Politics of Latin America Course Syllabus

http://cpbucket.fiu.edu/cpo3304vc1128/syllabus.html

COURSE SYLLABUS POLITICS OF LATIN AMERICA 1128-CPO3304VC1128-90411
GENERAL INFORMATION

• IMPORTANT INFORMATION • COURSE DETAIL • COURSE CALENDAR GENERAL INFORMATION

PROFESSOR INFORMATION

Instructor: Office: E-mail:

Eduardo A. Gamarra SIPA 409, MMC Campus gamarrae@fiu.edu

Phone: Office Hours: Twitter:

(305) 348-1718 By appointment @gamarrae

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Is Latin America a forgotten continent, as Michael Reid states in his recent book and required course reading? "One of the problems Latin America's democracies face is the persistent denial of progress by many academics, journalists and politicians, both within the region and among those who observe it from the United States and Europe." The objective of this course is to analyze the most significant political, social and economic currents unfolding in the region and to examine Reid's assertion that progress is visible and evident in Latin America. We will begin by focusing on the academic constructs that have been used to explain the regional situation. The second part of the course will explore broadly the historical cycles that have led to the current moment. The course will then examine the nearly thirty years of democracy through an analysis of the behavior of political actors, the functioning of institutions, the evolving social structures, and the pattern of economic development.

COURSE OBJECT IVES

This principal objective of this course is to foster critical, analytical thinking about Latin American and Caribbean politics and development. Through an evaluation of several leading texts students are introduced to the political history of the region, to the basic tools of analysis, and to the main themes and issues that affect the pattern of development of the region. By the end of the term students should be able to: Identify the principal developmental stages of Latin American and Caribbean development. Students will also be expected to identify the principal actors historically and the key actors in contemporary Latin America and the Caribbean. Recognize the critical themes and issues that have characterized the development of political, economic and social systems. Describe the characteristics of specific sub regions and countries as they fit into the broader pattern of development. Classify countries, sub regions, and themes into analytical categories. Evaluate the political processes in the region and in specific sub regions and/or countries utilizing the analytical constructs introduced in the course. Explain the challenges and dilemmas facing contemporary Latin America and the Caribbean leaders and

1 of 7

8/20/2012 11:31 AM

Politics of Latin America Course Syllabus

http://cpbucket.fiu.edu/cpo3304vc1128/syllabus.html

countries. Define key concepts and themes used in the course to evaluate, classify and explain the political development of Latin America and the Caribbean.

IMPORTANT INFORMATION
POLICIES

Please review the policies page as it contains essential information regarding guidelines relevant to all courses at FIU and additional information on the standards for acceptable netiquette important for online courses.

COURSE PREREQUISITES

For information about prerequisites, click here.

TEXTBOOK

Forgotten Continent: The Battle for Latin America's Soul (Required) Michael Reid Yale University Press, 2008 ISBN 13: 9780300151206

Modern Latin America, 7th Edition (Required) Thomas Skidmore, Peter Smith and James Green Oxford University Press, 2009 ISBN 13: 9780195375701

EXPECTAT IONS OF T HIS COURSE

This is an online course, meaning that most of the course work will be conducted online. Expectations for performance in an online course are the same as for a traditional course; in fact, online courses require a degree of self-motivation, self-discipline, and technology skills that can make them more demanding for some students. Students are expected to: Review the how to get started information located in the course content Introduce yourself to the class during the first week by posting a self introduction in the appropriate discussion forum Take the practice quiz to ensure that your computer is compatible with Blackboard Interact online with instructor/s and peers Review and follow the course calendar

COURSE DETAIL

2 of 7

8/20/2012 11:31 AM

Politics of Latin America Course Syllabus

http://cpbucket.fiu.edu/cpo3304vc1128/syllabus.html

COURSE COMMUNICATION

Communication in this course will take place via messages. The message feature is a private, internal Blackboard only communication system. Users must log on to the blackboard system to send/receive/read messages. There are no notifications in Blackboard to inform users when a new message has been received; therefore, it is recommended that students check their messages routinely to ensure up-to-date communication. This is the best method to communicate with your instructor privately.

