www.smdailyjournal.

com
Thursday • Sept. 20, 2012 • Vol XII, Edition 29
DOING HIS JOB
NATION PAGE 7
GRYPHONS WIN
WBAL OPENER
SPORTS PAGE 11
TIME TO CLEAN
YOUR GARAGE
SUBURBAN LIVING PAGE 18
VOTERS SOUR ON ECONOMY, OBAMA JOBS
APPROVAL UP
Elegant Home Design Since 1952
650•227• 4882
FREE ESTIMATE
165 N. Amphlett
San Mateo
www.rudolphsinteriors.com
Turning 65 soon? Understand your options?
I CAN HELP!
John Bowman
(650) 525-9180
john@baywoodinsurance.com
CA License# 0E08395
1700 S. El Camino Real Suite 355l, San Mateo
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The emergency room at Mills Health Center
in San Mateo will close Dec. 1 to meet earth-
quake standards set by the state, hospital offi-
cials announced yesterday.
The standby emergency department will be
replaced with an urgent care center in the
same space, scheduled to open in late 2013.
It would cost between $60 million and $80
million to retrofit the one affected building at
Mills which hospital officials said is “simply
not feasible.”
With its closure, emergency and urgent care
services will be provided at the emergency
department at Mills-Peninsula Medical
Center in Burlingame, a Sutter Health affili-
ate, which has expanded capacity since the
new hospital opened last year and is just four
miles from the San Mateo ER.
Most patients who visit the standby ER at
Mills today require urgent care services rather
than critical emergency care. Ambulances
have bypassed Mills Health Center to take
critically ill or injured patients to Mills-
Peninsula Medical Center in Burlingame
since the Mills ER was downgraded to stand-
by status in 1997, according to a hospital
statement.
An urgent care facility will be a better fit for
the community in San Mateo, Bob Merwin,
chief executive officer at Mills-Peninsula
Health Services told the Daily Journal yester-
day.
Merwin does not expect the standby ER’s
closing in San Mateo to negatively affect the
community.
Sutter to close San Mateo ER
Officials say cost to seismically retrofit building too expensive
Challengers seek
change for HMB
Incumbents want to
continue city’s revival
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The two incumbents running for re-election in Half Moon
Bay say the city is on the right track now after years of intense
belt-tightening and lost court settlements but the two chal-
lengers in the race say the city fell so low because of poor
leadership on the council.
Councilwoman Marina Fraser and Councilman John Muller
face first-time candidates Harvey Rarback and John Ullom this
November for the two open seats on the council.
The Daily Journal sat the four candidates down for a meet-
ing this week to discuss the issues facing Half Moon Bay and
to get a sense of why they are running for office.
Fraser has already served two terms on the council and has
lived in Half Moon Bay for 40 years. She is seeking re-elec-
tion because there are projects in the city, like building a new
library or sprucing up athletic fields, that need to be realized,
she said.
She also said she wants to see the city become safer for
Voters facing sales tax
hike in Half Moon Bay
Increase will help with capital needs
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
After voters rejected a 1-cent sales tax hike in 2010, Half
Moon Bay officials are once again asking city residents to
approve a similar measure — this time for a half-cent.
The Half Moon Bay City Council approved putting the
measure on the November ballot earlier this year to help sup-
port some of the city’s capital needs such as repairing the Main
Street Bridge. The council voted 4-1, with Councilwoman
See ELECTION, Page 16
See TAX, Page 16
See SUTTER, Page 20
HEATHER MURTAGH/DAILY JOURNAL
Burlingame High School students Bryce Nelson,left to right,Andrew Malta and Sebastian Shanus pull up graphics of the BHS
Mobile application they designed in hopes of helping people easily access school information.
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
When grades are posted, students at
Burlingame High School often pull out
their cellphones to check where they
stand after the most recent test, quiz or
assignment.
Noting dead spots in service and slow
Wi-Fi, students were finding it challeng-
ing to do so between class. In hopes of
offering a quicker solution, three stu-
dents released an app, available for free
download on iTunes, to allow students,
teachers and parents the chance to check
class schedules, grades or simply share
information. Called BHS Mobile, it’s
not the only app option on the
Burlingame campus. It’s an example of
what teens are often doing on their own
— creating technology despite classes
not always being available. For the teens
who created the app, it’s the first of a few
they hope to put out for other local high
schools.
Seventeen-year-old senior Sebastian
Shanus explained the idea has been there
for a while, the challenge was knowing
how to centralize information. After an
internship this summer, Shanus was able
to look at the problem from a different
angle.
Junior Andrew Malta, 16, joined in
before the duo brought 15-year-old
Bryce Nelson on to help with graphics
and marketing. It was launched Aug. 22
and has already been revised once.
The idea was and continues to be sim-
ple: offer students, teachers and parents
a quick way to access information. For
BHS goes mobile
High school students create appto share class information
See APP, Page 20
FOR THE RECORD 2 Thursday • Sept. 20, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
Publisher: Jerry Lee Editor in Chief: Jon Mays
jerry@smdailyjournal.com jon@smdailyjournal.com
smdailyjournal.com scribd.com/smdailyjournal
twitter.com/smdailyjournal facebook.com/smdailyjournal
Phone: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (650) 344-5200 Fax: (650) 344-5290
To Advertise:. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ads@smdailyjournal.com
Events: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . calendar@smdailyjournal.com
News: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . news@smdailyjournal.com
Delivery: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . circulation@smdailyjournal.com
Career: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . info@smdailyjournal.com
As a public service, the Daily Journal prints obituaries of approximately 250 words or less with a photo one time on the date of the family’s choosing.To submit obituaries, email
information along with a jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com.Free obituaries are edited for style, clarity, length and grammar. If you would like to have an obituary printed
more than once, longer than 250 words or without editing, please submit an inquiry to our advertising department at ads@smdailyjournal.com.
Hockey Hall of
Famer Guy LaFleur
is 61.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1962
James Meredith, a black student, was
blocked from enrolling at the
University of Mississippi by
Democratic Gov. Ross R. Barnett.
(Meredith was later admitted.)
“Politics is very much like taxes —
everybody is against them, or everybody is
for them as long as they don’t apply to him.”
— Fiorello La Guardia, New York City mayor (1882-1947)
Actress Sophia
Loren is 78.
Actor Gary Cole is
56.
In other news ...
Birthdays
REUTERS
Bubble artist Melody Yang looks through bubbles she created on a table during a demonstration in Vancouver, British
Columbia, Canada.
Thursday: Cloudy in the morning then
becoming partly cloudy. Patchy fog in the
morning. Highs in the upper 50s to mid 60s.
West winds 10 to 20 mph.
Thursday night: Partly cloudy in the
evening then becoming cloudy. Patchy fog
after midnight. Lows around 50. Northwest
winds 10 to 20 mph.
Friday: Cloudy in the morning then becoming partly cloudy.
Patchy fog in the morning. Highs in the 60s to lower 70s.
Northwest winds 5 to 10 mph increasing to west 15 to 20 mph
in the afternoon.
Friday night: Partly cloudy in the evening then becoming
cloudy. Patchy fog after midnight. Lows around 50. Northwest
winds 10 to 20 mph.
Saturday: Cloudy in the morning then becoming partly
cloudy. Patchy fog. Highs in the 60s.
Local Weather Forecast
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are No.09 Winning
Spirit in first place; No. 08 Gorgeous George in
second place; and No. 07 Eureka in third place.
The race time was clocked at 1:42.28.
(Answers tomorrow)
TIGER CHAOS FACTOR CLINIC
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: When the zombies took over the railroad,
passengers rode on — “FRIGHT” TRAINS
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
NEESS
ADEGA
TREELT
CLEDOK
©2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
F
in
d

u
s

o
n

F
a
c
e
b
o
o
k

h
t
t
p
:
/
/
w
w
w
.
f
a
c
e
b
o
o
k
.
c
o
m
/
ju
m
b
le
Print answer here:
9 2 8
5 9 22 36 49 36
Mega number
Sept. 18 Mega Millions
1 2 7 19 21
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
4 7 4 9
Daily Four
5 8 5
Daily three evening
In 1519, Portuguese explorer Ferdinand Magellan and his
crew set out from Spain on five ships to find a western pas-
sage to the Spice Islands. (Magellan was killed enroute, but
one of his ships eventually circled the world.)
In 1870, Italian troops took control of the Papal States, lead-
ing to the unification of Italy.
In 1873, panic swept the floor of the New York Stock
Exchange in the wake of railroad bond defaults and bank
failures.
In 1884, the National Equal Rights Party was formed during
a convention of suffragists in San Francisco; the convention
nominated Belva Ann Bennett Lockwood for president.
In 1911, the British liner RMS Olympic collided with the
Royal Navy cruiser HMS Hawke off the Isle of Wight;
although seriously damaged, the Olympic was able to return
to Southampton under its own power.
In 1947, former New York City Mayor Fiorello La Guardia
died.
In 1958, Martin Luther King Jr. was seriously wounded dur-
ing a book signing at a New York City department store
when Izola Curry stabbed him in the chest. (Curry was later
found mentally incompetent.)
In 1967, the Cunard liner RMS Queen Elizabeth 2 was chris-
tened by Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II in Clydebank,
Scotland.
In 1973, in their so-called “battle of the sexes,” tennis star
Billie Jean King defeated Bobby Riggs in straight sets, 6-4,
6-3, 6-3, at the Houston Astrodome.
In 1979, Jean-Bedel Bokassa), self-styled head of the
Central African Empire, was overthrown in a French-sup-
ported coup while on a visit to Libya.
Singer Gogi Grant is 88. Actress-comedian Anne Meara is 83.
Pro Football Hall of Famer Jim Taylor is 77. Rock musician
Chuck Panozzo is 65. Acttor Tony Denison is 63. Actress Debbi
Morgan is 61. Jazz musician Peter White is 58. Actress Betsy
Brantley is 57. TV news correspondent Deborah Roberts is 52.
Country-rock musician Joseph Shreve (Flynnville Train) is 51.
Rock musician Randy Bradbury (Pennywise) is 48. Actress
Kristen Johnston is 45. Rock singers Gunnar Nelson and
Matthew Nelson are 45. Rock musician Ben Shepherd is 44.
Actress-model Moon Bloodgood is 37. Actor Jon Bernthal is 36.
Rock musician Rick Woolstenhulme (Lifehouse) is 33.
Security official tries
to take gun on flight
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. —
Albuquerque airport officials say the
second-in-command of New Mexico’s
domestic security agency was caught
trying to bring a loaded gun through a
security checkpoint.
State Deputy Secretary of Homeland
Security Anita Tallarico told
Albuquerque Sunport police that she
forgot to leave the weapon at home
when TSA agents spotted it in her purse
in a scanner Friday.
KOB-TV reports Tallarico told TSA
officials she was distraught because she
was going to a funeral. She was cited for
unlawful carrying of a deadly weapon.
Airport police chief Marshall Katz
says he’s not sure how a person of
Tallarico’s position could make such a
slip-up, but added that it happens fre-
quently nationwide.
Tallarico’s gun was turned over to city
police as evidence.
Stowaway cat back in
Ohio after trip to Florida
CIRCLEVILLE, Ohio — An Ohio
woman says the pet cat that sneaked into
her luggage for a flight to Florida has
returned home safely and seems rela-
tively unaffected by his surprise vaca-
tion in Orlando.
Ethel Maze tells The Circleville
Herald that Bob-Bob the stowaway
spent 10 hours in a suitcase before she
opened it last week. She says he was
lethargic and wet from perspiration, and
she initially thought he’d died.
Eventually he perked up, and he spent
the week in a crate at Maze’s hotel. He
rode in a carrier near Maze’s seat for the
return flight.
Somehow the cat had made it through
screening at Port Columbus
International Airport. The man who han-
dled the bags for Maze’s group told
reporters he thought he saw the bag
move but loaded it anyway.
Lohan charged with
leaving scene of accident
NEW YORK — Lindsay Lohan was
arrested in New York early Wednesday
on charges that she clipped a pedestrian
with her car and did not stop driving, but
her publicist said he expects the allega-
tions to be proven false.
The 26-year-old actress was arrested
at 2:25 a.m. as she left a nightclub at the
Dream Hotel in Manhattan’s Chelsea
neighborhood, police said. They said no
alcohol was involved.
Lohan was charged with leaving the
scene of an accident and causing injury.
She was given a ticket and scheduled to
appear in court on Oct. 23.
Police said Lohan was slowly driving
a black Porsche through an alley
between the Dream Hotel and the
Maritime Hotel on 16th Street when the
accident occurred. The victim called
911. He was treated
at a hospital for a
knee injury and
released.
“We are confident
this matter will be
cleared up in the
coming weeks and
the claims being
made against
Lindsay will be
proven untrue,” Lohan’s publicist Steve
Honig wrote in an email. He wrote the
incident appeared to be “much ado about
nothing.”
It was the latest car accident involving
Lohan.
On June 8, Lohan was involved in a
crash in California that sent her and her
assistant to a hospital. They were on
their way to a shoot for the film “Liz and
Dick” when Lohan’s Porsche collided
with a dump truck on the Pacific Coast
Highway. Neither was seriously injured
and Lohan resumed shooting later in the
day.
The accident remains under investiga-
tion; police have said they are trying to
determine who was driving.
The actress, best known for roles in
“Freaky Friday” and “Mean Girls,” was
cleared in May of allegations that she
struck a Hollywood nightclub manager
with her car. Los Angeles prosecutors
refused to file charges, stating there was
no evidence an accident occurred and
citing doubts about the manager’s credi-
bility.
5 11 28 34 39 15
Mega number
Sept. 19 Super Lotto Plus
Lindsay Lohan
3
Thursday • Sept. 20, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
Advertisement
SAN CARLOS
Stolen vehicle. A vehicle was stolen on the 100
block of Glenn Way before 6 a.m. Tuesday,
Sept. 18.
DUI. A man was cited and released for driving
drunk on Holly Street and Shoreway Road
before 4:20 a.m. on Sunday, Sept. 16.
Accident. An accident occurred on the 1000
block of Holly Street before 10:04 p.m. on
Thursday, Sept. 13.
Vehicle burglaries. Seven vehicles were broken
into via smashed windows at the Wheeler and
Clark plazas on the 600 and 700 blocks of
Laurel Street between 7 p.m. and 9 p.m. on
Wednesday, Sept. 12.
Reckless driving. A juvenile was arrested for
driving recklessly on Holly Street and Old
County Road before 10:35 p.m. Tuesday, Sept.
11.
MENLO PARK
Gun shots. Gun shots were fired on University
Avenue and Bayfront Expressway before 11:46
p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 12. Local police found
shell casings.
Robbery. Two juveniles were arrested and
booked for robbery on the 1600 block of Marsh
Road before 5:49 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 11.
Fraud. Fraud was reported on the 1000 block of
Cambridge Avenue before 4:32 p.m. Tuesday,
Sept. 11.
Petty theft. The registration tabs off a vehicle’s
license plate were stolen on the 2800 block of
Sand Hill Road before 3:11 p.m. Tuesday, Sept.
11.
Police reports
Everyone’s a critic
A student wrote a disturbing poem on the
first block of Mangini Way in Burlingame
before 3:13 p.m. on Friday, Sept. 14.
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
A Menlo-Atherton English teacher and a
sixth grade teacher from Roosevelt were rec-
ognized yesterday as the 2013 San Mateo
County Teachers of the Year.
Marei Kane, an English and English lan-
guage development teacher at Menlo-
Atherton High School was chosen as the 2013
San Mateo County Teacher of the Year for
middle/high school category. Sarah Coyle, a
sixth grade language arts and social studies
teacher at Roosevelt Elementary School in
the Redwood City, was selected as the 2013
San Mateo County Teacher of the Year for
elementary education.
“Ms. Kane is remarkable for her many
skills and talents, but in particular, for how
she meets the needs of all learners, scaffold-
ing rigorous and engaging lessons for stu-
dents of all abilities. Her approach with dif-
ferentiated instruction provides the necessary
support for all her students to realize suc-
cess,” County Superintendent Anne Campbell
wrote in a press release.
Kane, who immigrated to the United States
from Germany as a child, joined the M-A
staff in 1998. Today, she teaches two very dif-
ferent groups of students both of whom chal-
lenge her. She has the pleasure of working
with both the advanced placement English
students and teens who are working to truly
learn the language.
Kane said she went into teaching because
she enjoys watching students learn.
“It’s an exciting thing,” she said.
Kane graduated cum laude from San
Francisco State University in 1986, earning
her bachelor’s degree in English literature.
She followed that up with two single subject
credentials, one in English and one in
German. She has taught in the San Francisco
Unified and Jefferson Elementary school dis-
tricts before joining Sequoia Union.
Kane enjoys bringing a global perspective
into her classroom. She also enjoys that M-A
is a campus that represents a cross section of
cultures and economic backgrounds. When
not teaching, Kane enjoys traveling and hik-
ing. The mother of an adult daughter, Kane is
also teaching herself to play the guitar.
Coyle was also surprised to be honored.
She thought it was a mistake for a full day,
Coyle said with a laugh.
She joined teaching at the encouragement
of the youngest of her two sons. At the time,
Coyle was doing day care at home. He want-
ed to stop sharing toys and asked if Coyle
could do her job outside their home. Teaching
seemed like a logical step.
For Coyle, the biggest challenge is finding
ways to connect with each child. This also
happens to be what she enjoys most about her
job. Sharing her own passions, Coyle said,
seems to be one way to really get children
invested.
“I don’t feel like I do anything different
than what anyone else would do,” she said. “I
love coming to work. I love my students.
Who wouldn’t go above and beyond for
them?”
To support the needs of struggling learners,
Coyle established an after-school home-
work/tutoring club two days a week utilizing
the talents of volunteers she trains herself.
Students who participate in the tutoring club
receive homework assistance and individual
instruction as needed.
“Ms. Coyle is a committed professional
whose high expectations for her students
result in their buoyed confidence and measur-
able academic growth. Her enthusiasm and
creativity combine to produce a fun and
adventurous learning environment,”
Campbell said.
Coyle holds her bachelor’s degree in liber-
al arts from the California State University at
Hayward and a multi-subject credential and
master’s in English from Notre Dame de
Namur University. She began teaching at
Roosevelt in 2008. Without the supportive
environment at her school, Coyle said the
work she does wouldn’t be possible.
Heather Murtagh can be reached by email:
heather@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: (650)
344-5200 ext. 105.
Two named county teachers of the year
“I don’t feel like I do anything different
than what anyone else would do. ... I love coming to work. I
love my students.Who wouldn’t go above and beyond for them?”
—Sarah Coyle, a sixth grade language arts and
social studies teacher at Roosevelt Elementary School
4
Thursday • Sept. 20, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
5
Thursday • Sept. 20, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE/NATION
Wells Fargo SBA Lending
Your community
counts on
small businesses
And you can count on Wells Fargo for the
lnancing you nccd.
Wells Fargo SBA Lending has dedicated specialists
near you ready to work with small businesses to
Lcl¡ LLcm giow.
Call us Loday and gcL LLc lnancing you dcscivc.
Ioi discussion ¡ui¡oscs only.
All lnancing sub|ccL Lo cicdiL a¡¡ioval
by LLc Wclls Iaigo SIA Icnding giou¡.
¡ zo1z Wclls Iaigo Iank, N.A.
All iigLLs icscivcd. Mcmbci IÐIC.
ICC-;z(88;. AI-¸-1o{oq
Together we’ll go far
JoLn Ignacio
(1¸-qo¸-o8¸(
CITY GOVERNMENT
• Burlingame is looking for two
people to serve on the Traffic Safety
Parking Commission.
Commissioners offer their ideas and
recommendations to the City
Council and staff. The council is like-
ly to appoint commissioners to the
full three-year term. Applications are available at
www.burlingame.org. The deadline to apply is Nov. 9. For
more information contact Ana Silva at 558-7204.
By Judy Lin
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO — California elec-
tions officials hope to make signing up to
vote easier than ever through an online
registration system that launched
Wednesday.
Secretary of State Debra Bowen called
the new process "great news for democra-
cy." She was joined by state lawmakers
and voter advocates in Sacramento to
announce the web feature, which is being
made available for the first time ahead of
the November election.
Supporters say it will help more than 6
million Californians who are qualified but
have not registered. Republicans had
opposed the bill that created complete
online registration, saying the change
could lead to voter fraud and additional
costs.
Under the new law, applicants can fill
out a traditional paper form or complete a
form online through the secretary of
state's website or at
www.registertovote.ca.gov . The applica-
tion, which will include date of birth and
the last four digits of the Social Security
number, will be checked against their dri-
ver's license or the state identification
card kept by the California Department of
Motor Vehicles.
If the information matches, an electron-
ic image of the applicant's DMV signa-
ture will be added to the application at the
end of the process.
If no signature is on file with the DMV,
applicants will have to print out the form
and mail the completed version to their
county elections office. That essentially is
the same process in place now.
"Today, the Internet replaces the mail-
box for thousands of Californians wish-
ing to register to vote," Bowen said dur-
ing a news conference.
She stressed that completing an online
application does not lead to automatic
registration. The information still has to
be verified by county elections officials
before an applicant is added to the voter
rolls.
Assemblyman Dan Logue, R-Linda,
who serves as vice chairman of the
Assembly elections committee and voted
against the bill, said the online system
opens up the state to more potential voter
fraud.
"I think California has to be careful
with that type of legislation. It could be
detrimental to the democratic process,"
Logue said. "Even in Arizona where they
have the online registration, they require
proof of citizenship. We don't even have
that."
The lawmaker blamed Democrats like
Bowen for politicizing the process to ben-
efit their party. "I think we're going to find
a lot of abuses in the system over the next
few years," he said.
Californians have until Oct. 22 to regis-
ter for the Nov. 6 general election, which
features the presidential race and 11
statewide ballot initiatives.
The online application process is the
result of legislation passed last year,
SB397 by state Sen. Leland Yee, D-San
Francisco/San Mateo.
State allows complete voter registration online
PHOTO COURTESY OF THE OFFICE OF LELAND YEE
State Sen. Leland Yee, D-San Francisco/San Mateo, speaks at
a Redwood City press conference announcing the launch of
online voter registration in California while Mark Church,chief
elections officer and assessor-county clerk-recorder of San
Mateo County, at left, and Supervisor Dave Pine, right, Jackie
Jacobberger of the League of Women Voters and Raymond
Parenti-Kurttila of San Francisco State University Associated
Students listen.
