less fragmented, less conflicted, and  more  coherent  can  liberate  people  to  live  in  new  ways.    How  does  this  reflect  the  way  in 

 

Urban Consultation June 2012 ‐ Believing in the City 

David Close 

David Close  Following Nehemiah: The STAR Project and working with vulnerable people 

11 

which we see God make a people for himself whose sense of self is established by the story  they tell of themselves (all those Hebrew festivals of remembering), who are called by name  and  whose  name  is  changed  (Abram  to  Abraham,  Jacob  to  Israel,  Simon  to  Peter,  Saul  to  Paul) as who they know themselves to be changes thanks to a God who doesn’t take away  the past but tells a new story with us.    So we’ve thought about the significance of enabling people to feel safe, of accepting them  as they are, and of discovering with them a new sense of self.  Why do these things matter?  Because they enact the gospel, in two senses:  • • They make real in people’s live the movement of the gospel, the nearness of the  Kingdom  They  make  the  gospel  intelligible  and  accessible  (feasible  to  be  accessed)  to  people  who  would  otherwise  be  distant  from  and  defended  against  the  possibility or hope of relationship with God.   

 

 

Urban Consultation June 2012 ‐ Believing in the City 

David Close 

David Close  Following Nehemiah: The STAR Project and working with vulnerable people 

12 

Handout  
  The STAR Project is a Christian organization delivering grass‐roots community work in the    Responsive to individuals  Holistic    North End of Paisley which is:         This work comprises diverse individual and group activities for    Adults      Families  Children and Young people   
 

In a community where many people are disconnected, diminished and resigned to nothing  changing,    STAR  strives  for  a  future  where  people  value  themselves  and  others,  active  in  fulfilling relationships in a more connected and resilient community. 
 

Following Nehemiah 
WALLS EQUAL SAFETY  1. So many hurts…      2. Asking people to make change (inc to follow Christ) is asking them to take a risk 
   

3. We want to care for people and to help them to explore – explore faith, the claims of  Christ – but how do these sit together?    WALLS EQUAL DIGNITY (WORTH IN RELATIONSHIP)  1. It is a truth largely unacknowledged that you are utterly precious.    2. Rejection sows death      3. Acceptance sows life and hope  WALLS EQUAL RECIPROCAL RELATIONSHIP   1. The gate called Beautiful… 
    2. The person called beautiful 

 

 

Urban Consultation June 2012 ‐ Believing in the City 

David Close