DISCUSSION FORUMS

Students will be expected to participate in the discussion board during each module. The professor will post weekly questions related to the readings to guide the discussion forum. Active participation in the module accounts for 10 percent of the course grade. Keep in mind that forum discussions are public, and care should be taken when determining what to post.

ASSIGNMENTS

Students must write a 10-12 page paper to be submitted on the final day of class. The professor will provide the guidelines for the paper in a separate handout. Mature student conduct in all course work is expected. Little tolerance will be shown for any disruptions or violations of basic rules of conduct and ethics. If you are uncertain about these rules as they apply to you, please consult the student handbook. Please be aware that plagiarism, no matter how minimal, will be sanctioned to the full extent allowed by FIU. Ignorance of these rules is not an acceptable defense. All violations of academic dishonesty will be vigorously prosecuted. For more information visit: www.fiu.edu/~oabp/misconductweb/unitinstructions.htm

EXAMS

There will two examinations on pre-established dates. The examination questions will be posted on specific dates listed below. In order to mitigate any issues with your computer and online assessments, it is very important that you take the "Practice Quiz" from each computer you will be using to take your graded quizzes and exams. It is your responsibility to make sure your computer meets the minimum hardware requirements.

ADOBE CONNECT PRO MEETING

The Adobe Connect Pro Meeting is an online meeting room in which you can interact with your Professor and fellow students by sharing your computer, screens or files, chat, broadcast live audio and take part in other interactive online activities. Seven Adobe Connect sessions are scheduled for this semester and students are expected to participate. discussion forum will be held the following day for those students who are unable to make the Adobe Connect session. Requirements for using Adobe Connect Pro Meeting: Disable any window pop-up blocker. Adobe Flash Player is required to successfully run your Connect Pro meeting. You can test your computer to A

3 of 7

8/20/2012 11:31 AM

Politics of Latin America Course Syllabus

http://cpbucket.fiu.edu/cpo3304vc1128/syllabus.html

make sure that you are set up with all of the tools you will need to participate in the meeting. Use of a combination headset and microphone with USB connection is recommended to ensure quality sound and reduce technical difficulties. Please click here for additional information on Adobe Connect (Tutorials & Help).
GRADING

More information on weights coming soon.
LETTER GRADE A AB+ B RANGE Above 93 91 - 92 87 - 90 84 - 86 LETTER GRADE BC+ C CRANGE 81-83 77 - 80 74 - 76 71 - 73 LETTER GRADE D+ D DF RANGE 67 - 70 64 - 66 61 - 63 < 61

COURSE CALENDAR
WEEKLY SCHEDULE
MODULE CONTENT MODULE ONE: THE COLONIAL LEGACY Readings: Reid, Chapters 1,2,3 Skidmore and Smith, Chapter 1, 2 Additional Material: This material can be found in the correspoing module folder in the Course Content. - Leandro Prados de la Escosura, Lost Decades? Economic Performance in Post-Independence Latin America, Journal of Latin American Studies 41, 279–307 - James Mahoney, Long-Run Development and the Legacy of Colonialism in Spanish America, The American Journal of Sociology, Vol. 109, No. 1 (July 2003), pp. 50-106 - Please watch (The Buried Mirror film by Carlos Fuentes) MODULE TWO: THE PATTERN OF DEVELOPMENT Readings: Skidmore and Smith, Part Three (pages 352-362; 376-389; 403-414) Reid, Chapter 4. Additional Material: This material can be found in the correspoing module folder in the Course Content. - John D. Martz and David J. Myers, Understanding Latin American Politics: Analytic Models & Intellectual Traditions, Polity, Vol. 16, No. 2 (Winter, 1983), pp. 214-241 - Richard N. Adams, The Pattern of Development in Latin America, Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, Vol. 360, Latin America Tomorrow (Jul., 1965), pp. 1-10. - Aurora Gomez Galvarriato and Jeffrey G. Williamson, Was It Prices, Productivity or Policy? Latin American Industrialization after 1870, Journal of Latin America. Studies, 41, 663–694 - Gary Gereffi, Rethinking Development Theory: Insights from East Asia and Latin America, Sociological Forum, Vol. 4, No. 4, Special Issue: Comparative National Development: Theory and Facts for the 1990s (Dec., 1989), pp. 505-533 - Eduardo Silva, The Import-Substitution Model: Chile in Comparative Perspective Latin American Perspectives, Vol. 34, No. 3, Contested Transformation (May, 2007), pp. 67-90 Module 2 - Discussion Board First Adobe Connect Session: Wednesday August 29 Review the How to Get Started information located in the Course Content Module 1 - Discussion Board TASKS