By Juliet Williams
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO — The Federal
Railroad Administration gave its
approval Wednesday for construction on
the first phase of California’s high-speed
rail system, clearing the final technical
hurdle for construction to start next year
on a 65-mile span from Merced to
Fresno.
The decision supports the California
High-Speed Rail Authority’s so-called
hybrid alternative, which state officials
say is the least costly approach and the
one that is least harmful to the environ-
ment. Rail authority Chief Executive
Officer Jeff Morales said the federal
decision will allow the project to break
ground next year.
“This is now a statewide rail modern-
ization plan which will not only deliver
high-speed rail but also will invest bil-
lions of dollars of improvements to local
and regional rail systems around the state
immediately,” Morales said.
Federal officials reviewed the plan to
ensure compliance with dozens of feder-
al regulations, including the Endangered
Species Act, U.S. Fish and Wildlife reg-
ulations and the National Historic
Preservation Act. The plan also requires
the rail authority to provide financial
compensation for environmental damage
such as increased pollution or harm to
wetlands and water sources.
Lawmakers approved the first phase of
the planned 800-mile line this summer,
allowing the state to begin selling $2.6
billion in bonds for construction of the
initial 130-mile segment of the bullet
train in the Central Valley.
It also allowed the state to tap $3.2 bil-
lion from the federal government.
Feds approve first leg
of state high-speed rail
Justice Dept faulted
in gun-trafficking operation
WASHINGTON — The Justice
Department’s internal watchdog on
Wednesday faulted the agency for mis-
guided strategies, errors in judgment and
management failures during a bungled
gun-trafficking probe in Arizona that dis-
regarded public safety and resulted in
hundreds of weapons turning up at crime
scenes in the U.S. and Mexico.
A former head of the department’s
Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms
and Explosives and a deputy assistant
attorney general in Justice’s criminal divi-
sion in Washington left the department
upon the report’s release — the first by
retirement, the second by resignation.
In the 471-page report, Inspector
General Michael Horowitz referred more
than a dozen people for possible depart-
ment disciplinary action for their roles in
Operation Fast and Furious and a sepa-
rate, earlier probe known as Wide
Receiver, undertaken during the George
W. Bush administration.
Around the nation
6
Thursday • Sept. 20, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/NATION
Kaiser earns performance honor
Kaiser Permanente’s medical center in South
San Francisco and Redwood City were recog-
nized for a commitment to safe, high quality
and effective care. The Joint Commission, the
leading accreditor of health care organizations
in America, named the hospitals among the
nation’s Top Performers on Key Quality
Measures for 2011 performance in the annual
report “Improving America’s Hospitals”
released Wednesday.
The two Kaiser Permanente hospitals were
recognized by The Joint Commission for
exemplary performance in using evidence-
based clinical processes that are shown to
improve care for certain conditions, including
heart attack, heart failure, pneumonia, surgical
care, children’s asthma and stroke.
“Every day, the staff at our two hospitals,
South San Francisco and Redwood City, work
hard to provide our patients and members with
safe, high-quality, affordable world-class
health care,” said Frank Beirne, senior vice
president and San Mateo area manager. “This
Joint Commission Top Performer award
acknowledges their diligence.”
The Top Performer on Key Quality
Measures comes as Kaiser Permanente
Redwood City is building a brand new hospital
in Redwood City, which is to open in late
2014.
PG&E to vent natural gas in Belmont
Pacific Gas and Electric will vent natural gas
for approximately 30-45 minutes the morning
of Friday, Sept. 21 in Belmont near the State
Route 92 and Interstate 280 interchange to per-
form work on sections of pipe.
PG&E reports customers in the area may
smell natural gas and hear the sound of it vent-
ing from the pipe. It will quickly dissipate into
the atmosphere and is not harmful, according
to PG&E.
For more information call (800) 743-5000.
San Carlos man missing
The San Mateo County Sheriff’s Office is
asking residents to be on the lookout for a
missing San Carlos man.
Dereck Ohlsen, 25, was
last seen the evening of
Sept. 4 at his residence in
San Carlos. Ohlsen is
known to take long walks
throughout San Mateo
County and had mentioned
to family he wanted to walk
to San Jose to visit his
grand parents, according to
police.
Anyone with information of Dereck’s loca-
tion is asked to contact San Mateo County
Sheriff’s Office Missing Persons Detective Ken
Clayton at (650) 363-4050 or (650) 363-4911.
Search for missing
San Mateo man continues
Family members of a retired San Francisco
firefighter who disappeared from an Amtrak
train last week are continu-
ing to search for him in
towns along the tracks in
Colorado and Nebraska.
Charles “Charlie” Dowd,
69, of San Mateo, was last
seen by an Amtrak conduc-
tor on Thursday evening
somewhere near Omaha,
Neb., according to Dowd’s
wife Patricia.
Wednesday, the couple’s
son and daughter, who organized search parties
this week in Omaha and Lincoln, are following
up on reports that a passenger might have seen
Dowd standing near a door of the moving train
around 11 p.m. Thursday.
Local briefs
Charles Dowd
By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Nearly 6 million
Americans — significantly more than first
estimated— will face a tax penalty under
President Barack Obama’s health overhaul for
not getting insurance, congressional analysts
said Wednesday. Most would be in the middle
class.
The new estimate amounts to an inconven-
ient fact for the administration, a reminder of
what critics see as broken promises.
The numbers from the nonpartisan
Congressional Budget Office are 50 percent
higher than a previous projection by the same
office in 2010, shortly after the law passed.
The earlier estimate found 4 million people
would be affected in 2016, when the penalty is
fully in effect.
That’s still only a sliver of the population,
given that more than 150 million people cur-
rently are covered by employer plans.
Nonetheless, in his first campaign for the
White House, Obama pledged not to raise
taxes on individuals making less than
$200,000 a year and couples making less than
$250,000.
And the budget office analysis found that
nearly 80 percent of those who’ll face the
penalty would be making up to or less than
five times the federal poverty level. Currently
that would work out to $55,850 or less for an
individual and $115,250 or less for a family of
four.
Average penalty: about $1,200 in 2016.
“The bad news and broken promises from
Obamacare just keep piling up,” said Rep.
Dave Camp, R-Mich., chairman of the House
Ways and Means Committee, who wants to
repeal the law.
Starting in 2014, virtually every legal resi-
dent of the U.S. will be required to carry
health insurance or face a tax penalty, with
exemptions for financial hardship, religious
objections and certain other circumstances.
Most people will not have to worry about the
requirement since they already have coverage
through employers, government programs like
Medicare or by buying their own policies.
A spokeswoman for the Obama administra-
tion said 98 percent of Americans will not be
affected by the tax penalty — and suggested
that those who will be should face up to their
civic responsibilities.
“This (analysis) doesn’t change the basic
fact that the individual responsibility policy
will only affect people who can afford health
care but choose not to buy it,” said Erin
Shields Britt of the Health and Human
Services Department. “We’re no longer going
to subsidize the care of those who can afford
to buy insurance but make a choice not to buy
it.”
Tax penalty to hit nearly 6
million uninsured people
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — The Department of
Veterans Affairs has approved $28.4 million
in grants to fund 38 projects in 25 states and
the District of Columbia that will provide
transitional housing to homeless Veterans.
Among these 38 projects, 31 will provide
temporary housing to homeless Veterans
with the goal that they will retain the resi-
dence as their own.
“As we drive toward our goal to end
homelessness among Veterans by 2015,
VA continues to find innovative ways to
permanently house Veterans who were
formerly homeless,” said VA Secretary
Eric K. Shinseki. “Under President
Obama’s leadership, we have made
incredible strides in creating programs to
aid these brave men and women who have
served our Nation so well.”
Thirty-one of the grants were awarded
through VA’s Homeless Providers Grant and
Per Diem Program’s (GPD) “Transition in
Place” model.
The program allows Veterans the oppor-
tunity to take over payment of a lease
instead of moving out after using VA serv-
ices—substance use counseling, mental
health services, job training and more.
Other VA programs require Veterans living
in transitional housing to move out after 24
months. A list of the grant recipients can be
found at: http://www.va.gov/HOME-
LESS/GPD.asp.
GPD helps close gaps in available housing
for the nation’s most vulnerable homeless
Veterans, including women with children,
Indian tribal populations, and Veterans with
substance use and mental health issues.
VA approves $28 million in
grants for homeless veterans
Dereck Ohlsen
NATION 7
Thursday • Sept. 20, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
PIGSKIN
Pick ‘em Contest
We are not responsible for late, damaged, illegible or lost entries. Multiple entries are accepted. One prize per household. All applicable Federal, State & Local taxes associated
with the receipt or use of any prize are the sole responsibility of the winner. The prizes are awarded “as is” and without warranty of any kind, express or implied. The Daily
Journal reserves the right in its sole discretion to disqualify any individual it finds to be tampering with the entry process or the operation of the promotion; to be acting in vio-
lation of the rules; or to be acting in an unsportsmanlike manner. Entry constitutes agreement for use of name & photo for publicity purposes. Employees of the Daily Journal,
Redwood General Tire Pros, Broadway Grill, and Original Nick’s are not eligible to win. Must be at least 18 years of age. Call with questions or for clarification (650) 344-5200.
Each winner, by acceptance of the prize, agrees to release the Daily Journal, Redwood General Tire Pros, Broadway Grill, and Original Nick’s from all liability, claims, or actions
of any kind whatsoever for injuries, damages, or losses to persons and property which may be sustained in connection with the receipt, ownership, or use of the prize.
THE DAILY JOURNAL
Redwood General Tire Pros,
Broadway Grill and Original Nick’s Pizzeria & Pub
PRESENT THE EIGHTH ANNUAL
PIGSKIN
Pick ‘em Contest
Week THREE
PICK THE MOST NFL WINNERS AND WIN! DEADLINE IS 9/21/12
San Francisco Minnesota
Detroit Tennessee
Jacksonville Indianapolis
St. Louis Chicago
Buffalo Cleveland
Cincinnati Washington
Kansas City New Orleans
NY Jets Miami
Tampa Bay Dallas
Atlanta San Diego
Pittsburgh Oakland
Houston Denver
Philadelphia Arizona
New England Baltimore
Green Bay Seattle
TIEBREAKER: Green Bay @ Seattle __________
ROAD TEAM HOME TEAM ROAD TEAM HOME TEAM
How does it work?
Each Monday thru Friday we will list the upcoming weeks’ games. Pick the winners of each game
along with the point total of the Monday night game. In case of a tie, we will look at the point
total on the Monday night game of the week. If there’s a tie on that total, then a random drawing
will determine the winner. Each week, the Daily Journal will reward gift certificates to Redwood
General Tire Pros, Broadway Grill and Original Nick’s. The Daily Journal Pigskin Pick’em Contest
is free to play. Must be 18 or over. Winners will be announced in the Daily Journal.
What is the deadline?
All mailed entries must be postmarked by the Friday prior to the weekend of games, you may
also drop off your entries to our office by Friday at 5 p.m. sharp.
Send entry form to: 800 S. Claremont Street, #210, San Mateo, CA 94402. You may enter as many
times as you like using photocopied entry forms. Multiple original entry forms will be discarded.
You may also access entry entry forms at www.scribd.com/smdailyjournal
NAME ____________________________________
AGE _____________________________________
CITY _____________________________________
PHONE ___________________________________
Mail or drop off by 9/21/12 to:
Pigskin Pick’em, Daily Journal,
800 S. Claremont Street, #210,
San Mateo, CA 94402
The Daily Journal will not use
your personal information for
marketing purposes. We respect
your privacy.
By Jennifer Agiesta and Nancy Benac
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Still sour on the state of
the U.S. economy, Americans are nonetheless
heading into the home stretch to Election Day
feeling better about the country’s future and
about how President Barack Obama is doing
his job, a new Associated Press-GfK poll
shows.
Republican rival Mitt Romney, meanwhile,
has lost his pre-convention edge on the econo-
my amid a flurry of distractions that have
taken him on a detour from the central mes-
sage of his campaign.
For all of that, neither candidate has man-
aged to break away in the drum-tight presi-
dential race.
Obama is supported by 47 percent of likely
voters and Romney by 46 percent, according
to the poll. The survey was ending just as
word surfaced of Romney’s caught-on-tape
comment that he doesn’t worry about the 47
percent of people who pay no income taxes,
describing them as believing they are victims
and dependent on government.
The poll results vividly underscore the
importance that turnout will play in determin-
ing the victor in Campaign 2012: Among all
adults, Obama has a commanding lead,
favored by 52 percent of Americans to just 37
percent for Romney.
That gap virtually vanishes among likely
voters, promising an all-out fight to gin up
enthusiasm among core supporters and domi-
nate get-out-the-vote operations.
Voters sour on economy,
Obama jobs approval up
By Steve Peoples
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
MIAMI — Facing tough questions about his
commitment to all Americans, Republican
presidential nominee Mitt Romney declared
Wednesday that his campaign supports “the
100 percent in America.”
Romney was responding at a televised
forum to questions sparked by his remarks last
spring that, as a candidate, “my job is not to
worry about” the 47 percent of Americans
who don’t earn enough to pay income taxes
and are likely to support President Barack
Obama. He also described them as people who
are “dependent upon government, who believe
that they are victims, who believe they are
entitled” to a wide range
of benefits.
In the days since the
magazine Mother Jones
posted the secretly taped
comments to donors, the
Romney campaign has
tried to fend off criticism
that the Republican candi-
date was writing off near-
ly half the country or was
disdainful of them.
Earlier in the day, Romney tried to draw a
distinction between himself and Obama. “The
question of this campaign is not who cares
about the poor and the middle class. I do. He
does,” Romney said at an Atlanta fundraiser.
Romney supports ‘100
percent in America’
Mitt Romney
REUTERS
Barack Obama mentions the Catwalk for a Cure charity program during a reception for members
of the 2011 WNBA champion Minnesota Lynx at the White House in Washington, D.C.
NATION/WORLD 8
Thursday • Sept. 20, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Volunteer
www. ossmc.org

Looking for a challenging volunteer
opportunity?
Interested in helping the aging
community?
Investigate Advocate
By Jamey Keaten
and Lori Hinnant
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PARIS — France stepped up security
Wednesday at its embassies across the
Muslim world after a French satirical
weekly revived a formula that it has
already used to capture attention:
Publishing crude, lewd caricatures of
Islam’s Prophet Muhammad.
Wednesday’s issue of the provocative
satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo, whose
offices were firebombed last year,
raised concerns that France could face
violent protests like the ones targeting
the United States over an amateur
video produced in California that have
left at least 30 people dead.
The drawings, some of which depict-
ed Muhammad naked and in demean-
ing or pornographic poses, were met
with a swift rebuke by the French gov-
ernment, which warned the magazine
could be inflaming tensions, even as it
reiterated France’s free speech protec-
tions.
The principle of freedom of expres-
sion “must not be infringed,” Foreign
Minister Laurent Fabius said, speaking
on France Inter radio.
But he added: “Is it pertinent, intelli-
gent, in this context to pour oil on the
fire? The answer is no.”
Anger over the film “Innocence of
Muslims” has fueled violent protests
from Asia to Africa. In the Lebanese
port city of Tyre, tens of thousands of
people marched in the streets
Wednesday, chanting “Oh, America,
you are God’s enemy!”
Worried France might be targeted,
the government ordered its embassies,
cultural centers, schools and other offi-
cial sites to close on Friday — the
Muslim holy day — in 20 countries. It
also immediately shut down its
embassy and the French school in
Tunisia, the site of deadly protests at
the U.S. Embassy last week.
The French Foreign Ministry issued
a travel warning urging French citizens
in the Muslim world to exercise “the
greatest vigilance,” avoiding public
gatherings and “sensitive buildings.”
The controversy could prove tricky
for France, which has struggled to inte-
grate its Muslim population, Western
Europe’s largest. Many Muslims
believe the Prophet Muhammad should
not be depicted at all — even in a flat-
tering way — because it might encour-
age idolatry.
Muhammad cartoons inflame tensions
By Paul Schemm
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
TEL RIFAAT, Syria — The bearded
gunmen who surrounded the car full
of foreign journalists in a northern
Syrian village were clearly not
Syrians. A heavyset man in a brown
gown stepped forward, announced he
was Iraqi and fingered through the
American passport he had confiscated.
“We know all American journalists
are spies. Now tell us what you are
doing here and who you are spying
for,” he said in English before going
on to accuse the U.S. of the destruc-
tion of Iraq and Afghanistan.
“I really want to cut your head off
right now,” he added, telling his men,
many of whom appeared to have
North African accents, that this
American kills Muslims.
With the intervention of nearby vil-
lagers, the confrontation eventually
was defused. But it underscored the
unpredictable element that foreign
fighters bring to the Syrian conflict.
Most of those fighting the regime of
President Bashar Assad are ordinary
Syrians and soldiers who have defect-
ed, having become fed up with the
authoritarian government, analysts
say. But increasingly, foreign fighters
and those adhering to an extremist
Islamist ideology are turning up on the
front lines. The rebels are trying to
play down their influence for fear of
alienating Western support, but as the
18-month-old fight grinds on, the
influence of these extremists is set to
grow.
On Monday, a U.N. panel reported a
rise in the number of foreign fighters
in the conflict and warned that it could
radicalize the rebellion.
The Syrian government has always
blamed the uprising on foreign terror-
ists, despite months of peaceful
protests by ordinary citizens that only
turned violent after repeated attacks
by security forces. The transformation
of the conflict into an open war has
given an opening to the foreign fight-
ers and extremists.
Talk about the role of foreign
jihadists in the Syrian civil war began
in earnest, however, with the rise in
suicide bombings. U.S. National
Director of Intelligence James
Clapper said in February that those
attacks “bore the earmarks” of the
jihadists in neighboring Iraq.
Extremists showing up
on front lines in Syria
REUTERS
Free Syrian Army fighters prepare their machinegun in al-Ezaa front line in Aleppo.
FDA urged to set
guidance levels
for arsenic in rice
By Mary Clare Jalonick
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — The Food and Drug Administration may
consider new standards for the levels of arsenic in rice as con-
sumer groups are calling for federal guidance on how much of
the carcinogen can be present in food.
So far, FDA officials say they have found no evidence that sug-
gests rice is unsafe to eat. The agency has studied the issue for
decades but is in the middle of conducting a new study of 1,200
samples of grocery-store rice products — short and long-grain
rice, adult and baby cereals, drinks and even rice cakes — to
measure arsenic levels.
Rice is thought to have arsenic in higher levels than most other
foods because it is grown in water on the ground, optimal condi-
tions for the contaminant to be absorbed in the rice. There are no
federal standards for how much arsenic is allowed in food.
Arsenic is naturally present in water, air, food and soil in two
forms, organic and inorganic. According to the FDA, organic
arsenic passes through the body quickly and is essentially harm-
less. Inorganic arsenic — the type found in some pesticides and
insecticides — can be toxic and may pose a cancer risk if con-
sumed at high levels or over a long period.
How much organic and inorganic arsenic rice eaters are con-
suming, and whether those levels are dangerous, still remains to
be seen.
FDA Commissioner Margaret Hamburg says consumers
shouldn’t stop eating rice, though she does encourage a diverse
diet just in case.
“Our advice right now is that consumers should continue to eat
a balanced diet that includes a wide variety of grains — not only
for good nutrition but also to minimize any potential conse-
quences from consuming any one particular food,” she said.
REUTERS
Farmers plant rice sprouts in a paddy field in Thailand’s
Suphan Buri province.
OPINION 9
Thursday • Sept. 20, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Muslim unrest
Editor,
The whole Muslim world is exploding
with unrest and violence. Mobs are con-
ducting violent protests against the
United States. “America go to hell” is on
signs and shouted in slogans. The admin-
istration insists this is “spontaneous and
unplanned as a result of a movie that no
one has seen.” They further insist that
this has nothing to do with our foreign
policy. They could be right. The only
foreign policy that I know about is:
“Osama is dead and GM is alive.” How
could that incite riots and trigger animos-
ity? Maybe the president should cancel
the Letterman interview and attend a
security briefing. He might even find
time to talk to Netanyahu.
Keith C. De Filippis
San Jose
Bay Meadows
Editor,
Deep in Bill Silverfarb’s article
“Nueva School recruiting its first fresh-
man class in the Sept. 14 edition of the
Daily Journal, is this sentence: “the city
is ready to issue the first building permits
this month for a townhome development
on the sprawling site where a horse rac-
ing track once stood.”
A horse racing track? What horse rac-
ing track? Gee whiz. Being a poor, old,
steady, reliable agricultural entity, sport-
ing venue, family entertainment center,
financial supporter of the World War II
effort, decades-long employer, tax rev-
enue supplier for the city and county of
San Mateo along with the 74 years of
history that is Bay Meadows race track
didn’t even merit being referred to by
name in this article.
Instead “where a horse racing track
once stood” was the pitiful acknowledge-
ment historic Bay Meadows race track
and Bill Kyne’s contributions to this
community deserved?
Shameful.
Linda Slocum Lara
San Mateo
World Alzheimer’s month
Editor,
September is world Alzheimer’s
month. I have slowly seen my mother
robbed of her independence and memo-
ries over the course of the last 10 years.
No one deserves to end their life this
way: not knowing their family or loved
ones and unable to manage even the sim-
plest of daily tasks. Even if you have not
been impacted by this terrible disease, I
am sure that you know someone that has.
Thirty-six million people worldwide
are living with dementia and more than 5
million Americans are living with
Alzheimer’s disease, which is the most
common form of dementia. Currently
there is no way to prevent, cure or slow
the progression of this disease. World
Alzheimer’s Month is our chance to join
the global fight against Alzheimer’s.
Please support my mother Margaret
Sharp and the millions of people facing
Alzheimer’s by wearing purple in an
effort to spread awareness on Sept. 21 —
Alzheimer’s Action Day.
If you or someone you know is seek-
ing support please contact the
Alzheimer’s Association at (800) 272-
900 or visit www.alz.org.
Sandra Sharp
Burlingame
The letter writer is a volunteer with
the Alzheimer’s Association Advocacy.
Lies and distortions
Editor,
Scott Abramson’s letter (“U.S.
Embassy stormed” in the Sept. 13 edi-
tion of the Daily Journal) reminds me of
Reagan’s famous remark, “Here you go
again!”
It isn’t always easy to tell if Mr.
Abramson simply doesn’t know better,
or uses every opportunity to ignore facts
and twist things around, hoping that
some gullible souls will buy his attacks
on our duly elected president. If you
have at least made it through high
school, you should know that the presi-
dent doesn’t dole out money. That’s
Congress’ responsibility. There are rea-
sons for foreign aid, not always obvious
to others, but those amounts are dwarfed
by our spending on unnecessary wars
and excessive military.
Thank goodness we now have a presi-
dent who stays calm and thinks before
he issues statements with consequences.
Republican hopeful Romney has a lot to
learn here too. While on a losing cam-
paign track, Romney uses every opportu-
nity he can to attack Obama — with no
regard for the facts or the damage done.
When we are faced with international
crises, we should stay united and let the
elected officials handle it. Anything else
is unpatriotic and irresponsible.
Mitt Romney keeps demonstrating that
he has no presidential potential, while
Obama reminds us how important it is
for us to re-elect him — for the good of
the country, and for a safer world.
Oh yes, it now looks like an American
Christian was behind the movie that
served as an excuse for Islamists to
attack us.
Jorg Aadahl
San Mateo
Letters to the editor
— The Clarion-Ledger, Jackson, Miss.
E
leven years after the 9/11
attacks, regular reminders about
that awful day persist, whenev-
er you pass through an airport, see the
altered Manhattan skyline or hear about
the latest casualties in Afghanistan. Less
visibly, millions of security cameras
track your movements, and the govern-
ment has amassed vast powers to snoop
on you.
But the palpable sense of fear that
gripped the nation has dissipated, and
terrorism has taken a back seat to the
economy and other issues in the presi-
dential campaign, something that would
have been unimaginable in the fall of
2001.
As important as the economy is, ter-
rorism shouldn't be relegated to an after-
thought. Of the many things done fol-
lowing 9/11, some were smart (reinforc-
ing cockpit doors on jetliners) and some
were silly (the color-coded alert sys-
tem). After 11 years, it's time to reassess
the threat and recalibrate the responses.
The threat has evolved. Osama bin
Laden is dead, and his al-Qaida organi-
zation is on the ropes, far less able to
mount a 9/11-style attack. Its effort to
recruit Muslims in the U.S. for terrorism
has mostly been a flop.
At the same time, the threat is far
from eradicated. Bin Laden's successor,
Ayman al-Zawahri, remains at large.
The Taliban, which sheltered bin Laden
before 9/11, continues trying to reclaim
power in Afghanistan. Radical Islamists
are seeking a foothold in failing states
in the Middle East and Africa. A show-
down over Iran's nuclear program could
bring about a resurgence of Iranian-
sponsored terrorism, either from Tehran
or its Hezbollah allies. Then there's the
continuing danger from home-grown
terrorists, be they self-activated jihadists
like Fort Hood shooter Nidal Hasan or
non-Muslim anti-government fanatics.
Former New Jersey governor Thomas
Kean, who co-chaired the 9/11
Commission, tells us "this is exactly the
right time" to re-examine the threat and
response. He'd like to see Congress do
the job itself.
But if that can't happen — either
because members are too partisan or
find it impossible to decide what not to
do — then the job should go to another
independent commission, which could
provide the necessary political cover.
Reassessing anti-terrorism efforts
Jail will not bring
long-lasting safety
By Manuel La Fontaine and Sharifa Wilson
“J
ail did not help in my recovery or rehabilitation. If
anything, it made it difficult for me to keep my
family intact,” said Pam Strong, an East Palo Alto
resident at a recent San Mateo County
Board of Supervisors meeting challenging
the proposal to build a new jail. “Instead
of providing me with treatment for my
drug addiction and mental health issues,
they locked me up.”
An expensive new jail is not an answer
to the issues raised by Strong. Many San
Mateo county residents already know this.
Sheriff Greg Munks and District Attorney
Steve Wagstaffe insist that millions of
dollars toward people’s failures and a new
jail (and their departments) is exactly what we need. We need
to shift from failed measures that distort the nature of vio-
lence in our communities and move toward initiatives that
heal and restore dignity.
Sheriff Munks stated, in a video interview in the Peninsula
Press in June 2011, that 70 percent of people arrested had
substance abuse problems, more than 22 percent had mental
health issues, and more than 60 percent were unemployed.
Jail cannot solve any of these underlying problems and, in
fact, the trauma of living in a cage often makes them worse.
As the county’s Health System wrote in response to the jail
planning, “The research evidence is strong that despite the
best treatment that can be provided while people are in cus-
tody, people with mental illness do not get better in institu-
tions, particularly in jails, which tend to be difficult even for
people without mental illness.”
The incarceration of Pam Strong was not a question of pub-
lic safety, but rather a reactionary, misunderstood response by
people who don’t understand the underlying conditions peo-
ple are facing in poor and marginalized communities. Racial
profiling, immigration checkpoints and harassment of youth
in East Palo Alto, Redwood City and Daly City, has led to the
increased fear of law enforcement, constant confrontations
with police and arrests of many young people of color. The
communities who bear the brunt of these problems are deeply
impacted by county budget cuts and underfunded programs,
and are further destabilized by having people cycle in and out
of jail.
People who are incarcerated are treated in a way that is
meant to take away their dignity — and that is not a problem
that can be solved by a new jail design; it’s a problem of the
power relations between guards and prisoners. Perhaps you
think people who commit a “crime” don’t deserve to be treat-
ed with dignity. But how are people going to transform them-
selves if they experience violence in a place that is supposed
to be correcting their behavior? When people get sentenced
by a judge, they do not get sentenced to physical or psycho-
logical beatings. However, when some people decide to act
out due to mental health issues, or to demand to be treated
with respect, they are retaliated against. “Since incarcerated
people are considered the ‘bad guys’ and expendable, the
majority of correctional officers act, at best with indifference
and callousness, and at worse, with abuse and impunity
towards those they deem “non-conformist,’” said Dorsey
Nunn, a formerly-incarcerated person from East Palo Alto at
the press conference outside the recent BOS meeting. “But
this is something that is hidden from the public lens by law
enforcement, career politicians and mainstream media.” Jails
are not places for transformation, and they are not social
service providers; they are simply the places we lock away
the people we scapegoat for systemic social and economic
problems that we haven’t solved.
Besides the sheriff, district attorney and some county offi-
cials, there is little support for the jail. Just this week, 150
people turned out to a 9 a.m. weekday San Mateo County
Board of Supervisors meeting to demand they cancel funding
for the jail. Shouldn’t the public have input when considering
huge decisions like building and funding a new jail? Why not
explore alternatives to incarceration before investing in an
expensive project that has long-lasting implications? We need
to address overcrowding by reducing the amount of people
we are sending to jail in the first place. There are solutions;
we can release people who can’t make bail on their “own
recognizance” (OR), reduce bail and expand substance abuse
and mental health programs. We all want safe and healthy
communities. And we all want justice. However, it must be
applied universally across all neighborhoods, regardless of
race, gender or class. We welcome all our neighbors to join
us in building a safer San Mateo County.
Manuel La Fontaine is a native Daly City resident, and a staff
with Legal Services for Prisoners with Children, and a member
of California United for a Responsible Budget. Sharifa Wilson
is a resident and former mayor of East Palo Alto.
Other voices
Guest perspective
Manuel La
Fontaine
Follow us on Twitter and Facebook:
facebook.com/smdailyjournal
twitter.com/smdailyjournal
Onlineeditionat scribd.com/smdailyjournal
OUR MISSION:
It is the mission of the Daily Journal to be the most
accurate, fair and relevant local news source for
those who live, work or play on the MidPeninsula.
By combining local news and sports coverage,
analysis and insight with the latest business,
lifestyle, state, national and world news, we seek to
provide our readers with the highest quality
information resource in San Mateo County.
Our pages belong to you, our readers, and we
choose to reflect the diverse character of this
dynamic and ever-changing community.
SMDAILYJOURNAL.COM
Jerry Lee, Publisher
Jon Mays, Editor in Chief
Nathan Mollat, Sports Editor
Erik Oeverndiek, Copy Editor/Page Designer
Nicola Zeuzem, Production Manager
Kerry McArdle, Marketing & Events
Michelle Durand, Senior Reporter
REPORTERS:
Julio Lara, Heather Murtagh, Bill Silverfarb
Susan E. Cohn, Senior Correspondent: Events
Carrie Doung, Production Assistant
BUSINESS STAFF:
Charlotte Andersen Jim Dresser
Blanca Frasier Charles Gould
Gale Green Helen Holdun
Jeff Palter Kevin Smith
INTERNS, CORRESPONDENTS, CONTRACTORS:
Paniz Amirnasiri Dennis Brown
Carly Bertolozzi Kore Chan
Elizabeth Cortes JD Crayne
Rachel Feder Darold Fredricks
Brian Grabianowski Ashley Hansen
Kevin Harris Drake Herrador
Erin Hurley Melanie Lindow
Nick Rose Andrew Scheiner
Sally Schilling Kris Skarston
Samantha Weigel Chloee Weiner
Sangwon Yun
Letters to the Editor
Should be no longer than 250 words.
Perspective Columns
Should be no longer than 600 words.
• Illegibly handwritten letters and anonymous letters
will not be accepted.
• Please include a city of residence and phone number
where we can reach you.
• Emailed documents are preferred. No attachments
please.
• Letter writers are limited to two submissions a
month.
Opinions expressed in letters, columns and
perspectives are those of the individual writer and do
not necessarily represent the views of the Daily Journal
staff.
Correction Policy
The Daily Journal corrects its errors.
If you question the accuracy of any article in the Daily
Journal, please contact the editor at
news@smdailyjournal.com
or by phone at: 344-5200, ext. 107
Editorials represent the viewpoint of the Daily Journal
editorial board and not any one individual.
BUSINESS 10
Thursday • Sept. 20, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 13,577.96 +0.10% 10-Yr Bond 1.782 -1.66%
Nasdaq3,182.62 +0.15% Oil (per barrel) 91.730003
S&P 500 1,461.05 +0.12% Gold 1,771.90
By Daniel Wagner
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
A pair of encouraging reports about the
housing market gave U.S. stocks a little
boost Wednesday.
Home sales jumped to the highest level
in more than two years in August, the
National Association of Realtors said.
Sales rose 7.8 percent to a seasonally
adjusted annual rate of 4.82 million, the
most since May 2010.
Earlier, the government reported that
construction of single-family homes in
August also was the fastest in more than
two years.
Stocks of homebuilders, already up
after the construction report, rose sharply
after 10 a.m., when the jump in home
sales was reported. D.R. Horton Inc. rose
87 cents, or 4.1 percent, to $22.22; Beazer
Homes USA Inc. rose 22 cents, or 6.2
percent, to $3.75; and KB Home rose 46
cents, or 3.6 percent, to $13.16.
The gains for broader stock indexes
were muted. At its high for the day, the
Dow Jones industrial average was up just
62 points.
The housing numbers “are fantastic
news,” but traders continue to worry
about recent discouraging signals this
week like downgrades of railroads and a
warning from Federal Express that the
global economy is slowing, said JJ
Kinahan, chief derivatives strategist for
TD Ameritrade, a retail brokerage.
“The market is at a bit of a conun-
drum,” Kinahan said. “There are just con-
stantly these mixed signals about what’s
going on.”
The Dow closed up 13.32 points, or 0.1
percent, at 13,577.96. The Dow is just a 4
percent rally shy of its all-time high of
14,164, reached Oct. 9, 2007.
The Standard & Poor’s 500 index rose
1.73 points, or 0.1 percent, to 1,461.05.
Telecom and consumer discretionary
stocks added the most among the industry
groups in the S&P 500 index.
Energy stocks suffered as the price of
oil fell $3.31, or 3.5 percent, to $91.98 per
barrel. Traders are questioning whether
economic growth is strong enough to jus-
tify a recent run-up to $100 per barrel.
Crude is down 7 percent this week.
The Nasdaq composite index rose 4.82
points, or 0.2 percent, to 3,182.62.
Earlier, Asian and European markets
closed higher after the Bank of Japan
announced a massive asset purchasing
plan similar to what the Federal Reserve
approved last week. Japan’s main stock
index hit a four-month high.
The yield on the 10-year Treasury note
fell to 1.78 percent from 1.81 percent late
Tuesday as demand for safe investments
increased.
Stocks get a boost
Wall Street
Stocks that moved substantially or traded
heavily Wednesday on the New York Stock
Exchange and Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
Corning Inc., up 15 cents at $12.88
A Goldman Sachs analyst upgraded shares of
the glass maker to “Buy,”saying that it may see
a rise in its fourth-quarter earnings.
Webster Financial Corp., up 67 cents at $24.65
Citing a recent turnaround in its business, a
Raymond James analyst upgraded shares of
the bank holding company to “Strong Buy.”
PulteGroup Inc., up 67 cents at $16.43
Shares of the homebuilder jumped after two
positive U.S. housing reports showed that the
housing sector is slowly recovering.
United Rentals Inc., up $2.24 at $37.55
The company, which rents heavy equipment,
said that it is opening three branches in the U.S.
and two other branches in Canada.
Nasdaq
Cracker Barrel Old Country Store Inc., up $3.69
at $67.31
An increase in customers and sales helped the
casual restaurant chain nearly double its net
income in the fiscal fourth quarter.
Ascena Retail Group Inc., down 20 cents at
$20.81
The women’s retailer said fiscal fourth-quarter
net income fell 94 percent on costs related to
buying rival Charming Shoppes.
Deckers Outdoor Corp., down $2.64 at $41.31
A Sterne Agee analyst said in a note to investors
that sales on rarely discounted Ugg boots are
a troubling sign for the footwear maker.
Ramtron International Corp., up 21 cents at
$3.08
Cypress Semiconductor Corp. is buying rival
Ramtron International in a deal that values the
chip maker at about $109.8 million.
Big movers
By Christopher S. Rugaber
and Martin Crutsinger
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — A jump in sales
of previously occupied homes and fur-
ther gains in home construction sug-
gest the U.S. housing recovery is gain-
ing momentum.
The pair of reports Wednesday fol-
lows other signs of steady progress in
the housing market after years of stag-
nation. New-home sales are up, builder
confidence has reached its highest level
in more than six years and increases in
home prices appear to be sustainable.
Sales and construction rates are still
below healthy levels, economists cau-
tion. But the improvement has been
steady.
And the broader economy is likely to
benefit. When home prices rise,
Americans typically feel wealthier and
spend more — a point Federal Reserve
Chairman Ben Bernanke made last
week after the Fed unveiled a plan to
lower mortgage rates. Consumer
spending drives 70 percent of the eco-
nomic growth.
“We have a real housing recovery
taking root, and that has positive
implications for the broader econo-
my,” said Sal Guatieri, senior econo-
mist at BMO Capital Markets. “If
home prices continue to rise, so, too,
will household wealth and consumer
confidence.”
Sales of previously occupied homes
rose 7.8 percent in August from July to
a seasonally adjusted annual rate of
4.82 million, the National Association
of Realtors said Wednesday.
U.S. housing recovery gains momentum in August
HP resolves patent infringement lawsuit
NEW YORK — Computer and printer maker Hewlett-
Packard said Wednesday that it has resolved an ink cartridge
patent infringement lawsuit with Brazil’s Rio Branco Ltda.,
a distributor of Maxprint ink cartridges.
HP had filed a suit in Brazil in April 2011, alleging that
HP-compatible inkjet print cartridges were being imported
and sold in Brazil that infringed on HP patents. It described
the settlement with Rio Branca as amicable.
The settlement includes the Maxprint brand’s acknowl-
edgement that HP’s patents relating to its integrated print-
head inkjet cartridges are valid and enforceable, HP said.
HP said Maxprint has also agreed to stop selling the ink car-
tridges in question in Brazil and in other countries that offer
Maxprint cartridges.
Judge leaves U.S. sales
ban on Samsung tablet intact
SAN JOSE — A federal judge has refused to rescind a
court order banning Samsung Electronics from selling its
Galaxy Tab 10.1 computer in the U.S.
The denial issued this week in San Jose federal court is
part of a bitter battle pitting Samsung Electronics against
Apple Inc. in a dispute over the mobile devices made by the
two companies.
A jury last month awarded Apple $1.05 billion after con-
cluding several Samsung smartphones infringed on Apple’s
iPhone patents.
Groupon launches payments service in U.S.
NEW YORK — Groupon launched a payment service
Wednesday that allows businesses to accept credit cards
using an iPhone or iPod Touch, becoming the latest compa-
ny to enter the growing mobile payments market.
The announcement sent the online deals company’s stock
up nearly 14 percent. Groupon shares climbed 65 cents to
close at $5.34 Wednesday. The Chicago-based company
went public in November at a stock price of $20.
Business briefs
<< Giants’ magic number is 5, page 13
• Replacement refs aren’t more flag happy, page 13
Thursday, Sept. 20, 2012
LATE-SEASON SLUMP: THE OAKLAND A’S LOST TO DETROIT FOR SECOND STRAIGHT DEFEAT >>> PAGE 12
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
When the Pinewood girls’ volleyball team
traveled to Hillsborough to take on host Crystal
Springs Uplands School, it featured two one-
loss teams entering their West Bay Athletic
League Foothill Division opener.
Not all one-loss teams are the same, howev-
er. That was evident as Crystal Springs cruised
to a 25-17, 25-20, 25-14 victory.
“I thought we played rather well. Overall,
we played OK.,” said Crystal Springs coach
Steve Cavella. “I think our goal was … we
wanted to work on things, get some sets to
other people besides Hannah.”
That would be Hannah Kaiser, the
Gryphons’ premiere outside hitter. The 5-11
senior finished with 19 kills in three games —
nine in the first, five in Game 2 and four more
in the final set. Making her match even more
impressive is Kaiser had 19 kills on just 33
attempts with only three hitting errors.
“She had 19 kills in three games, which is
pretty ridiculous,” Cavella said.
Kaiser was far from the only effective hitter
for Crystal Springs (1-0 WBAL, 8-1 overall).
Caroline Dicioccio and Caroline Callaghan,
the Gryphons’ middle blockers, combined for
11 kills.
“A lot of our setting decisions were pretty
good,” Cavella said. “We’re running our mid-
dles a little more now. We’re trying to spread
things out, mixing things up.”
Setter Michelle Embury was the main dis-
tributor. Of the Gryphons’ 34 kills, Embury
assisted on 32 of them.
The Crystal Springs defense wasn’t bad
either. Kaiser finished with 14 digs, while
freshman libero Angelica “Geli” Du had a
team-high 22 digs. Du got to balls a lot of play-
ers don’t even attempt and while she did have
some attacks glance off her, the fact she even
got a hand on it was impressive in and of itself.
“She’s a really good player. It’s hard to step
into a starting role as freshman,” Cavella said.
“[Du] is a pretty special player. She’s really
good at reading the hitter and getting herself in
the right spots.”
Gryphons cruise to win
NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL
Crystal Springs’ Hannah Kaiser hammers home one of her 19 kills during the Gryphons’
three-game sweep in the WBAL opener for both squads. See GRYPHONS, Page 14
A
s much as the spread offense has
infiltrated the game of high school
football, the next big “thing”
appears to be the hurry-up, no-huddle
offense. No longer is it used exclusively for
two-minute drills at the end of the half.
Teams are starting to use it all game long.
Why not? Look at the success the
University of Oregon has had with it at the
college level, or what Peyton Manning did
with the Indianapolis
Colts all those years.
What about the “K-
Gun” the Buffalo
Bills ran during the
Jim Kelly heyday? All
were used to keep
defenses on the field,
to prevent defensive
substitutions and to
wear them out.
Sequoia coach Rob
Poulos said he
planned to implement
the hurry-up offense
this season, although I have yet to see the
current Cherokees in action. The other team
I know running the no-huddle is Half Moon
Bay.
After watching the Cougars beat South
City 17-2 last weekend, I asked Half Moon
Bay coach Keith Holden about it. The
answer kind of surprised me. He said the
Cougars are implementing it not because it
gives his team an advantage against a
defense but because it allows the Cougars
to make better use of their practice time.
“Where it really helps is practice,”
Holden said. “Before, we’d get five plays
(run) in five minutes. Now, we can get 12
plays in five minutes.”
The Half Moon Bay version of the no-
huddle is strictly that — no huddle. There
Playing
how you
practice
See LOUNGE, Page 14
By Janie McCauley
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SANTA CLARA — It was a natural
moment for Michael Crabtree to address his
49ers teammates — on his 25th birthday last
Friday.
When asked to say a few words on the field
after practice, Crabtree kindly obliged. And he
surprised a few of his San Francisco col-
leagues with a spot-on message: The defense
has been doing so much to carry San
Francisco, he called for the offense to match
that performance.
“He broke it down with some pretty power-
ful words for us on offense,” left tackle Joe
Staley said. “He said: ‘We have this defense
and we can’t depend on this defense anymore.
It’s time to step up as an offense.’ And I think
everybody kind of took that to heart.”
Coach Jim Harbaugh presented the wide
receiver with a celebratory red velvet cupcake
and hand-written card, a regular gesture for
players’ birthdays.
Two days later, Crabtree did his part to make
good on his challenge to the team — deliver-
ing three third-down con-
version catches in a 27-19
win by the 49ers (2-0) over
the Lions.
His teammates certainly
appreciated the thoughtful
words Friday as much as
they did the big plays
Sunday.
“The defense gets a lot
of credit, deservedly so,”
quarterback Alex Smith
said. “Especially last season, they played at a
really high level. (He) talked a lot about
offense. If you can get offense, defense and
special teams all rolling, you know how scary
it can be. Michael is the guy who has been
there, worked extremely hard. He continues to
work extremely hard, and our guys look to
him.”
Crabtree is healthy at last, and showing his
ability to make athletic possession receptions
under pressure and extend plays after the
catch. Detroit’s aggressive, physical defense
Crabtree challenged
San Francisco’s offense
By Josh Dubow
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ALAMEDA — The Oakland Raiders made
moves to bolster their banged-up secondary
on Wednesday by signing cornerback
Brandian Ross from Green Bay’s practice
squad and giving starting free safety Michael
Huff work at cornerback in practice.