Module 1 August 20-24

Module 2 August 27-31

4 of 7

8/20/2012 11:31 AM

Politics of Latin America Course Syllabus

http://cpbucket.fiu.edu/cpo3304vc1128/syllabus.html

MODULE THREE: REVOLUTIONARY CHANGE IN LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN: MEXICO, BOLIVIA, AND CUBA Readings: Skidmore and Smith, Chapters 3, 4, 5 Module 3 September 3-7 Additional Material: This material can be found in the correspoing module folder in the Course Content. - Richard Patch “Bolivia: The Restrained Revolution” - Aureliano Ortega Esquivel, “Thinking about the Mexican Revolution: Philosophy, Culture and Politics in Mexico: 1910-1934” “Originality and Relevance of the Cuban Revolution” MODULE FOUR: THE MILITARY IN POLITICS Readings: Skidmore and Smith, Chapters 10 and 11 Additional Material: This material can be found in the correspoing module folder in the Course Content. Module 4 September 10 -14 - Paul E. Sigmund, Review: Approaches to the Study of the Military in Latin America. Comparative Politics, Vol. 26, No. 1 (Oct., 1993), pp. 111-122. - Karen Remmer and Gilbert Merkx, Bureaucratic Authoritarianism Revisited, Latin American Research Review, Volume 17, number 2, (1982) pp. 3-40. - Robert D. Putnam, “Toward Explaining Military Intervention in Latin American Politics” World Politics Volume 20, Number 1, October 1967. - Howard Handelman, “The Military in Latin American Politics: Internal and External Determinants.” Latin American Research Review Volume 22 Number 3, 1987. - Martin C. Needler, The Military and Politics in Latin America, Journal of Interamerican Studies and World Affairs, Volume 28, Number 3 Autumn 1986. MODULE FIVE: THE TRANSITION TO DEMOCRACY IN THE 1980S Readings: Skidmore and Smith, Chapter 13 pages 389-402 Reid: Chapter 5 Module 5 September 17-25 Additional Material: This material can be found in the correspoing module folder in the Course Content. - Stephan Haggard and Robert R. Kaufman, The Political Economy of Democratic Transitions: Comparative Politics, Vol. 29, No. 3, Transitions to Democracy: A Special Issue in Memory of Dankwart A. Rustow (Apr., 1997), pp. 263-283. MODULE SIX: NEOLIBERALISM Readings: Reid, Chapters 6, 7, 8. Skidmore and Smith, Chapter 12 (pages 368-375) Module 6 September 24-28 Additional Material: This material can be found in the correspoing module folder in the Course Content. - Kurt Weyland, Neoliberalism and Democracy in Latin America: A Mixed Record, Latin American Politics and Society, Vol. 46, No. 1 (Spring, 2004), pp. 135-157 - Evelyn Huber and Fred Solt "Successes and Failures of Neoliberalism," Latin American Research Review, Volume 39 Number 3 (2004) pp. 150-164. MODULE SEVEN: NEOPOPULISM Readings: Skidmore and Smith, Chapters, 7-8 Additional Material: This material can be found in the correspoing module folder in the Course Content. - Guillermo O'Donnell, Delegative Democracy? - Peter H. Smith and Melissa R. Ziegler, Liberal and Illiberal Democracy in Latin America. Latin American Politics and Society, Volume 50: 1 - Paul Cammack , The Resurgence of Populism in Latin America, Bulletin of Latin American Research, Vol. 19, No. 2, Special Issue: Old and New Populism in Latin America (Apr., 2000), pp. 149-161. - Alejandro Portes and Kelly Hoffman, Latin American Class Structures: Their Composition and Change during the Neoliberal Era, Latin American Research Module 5 - Discussion Board Module 4 - Discussion Board Adobe Connect Session: Wednesday September 12 Mid Term Examination: September 19 Module 3 - Discussion Board