The Raiders are short-handed at cornerback
after injuries to both starters. Ron Bartell
broke his shoulder blade in the opener and
was placed on the reserve-injured list that will
prevent him from playing in a game until at
least Nov. 11. The other starter, Shawntae
Spencer, left last week’s game in Miami in the
fourth quarter with a sprained right foot.
With Pat Lee and Joselio Hanson both
struggling in coverage in the loss to the
Dolphins, the Raiders needed to make some
changes in order to contend with Ben
Roethlisberger and the Pittsburgh Steelers’
dangerous passing attack.
“Next guy has to step up,” Hanson said.
“That’s why you have depth on a team. In the
NFL everybody can play, so the next guy has
to step up.”
The first move was to sign Ross, who made
the Packers’ 53-man roster out of camp but
was inactive the first game and then demoted
to the practice squad last week. Ross spent
last season on Green Bay’s practice squad as
an undrafted free agent out of Youngstown
State when Raiders general manager Reggie
McKenzie was a personnel executive with the
Packers.
McKenzie convinced Ross to stay in Green
Bay last year when another team was interest-
ed in signing him and then got him for the
Raiders.
“He’s a big guy, a physical guy, has got
some coverage skills,” coach Dennis Allen
said. “He’s a guy that Reggie knew about
from being there with him, so he was a guy
we thought could come in and compete.”
Ross said he has been able to pick up the
new defense well on his first day and is hop-
ing to be ready to contribute Sunday against
the Steelers.
Lee moved into the starting lineup when
Bartell went down with the injury against San
Diego but got pulled early in the loss in
CB Brandian Ross joins
Raiders’beat-up secondary
Michael
Crabtree
See 49ERS, Page 14 See RAIDERS, Page 13
SPORTS 12
Thursday • Sept. 20, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Ronald Blum
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Major League Baseball
appears unlikely to interfere if Melky Cabrera
wins the NL batting title while serving his 50-
game suspension for a positive drug test.
The San Francisco Giants outfielder began
Wednesday with a league-leading .346 average,
seven points ahead of Pittsburgh's Andrew
McCutchen.
Cabrera has 501 plate appearances, one fewer
than the required amount if the Giants play 162
games. Under section 10.22(a) of the Official
Baseball Rules, he would win the batting title if
an extra hitless at-bat is
added to his average and it
remains higher than that of
any other qualifying player.
“We’ll see how it all plays
out,” baseball
Commissioner Bud Selig
said Wednesday after taping
an episode of
“CenterStage” for the YES
Network. “We generally
don’t interfere in that process. We’ll take a look
at it at the end of the year.”
Cabrera, the All-Star game MVP, was sus-
pended Aug. 15 for a positive test for testos-
terone and is missing the final 45 games of the
regular season.
During the YES interview, scheduled to air for
the first time Sept. 27, Selig was asked whether
records set during the Steroids Era should be
revisited.
“You can’t change records because once you
get into that it would never stop,” Selig said. “It
would create more problems than it would
solve.”
Selig did say he was pleased an agreement
was reached Tuesday to suspend Toronto short-
stop Yunel Escobar for three games for wearing
eye-black displaying an anti-gay slur written in
Spanish during a game last weekend against
Boston.
“When something like that happens, it’s dis-
appointing,” Selig said.
Selig would not indicate whether he was clos-
er to making a decision on the dispute between
the Oakland Athletics and San Francisco Giants.
Oakland wants to build a ballpark in San Jose,
which is part of the Giants’ territory, and Selig
appointed a committee in March 2009 to evalu-
ate the issue.
Cabrera likely
free to win
batting title
Melky Cabrera
By Larry Lage
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
DETROIT — Oakland hopes it only lost a
game in the Motor City.
Brett Anderson pitched just two-plus
innings before leaving with a strained right
oblique and the Detroit Tigers went on to beat
the Athletics 6-2 on Wednesday night.
“He’s getting an MRI
right now,” A’s manager
Bob Melvin said. “So, we
won’t know anything until
he gets back.”
After walking Miguel
Cabrera intentionally and
giving Prince Fielder a
free pass on four pitches to
load the bases, Anderson
was injured while pitching
to Delmon Young. Anderson fell forward and
landed awkwardly after throwing his 48th
pitch. Oakland trainer Nick Paparesta and
Melvin talked with Anderson briefly on the
field before deciding to take him out of the
game.
“We could see earlier in the inning that he
was trying to stretch out his back, so I don’t
think the fall had anything to do with it,”
Melvin said. “We just checked him at that
point and decided we didn’t want to go any
farther with him.”
Melvin plans to pitch Dan Strally in
Anderson’s spot in the rotation if he can’t
make his next start.
Oakland, clinging to an AL wild-card spot,
has dropped three straight.
“You are never going to just speed through
a pennant race and win everything,” Melvin
said.
Cabrera homered, Omar Infante drove in
three runs and Justin Verlander pitched six
scoreless innings for the Tigers. Anderson (4-
2) gave up three runs and three hits, losing his
second straight start after winning his first
four this season.
Verlander (15-8) allowed five hits and three
walks while striking out five in a 122-pitch
outing.
“You know that he’s out there trying to go
all nine, and your only chance to get his pitch
count up,” infielder Brandon Moss said. “The
problem is that he’s still one of the best pitch-
ers in baseball, so even if you get runners on
base, you have to find a way to get them in.”
The Tigers have won two straight over the
A’s — and 28 of their last 36 games at home
— to pull within two games of AL Central-
leading Chicago White Sox.
“We played a couple good games against
one of the hottest teams in all of baseball,”
Detroit manager Jim Leyland said. “That’s
pretty good.”
Detroit’s Octavio Dotel struck out two in a
perfect seventh. Joaquin Benoit had two
strikeouts in the eighth. Jose Valverde closed
the game in a non-save situation, entering
with a six-run lead, and was booed after giv-
ing up two-out RBI singles to Cliff
Pennington and Stephen Drew.
The Tigers played some small ball to take a
3-0 lead in the third.
Andy Dirks and Gerald Laird started the
inning with bunt singles and advanced on
Austin Jackson’s groundout. Infante followed
with a double down the left-field line to put
Detroit up 2-0.
Right-hander Pat Neshek replaced
Anderson and Young promptly hit a sacrifice
fly to give the Tigers a 3-0 lead.
Detroit shortstop Jhonny Peralta had an
error in the fifth — snapping a 75-game error-
less streak — but he helped turn a double play
to end the inning. He chipped in at the plate in
the home half, hitting an RBI single to put
Detroit ahead 4-0.
Cabrera sent Jim Miller’s 94 mph high fast-
ball on an 0-2 pitch over the fence in left field
for his 41st home run and 130th RBI to bolster
his chances of being baseball’s first Triple
Crown winner since Boston’s Carl
Yastrzemski pulled off the feat in 1967.
Infante’s groundout gave the Tigers a six-
run lead in the eighth inning.
“We’ve lost back-to-back games before, this
isn’t a big deal,” Moss said.
NOTES: A’s OF Coco Crisp didn’t play
because of infections in both eyes and Melvin
is hoping his contagious ailment doesn’t
spread. “He’s got his own towels,” Melvin
said. ... Oakland 3B Brandon Inge, who the
Tigers released in April, was in Oakland’s
dugout with his sons a week after having sur-
gery on right shoulder to repair the labrum.
“I’ll be ready for spring,” Inge said. ... Melvin
said Travis Blackley will pitch Saturday at
New York.
A’s lose Anderson, game
Tigers 6, A’s 2
Brett Anderson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — Matt Cain pitched
eight solid innings to earn his career-best 15th
win, Pablo Sandoval homered for his first time
in two months and the San Francisco Giants
moved another game closer to clinching the NL
West title with a 7-1 victory over the Colorado
Rockies on Wednesday night.
Sandoval’s three-run shot in the first inning
off Tyler Chatwood (4-5) was his ninth homer
of the season and helped hand Cain (15-5)
another milestone in a season full of them. With
the second-place Dodgers splitting a double-
header in Washington, San Francisco (86-63)
lowered its magic number to clinch the division
to five.
Cain allowed four hits, struck out eight and
walked four. Chris Nelson scored Colorado’s
only run on D.J. LeMahieu’s flyout in the fifth.
Gregor Blanco added three singles and two
RBIs, and Jose Mijares pitched a perfect ninth
to give San Francisco its third straight win and
seventh in the last eight games.
Chatwood allowed eight hits and three runs in
four innings, extending his winless streak to
four straight starts as the Rockies dropped their
fifth straight.
Even seemingly unhittable pitches for
Colorado these days are proving otherwise.
Sandoval reached in front of the plate to dig
out an 0-2 slider near his ankles, pulling it off
the right-field foul pole to give the Giants a 3-0
lead in the first inning. The switch-hitting
Sandoval had gone 161 at-bats since his last
home run July 8 against Pittsburgh’s A.J.
Burnett.
In the pitcher-friendly confines of AT&T
Park, the home run was just the 24th at home for
the Giants this year, which has frustrated hitters
but also played into San Francisco’s strength.
Cain controlled Colorado’s depleted lineup in
his typical solid and steady style.The only hits
the hard-throwing righty allowed over the first
15 batters were singles by Nelson. And Cain
wriggled out of his only jam when he got Carlos
Gonzalez to ground out to second with the
bases loaded for the final out of the fifth.
Cain, often the hard-luck loser for most of his
San Francisco career, went 14-8 in 2009 and has
won at least 12 games in four of his eight sea-
sons. The National League All-Star game starter
improved to 14-0 this season when the Giants
score at least three runs.
Giants closing in on NL West title
Giants 7, Rockies 1
SPORTS 13
Thursday • Sept. 20, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Peninsula
º Loog |ast|og post0ra| chaoge
º |ocrease ath|et|c perIormaoce
º Treat repet|t|ve stress |oj0r|es
º |ocrease mob|||ty & ßex|b|||ty
$50 OFF 3 Session
Mini-Series
º Look 8etter
º Fee| 8etter
º |mprove Post0re
º |mprove 8a|aoce
º 8e||eve 0hroo|c Pain
Pa0| F|tzgera|d
™ r e f l o R d e c n a v d A d e fi i t r e C
www.peo|os0|aro|hog.com
448 h. Sao Nateo 0r|ve, Ste 3 º Sao Nateo º 650-343-0777
Yo0 doo't
have to ||ve
||ke th|s!
Miami after struggling to guard Brian Hartline.
Lee allowed four catches in six throws his way
in coverage for 56 yards, according to STATS
LLC.
“We just have to pick it up. Guys that are
backing up just have to do what we have to do
and do our jobs right,” Lee said. “Just be more
aware of the situation and be more physical.”
Hanson, picked up before the season after
being cut by Philadelphia, didn’t fare any better
after replacing Lee. He allowed five catches in
six attempts for 58 yards. Hanson had most of
his success with the Eagles playing in the slot
and could return there if the Raiders decide to
shift Huff from safety to cornerback.
The Raiders had been planning to make that
switch after last season before McKenzie and
Allen took over the organization. Huff remained
at free safety under the new regime while still
getting time as a cornerback in nickel packages.
He got some work at cornerback in practice
Wednesday and could play there Sunday with
Matt Giordano getting more time at safety.
“Huff is an all-around guy,” Lee said. “He’s a
good player. He can do whatever out there on
the field. He’s going to do his job. That’s Huff.”
The Raiders also may have to replace a starter
on the offensive line with right tackle Khalif
Barnes out with a groin injury. Willie Smith,
signed earlier this month, replaced Barnes in the
game and will start Sunday. Smith started three
games last season for Washington and was cred-
ited with allowing three sacks, according to
STATS LLC. Smith will have his hands full with
Pittsburgh linebacker LaMarr Woodley, whose
49 career sacks since entering the league in
2007 are the seventh most in the league in that
span.
Mention this AD for
10% off Labor Costs
Continued from page 11
RAIDERS
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — The numbers say there isn’t
much difference in the NFL with replacement
officials. Comments from players and coaches
say otherwise.
As fan outrage grows over calls and non-
calls, delays in doling out penalties and indeci-
sion by the replacements, statistics show strong
similarities between the number of flags thrown
this year by the temporary crews and last year
by the guys who currently are locked out.
The NFL knows things are far from perfect
— something that could have been predicted
with officials whose recent experience typical-
ly was not even at the highest college levels.
But things are never perfect with the regulars,
either, and the league shows no sign of being
forced back to the negotiating table because of
the criticism.
“We are going to continue to do everything
possible to raise the level of performance of the
current officials” through training tapes, confer-
ence calls and meetings, NFL spokesman Greg
Aiello said Wednesday.
The league does that with the regular offi-
cials, too.
One point of emphasis this week will be
game control and making sure players are
penalized for unnecessary actions ranging from
roughness penalties to unsportsmanlike con-
duct.
Game control and simple professionalism by
the officials have become key issues this week
after complaints from a number of players.
“There’s no doubt the integrity of the game
has been compromised not having the regular
officials out there,” Giants linebacker Mathias
Kiwanuka said. “We’ve got to get that taken
care of.”
Added Rams coach Jeff Fisher: “We just all
hope, and I’m speaking on behalf of all 31 other
head coaches, we hope they get something
done. We’re trusting that they will.”
The Eagles’ LeSean McCoy was stunned
when one of the replacements told the All-Pro
running back he was on the official’s fantasy
football team. The league prohibits its game
officials from playing fantasy football.
“I’ll be honest,” McCoy said, “they are like
fans.”
What the fans seem most annoyed with is the
lack of pace to games, most notably Monday
night’s win by the Falcons over the Broncos
that dragged on past midnight. That’s about the
only area where, statistically, the replacements
have been far inferior.
Average time of game is about six minutes
longer in 2012 than in 2011, and with only one
overtime game in the opening two weeks —
same as last year — extra periods can’t be
blamed. More likely, the time it takes to prop-
erly administrate penalties throughout the game
is the cause.
The league has a supervisor in the press box
and an alternate official on the sideline to help
in that area. But it’s been a struggle.
“It’s a combination of everything,” said
Fisher, who has served on the NFL’s competi-
tion committee for most of his coaching career.
“Most of them are not (from) Division I.
They’re all doing the best they can but it’s a
combination of everything: it’s the speed, it’s
the differences in rules. We just hope they’re
able to put things together as soon as they can.”
Offensive players believe the replacements
are concentrating on pass interference penalties
against them, not against defensive backs. The
numbers: six such calls this season to nine
through two weeks last year.
Flags by replacements, regular refs about the same
SPORTS 14
Thursday • Sept. 20, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Pinewood (0-1, 5-2) countered offensively
with outside hitter Mehra den Braven, a fresh-
man, who finished with 13 kills and four serv-
ice aces. But the Gryphons’ variety on offense
more than offset den Braven’s strong perform-
ance.
The Panthers hung with the Gryphons early
in all three games before Crystal Springs pulled
away in the middle of each game. In Game 1,
Crystal Springs held just a one-point lead, 9-8,
following a den Braven kills, but the Gryphons
got the sideout on a Kaiser kills and that
sparked a 7-0 Gryphons’ run. Kaiser accounted
for four of those points.
After Crystal Springs served the ball into the
net, the Gryphons won four of the next five
points to take a 20-10 lead. Not even a
Pinewood 4-0 run would prevent the Gryphons
from taking Game 1 25-17.
Game 2 was similar to the first, but this time
it was Pinewood that made an early run. With
Crystal Springs holding a 7-5 lead, the Panthers
won seven of the next eight points to grab an
11-8 advantage.
The Panthers, however, won only two of the
next 12 points as Crystal Springs turned that
three-point deficit into a 19-14 lead, punctuated
by another Kaiser kill. Pinewood got back into
the game, winning four of the next five points
to cut its deficit to 21-19, but the Panthers could
not get over the hump as the Gryphons went on
to win Game 2 25-20.
Crystal Springs closed out the Panthers in
Game 3, steadily extending an early lead. The
Gryphons ended the match with authority, get-
ting kills for three of their final four points —
two from Dicioccio and one from Maddison
Clay, another freshman.
“I think we’re at a point where we realize
we’re competing for a league title,” Cavella
said.
Continued from page 1
GRYPHONS
is no added hurry-up to the plays, the
Cougars just choose not to group up to call a
play. Instead, the offensive line moves into
position at the line of scrimmage, while quar-
terback Shane Acton calls out the play and
snap count.
Considering the Cougars managed only 90
yards of offense against South City, the no-
huddle offense does not necessarily give an
offense an advantage. Besides, it’s not like
most high schools around here are making
mass defensive substitutions.
“Most teams put their best 11 defenders out
there and they stay out there,” Holden said.
He said the main benefit was for the quarter-
back to get a longer look at what scheme the
defense is using.
***
Another week, another strange start time
for the Serra football team.
Last week, when the Padres hosted Encinal,
kickoff was a weird 4 p.m. start, which Serra
coach Patrick Walsh believed would challenge
his players.
The Padres passed that test with flying col-
ors.
This week is another abnormal start time
when the Padres travel to the Central
California town of Atwater to take on Buhach
Colony — at 7:30 p.m. tonight.
Strange kickoff aside, the Padres appear to
have their hands full with the Thunder, which
are 3-1 and have knocked off North Coast
Section power San Ramon Valley and have
hung 50-plus points on both Modesto and
Lodi.
I don’t believe, however, Buhach Colony
has seen a defense as good as Serra’s. What
stood out the most in the first half of the
Padres’ 56-7 win over Encinal last week was
how scary fast the Serra defense is. The Jets
had a handful of quick, athletic skill-position
players, but they had no chance escaping the
Padres’ defense.
And when Serra does catch you, the Padres
put a hurting on you.
This Serra defense is probably the best in
Walsh’s 11-year tenure at the school.
***
Serra will induct seven new members into
the school’s Athletic Hall of Fame next
month. The new members are Al Paganucci
(1966, baseball); Parker Kelly Jr. (1987, cross
country and track); Sean Renault (1992,
swimming and water polo); Dustin Delucchi
(1996, baseball, basketball and football);
Dave Taufoou (1999, football); and Rich
Jeffries (long-time assistant baseball coach).
The Hall of Fame dinner is scheduled for 6
p.m. cocktails and 7 p.m. dinner Oct. 12 at
the San Mateo Elks Club. Cost is $60 for din-
ner. For more information or to purchase tick-
ets, contact alumni director Bob Greene at
bgreene@serrahs.com or call him at 650-573-
9935 ext. 191.
Nathan Mollat can be reached by email:
nathan@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: 344-
5200 ext. 117. He can also be followed on Twitter
@CheckkThissOutt.
Continued from page 11
LOUNGE
was just his style, if you ask Harbaugh.
“I think he secretly hopes it comes down to
that,” Harbaugh said. “I think he likes that physi-
cal part of the game because he thrives on it so
well. And he’s a tough, tough guy that will suck
it up in a heartbeat.”
Crabtree’s early 17-yard catch on the left side-
line set up a 21-yard touchdown pass to Vernon
Davis that put the 49ers on the scoreboard 2 min-
utes, 35 seconds into the game.
“A lot of things can be momentum changers in
the game. That was one,” Crabtree said. “I get
hyped every weekend about football. This is my
job. I don’t see big play. I just see catch the ball,
every play. I wish I could tell you something spe-
cial.”
He has led the team in receptions in both wins
so far, with the 49ers headed to Minnesota to
meet the Vikings on Sunday. Against the Lions,
Crabtree converted on third down with receptions
of 7, 16 and 11 yards — all in the fourth quarter.
Now, the Niners’ No. 10 overall pick in the 2009
draft out of Texas Tech has 13 catches through
two games for 143 yards. Crabtree and fellow
wideout Randy Moss are complementing each
other as well as anybody could ask for — and
pulling some defenders away from Davis.
“As long as he’s healthy, I feel that he’s one of
the top guys in the league,” running back Frank
Gore said of Crabtree. “He can do everything —
catch, be physical, tough, yards after the catch, he
blocks. This doesn’t surprise me at all what
Michael Crabtree’s doing.”
Crabtree has avoided the spotlight as best he
can since arriving in the NFL with huge expecta-
tions, albeit after a 71-day contract stalemate his
rookie season before he finally signed his con-
tract that October. By Oct. 25 at Houston, he had
cracked the starting lineup.
Crabtree, who has long had the reputation of
being a diva, was angrily confronted by Davis
during an early September practice two years ago
and then-coach Mike Singletary had to step
between them. There have been no such known
issues since, and Davis has supported him.
Crabtree had 72 receptions for 874 yards and
four touchdowns in 2011, helping the 49ers
return to the playoffs for the first time in nine
years.
While he did miss a week of training camp this
summer, he was on the field more than he had
been in any previous preseason because of
injuries.
“Alex had a lot of criticism, too, but he never
paid any attention to that stuff. I know Crabtree is
the same way,” Staley said. “And I don’t think the
criticism that he was getting was fair. I think it
was all perception. They called him a ‘diva’ and
all that stuff. That’s never anything that people
who have been around him have ever thought.
He’s always been a guy that’s been very, very
professional. He might not have had the success
he wanted early, but it wasn’t because of that.”
Continued from page 11
49ERS
SPORTS 15
Thursday • Sept. 20, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
East Division
W L Pct GB
Washington 90 58 .608 —
Atlanta 86 64 .573 5
Philadelphia 75 74 .503 15 1/2
New York 66 82 .446 24
Miami 66 84 .440 25
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Cincinnati 90 59 .604 —
St. Louis 79 70 .530 11
Milwaukee 76 72 .514 13 1/2
Pittsburgh 74 74 .500 15 1/2
Chicago 58 91 .389 32
Houston 48 101 .322 42
West Division
W L Pct GB
San Francisco 86 63 .577 —
Los Angeles 77 72 .517 9
Arizona 74 74 .500 11
San Diego 71 78 .477 15
Colorado 58 90 .392 27 1/2
Wednesday’sGames
Washington 3, L.A. Dodgers 1, 1st game
Milwaukee 3, Pittsburgh 1
Atlanta 3, Miami 0
Philadelphia 3, N.Y. Mets 2
L.A. Dodgers 7,Washington 6, 2nd game
Cincinnati 6, Chicago Cubs 5, 11 innings
St. Louis 5, Houston 0
Arizona 6, San Diego 2
SanFrancisco 7, Colorado 1
Thursday’sGames
Houston (B.Norris 5-12) at St. Louis (J.Garcia 4-7),
10:45 a.m.
Cincinnati (Cueto 17-9) at Chicago Cubs (Berken 0-
1), 11:20 a.m.
San Diego (Richard 13-12) at Arizona (Skaggs 1-2),
12:40 p.m.
Colorado (J.De La Rosa 0-0) at San Francisco (Zito
12-8), 12:45 p.m.
Milwaukee (Fiers 9-8) at Pittsburgh (W.Rodriguez
11-13), 1:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Capuano 11-10) at Washington (De-
twiler 9-6), 4:05 p.m.
Philadelphia (Cloyd 1-1) at N.Y. Mets (Hefner 2-6),
4:10 p.m.
Friday’sGames
St. Louis at Chicago Cubs, 11:20 a.m.
Atlanta at Philadelphia, 4:05 p.m.
Milwaukee at Washington, 4:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at Cincinnati, 4:10 p.m.
Miami at N.Y. Mets, 4:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Houston, 5:05 p.m.
Arizona at Colorado, 5:10 p.m.
San Diego at San Francisco, 7:15 p.m.
East Division
W L Pct GB
New York 85 63 .574 —
Baltimore 84 64 .568 1
Tampa Bay 79 70 .530 6 1/2
Boston 68 82 .453 18
Toronto 66 81 .449 18 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Chicago 81 67 .547 —
Detroit 79 69 .534 2
Kansas City 67 81 .453 14
Minnesota 62 87 .416 19 1/2
Cleveland 61 88 .409 20 1/2
West Division
W L Pct GB
Texas 87 60 .592 —
Oakland 84 64 .568 3 1/2
Los Angeles 81 67 .547 6 1/2
Seattle 70 79 .470 18
Wednesday’s Games
N.Y.Yankees 4,Toronto 2, 1st game
Minnesota 6, Cleveland 4
Detroit 6, Oakland 2
N.Y.Yankees 2,Toronto 1, 2nd game
Tampa Bay 13, Boston 3
Kansas City 3, Chicago White Sox 0
Texas at L.A. Angels, late
Baltimore at Seattle, late
Thursday’sGames
Minnesota (Vasquez 0-2) at Cleveland (Kluber 1-
4), 9:05 a.m.
Oakland (Milone 13-10) at Detroit (A.Sanchez 3-5),
10:05 a.m.
Toronto (Laffey 3-5) at N.Y. Yankees (P.Hughes 15-
12), 4:05 p.m.
Boston (Buchholz 11-6) at Tampa Bay (Price 18-5),
4:10 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Liriano 6-11) at Kansas City
(Guthrie 4-3), 5:10 p.m.
Texas (Darvish 15-9) at L.A. Angels (Greinke 5-2),
7:05 p.m.
Friday’sGames
Minnesota at Detroit, 4:05 p.m.
Oakland at N.Y.Yankees, 4:05 p.m.
Baltimore at Boston, 4:10 p.m.
Toronto at Tampa Bay, 4:10 p.m.
Cleveland at Kansas City, 5:10 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at L.A. Angels, 7:05 p.m.
Texas at Seattle, 7:10 p.m.
NL STANDINGS AL STANDINGS
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
N.Y. Jets 1 1 0 .500 58 55
New England 1 1 0 .500 52 33
Miami 1 1 0 .500 45 43
Buffalo 1 1 0 .500 63 65
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Houston 2 0 0 1.000 57 17
Indianapolis 1 1 0 .500 44 61
Tennessee 0 2 0 .000 23 72
Jacksonville 0 2 0 .000 30 53
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Baltimore 1 1 0 .500 67 37
Cincinnati 1 1 0 .500 47 71
Pittsburgh 1 1 0 .500 46 41
Cleveland 0 2 0 .000 43 51
West
W L T Pct PF PA
San Diego 2 0 0 1.000 60 24
Denver 1 1 0 .500 52 46
Kansas City 0 2 0 .000 41 75
Oakland 0 2 0 .000 27 57
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
Philadelphia 2 0 0 1.000 41 39
Dallas 1 1 0 .500 31 44
Washington 1 1 0 .500 68 63
N.Y. Giants 1 1 0 .500 58 58
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Atlanta 1 0 0 1.000 40 24
Tampa Bay 1 1 0 .500 50 51
Carolina 1 1 0 .500 45 43
New Orleans 0 2 0 .000 59 75
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Green Bay 1 1 0 .500 45 40
Detroit 1 1 0 .500 46 50
Minnesota 1 1 0 .500 46 46
Chicago 1 1 0 .500 51 44
West
W L T Pct PF PA
Arizona 2 0 0 1.000 40 34
San Francisco 2 0 0 1.000 57 41
St. Louis 1 1 0 .500 54 55
Seattle 1 1 0 .500 43 27
Thursday’sGame
N.Y. Giants at Carolina, 5:20 p.m.
Sunday’sGames
Tampa Bay at Dallas, 10 a.m.
St. Louis at Chicago, 10 a.m.
San Francisco at Minnesota, 10 a.m.
Detroit at Tennessee, 10 a.m.
Kansas City at New Orleans, 10 a.m.
Cincinnati at Washington, 10 a.m.
N.Y. Jets at Miami, 10 a.m.
Buffalo at Cleveland, 10 a.m.
Jacksonville at Indianapolis, 10 a.m.
Philadelphia at Arizona, 1:05 p.m.
Atlanta at San Diego, 1:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Oakland, 1:25 p.m.
Houston at Denver, 1:25 p.m.
NFL
Padres
7:15p.m.
CSN-BAY
9/21
@Colorado
6p.m.
CSN-CAL
10/6
Galaxy
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
10/21
@Portland
3:30p.m.
NBC
10/27
vs.Timbers
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
9/19
@Seattle
7p.m.
CSN-CAL
9/23
Dbacks
12:45p.m.
CSN-BAY
9/27
vs.FCDallas
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
9/29
@Rangers
5:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
9/26
@Yankees
TBD
CSN-CAL
9/22
@Tigers
10:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
9/20
Padres
1:05p.m.
CSN-BAY
9/23
@Rangers
5:05
CSN-CAL
9/24
@Yankees
4:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
9/21
Rockies
12:45p.m.
CSN-BAY
9/20
Dbacks
7:15p.m.
CSN-BAY
9/25
Padres
6:15p.m.
CSN-BAY
9/22
@Rangers
5:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
9/25
Dbacks
7:15p.m.
CSN-BAY
9/26
@Yankees
10:05a.m.
CSN-CAL
9/23
@Jets
10a.m.
FOX
9/30
vs.Seattle
5:20p.m.
NFL-NET
10/18
vs.Bills
4:25p.m.
CBS
10/7
@Arizona
5:30p.m.
FOX
10/29
vs.Giants
1:25p.m.
FOX
10/14
Bye
@ Vikings
10a.m.
FOX
9/23
@Broncos
1:05p.m.
CBS
9/30
vs.Jaguars
1:25p.m.
CBS
10/21
BYE
10/7
@Chiefs
1:15p.m.
CBS
10/28
@Falcons
10a.m.
CBS
10/14
vs.Tampa
1:05p.m.
FOX
11/4
vs.Steelers
1:25p.m.
CBS
9/23
BOYS’WATERPOLO
SacredHeart Prep10, ValleyChristian-SJ 3
SacredHeart Prep5401— 10
ValleyChristian1110— 3
SHP goal scorers — Hinrichs 5; Holloway, Jolly-
mour, Perla-Ward, Lazar, M. Swart. SHP goaltender
saves — Runkel 7. Records — Sacred Heart Prep
2-0 WCAL, 4-2 overall.
GIRLS’WATERPOLO
SacredHeart Prep14, ValleyChristian-SJ 2
SacredHeart Prep7234—14
ValleyChristian0011—2
SHP goal scorers — McCracken, Zelinger 3; Bocci,
Stuewe 2; Bigley, Koshy, Rakow, Willard. SHP goal-
tender saves— Moran8.Records— SacredHeart
Prep 2-0 WCAL, 4-3 overall.
Presentation23, NotreDame-Belmont 4
NotreDame-Belmont 2101— 4
Presentation8483— 23
ND-Bgoal scorers— Scheinman2;Garcia,Stauber.
Records — Notre Dame-Belmont 0-2 WCAL, 0-2
overall.
GIRLS’VOLLEYBALL
NotreDame-Belmont def.Half MoonBay25-9,
25-12, 25-7 (Highlights: Latchford 8 kills; Delzio 6
kills;Santana 16 digs).Records — Notre Dame-Bel-
mont 9-4 overall.
GIRLS’TENNIS
PaloAlto5, SacredHeart Prep2
SINGLES — Budhiraja (PA) d. Nordman 6-1, 6-1;
Wang (PA) d.R.Sarwal 6-0,6-1;Nguyen (PA) d.Casey
6-3, 6-3; Soloman (PA) d. K. Ackley 4-6, 7-5, (10-5).
DOUBLES— Westerfield-L.Ackley(SHP) d.Abbott-
Nore 6-4,6-3;Kool-Wang (PA) d.Ritchey-Schumann
7-6(7), 6-1; Jones-McKenzie Lynch (SHP) d. Lee-
Dewess 6-4,6-4.Records — Sacred Heart Prep 3-3
overall.
MontaVista9, MenloSchool 0
SINGLES — Kong (MV) d.Yao 6-3, 6-3; Law (MV) d.
Ong 6-7(6), 6-4, (10-5); Sankar (MV) d. Eliazo 6-4, 6-
2;Qian(MV) d.Gradiska6-2,6-3;Mui (MV) d.Tran6-0,
6-1. DOUBLES — Chong-Koybayakawa (MV) d.
Hoag-Bronk 6-0, 6-0; Bharadwaj-Kesala (MV) d.
Kvamme-Golikova 4-6, 6-2, 6-4.
Crystal Springs 7, Mercy-SF0
SINGLES — Chui (CS) d. Fernando 6-0, 6-0; Tsuei
(CS) d. Lam 6-3, 6-2; Schulz (CS) d. Bustos 6-1, 6-2;
Maluth (CS) d. Mui 6-1, 6-4. DOUBLES — Loh-Park
(CS) d.Deng-Mendoza 6-2,6-0; Milligan-Wang (CS)
d.Ng-Shaw6-2,6-3;Chu-Scampavia(CS) bydefault.
Records — Crystal Springs 4-0 overall.
LOCAL SCOREBOARD
NHL cancels September
slate of preseason games
NEW YORK — The NHL canceled its entire
September preseason game schedule on
Wednesday, the first on-ice casualty of the four-
day lockout.
The league is wiping out all games through
Sept. 30, a move it deems “necessary because of
the absence of a collective bargaining agree-
ment” with the players' association.
The NHL also said the 2012 Kraft
Hockeyville preseason game, scheduled for Oct.
3 in Belleville, Ontario, has been postponed until
2013, bringing the total to 60 games called off
on Wednesday.
The regular season is scheduled to begin on
Oct. 11.
NHL Deputy Commissioner Bill Daly said
the league has “no set policy on cancellations”
of other games. Also Wednesday, a person famil-
iar with the plan says NHL employees at the
league offices will switch to a four-day work
week Oct. 1 because of the lockout.
Sports brief
16
Thursday • Sept. 20, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
Marina Fraser voting against it.
Fraser, however, fully supported Measure K
in 2010 but the city’s needs have changed
since then, she previously told the Daily
Journal. Ironically, current Vice Mayor Rick
Kowalczyk opposed Measure K but is now on
board with supporting Measure J.
He and Mayor Allan Alifano are leading the
charge in trying to get the measure passed.
Measure K barely lost in 2010 and Alifano
thinks a less burdensome tax with a three-year
sunset might be more palatable for Half Moon
Bay residents this year.
Opponents of Measure J, however, say the
city is not in the dire straits it says it’s in.
The city has already reduced cost signifi-
cantly by contracting out services such as
police but still has capital needs, to the tune of
$1 million a year, that need to be addressed,
Alifano told the Daily Journal.
But George Gipe, one of the main oppo-
nents of Measure J, told the Daily Journal that
Half Moon Bay can cover its capital needs
within its current budget.
The city now has an operating surplus, Gipe
said, and can use grants and gas tax funds to
pay for any capital projects the city wants to
undertake.
Gipe also questions a city expenditure of
$450,000 to pay for a Emergency Operations
Center that he calls redundant.
Boosting sales tax also hurts the poor and
leads to higher unemployment, Gipe said.
The city got itself into a structural deficit
after losing a court settlement over the
botched Beachwood development that is cost-
ing the city more than $1 million annually in
bond payments.
“If that wasn’t there, there would be no need
for a tax,” Alifano said.
Business owners in town, Alifano said,
have expressed more favor toward Measure
J this year than they did for Measure K in
2010, Alifano said.
“We’ve done all the cutting. Now we need
to raise revenue,” Alifano said.
The three-year tax will help the city with its
capital needs for the next three years and, after
that, the city may be able to generate money
from Beachwood, now called the Cabrillo
Highway properties, once it is sold in a few
years.
But Gipe contends the city has much more
money to spend on capital needs since it now
has an operating surplus of about $2 million.
The city’s revenue is about $11.1 million
annually. It spent $12.2 million last year but
Gipe said those were one-time costs to the city
and that its actual expenditures are closer to
about $9 million.
Other tax sources, such as property, sales
and hotel, are on the rise, Gipe said.
The sales tax hike is “totally unnecessary.
The situation is not dire enough to justify a tax
increase,” he said.
Half Moon Bay’s current sales tax is one of
the highest in the region, he said.
The tax will also hurt local jobs, Gipe said.
The half-cent sales tax hike, if approved,
will bring in about $870,000 annually.
The city may want to consider selling off
surplus property to support capital projects,
Gipe said.
He also suggested the city can loan itself
money out of its sewer fund, if it really wants
to address capital needs.
“The city needs to live within its means,”
Gipe said.
Alifano said, however, that the city’s capital
project costs could increase drastically if it
doesn’t move toward addressing them now.
“If we spend now, we can save later,”
Alifano said.
If approved, the sales tax in Half Moon Bay
will rise to 8.75 percent. The tax needs a sim-
ple majority to pass.
The general election is Tuesday, Nov. 6.
Bill Silverfarb can be reached by email: silver-
farb@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: (650) 344-
5200 ext. 106.
Continued from page 1
TAX
pedestrians and bicyclists.
Rarback, a retired physicist, is running
because he had some run-ins with city staff in
the past and felt ignored when trying to weigh
in on a potential development about 10 years
ago.
“It left a bad taste in my mouth,” he said.
Now that he is retired, he feels he has the
time now to give back to the community.
Muller, known as “Farmer” John, touts his
decades of experience serving on regional
boards and wants to continue bringing the
city’s expenses in line with its revenue.
“It’s not just two meetings a month. It’s an
everyday job,” Muller said.
Ullom is running because current coun-
cilmembers “haven’t learned from their mis-
takes.”
No one took the blame for the botched
Beachwood development that is costing the
city more than $1 million a year in bond pay-
ments, he said.
He also said the city’s effort to pass a 1-
cent sales tax to keep from having to contract
out its police force was characterized by city
officials as a “doom and gloom” scenario.
“Now they are taking credit for turning the
city around,” Ullom said about the annual
$800,000 the city saves by contracting out
police services to the San Mateo County
Sheriff’s Office.
He also said the city spends money on
things the city doesn’t need such as the
$450,000 it spent for an Emergency
Operations Center that is currently little used.
Rarback, too, called that expense too cost-
ly.
“It is redundant and a waste of money,”
Rarback said.
But Fraser said the coastal city needs to be
prepared for potential disasters, such as a
tsunami, and that the expenditure is justified.
“We need to continue to be prepared in the
event of an emergency,” she said.
Fraser wants to bring some projects back to
life that sat idle while the city dealt with
Beachwood such as a facility for seniors.
The city had about 70 employees just a few
short years ago but that number has dwindled
to about 20 now as Half Moon Bay contracts
out many services it used to provide in house.
“We’ve restructured and reorganized the
city but there is still room to explore combin-
ing and sharing resources with other cities,”
she said.
Rarback is especially upset with city offi-
cials for not respecting the Coastal Act.
Recently, the city had to pay a more than
$400,000 settlement for doing work on the
coast for which it did not seek permits.
As far as future development in the city
goes, Fraser said, the city does not have a lot
of land left to develop.
The Beachwood property, now known as
the Cabrillo Highway properties, can one day
be sold to reap the city significant money and
create housing opportunities.
Muller, however, thinks growth “is a thing
of the past.”
Future development, he said, would likely
be private property infill.
Ullom, however, thinks the city should
develop every piece of property it can.
“We are on the edge,” he said.
He suggests building high-density housing
for seniors since there are not enough jobs on
the coast to support family housing.
Tourism is one of the city’s biggest revenue
generators and Muller wants to attract more
Bay Area residents to the coastal city.
Fraser agrees, saying the area’s “beautiful
beaches” and small-town feel should be a
draw for “staycations.”
Ullom, too, wants the city to promote eco-
tourism.
“Half Moon Bay is the premier destination
to ride a bicycle and we need to promote that
to the rest of the Bay Area,” Ullom said.
Ullom’s biggest issue with the council is
that none of its members have “owned up” to
their mistakes.
“They need to take responsibility,” he said.
Rarback is seeking more transparency from
the city.
“We need to fix the mistakes from our past
and clean house. There’s more to being a
good leader than just being well-liked,” he
said about the current council.
The general election is Tuesday, Nov. 6.
Bill Silverfarb can be reached by email: silver-
farb@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: (650) 344-
5200 ext. 106.
Continued from page 1
ELECTION
Age: 53
Occupation: Project
manager at Genentech
Experience: Incumbent
councilwoman
Education: Attended De
Anza College and College
of San Mateo
Marina Fraser
Age: 66
Occupation: Farmer
Experience: Incumbent
councilman
Family: Married with two
children and two
grandchildren
John Muller
Age: 52
Occupation:Technology
specialist
Experience: Self-
employed business
person
Education: Graduated
from high school
John Ullom
Age: 66
Occupation: Retired
physicist
Experience: Officer, Sandy
Cove Homeowner’s
Association
Education: Ph.D. in physics
Family: Married with two
children
Harvey Rarback
SUBURBAN LIVING 17
Thursday • Sept. 20, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ALL ELECTRIC SERVICE™
650-322-9288
FOR ALL YOUR ELECTRICAL NEEDS®
SERVICE CHANGES
SOLAR INSTALLATIONS
LIGHTING / POWER
FIRE ALARM / DATA
GREEN ENERGY
FULLY LICENSED
STATE CERTIFIED
LOCALLY TRAINED
EXPERIENCED
ON CALL 24/7
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
Dog Days are time to unleash the pruners
By Sean Conway
TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES
By the time the Dog Days of summer arrive, the garden can
start to look just like the rest of us feel. Tired, worn out and
longing for a bit of cool, fresh air. In spite of my lack of desire
to work in the garden, I have learned from past years that
spending a little time cleaning up and cutting back not only
makes the garden look better, it makes me feel better!
Change can be hard to accept, and for most of us, abrupt
change is often the hardest. This is especially true in the gar-
den. Whenever a violent storm knocks over a tree in my yard
or sends a large limb crashing to the ground, I am in shock for
a few days afterward. I am usually at a loss about what to do
with the void, and it sometimes takes me quite some time to
figure out a plan of action.
On the other hand, gradual change in the landscape hardly
gets noticed. By September, many of the perennial plants in
my garden have been growing for nearly five months. Many
have put on tremendous amounts of growth, bloomed, suffered
through heat and drought, and are now looking very bedrag-
gled.
The front walk to our house is a prime example. To the left
of the walk are two large American holly trees underplanted
with a carpet of English ivy. The ivy holds its leaves year-
round, and along with the holly it provides a nice bit of deep
green during the otherwise drab winter months.
To add seasonal interest during the spring and summer
months, I planted variegated petasites amongst the ivy.
Petasites is a hardy perennial plant with large, round leaves,
and is vigorous enough to compete with the ivy. The variegat-
ed form of this plant has splashes of creamy yellow markings
that provide a nice contrast to the dark green of the English
ivy.
Petasites loves the cool weather and begins its seasonal push
out of the ground with chartreuse flowers that lie close to the
soil sometime in late March to early April. Following the flow-
ers, it sends up its leaves, and by mid summer it has had
enough of the heat. By early August, its leaves begin to brown
around the edges and often wilt during heat waves. Its exuber-
ant growth causes it to spread over the walkway to our front
door, forcing passers-by to the right side of the path.
About this time every summer, I have had enough of the pet-
asites. This week, despite the heat and my lack of motivation,
I decided it was time for it to go. After about 30 minutes wield-
ing my Felco pruners, the tired leaves were gone once again,
revealing the lush green ivy underneath.
The transition is remarkable, and it leaves me wondering
why I didn’t do the deed sooner. I know it is because I had
gradually grown accustomed to the way the bed looked —
until that fateful point when I couldn’t stand it any more.
After a couple of weeks of shock, the petasites will begin to
grow back, this time with smaller, yet neater leaves that lie
closer to the ground. By then, the extreme high temperatures
will have passed and the plant will remain relatively good
looking well into fall.
Now that the most visible part of my garden is cleaned up
and looks so much better, it has me wondering what else might
need a little chop-chop-chop. No doubt, other areas have out-
grown themselves because I have slowly grown inured to their
decline. Until now.
September is high time to cut back exhausted plants in your garden.
18
Thursday • Sept. 20, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SUBURBAN LIVING
SHOWROOM HOURS:
Wednesday – Saturday 12:00 noon – 5:30 PM
All other times by appointment
853 Industrial Rd. Ste E, San Carlos
(Between Brittan & Holly)
652-388-8836
Making Peninsula homes more beautiful since 1996
www.cinnabarhome.com
FREE DESIGN SERVICE WITH PURCHASE
•Home furnishings & accessories
•Drapery & window treatments, blinds & shades
•Free in-home consultation with purchase
• Gifts • Interior Design
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Equity Based Direct Lender
Homes º Mu|ti-Fami|y º Mixed-Use º Commercia|
Good or Bad Credit
Purchase / Reñnance / Cash Out
Investors We|come º Loan Servicing Since 1979
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker, CA Dept. of Real Estate #746683
Nationwide Mortgage Licensing System ID #348288 650-348-7191
By Ellen Gibson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
For many families, the end of summer
means it’s time to put away the inflatable kid-
die pools, camping equipment and gardening
tools for the season.