Module 6 - Discussion Board Adobe Connect Session: Wednesday September 26

Module 7 October 1-5

Module 7 - Discussion Board

5 of 7

8/20/2012 11:31 AM

Politics of Latin America Course Syllabus

http://cpbucket.fiu.edu/cpo3304vc1128/syllabus.html

Review, Vol. 38, No. 1 (2003), pp. 41-82. - Monica Barczak, Representation by Consultation? The Rise of Direct Democracy in Latin America, Latin American Politics and Society, Vol. 43, No. 3 (Autumn, 2001), pp. 37-59 - Film: The Hugo Chavez Show - Film: The Fall of Fujimori MODULE EIGHT: POLITICAL INSTITUTIONS AND GOVERNANCE Readings: Reid: Chapter 12 Additional Material: This material can be found in the correspoing module folder in the Course Content. Module 8 October 8-12 - Carlos Blanco, Reform of the State: An Alternative for Change in Latin America , Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, Vol. 606, Chronicle of a Myth Foretold: The Washington Consensus in Latin America (Jul., 2006), pp. 231-243. - Donna Lee Van Cott , Institutional Change and Ethnic Parties in South America, Latin American Politics and Society, Vol. 45, No. 2 (Summer, 2003), pp. 1-39 - Scott Mainwaring and Matthew S. Shugart, “Juan Linz, Presidentialism, and Democracy: A Critical Appraisal,” Comparative Politics, Vol. 29, No. 4 (Jul., 1997), pp. 449-471 MODULE NINE: POLITICAL CULTURE AND PUBLIC OPINION Module 9 October 15-19 Readings: Iberobarometro 2011 The Political Culture of Democracy 2010, Chapter III. Latinobarometer 2011 pp. 23-69. MODULE TEN: NATIONAL AND CITIZEN SECURITY Readings: Reid, Chapter 11 Skidmore & Smith, Chapter 4 and 7 Additional Material: This material can be found in the correspoing module folder in the Course Content. - David Howard, Mo Hume, Ulrich Oslender, “Violence, Fear, and Development in Latin America: A Critical Overview, Development in Practice, Vol. 17, No. 6 (Nov., 2007), pp. 713-724 - Angelina Snodgrass Godoy, When "Justice" Is Criminal: Lynchings in Contemporary Latin America, Theory and Society, Vol. 33, No. 6 (Dec., 2004), pp. 621-651. - Mo Hume, Mano Dura: El Salvador Responds to Gangs, Development in Practice, Vol. 17, No. 6 (Nov., 2007), pp. 739-75. - Sérgio Pinheiro, Democratic Governance, Violence, and the (Un)Rule of Law, Paulo Daedalus, Vol. 129, No. 2, Brazil: The Burden of the past; The Promise of the Future(Spring, 2000), pp. 119-143. - Lucia Dammert and Mary Fran T. Malone, Does It Take a Village? Policing Strategies and Fear of Crime in Latin America, Latin American Politics and Society, Vol. 48, No. 4 (Winter, 2006), pp. 27-51 - Magaly Sanchez R, Insecurity and Violence as a New Power Relation in Latin America, Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, Vol. 606, Chronicle of a Myth Foretold: The Washington Consensus in Latin America (Jul., 2006), pp. 178-195 MODULE ELEVEN: THE EMERGENCE OF CIVIL SOCIETY: RACE, COLOR, CLASS AND IDENTITY (BOLIVIA, HAITI, DOMINICAN REPUBLIC Readings: Reid, Chapter 9 Additional Material: This material can be found in the correspoing module folder in the Course Content. - Raúl L. Madrid, The Rise of Ethnopopulism in Latin America, World Politics, Volume 60, Number 3, April 2008, pp. 475-508 - Juliet Hooker, Indigenous Inclusion/Black Exclusion: Race, Ethnicity and Multicultural Citizenship in Latin America, Journal of Latin American Studies, Vol. 37, No. 2 (May, 2005), pp. 285-310. - Steven Levitsky and Scott Mainwaring, Organized Labor and Democracy in Latin America, Comparative Politics, Vol. 39, No. 1 (Oct., 2006), pp. 21-42. - PBS Film: Black in America: Haiti and the Dominican Republic an Island Divided - PBS Film: Black in America: Cuba: The Next Revolution Module 10 - Discussion Board Adobe Connect Session: Wednesday October 24 Module 9 - Discussion Board