If you plan to shove this gear into arbitrary
piles around the edge of the garage, you’re not
alone: Many Americans say the garage is the
most disorganized room in their home,
according to the International Association of
Business Organizing.
But a messy garage is not just unsightly, it
can cost you money. People with cluttered
garages tend to waste time searching for mis-
placed items and end up re-buying things they
already own, says Erica Ecker, a professional
organizer in New York City.
They also risk injury. Garages often hold
hedge trimmers, table saws, toxic chemicals
and other dangerous items alongside chil-
dren’s scooters and bikes.
An overstuffed garage puts your vehicles at
risk, too. When the car door can’t swing open
without hitting a wheelbarrow or workbench,
it gets dented and dinged. Monica Ricci, a
professional organizer who makes appear-
ances on the HGTV show “Mission:
Organization,” says that in many homes,
garages are so filled with clutter they stop
serving their main purpose.
“When your garage is too full to park a car
in, that expensive piece of machinery sits out
in the elements every day and night while
your clutter stays cozy and dry inside,” Ricci
says. “What kind of sense does that make?”
Whether your garage is slightly disheveled
or looks more like an overstuffed storage unit,
the changeover to fall is an ideal time to give
it a tune-up using these steps from organiza-
tional experts:
Fall’s a good time to give the garage a tune-up
Just as you take the car in for an oil change every 5,000 miles, when you start to see clutter
accumulating, it’s time to do garage maintenance.
See GARAGE, Page 19
SUBURBAN LIVING 19
Thursday • Sept. 20, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
1. PREPARE. Tackling a junk-filled garage
is physically demanding. Ecker advises pac-
ing yourself and setting a schedule in advance.
Consider renting an outdoor storage container
so your belongings aren’t sitting in the drive-
way or in the house for a month while you fin-
ish reorganizing the garage.
Enlist help. If you can’t afford a profession-
al organizer, recruit relatives or offer to swap
labor with a friend who is planning a similar
household project. An assistant can help you
move heavy objects, keep you motivated and
ask objective questions (“Do you really use
that?”), says Ellen Kutner, who runs the com-
pany Simply Organized in Poughkeepsie,
N.Y.
2. EMPTY AND SORT. Empty the con-
tents of the garage out into the driveway and
begin sorting it into piles, grouping like things
together. Categories will vary by household,
but you may start with Sporting Equipment,
Tools, Hardware, Car Care, Lawn Care,
Seasonal, Toys and Household Goods.
3. PURGE. The next step — paring down
your stuff — is the most important. First, toss
anything broken or expired. Return borrowed
items to their owners. If you own multiples of
something, donate the duplicates or sell them.
Analyze how often things get used. “Too often
the garage can be like a time capsule,” Ricci
says. Are you storing camping equipment
from when your college-age kids were Cub
Scouts? Time to get rid of it.
Find ways to downsize bulky items. For
example, Ecker says, rather than storing most-
ly-empty paint cans for future touch-up jobs,
keep a mason jar-size container of each left-
over paint, labeled with the brand, color name
and finish. “Being organized is not about
being neat and tidy, it’s about limits and
boundaries,” Kutner says. “You don’t need to
stock everything you might one day need.
That’s why there are stores.”
4. SPRUCE UP THE SPACE. While the
garage is bare, give it a thorough cleaning.
Kristin Long, who owns the company The
Organizational Specialists, recommends
adding durable floor tiles or a fresh coat of
paint. Making the garage more visually
appealing will inspire you to keep it tidy.
While you’re at it, wipe down all the warm-
weather gear that is going to get stashed for
the next eight months.
5. BUILD UPWARD. Look at what’s left
and figure out where it will live in the garage,
placing the most frequently used stuff in the
most accessible locations. Install shelving to
add vertical storage and get things off the
floor. Clear bins are best so you can see what’s
inside. Ecker recommends the ELFA system
sold by The Container Store, saying it’s easy
to install and adjust. If you’re feeling less
ambitious, the snap-together plastic shelves
sold at any big-box store work fine.
Use hooks to hang ladders, bikes, shovels
and rakes. Mount pegboard on the wall to
keep tools out of kids’ reach, and put danger-
ous substances like pesticides on high shelves.
The garage ceiling is underutilized, Ricci
says, but with a ceiling storage system such as
Hy-Loft, Racor Hydraulics Lifts or Onrax,
you can stash stuff you only access once or
twice a year, such as sleds or cushions for out-
door furniture.
If you do woodworking or crafts, metro
shelving on wheels gives you the flexibility to
move supplies into the center of the garage or
driveway. Ecker recommends the Uline brand.
6. LABEL EVERYTHING. Label con-
tainers using a Sharpie or other permanent
method. Be sure to label the container, not the
shelf, so when bins get moved, items are still
put in the correct place, Long says.
7. MAINTAIN. An organizing project is
only as good as its upkeep, Kutner says. Just
as you take the car in for an oil change every
5,000 miles, when you start to see clutter
accumulating, it’s time to do garage mainte-
nance. If you buy something new, something
else has to go. When you take an item out to
use it, put it away immediately after you’re
done.
Continued from page 18
GARAGE
DATEBOOK 20
Thursday • Sept. 20, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
THURSDAY, SEPT. 20
Recovery Happens Picnic. 11 a.m. to
2 p.m. Flood Park, 215 Bay Road, Menlo
Park. Free. For more information and
to RSVP call 573-3437 or visit
kasheridan@smcgov.org.
Burlingame Lions Club
Membership Drive. Noon. 990
Burlingame Ave., Burlingame. Join the
Lions Club for lunch and see what
they are all about. Free. For more
information call 245-2993.
San Mateo Chapter 139 AARP
Meeting. Noon. Beresford Recreation
Center, 2720 Alameda de las Pulgas,
San Mateo. Please bring donations of
school supplies to this business
meeting. Free. For more information
call 345-5001.
Great Houses of San Francisco. 2
p.m. to 3 p.m. Filoli, 86 Cañada Road,
Woodside. Author Erin Feher will
speak about many private
architectural treasures in San
Francisco. The presentation will
include photographs from the Bourn’s
Webster Street home. The Bourns
were prominent San Franciscans,
builders of Filoli and owners of the
Empire Gold Mine. $25 for members.
$30 for non-members. For more
information and for tickets visit
filoli.org or call 364-8300.
Facebook Class. 3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m.
Little House Activity Center, 800
Middle Ave., Menlo Park. Free. For
more information visit
www.penvol.org.
SufiTalks: Teachings of an American
Sufi Sheikh. 5:30 p.m. Sofia University,
1069 E. Meadow Circle, Palo Alto. Dr.
Robert Frager will speak and answer
questions. Free. For more information
contact kristen.sato@sofia.edu.
Fall Retreat Keynote Speech. 7 p.m.
Sofia University, 1069 E. Meadow
Circle, Palo Alto. Reverend Deborah L.
Johnson will speak. Free. For more
information contact
kristen.sato@sofia.edu.
Australian Author of ‘Entice’ to
Discuss Book. 7 p.m. Kepler’s Books
1010 El Camino Real, Menlo Park.
Jessica Shirvington will sign copies
and talk about her book. Free and
open to the public. For more
information call 324-4321.
Richard Douglass presents MOAH
lecture series: Coins and Coin
Collections: What do do with them.
7 p.m. Museum of American Heritage
Lecture Series, 351 Homer Ave., Palo
Alto. Expert coin collector Richard
Douglas presents a fascinating and
practical lecture on the do’s and
don’t’s of coin collecting. The lecture
will focus on how to treat coins, the
collectability and conservation of
coins and how to predict their future
worth. Participants may bring one or
two coins per person for him to
assess. Free for MOAH members. $10
for non-members. For more
information call 321-1004.
Tango, Bachata and Salsa Classes.
7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Boogie Woogie
Ballroom, 551 Foster City Blvd., Suite G,
Foster City. For more information call
627-4854.
FRIDAY, SEPT. 21
Dreams and the Sacred. 1069 E.
Meadow Circle, Palo Alto. an evening
with Dr. Robert Hopcke and Minister
Jeremy Taylor as they discuss their 30-
year work with dreams from a Jungian
perspective. For more information
contact ksato@itp.edu.
Fall Harvest Book Sale. 11 a.m. to
4:30 p.m. San Mateo Public Library,
first floor, Oak Meeting Room, 55 W.
Third Ave., San Mateo. Those who
attend can pick from a wide selection
for bargain prices. Books will be sorted
into 35 categories. Credit cards
accepted. Admission is free. For more
information call 522-7802.
Affordable Books at the Book
Nook. Noon to 4 p.m. 1 Cottage Lane,
Twin Pines Park, Belmont. Paperbacks
are three for $1. Proceeds go to the
Belmont Public Library. For more
information call 593-5650.
Wine and Beer Tasting at New Leaf.
4 p.m. to 6 p.m. New Leaf Community
Markets, 150 San Mateo Road, Half
Moon Bay. Must be 21 or older to
taste. Free. For more information email
patti@bondmarcom.com.
Happy Hour: Dinner, Drinks and
Dancing with Joni Morris. 4 p.m. to 6
p.m. San bruno Senior Center, 1555
Crystal Springs Road, San Bruno. $5 in
advance, $6 at the door. For more
information call 616-7150.
Music on the Square: Rick Estrin &
the Nightcats. 5 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.
Courthouse Square 2200 Broadway,
Redwood City. Popovic will perform a
mixture of blues, jazz and rock. Free.
For more information call 780-7340.
Heist: Who Stole the American
Dream? 7 p.m. Beck Hall, Unitarian
Universalists of San Mateo, 300 E.
Santa Inez Ave., San Mateo. Admission
free. Contributions will be requested.
For more information visit
sanmateopeaceaction.org or call 342-
8244.
For Beginners Only BallroomDance
Class. 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. Boogie Woogie
Ballroom, 551 Foster City Blvd., Suite G,
Foster City. $16. For more information
call 627-4854.
Peace Action Society of San Mateo
Screening of Documentary ‘Heist:
Who Stole the American Dream?’ 7
p.m. to 9 p.m. Unitarian Universalists of
San Mateo, 300 E. Santa Inez Ave., San
Mateo. Free. For more information call
342-8244.
Iron Sky Film Premier. 7:30 p.m.
Cinemark 20, 825 Middlefield Road,
Redwood City. Science fiction film.
$10. For more information visit
tugg.com/events/1462.
Movie in the Park. 8 p.m. to 10 p.m.
Baseball field in Washington Park, 850
Burlingame Ave., Burlingame.
Screening ‘The Adventures of Tintin.’
Access to concession stand. Free. For
more information call 558-7300.
Monthly Milonga. 8 p.m. to
midnight. Boogie Woogie Ballroom,
551 Foster City Blvd., Suite G, Foster
City. $12 at 8 p.m. for Argentine Tango
lesson. $10 at 9 p.m. for Milonga. For
more information visit
boogiewoogieballroom.com.
Salsa, Bachata, Merengue and Cha
Cha Cha. 9 p.m. Club Fox, 2209
Broadway, Redwood City. $10. For
more information call 369-7770.
SATURDAY, SEPT. 22
French Flea Market. Sequoia High
School, 1201 Brewster Ave., Redwood
City. On the corner of Broadway and El
Camino. All proceeds benefit French
Club of Sequoia High School. To be
post-poned to Sept. 23 in event of
rain. For more information email
kachin@seq.org.
Food Addicts in Recovery
Anonymous. 8 a.m. to 9:30 a.m.
Central Peninsula Church, 1005 Shell
Blvd., Foster City. FA is a free 12-step
recovery program for anyone
suffering from food obsession,
overeating, under-eating or bulimia.
For more information call (800) 600-
6028.
Health Walk with Dr. James L.
Hutchinson, M.D. 8:30 a.m. to 9:30
a.m. City of San Mateo Beresford Park,
2720 Alameda de las Pulgas, San
Mateo. Registration starts at 8:30 a.m.
Those who plan on attending can
walk as little or far as they’d like. Free.
For more information call 522-7490.
2012 Vital Aging Conference. 9 a.m.
to 4 p.m. Little House Activity Center,
800 Middle Ave., Menlo Park.
Presentations by David John Casper,
former Oakland Raider and current
financial planner. Also hear Barbara
Brooker, author of the Viagra Diaries.
More speakers. $10 at the door. $5
pre-registration. For more information
call 326-2025 ext. 224 or contact
kwilson@penvol.org.
Recording Made Easy Course. 10
a.m. Guitar Center, 53 W. Hillsdale Blvd.,
San Mateo. Mixing and Bouncing in
Pro Tools 10. Free. For more
information contact
skim@v2comms.com.
City of San Mateo Senior Center
Health and Wellness Fair. 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. City of San Mateo Senior Center,
2645 Alameda de las Pulgas, San
Mateo.The event will feature resource
information, a guest speaker, health
screenings and demonstrations. Old
eyeglasses, hearing aids and
cellphones can be brought to the
event for the San Mateo Lions to
repair and distribute. Free. For more
information call 522-7490.
SAT/ACT Combo Test and Score-
raising Strategies: Practice test. 11
a.m. to 3 p.m. SSF Main Library, 840 W.
Orange Ave., South San Francisco.
Hosted by Kaplan Test Prep. Free. For
more information and to register visit
kaptest.com/enroll/SAT/94080/events
.
Fall Harvest Book Sale. 11 a.m. to
4:30 p.m. San Mateo Public Library,
first floor, Oak Meeting Room, 55 W.
Third Ave., San Mateo. Used book sale.
Those who attend can pick from a
wide selection of books for bargain
prices. Books will be sorted into 35
categories. Admission is free. For more
information call 522-7802.
La Marianne Vintage Costume
JewelryTrunkShow. 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.
The Ritz Carlton Hotel, 1 Miramontes
Pt. Road, Half Moon Bay. Vintage
costume jewelry show, pieces to be
purchased. Free admission. For more
information email
judy.webster@ritzcarlton.com.
San Mateo High School Class of
1987 Reunion. Noon to 3 p.m.
Eucalyptus Picnic Area No. 1, 1961
Coyote Point Drive, San Mateo. Please
bring a $5 per person donation and
your own food and beverages. For
more information and to register visit
www.greatreunions.com.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
example, School Loop is an online
resource that allows parents, teachers
and students to connect. When grades
are posted, students instantly attempt to
check School Loop. So, the teens put
that as the first option for app users.
Accessing the schedule, which has
changed this year, is another popular
feature. Users have a spot to create a to-
do list or go onto an anonymous forum
to talk about classes.
From the analytics, the usage of the
app, which has about 500 users so far, is
during the week. While not the target
audience, the guys explained that adults
— parents and teachers alike — can also
use the app to quickly check informa-
tion.
With the basic format set, the guys are
considering tweaks like creating a sec-
tion for a big upcoming event like Relay
for Life. Also, since schools within the
district are similarly set up, the guys are
working on rolling out apps for other
high schools like San Mateo and
Aragon.
Seems strange to work so hard on
something that doesn’t result in income
but each of the teens pointed to experi-
ence gained as their motivation.
Heather Murtagh can be reached by email:
heather@smdailyjournal.com or by phone:
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105.
Continued from page 1
APP
“I actually think it can be very good
for the community. It will also be a
lower cost to the consumer,” Merwin
said about the difference from receiving
care in an urgent care facility compared
to an emergency room.
Most people who use the ER in San
Mateo are really in need of urgent care,
he said.
The Mills standby emergency depart-
ment in San Mateo served about 34
patients a day in 2011, compared to
about 100 at Mills-Peninsula Medical
Center and up to 145 a day at San Mateo
County Medical Center, according to the
hospital. From midnight to 7 a.m., on
daily average, only one to three people
come to the standby ER for care, accord-
ing to the hospital.
But Patricia Lane, a nurse at Mills in
San Mateo, told the Daily Journal yes-
terday that the ER at Mills Health Center
serves a vital community need.
“It is heavily used,” Lane said. “It will
clearly be impactful to seniors who
chose to live near the hospital.”
Many people use the ER for primary
care, she said, bringing in their children
for pediatric care.
“People are still brought to Mills with
acute conditions who then get sent to
Burlingame,” she said.
Another nurse, Luchiana Kincer, who
works at the Burlingame campus said it
is another example of Sutter putting
money over care.
“It will be sad for us to lose. Once it is
gone it will never come back,” said
Kincer, a nurse for 37 years.
Sutter has already eliminated acute
rehabilitative services at the two cam-
puses, she said, and has contracted out
other services, such as dialysis, to pri-
vate companies.
“It’s a money game,” she said.
However, she thinks the ER in San
Mateo should close since it has been
“dumbed down” over the years.
The Mills structure in San Mateo does
not meet the newest, most stringent
building codes that go into effect Jan. 1
and upgrading it is too costly, hospital
officials said.
A public hearing is scheduled next
week for public comment and hospital
officials met with San Mateo city offi-
cials yesterday to discuss the closure and
have informed the local health care dis-
trict board of the decision.
“The Peninsula Health Care District
board was made aware of this decision,
however, since this service is operating
out of Mills, the district board does not
have any oversight of that facility, nor
does it have any say in what services are
provided,” the district’s Chief Executive
Officer Cheryl Fama wrote the Daily
Journal in an email. “Our district board
would definitely be involved in the deci-
sion-making had this been at the
Peninsula campus located on the dis-
trict’s land and covered by the 50-year
master agreement between the district
and Sutter Health.”
Generally, an emergency is a condi-
tion that may threaten a person’s life or
cause impairment if treatment is
delayed. On the other hand, urgent care
can treat medical problems that, while
not emergencies, do require prompt care
within 24 hours, according to a hospital
statement.
The new urgent care center at Mills in
San Mateo will offer:
• Diagnostic services including lab
and radiology;
• Treatments such as IV fluids and
medications, splinting and casting,
wound suturing, urgent minor surgical
procedures;
• Respiratory therapy treatments;
• Extended hours, 365 days a year; and
• Urgent care for all patients, regard-
less of insurance type.
Standby emergency departments do
not care for critical emergencies. At
Mills-Peninsula, critical emergency care
has been provided exclusively at Mills-
Peninsula Medical Center in Burlingame
since 1997, when all acute inpatient care
was consolidated at that location.
Emergency surgery and other care
services required for treating critical
emergencies have not been provided at
Mills since the 1997 consolidation,
according to the hospital.
California Senate Bill 1953 requires
that, as of Jan. 1, 2013, all acute-care
hospitals in the state either retrofit their
buildings to meet stricter standards or
discontinue acute care.
The San Mateo County Emergency
Services Department will host a public
hearing Thursday, Sept. 27, to allow
public comment on closure of the stand-
by emergency department at Mills
Health Center. The hearing is set for 5
p.m. to 6:30 p.m. in Room 100 of the San
Mateo County Health System at 225
37th Ave. in San Mateo.
Continued from page 1
SUTTER
Jimmy Kimmel rolls out
red carpet as Emmy host
LOS ANGELES — After rolling out
the red carpet Wednesday morning in
anticipation of Sunday’s Emmy ceremo-
ny, host Jimmy Kimmel warned he’s
planning a prank on folks not watching
the show.
“I have an idea for a prank, and if it
goes well, will be great,” the first-time
Emmy host teased after ceremoniously
unraveling the red carpet. “If it goes
badly, it won’t be so great. I think it will
go well. If you’re watching, you’ll be in
on it. If you’re not, you might get caught
up in the prank.”
Kimmel, whose “Jimmy Kimmel
Live!” received its first nomination for
outstanding variety series this year, is
looking forward to seeing what TV stars
look like out of costume Sunday.
“There’s certain shows you watch, like
‘Game of Thrones’ for instance, and you
see these people in their medieval fanta-
sy garb,” Kimmel said. “I don’t know
what these people look like in real life.
I’m kind of anxious about it. I want to
see the kid who
breast feeds his
mother. That’s who I
want to meet most of
all.”
For the fifth year,
the show will be held
at the Nokia Theatre
in downtown Los
Angeles. The mas-
sive red carpet —
more like a red sidewalk, really — will
canvass the entire plaza across the street
from the Staples Center for Sunday’s TV
extravaganza.
People in the news
Jimmy Kimmel
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2012
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Don’t give up too quickly
if things start out all wrong for you. Fortunately, you
will be able to stick in there until you’re able to turn
things around to your liking.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- Now is the time to start
looking ahead. You should be able to come up with
an idea for blending your present efforts with what
you have in mind for the future, resulting in a recipe
for success.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- How you conduct
yourself in front of others is likely to have a strong
bearing on something that is pending for you career-
wise. Make sure you get a good grade.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- Without minimiz-
ing or ignoring your logical assessments, you’ll still
be able to consider the feelings of others. Make sure
your fnal decisions have a broad appeal.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Devote your time
and effort to assignments that you enjoy performing.
If you are choosy, this could be an extremely produc-
tive and rewarding day for you.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- Whether you are
working on something creative or dealing with the
mundane, the artistry you employ is likely to be quite
impressive. Your endeavors will win favorable appeal.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -- The way you deal with
people and try to make everyone feel important will
win you all kinds of points. You will inspire people to
put forth more effort than they usually do.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) -- Don’t despair if your
day begins on a sour note. When you start to hear all
the nice things others are saying about you, you’ll
quickly turn your frown into a smile.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- Regardless of what kind
of fnancial mess you may fnd yourself in, fght your
way through it. Everything is likely to turn around for
you before the day is out.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- The cycle you’re pres-
ently in puts a very strong emphasis on your natural
leadership qualities. Even if you prefer not to use
them, others will still turn to you for direction.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) -- Any merchandise
you acquire today will likely be treasured for a long
time to come. It’s the combination of elegance and
practicality that makes this so.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- An unusual amount of suc-
cess in your endeavors is indicated, all because you
try to do the most good for the greatest number. It’ll
pay off for everybody.
COPYRIGHT 2012 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
COMICS/GAMES
9-20-12
wEDNESDAY’S PUZZLE SOLVED
PREVIOUS
SUDOkU
ANSwERS
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifeds
kids Across/Parents Down Puzzle Family Resource Guide


Each row and each column must contain the numbers 1
through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes, called
cages, must combine using the given operation (in any
order) to produce the target numbers in the top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in the
top-left corner.
K
e
n
K
e
n
®
is
a
r
e
g
is
te
r
e
d
tr
a
d
e
m
a
r
k
o
f N
e
x
to
y
, L
L
C
. ©
2
0
1
2
K
e
n
K
e
n
P
u
z
z
le
L
L
C
. A
ll r
ig
h
ts
r
e
s
e
r
v
e
d
.
D
is
t. b
y
U
n
iv
e
r
s
a
l U
c
lic
k
fo
r
U
F
S
, In
c
. w
w
w
.k
e
n
k
e
n
.c
o
m
9
-
2
0
-
1
2
ACROSS
1 Covey member
6 Hunks’ assets
10 Distant planet
12 Site
14 Roll by
15 Moose feature
16 Says
18 Ms. Lupino
19 Quote from
21 German industrial region
23 California fort
24 Habit
26 Promises to pay
29 Brenda or Peggy
30 Jellyfsh abode
32 “Orinoco Flow” singer
34 Letter starter
36 Tilly or Ryan
37 Next year’s grads.
38 Urban map
40 Cleaning tool
42 Puffn’s kin
43 Feint
45 Mounties
47 Four quarters
50 Mr. Dangerfeld
52 Eye part
54 Racing boats
58 New pet, maybe
59 Cream-flled pastry
60 “Shane” star
61 Tillers
DOwN
1 Vt. neighbor
2 Search engine fnd
3 Battery size
4 Enter data
5 Sheen
6 Miniature tree
7 Harvest Moon mo.
8 Limp-watch painter
9 Toboggan
11 Embed
12 “Tomb Raider” heroine
13 Epoch
17 Admired
19 Sleazeball
20 Optimal
22 Caviar, actually
23 Primeval
25 Mil. branch
27 Fix, as a copier
28 Waffe topping
31 In the past
33 Make inquiry
35 British rule in India
39 Went sour
41 Moralize
44 Zen riddle
46 Dishwasher phase
47 Sitcom planet
48 Diamond or Simon
49 Comics’ Miss Kett
51 PBS “Science Guy”
53 -- take forever!
55 Kubrick’s computer
56 Youngest Cratchit
57 AARP members
DILBERT® CROSSwORD PUZZLE
fUTURE SHOCk®
PEARLS BEfORE SwINE®
GET fUZZY®
Thursday • Sept. 20, 2012 21
THE DAILY JOURNAL
22
Thursday • Sept. 20, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACCOUNTING & CUSTOMER SERVICE
REPRESENTATIVE I/II
City of San Bruno, California
ACSR I - $3,537 - $4,341 Monthly
ACSR II - $4,067 - $4,992 Monthly
Minimum Qualifications
The Accounting and Customer Service Representative I/II re-
quires graduation from high school or GED equivalent with
demonstrated proficiency in English and Mathematics. Course-
work in modern office procedures, typing, personal computer
office applications, and book keeping are desirable. Bilingual
skills are highly desirable.
Accounting & Customer Services Representative I – One (1)
year of demonstrated clerical accounting
Accounting & Customer Services Representative II – Two (2)
years as an Accounting and Customer Service Representative
I or three (3) years of equivalent journey level clerical account-
ing experience.
Apply on line at www.calopps.org or contact the City of San
Bruno, Human Resources, 567 El
Camino Real, San Bruno CA 94066 (650) 616-7055
Final Filing Date: Thursday, October 27, 2012 at 5:00 p.m.
/s/ Carol Bonner,
San Bruno City Clerk
September 18, 2012
DELIVERY DRIVER
ALL ROUTES
Wanted: Independent Contractor to provide deliv-
ery of the Daily Journal six days per week, Mon-
day thru Saturday, early morning. Experience
with newspaper delivery required.
Must have valid license and appropriate insurance
coverage to provide this service in order to be eli-
gible. Papers are available for pickup in San Ma-
teo at 3:00 a.m. or San Francisco earlier.
Please apply in person Monday-Friday only,
10am to 4pm at
The Daily Journal,
800 S. Claremont St
#210, San Mateo.
GOT JOBS?
The best career seekers
read the Daily Journal.
We will help you recruit qualified, talented
individuals to join your company or organization.
The Daily Journal’s readership covers a wide
range of qualifications for all types of positions.
For the best value and the best results,
recruit from the Daily Journal...
Contact us for a free consultation
Call (650) 344-5200 or
Email: ads@smdailyjournal.com
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
105 Education/Instruction
CALVARY
PRESCHOOL
OPEN
ENROLLMENT
Little Learners: age 2.5-3.5
Big Explorers: age 3.5-5
calvarypreschoolmillbrae.com
(650)588-8030
106 Tutoring
TUTORING
English Language & Literature
History & Social Studies
Grades 7-12
Essay Writing
Reading Comprehension
(650)579-2653
TUTORING
Spanish, French,
Italian
Certificated Local
Teacher
All Ages!
(650)573-9718
110 Employment
ASSISTANT MANAGER,
AQUATIC CENTER
STUDENT UNION, INC. - SJSU
FT-EXC. BENEFITS
$3800-$5500
FOR APPLICATION CALL
(408)924-6378, M-F 9AM-5PM
www.union.sjsu.edu
AA/EOE/ADA EMPLOYER
CASHIER - PT/FT, will train. Apply at
AM/PM @ 470 Ralston Ave., Belmont
DRIVERS NEEDED!
Palo Alto & Redwood
Make Xtra money!!
Delivering phone books.
Must hv license,
transprtation w/ auto
Insurance. Call now!!
1-888-430-7944
www.deliveryofphonebooks.com
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
110 Employment
IRISH HELP AT HOME
Caregivers wanted.
High Quality Home Care.
Qualified, Experienced
Caregivers for Hourly and Live in
placements in San Mateo.
Inquire at: (650)347-6903
www.irishhelpathome.com
JEWELRY SALES
FUN! No Nights! Benefits & 401K!
(650)367-6500 FX:(650)367-6400
jobs@jewelryexchange.com
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
RESTAURANT -
Cooks, Cashiers, Avanti Pizza. Menlo
Park. (650)854-1222.
RESTAURANT -
Experienced line cook, Night / Week-
ends. Apply in person,1201 San Carlos
Ave., San Carlos.
TAXI DRIVER wanted. Pay cash every-
day. (650)766-9878
203 Public Notices
THE VENVERLOH FAMILY FOUNDA-
TION’S annual tax return is available for
public inspection. Contact Steven Sui,
CPA at 1534 Plaza Lane, #180, Burlin-
game, CA 94010 (650)697-4888
CHILD FIND NOTICE
The San Mateo County SELPA
is seeking children and young
adults from birth to age 21 who
may need special education
services, including highly mobile
(such as migrant or homeless)
children with disabilities and chil-
dren who are suspected of hav-
ing a disability and are in need
of special education. If you be-
lieve your child may have any of
these special needs, please con-
tact your local school district or
the SELPA Office at (650) 802-
5464.
23 Thursday • Sept. 20, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
LEGAL NOTICES
Fictitious Business Name Statements, Trustee
Sale Notice, Alcohol Beverage License, Name
Change, Probate, Notice of Adoption, Divorce
Summons, Notice of Public Sales, and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.
Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com 203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 515838
AMENDED ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE
FOR CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Annie Pai
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Annie Pai filed a petition with
this court for a decree changing name as
follows:
Present name: Annie Pai
Proposed name: Kaureen Hani Timur
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on October 18,
2012 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2E, at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 08/28/2012
/s/ Beth Freeman/
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 08/24/2012
(Published, 09/13/12, 09/20/12,
09/27/12, 10/04/12)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252021
The following person is doing business
as: Ramon’s Landscaping Maintenance
Service, 204 E. 2nd Ave. #116, SAN MA-
TEO, CA 94401 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Ramon T. Cisneros,
3281 Casa de Campo Way, #6, San Ma-
teo, CA 94403. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on
/s/ Ramon T. Cisneros /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/27/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/30/12, 09/06/12, 09/13/12, 09/20/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251834
The following person is doing business
as: True MVMNT, 123 Phillips Lv., RED-
WOOD CITY, CA 94062 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: True
MVMNT, LLC., CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Limited Liability Company.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on
/s/ Shara Esbenshade /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/24/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/30/12, 09/06/12, 09/13/12, 09/20/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251953
The following person is doing business
as: Anna Creations, 12 Fernwood Ave,
DALY CITY, CA 94015 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Cheuk Lai
Anna Ma Lau, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on
/s/ Cheuk Lai Anna Ma Lau /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/22/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/30/12, 09/06/12, 09/13/12, 09/20/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251822
The following person is doing business
as: Little Jewels Child Care and Pre-
school, 3012 Britton Ave., SAN CAR-
LOS, CA 94070 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Julie B. West, same
address. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on N/A
/s/ Julie B. West /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/13/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/30/12, 09/06/12, 09/13/12, 09/20/12).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252008
The following person is doing business
as: Quan Auto Sales, 24 Willow St., Ste.
4, REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063 is here-
by registered by the following owner:
Quan Ye Liu, 507 Price St., Daly City,
CA 94014. The business is conducted
by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on
/s/ Quan Ye Liu/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/27/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/30/12, 09/06/12, 09/13/12, 09/20/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251727
The following person is doing business
as: Almeida Limousine Service, 151
Eastmoor Avenue, Apt. 108, DALY CITY,
CA 94080 is hereby registered by the
following owner: Frederico Inacio Duarte
de Almeida, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on
/s/ Frederico Inacio Duarte de Almeida /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/05/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/06/12, 09/13/12, 09/20/12, 09/27/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252094
The following person is doing business
as: Kninebuddies.com, 2306 Hacienda
St., SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Irene
Kostakis, same address. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 08/28/2012
/s/ Irene Kostakis /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/30/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/06/12, 09/13/12, 09/20/12, 09/27/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251798
The following person is doing business
as: A and A Group, 40 Dockside Dr., DA-
LY CITY, CA 94014 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Antonieta Ascur-
ra, same address. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on
/s/ Antonieta Ascurra /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/10/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/06/12, 09/13/12, 09/20/12, 09/27/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252034
The following person is doing business
as: BeDutched, 182 Bonita Ave., #A,
REDWOOD CITY, CA 94061 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Natalie
Smeets, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 09/01/2012.
/s/ Natalie Smeets /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/28/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/13/12, 09/20/12, 09/27/12, 10/04/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252226
The following person is doing business
as: New England Lobster Market & Eat-
ery, 824 Cowan Road, Burlingame, CA
94010 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: New England Lobster Co.,
Inc., CA. The business is conducted by a
Corporation. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
09/06/2012.
/s/ Marc Worrell /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/10/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/13/12, 09/20/12, 09/27/12, 10/04/12).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252286
The following person is doing business
as: San Carlos Lock and Key, 922 Termi-
nal Way, SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Shay Bensimon, 3014 Los Prados St.,
#315, San Mateo, CA 94403. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 09/30/2012.
/s/ Shay Bensimon /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/12/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/13/12, 09/20/12, 09/27/12, 10/04/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252261
The following person is doing business
as: BGVB, LLC, 1611 Adrian Road,
BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: BGVB,
LLC, CA. The business is conducted by
a Limited Liability Company. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Galen Ma /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/11/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/20/12, 09/27/12, 10/04/12, 10/11/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #2521986
The following person is doing business
as: Nipun Capital, LLC, 1810 Gateway
Dr., Ste 120, SAN MATEO, CA 94404 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Nipun Capital, LLC. The business is con-
ducted by a Limited Liability Company.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 08/21/2012
/s/ Howe Ng /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/24/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/20/12, 09/27/12, 10/04/12, 10/11/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252280
The following person is doing business
as: Seven Seas Travel, 205 De Anza
Blvd, Ste 288, SAN MATEO, CA 94402
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Kong Lew, 2703 Wakefield Dr.
Belmont, CA 94002. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on N/A
/s/ Kong Lew /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/12/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/20/12, 09/27/12, 10/04/12, 10/11/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #252329
The following person is doing business
as: Evolve Tranning Center, 170 S.
Spruce Ave., SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO,
CA 94080 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owner: JJ Proformance, INC. The
business is conducted by a Corporation.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 09/12/2012
/s/ Mark P. Tabuso /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/17/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/20/12, 09/27/12, 10/04/12, 10/11/12).
NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO SELL
ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES
Date of Filing Application: Sept. 17, 2012
To Whom It May Concern:
The Name(s) of the applicant(s) is/are:
PHO 99 NOODLE HOUSE II INC
The applicant(s) listed above are apply-
ing to Department of Alcoholic Beverage
Control to sell alcoholic beverages at:
188 SKYLINE PLZ
DALY CITY, CA 94015-3823
Type of license applied for:
41-On-Sale Beer & Wine - Eating Place
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
September 20, 27, 2012,
October 4, 2012
210 Lost & Found
FOUND - Evan - I found your iPod, call
(650)261-9656
FOUND- LITTLE tan male chihuahua,
Found on Davit Street in Redwood
Shores Tuesday, August 28th. Please
call (650)533-9942
LOST - 2 silver rings and silver watch,
May 7th in Burlingame between Park Rd.
& Walgreens, Sentimental value. Call
Gen @ FOUND!
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST CHIHUAHUA/TERRIER mix in
SSF, tan color, 12 lbs., scar on stomach
from being spade, $300. REWARD!
(650)303-2550
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
294 Baby Stuff
B.O.B. DUALLIE STROLLER, for two.
Excellent condition. Blue. $300.
Call 650-303-8727.
BABY BJORN potty $10 (650)595-3933
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
294 Baby Stuff
DEX SAFE Sleeper Ultra bed rail $10
(650)595-3933
295 Art
WALL ART, from Pier 1, indoor/outdoor,
$15. Very nice! (650)290-1960
296 Appliances
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
MIROMATIC PRESSURE cooker flash
canner 4qt. $25. 415 333-8540
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24” wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SMALL SLOW cooker. Used once, $12
(650)368-3037
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
WASHER AND Dryer, $200
(650)333-4400
WATER HEATER $75, (650)333-4400
297 Bicycles
BIKE RACK Roof mounted, holds up to
4 bikes, $65 (650)594-1494
298 Collectibles
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 FIGURINES - 1 dancing couple, 1
clown face. both $15. (650)364-0902
67 OLD Used U.S. Postage Stamps.
Many issued before World War II. All
different. $4.00, (650)787-8600
ANTIQUE TRAIN set from the 40's com-
plete set in the box $80 OBO (650)589-
8348
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BAY MEADOWS BAG - mint condition,
original package, $20., (650)365-3987
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $90. OBO, (650)754-
3597
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
CHILDHOOD COMIC book collection
many titles from the 70's & 80's whole
collection $50 OBO (650)589-8348
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
FIVE RARE Non-Mint 1954 Dan Dee
Baseball Cards (Lemon, Wynn, Schoen-
dienst, Mitchell, Hegan), Each $20, All
$95, (650)787-8600
GAYLORD PERRY 8x10 signed photo
$10 (650)692-3260
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MARK MCGUIRE hats, cards, beanie
babies, all for $98., (650)520-8558
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
ORIGINAL SMURF FIGURES - 1979-
1981, 18+ mushroom hut, 1 1/2 x 3 1/2”,
all $40., (650)518-0813
POKEMON CARDS - 1000, excellent
condition, $30., (650)365-3987
POSTER - New Kids On The Block
1980s, $12., call Maria, (650)873-8167
RARE BASEBALL CARDS
Five Non-Mint 1954 Dan Dee Baseball
Cards (Lemon, Wynn, Schoendienst,
Mitchell, Hegan), All $95, (650)787-8600
ROCK MEMORABILIA Rolling Stones
Tour Guide, From ‘70s. $50 obo
(650)589-8348
298 Collectibles
SPORTS CARDS - 50 Authentic Signa-
tures $60 all, (650)365-3987
STACKING MINI-KETTLES - 3
Pots/cover: ea. 6” diam. Brown speckle
enamelware, $20., (650)341-3288
VINTAGE HOLLIE HOBBIE LUNCH-
BOX with Thermos, 1980s, $25., Call
Maria 650-873-8167
VINTAGE TEEN BEAT MAGAZINES
(20) 1980s $2 each, Call Maria 650-873-
8167
WANTED:
OLDER PLASTIC MODEL KITS.
Aurora, Revell, Monogram.
Immediate cash.
Pat 650-759-0793.
YUGIOH CARD - 2,000, some rare, 1st
Edition, $60 all, (650)365-3987
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
AMERICAN FLYER train set $75 OBO
SOLD!
ANTIQUE ELECTRIC train set with steel
engine full set from the 50's $75 OBO
(650)589-8348
BILINGUAL POWER lap top
6 actividaes $18 SOLD!
PLASTIC TOY army set from the 70's
many pieces $50 (650)589-8348
TONKA BULL Dozer from the 50's or
60's $50 obo (650)589-8348
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE WASHING machine, some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
CHINA CABINET - Vintage, 6 foot,
solid mahogany. $300/obo.
(650)867-0379
J&J HOPKINSON 1890-1900's walnut
piano with daffodil inlay on the front. Ivo-
ries in great condition. Can be played as
is, but will benefit from a good tuning.
$600.00 includes stool. Email
frisz@comcast.net for photos
STICKLEY STYLE solid oak Mission
Chair, SOLD!
303 Electronics
3 SHELF SPEAKERS - 8 OM, $15.
each, (650)364-0902
32” TOSHIBA Flat screen TV like new,
bought 9/9/11 with box. $300 Firm.
(415)264-6605
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
LSI SCSI Ultra320 Controller + (2) 10k
RPM 36GB SCSI II hard drives $40
(650)204-0587
NIGHT STANDS $20, obo (650)952-
3063
PROSCAM 36" color TV with cabinet
and 2 glass doors like new $90 obo
(650)952-3063
304 Furniture
2 DINETTE Chairs both for $29
(650)692-3260
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
4 DRAWER metal file cabinet, black, no
lock model, like new $50 (650)204-0587
AFGAN PRAYER rug beautiful original
very ornate $100 (650)348-6428
ALASKAN SEEN painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
CHANDELIER WITH 5 lights/ candela-
bre base with glass shades $20.
(650)504-3621
COFFEE TABLE - 30” x 58”, light oak,
heavy, 1980’s, $40., SOLD!
COFFEE TABLE set (3piece) mint con-
dition, dark wood, coffee table 53x24x16
high, end tables 27x22x22, $99.00,
(650)578-9208
COMPUTER DESK from Ikea, $40
(650)348-5169
COUCH-FREE. OLD world pattern, soft
fabric. Some cat scratch damage-not too
noticeable. 650-303-6002
DESK SOLID wood 21/2' by 5' 3 leather
inlays manufactured by Sligh 35 years
old $100 (must pick up) (650)231-8009
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DISPLAY CASE wood & glass 31 x 19
inches $30. (650)873-4030
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLES (2) - One for $5. hand
carved, other table is antique white mar-
ble top with drawer $40., (650)308-6381
END TABLES (2)- Cherry finish, still in
box, need to assemble, 26”L x 21”W x
21”H, $100. for both, (650)592-2648
FOLDING PICNIC table - 8’ x 30”, 7 fold-
ing, padded chairs, $80. (650)364-0902
FUTON DELUXE plus other items all for
$90 650 341-2397 (U haul away)
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
HAWAIIAN STYLE living room chair Re-
tton with split bamboo, blue and white
stripe cushion $99 (650)343-4461
KITCHEN TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36”x58” with one leaf 11 1/2”. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
LOVE SEAT. Like New. Olive/green.
33" High, 60" wide, 42" deep. Very com-
fortable. $20.00 or B/O (650)578-1411
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
NIGHT STANDS $35, (650)952-3063
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36” Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
RATTAN PAPASAN Chair with Brown
cushion excellent shape $45 (650)592-
2648
RECLINER CHAIR very comfortable vi-
nyl medium brown $70, (650)368-3037
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
SMALL STORAGE/ Hutch, Stained
Green, pretty. $40, (650)290-1960
SOFA/LOVESEAT SET, mint condition,
7-ft sofa, 58 inch loveseat, brown, 6
matching pillows $99.00, (650)578-9208
24
Thursday • Sept. 20, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Former Astros,
A’s and Mets
manager Art
5 Arabian
Peninsula title
9 Nonpaying rail
rider
13 “Skip me this
time, thanks”
15 Princess once
allied with
Hercules
16 Each
17 Mattress
brand
18 Finished
19 Laugh-a-minute
type
20 GM compact that
replaced the
Cobalt
23 Soft spreads
24 Asserted
25 Teams of
fliers
28 Loss by #1,
say
29 Opposite of 1-
Down
30 B.C. Lions’ org.
33 School-to-be?
34 Does some
impromptu
singing
36 Mineral in a wall,
perhaps
37 Super Bowl
highlights, for
many
38 Dortmund’s
region
39 It’s a wrap
41 “Vanilla Sky”
actress
44 Prepare for a
bath
47 Hobbyist’s cutting
brand
48 Ocean holiday
51 Student aid
52 Beatles meter
maid
53 Stirs up
55 DOD branch
56 D’back, for one
57 Diplomat
58 Eyelid concern
59 Part of CBS:
Abbr.
60 Email button
DOWN
1 Opposite of 29-
Across
2 The UAE has
been a member
of it since 1967
3 Cavalry carriers
4 George’s mom
on “Seinfeld”
5 Make public
6 Dessert preceder
7 How backroom
deals are
conducted
8 Desert dangers
9 Ed of “Apollo 13”
10 __ den
11 Drink in a belt
12 Chose
14 “Don’t throw that
away”
21 “Apollo 13”
director Howard
22 Sounds near the
ears
25 __ of invincibility
26 Song-holding
gadget
27 2011 Masters
champ
Schwartzel
30 Like an etcher’s
acid
31 38-Across
spouse
32 Emmy winner
Kay
34 Aloe targets
35 With a smile on
one’s face
38 Speed Wagons,
e.g.