Module 8 - Discussion Board Adobe Connect Session: Wednesday October 10

Module 10 October 22-26

Module 11 October 29-November 2

Module 11 - Discussion Board

6 of 7

8/20/2012 11:31 AM

Politics of Latin America Course Syllabus

http://cpbucket.fiu.edu/cpo3304vc1128/syllabus.html

MODULE TWELVE: NATIONAL POLITICS AND THE MOVEMENT OF PEOPLE ACROSS BORDERS Readings: - Bridget Wooding and Richard Moseley-Williams, “Haitian immigrants and their descendants in the Dominican Republic. “ - T. H. Gindling, “South-South Migration: The Impact of Nicaraguan Immigrants on Earnings, Inequality and Poverty in Costa Rica.” - Maria Eugenia Brockmann Rojas, “ (Re )tuming home: Narratives of Bolivian transnational migrants.” - Andrés Solimano, “Workers Remittances to the Andean Region: Mechanisms, Costs and Development Impact.” - Ruth Ellen Wasem, “Cuban Migration to the United States: Policy and Trends.” - Lisandro Perez, “Cubans in the United States.” MODULE THIRTEEN: TRADITIONAL MEDIA, SOCIAL MEDIA, WIKILEAKS AND POLITICS Readings: - Taylor C. Boas, “Mass Media and Politics in Latin America.” - Taylor Boas, Television and Neopopulism in Latin America: Media Effects in Brazil and Peru. - Peter Kornbluth, Wiki Leaks, The Latin America Files - @LATAM: Connected. Social Media in Latin America Synthesio, Social Media in Latin America - Summer Harlow, Social Change and Social Media: Latin American Activists’ Use of Digital Tools in the Face of the Digital Divide - Dustin Harp, Ingrid Bachman, Lei Guo, The Whole Online World Is Watching: Profiling Social Networking Sites and Activists in China, Latin America, and the United States - María-Ángeles Cabrera-González and Ana-Isabel Bernal-Triviño, “Technological development of online media in Latin America. The case studies of emol.com, clarin.com, prensalibre.com. and jornada.unam.mx.” - “Tweeting in Latin America: The art to tweet with a Latino touch.” MODULE FOURTEEN: CONCLUSION Readings: Module 14 November 26-30 - Manual Alcantara, Politics and Society in Latin America at the Start of the New Millennium, Social Forces, Vol. 83, No. 4 (Jun., 2005), pp. 1659-1670. - Moisés Naím, The Lost Continent, Foreign Policy, No. 157 (Nov. - Dec., 2006), pp. 40-43. - Scott Mainwaring and Timothy R. Scully, Latin America: Eight Lessons for Governance, Journal of Democracy, Volume 19, Number 3, July 2008, pp. 113-127. Adobe Connect Session: Wednesday November 28 Final paper Due Final Exam: December 5 Module 12 - Discussion Board Adobe Connect Session: Wednesday November 7

Module 12 November 5-9

Module 13 November 12-16

Module 13 - Discussion Board

Module 14 - Discussion Board

Florida International University Online Copyright © 1998 - 2012. All rights reserved worldwide.

7 of 7

8/20/2012 11:31 AM