39 Stable
40 Lawsuits
41 Frolic
42 Vehicle pulled by
bovines
43 72 for 18, often
44 Passing grade
that won’t please
parents
45 Words of defeat
46 Sordid
49 Seine
summers
50 North Carolina
school
54 Pink Floyd
guitarist Barrett
By Steven J. St. John
(c)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
09/20/12
09/20/12
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
304 Furniture
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STIFFEL LAMPS (2) mint condition,
brass base, beige shade, includes easy
tap on/off $50.00, (650)578-9208
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
VANITY ETHAN Allen maple w/drawer
and liftup mirror like new $95
(650)349-2195
VINTAGE UPHOLSTERED wooden
chairs, $25 each or both for $40. nice
set. (650)583-8069
VINTAGE WING back chair $75,
(650)583-8069
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five availa-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
6 BOXES of Victorian lights ceiling & wall
$90., (650)340-9644
BEDSPREAD - queen size maroon &
pink bedspread - Fairly new, $50. obo,
(650)834-2583
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
COCKTAIL GLASSES - beautiful, rich,
smokey hue, oak tree design, wide base,
set of 12, $25., (650)341-8342
DINING ROOM Victorian Chandelier
seven light, $90., (650)340-9644
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
306 Housewares
ICE CREAM MAKER - 4 qt. electric,
never used, still in box, Elite Cuisine by
Maxi-Matic, $40., San Mateo, (650)341-
5347
IRONING BOARD $15 (650)347-8061
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
SUNBEAN TOASTER excellent condi-
tion (415)346-6038
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GOLD Lame' elbow length-
gloves sz 7.5 $15 New. (650)868-0436
308 Tools
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10”,
4 long x 20” wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN ARC-WELDER - 30-250
amp, and accessories, $275., (650)341-
0282
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
FMC TIRE changer Machine, $650
(650)333-4400
GENERATOR 13,000 WATTS Brand
New 20hp Honda $2800 (650)333-4400
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
SCNCO TRIM Nail Gun, $100
(650) 521-3542
STADILA LEVEL 6ft, $60
(650) 521-3542
308 Tools
TABLE SAW 10", very good condition
$85. (650) 787-8219
309 Office Equipment
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER Smith Corona
$60. (650)878-9542
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
10 PLANTS (assorted) for $3.00 each,
(650)349-6059
14 PLAYBOY magazines all for $80
(650)592-4529
14 SEGA genius games 2 controllers
$20 SOLD!
300 HOME LIBRARY BOOKS - $3. or
$5. each obo, World & US History and
American Novel Classic, must see to ap-
preciate, (650)345-5502
3D MOVIE glasses, (12) unopened,
sealed plastic, Real 3D, SOLD!
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes $100,
(650)361-1148
5 PHOTOGRAPHIC CIVIL WAR
BOOKS plus 4 volumes of Abraham Lin-
coln books, $90., (650)345-5502
7 UNDERBED STORAGE BINS - Vinyl
with metal frame, 42” X 18” X 6”, zipper
closure, $5. ea., (650)364-0902
9 CARRY-ON bags (assorted) - extra
large, good condition, $10. each obo,
(650)349-6059
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $25. each,
(650)212-7020
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
AMERICAN HERITAGE books 107 Vol-
umes Dec.'54-March '81 $99/all
(650)345-5502
ARTIFICIAL FICUS Tree 6 ft. life like, full
branches. in basket $55. (650)269-3712
310 Misc. For Sale
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BEADS - Glass beads for jewelry mak-
ing, $75. all, (650)676-0732
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BOOK “NATIONAL Geographic” Nation-
al Air Museums, $15 (408)249-3858
BOOK SELECTION, Mystery, Romance,
Biography, many authors, hard cover,
paperbacks, many authors, mint condi-
tion. 50 cents each (650) 578-9208.
BROADWAY by the Bay, Chorus Line
Sat 9/22; Broadway by Year Sat. 11/10
Section 4 main level $80.00 all.
(650)578-9208
CLEAN CAR Kit, unopened sealed box,
7 full size containers for leather, spots,
glass, interior, paint, chamois, $25.00
(650)578-9208
COMFORTER - King size, like new, $30
SSF, (650)871-7200
DELONGHI-CONVENTION ROTISSER-
IE crome with glass door excellent condi-
tion $55 OBO (650)343-4461
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good con-
dition $50., (650)878-9542
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
FOLDING LEG table 6' by 21/2' $25
(415)346-6038
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10), (650)364-
7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HYPO ALERGETIC Pillows (2) Great for
those with alergies, easy to clean,
$10.00 both, (650)578-9208
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
INFLATED 4'6" in diameter swimming
pool float $12 (415)346-6038
JAMES PATTERSON books 2 Hard
backs at $3 ea. (650)341-1861
JAMES PATTERSON books 5 paper
backs at $1 ea. (650)341-1861
MENU FROM Steam Ship Lurline Aug.
20 1967 $10 (650)755-8238
MIRROR, ETHAN ALLEN - 57-in. high x
21-in. wide, maple frame and floor base,
like new, $95., (650)349-2195
NATURAL GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM
- Alkaline, PH Balance water, with anti-
oxident properties, good for home or of-
fice, brand new, $100., (650)619-9203.
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OLD 5 gal. glass water cooler bottle $20
(650) 521-3542
OUTDOOR SCREEN - New 4 Panel
Outdoor Screen, Retail $130 With Metal
Supports, $80/obo. (650)873-8167
PICTORIAL WORLD History Books
$80/all (650)345-5502
PROFESSIONAL BEAUTY STYLING
STATION - Complete with mirrors, draw-
ers, and styling chair, $99. obo,
(650)315-3240
PUNCH BOWL - 10 cup plus one extra
nice white color with floral motif, $25.,
(650)873-8167
QUEEN SIZE inflatable mattress with
built in battery air pump used twice $40,
(650)343-4461
QUEEN SIZE inflatable mattress with
built in battery air pump used twice $40,
(650)343-4461
310 Misc. For Sale
SESAME STREET toilet seat excellent
condition $12 650 349-6059
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes), factory sealed, $10. (650)365-
3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SPECIAL EDITION 3 DVD Set of The
Freeze. English Subtitles, new $18
(650)871-7200
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
STUART WOODS Hardback Books
4 @ $3.00 each. (650)341-1861
TIRE CHAINS - brand new, in box, never
used, multiple tire sizes, $25., (650)594-
1494
TIRE CHAINS - used once includes rub-
ber tighteners plus carrying case. call for
corresponding tire size, $20.,
(650)345-5446
TOILET SINK - like new with all of the
accessories ready to be installed, $55.
obo, (650)369-9762
VAN ROOF rack 3 piece. clamp-on, $75
(650)948-4895
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WALL LIGHT fixture - 2 lamp with frost-
ed fluted shades, gold metal, never used,
$15., Burl, (650)347-5104
311 Musical Instruments
2 ORGANS, antique tramp, $100 each.
(650)376-3762
3 ACCORDIONS $110/ea. 1 Small
Accordion $82. (650)376-3762.
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
HOHNER CUE stick guitar HW 300 G
Handcrafted $75 650 771-8513
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
312 Pets & Animals
PET MATE Vari Kennel 38" length by 24"
wide and 26" high $90 SSF
(650)871-7200
PETMATE DOG CARRIER - XL size,39
1/2” L x 27” W x 30” like new, $95. firm,
SSF, SOLD!
REPTILE CAGE - Medium size, $20.,
(650)348-0372
SMALL DOG wire cage; pink, two doors
with divider $50. (650) 743-9534.
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
WILL PAY Cash for vintage designer
handbags. Louis Vuitton, Chanel, Gucci,
etc. (650)593-0757
316 Clothes
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
A BAG of Summer ties $15 OBO
(650)245-3661
BATHROBE MEN’S navy blue plush-ter-
ry and belt. Maroon piping trim, 2 pock-
ets. Medium. $10., (650)341-3288
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. size made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
316 Clothes
BLOUSES SWEATERS and tops. Many
different styles & colors, med. to lrg., ex-
cellent condition $5 ea., have 20,
(650)592-2648
COWBOY BOOTS size 9 Black - superb
condition $40 (650)595-3933
COWBOY BOOTS size 9 Silver.gray
good condition $30 (650)595-3933
GEORGE STRAIT Collection Resistol
oval shape, off white Hat size 7 1/8 $40
(650)571-5790
HARDING PARK mens golf dress shirts
(new) asking $25 (650)871-7200
LADIES BOOTS, thigh high, fold down
brown, leather, and beige suede leather
pair, tassels on back excellent, Condition
$40 ea. (650)592-2648
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES JACKET size 3x 70% wool 30%
nylon never worn $50. (650)592-2648
LADIES PLUS Clothing - mint condition,
Fancy/plain sweaters, tops, dresses, out-
fits, summer and winter. $4.00 each,
(650)578-9208
LEATHER COAT medium size (snake
skin design) $25 (650)755-8238
MEN'S SUIT almost new $25.
650-573-6981
NEW BROWN LEATHER JACKET- XL
$25., 650-364-0902
REVERSIBLE, SOUVENIR JACKET
Weatherproof 2-tone tan.; Inner: navy
fleece, $15. (650)341-3288
SNOW BOOTS, MEN'S size 12. Brand
New, Thermolite brand,(with zippers),
black, $18. (510) 527-6602
TUXEDOS, FORMAL, 3, Black, White,
Maroon Silk brocade, Like new. Size 36,
$100 All OBO (650)344-8549
VINTAGE 1930 Ermine fur coat Black full
length $35 650 755-9833
VINTAGE 1970S Grecian Made Size 6-7
Dresses $35 each, Royal Pink 1980s
Ruffled Dress size 7ish $30, 1880s Re-
production White Lace Gown $150 Size
6-7 Petite, (650)873-8167
WESTERN/COWBOY SHIRTS
7 pearl snap front, snap pockets XL and
XXL, $12 - $15 (650)595-3933
WOMEN’S SUMMER 3 pc.SUIT:
blue/white stripe seersucker, size 12,
$10., (650)341-3288
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
FLUORESCENT LIGHT Fixture, New in
Box, 24”, $15 (650)341-8342
PLYWOOD - good plywood, 4x8, various
sizes, 1/4”to 3/4”, $25., (650)851-0878
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
TILES, DARK Red clay, 6”x6”x1/2” 6
Dozen at 50¢ ea (650)341-8342
WHITE STORM/SCREEN door. Size is
35 1/4" x 79 1/4". Asking $50.00. Call
SOLD!
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $40., (650)368-3037
13 ASSORTED GOLF CLUBS- Good
Quality $3.50 each. Call (650) 349-6059.
BACKPACK - Large for overnight camp-
ing, excellent condition, $65., (650)212-
7020
BASKETBALL RIM, net & backboard
$35/all 650-345-7132 Leave message.
BOY’S BICYCLE with Helmet. Triax,
Good Condition, SOLD!
COLEMAN "GLO-MASTER" 1- burner
camp stove for boaters or camping. Mint
condition. $35.00 (650)341-3288
COMPLETE PORTABLE BASKET-
BALL SYSTEM - by Life Time, brand
new, $100., Pacific, SOLD!
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16” wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOLF BALLS - Many brands, 150 total,
good buy, San Mateo, $30., (650)341-
5347
GOLF CLUBS Driver, 7 wood, putter, 9
irons, bag, & pull cart. $99
(650)952-0620
PING CRAZ-E Putter w/ cover. 35in.
Like New $75 call(650)208-5758
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
TREADMILL PROFORM 75 EKG incline
an Staionery Bike, both $400. Or sepa-
rate: $150 for the bike, $350 for the
treadmill. Call (650)992-8757
TWO YOGA Videos. Never used, one
with Patrisha Walden, one by Rebok with
booklet. Both $6 (650)755-8238
25 Thursday • Sept. 20, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
325 Estate Sales
ESTATE/MOVING
SALE
Friday 9/21 &
Saturday 9/22
10am to 3pm
930 Vista Road
Hillsborough CA
(off Black Mtn Road)
Antique Furniture,
Linens, Glassware,
silverplate,dishes,dolls
Artwork,
Costume Jewelry.
Please do not disturb
occupants!
335 Garden Equipment
CRAFTSMAN 4 HP ROTARY LAWN-
MOWER - 20” rear discharge, extra new
grasscatcher, $85., (650)368-0748
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
381 Homes for Sale
BANK OWNED
HOMES
Free list with
Photos & Maps
of Bank Foreclosures
PeninsulaDistressHomes.com
Get a Fantastic Deal
on a Home
or
Free recorded message
(866) 262-8796
ID# 2042
Receive a Free
Hot List of Homes
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650) 591-4046
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49-59 daily + tax
$294-$322 weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
‘93 FLEETWOOD Chrome wheels Grey
leather interior 237k miles Sedan $ 2,500
or Trade, Good Condition (650)481-5296
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
HONDA ‘10 ACCORD LX - 4 door se-
dan, low miles, $19K, (650)573-6981
JEEP 2001 CHEROKEE LTD - 94K
miles, 4 wheel Drive, $7,525, (650)591-
0063
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
625 Classic Cars
DATSUN ‘72 - 240Z with Chevy 350, au-
tomatic, custom, $3,600 or trade.
(415) 412-7030
635 Vans
NISSAN ‘01 Quest - GLE, leather seats,
sun roof, TV/DVR equipment. Looks
new, $15,500. (650)219-6008
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘83 Shovelhead
special construction, 1340 cc’s,
Awesome! $5,950/obo
Rob (415)602-4535.
645 Boats
BANSHEE SAILBOAT - 13 ft. with ex-
tras, $750., (650)343-6563
650 RVs
‘73 Chevy Model 30 Van, Runs
good, Rebuilt Transmission, Fiber-
glass Bubble Top $1,795. Owner
financing.
Call for appointments. (650)364-1374.
CHEVROLET RV ‘91 Model 30 Van,
Good Condition $9,500., (650)591-1707
or (650)644-5179
655 Trailers
TENT TRAILER - Good Condition
Sleeps 6. Electric, Water Hook-ups,
Stove, $1,700 obo, (650)345-7750
670 Auto Service
MB GARAGE, INC.
Repair •Restore •Sales
Mercedes-Benz Specialists
2165 Palm Ave.
San Mateo
(650)349-2744
ON TRACK
AUTOMOTIVE
Complete Auto Repair
foreign & domestic
www.ontrackautomotive.com
1129 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)343-4594
670 Auto Service
People you can trust;
service you can trust
NORDIC MOTORS, INC.
Specializing in Volvo, Saab,
Subaru
65 Winslow Road
Redwood City
(650) 595-0170
www.nordicmotors.com
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
'91 TOYOTA COROLLA RADIATOR.
Original equipment. Excellent cond. Cop-
per fins. $60. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
2 SNOW/CABLE chains good condition
fits 13-15 inch rims $10/both San Bruno
650-588-1946
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
67-68 CAMERO PARTS - $85.,
(650)592-3887
CAMPER/TRAILER/TRUCK OUTSIDE
backup mirror 8” diameter fixture. $30.
650-588-1946
MAZDA 3 2010 CAR COVER - Cover-
kraft multibond inside & outside cover,
like new, $50., (650)678-3557
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
31 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 82,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
Cabinetry
Contractors
Contractors
HUSHER CONSTRUCTION
Full Service General Contractor
Remodels and Additions
Residential, Commercial
Lic #789107
www.husherconstruction.com
(650)873-4743
J & K
CONSTRUCTION
GENERAL
CONTRACTOR
Additions & Carpentry,
Kitchen & Bath remodeling,
Structural repair, Termite &
Dry Rot Repair, Electrical,
Plumbing & Painting
(650)548-5482
neno.vukic@gmail.com
Lic# 728805
NORTH HOMES
Additions, Baths, Kitchens,
Driveways, and Decks.
(650)232-1193
www.northhomes.biz
Lic.# 97583
Cleaning
GALA MAIDS
Residential
& Commercial
14 Years Experience
Excellent References
(650)773-4516 (650)773-4516
www.galamaids.com
Cleaning Concrete
POLY-AM
CONSTRUCTION
General Contractor
Free Estimate
Specializing in
Concrete •Brickwork •Stonewall
Interlocking Pavers •Landscaping
Tile •Retaining Wall
Bonded & Insured Lic. #685214
Ben: (650)375-1573
Cell: (650) 280-8617
Construction
Construction
Construction
650 868 - 8492
PATRICK BRADY PATRICK BRADY
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
ADDITIONS • WALL REMOVAL
BATHS • KITCHENS AND MORE!
PATBRADY1957@SBCGLOBAL.NET
License # 479385
Frame
Structural
Foundation
Roots & ALL
I make your
life better!
LARGE OR SMALL
– I do them all!
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed •Insured •Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben at (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
26
Thursday • Sept. 20, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Electricians
Gardening
Servicing Hillsborough,
Burlingame, Millbrae,
and San Mateo
We are a full service
gardening company
650 218-0657
Quality
Gardening

Weekly Lawn Care
Hedges, Fertilizing,
Leaf Blowing
Rose Care
Get ready for
Fall planting




Gutters
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior•Roof Re-
pair •Base Boards New Fence •
Hardwood Floors •Plumbing •Tile •
Mirrors •Chain Link Fence •Window
Glass •Water Heater Installation
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
Handy Help
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
•Fences •Decks •Patios •
Power Washes •Concrete
Work •Maintenance •Clean
Ups •Arbors
Free Estimates!
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
contreras1270@yahoo.com
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
•Carpentry •Plumbing •Drain
Cleaning •Kitchens •Bathrooms
•Dry Rot •Decks
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
PAYLESS
HANDYMAN
Kitchen & Bathroom Remodels
Electrical, Roofing.
Fences, Tile, Concrete, Painting,
Plumbing, Decks
All Work Guaranteed
(650)771-2432
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD
FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
JUNK HAULING
AND DEMOLITION
Clean up and Haul away all Junk
We also do Demolition
Call George
(650)384-1894
Hauling
Landscaping
COMPLETE TREE
SERVICE
Stamp Concrete
Brick Work
BEST PRICES!
Licensed & Insured
(650)222-4733
• New Lawns
• Lawn Renovations
• Sprinklers
• General CleanUp
• Commercial
& Industrial Maint.
Fisher Garden
& Landscape
Since 1972
(650) 347-2636
fisher-garden-landscape.com
FREE ESTIMATES QAC. Lic. C24951
Landscaping
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsula’s Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
BEST RATES
PRO PAINTING
Residential/Commercial
Interior/Exterior, Pressure Washing
Professional/Courteous/Punctual
FREE ESTIMATES
Sean (415)707-9127
seanmcvey@mcveypaint.com
CSL# 752943
CRAIG’S PAINTING
•Interior & Exterior
•Quality Work w/
Reasonable Rates
•Free Estimates
(650)553-9653
Lic# 857741
GOLDEN WEST
PAINTING
Since 1975
Interior/Exterior,
Complete Preparation.
Will Beat any
Professional Estimate!
CSL#321586
(415)722-9281
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Pressure Washing
Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
LEMUS PAINTING
650.271.3955
Interiors / Exteriors
Residential / Commercial
Free Estimates
Reasonable Rates
Lic#913961
Painting
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
Plumbing
Remodeling
CORNERSTONE HOME DESIGN
Complete Kitchen & Bath Resource
Showroom: Countertops Cabinets
Plumbing Fixtures Fine Tile
Open M-F 8:30-5:30 SAT 10-4
168 Marco Way
South San Francisco, 94080
(650)866-3222
www.cornerstoneHD.com
CA License #94260
KITCHEN & BATH
REMODELING
50% off cabinets
(manufacturers list price)
CABINET WORLD
1501 Laurel St.
San Carlos
(650)592-8020
Home Improvement
CINNABAR HOME
Making Peninsula homes
more beautiful since 1996
* Home furnishings & accessories
* Drapery & window treatments:
blinds & shades
* Free in-home consultation
853 Industrial Rd. Ste E San Carlos
Wed –Sat 12:00- 5:30pm, or by appt.
650-388-8836
www.cinnabarhome.com
Tile
CUBIAS TILE
Marble, Stone & porcelain
Kitchens, bathrooms, floors,
fireplaces, entryways, decks,
tile, ceramic tile
repair, grout repair
Free Estimates •Lic.# 955492
Mario Cubias
(650)784-3079
JZ TILE
Installation and Design
Portfolio and References,
Great Prices
Free Estimates
Lic. 670794
Call John Zerille
(650)245-8212
Window Coverings
RUDOLPH’S INTERIORS
Satisfying customers with world-
class service and products since
1952. Let us help you create the
home of your dreams. Please
phone for an appointment.
(650)227-4882
Window Fashions
247 California Dr
Burlingame • 650-348-1268
990 Industrial Rd Ste 106
San Carlos • 650-508-8518
www.rebarts.com
BLINDS, SHADES, SHUTTERS, DRAPERIES
Free estimates • Free installation
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Attorneys
* BANKRUPTCY *
Huge credit card debt?
Job loss? Foreclosure?
Medical bills?
YOU HAVE OPTIONS
Call for a free consultation
(650)363-2600
This law firm is a debt relief agency
Attorneys
Law Office of
Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Beauty
GRAND OPENING SPECIALS:
Facials , Eyebrow Waxing ,
Microdermabrasion
Full Body Salt Scrub &
Seaweed Wrap
Le Juin Day Spa & Clinic
155 E. 5th Avenue
Downtown San Mateo
(650) 347-6668 (650) 347-6668
KAY’S
HEALTH & BEAUTY
Facials, Waxing, Fitness
Body Fat Reduction
Pure Organic Facial $48.
1 Hillcrest Blvd, Millbrae
(650)697-6868
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR NANJAPA DDS
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
UCSF Dentistry Faculty
Cantonese, Mandarin &
Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
Food
AYA SUSHI
The Best Sushi
& Ramen in Town
1070 Holly Street
San Carlos
(650)654-1212
Food
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
FIND OUT!
What everybody is
talking about!
South Harbor
Restaurant & Bar
425 Marina Blvd., SSF
(650)589-1641
Food
GOT BEER?
We Do!
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
GULLIVER’S
RESTAURANT
Early Bird Special
Prime Rib Complete Dinner
Mon-Thu
1699 Old Bayshore Blvd. Burlingame
(650)692-6060
27 Thursday • Sept. 20, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Food
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEAL’S COFFEE
SHOP
Breakfast •Lunch •Dinner
Senior Meals, Kids Menu
www.nealscoffeeshop.com
1845 El Camino Real
Burlingame
(650)692-4281
SUNDAY CHAMPAGNE
BRUNCH
Crowne Plaza
1221 Chess Dr., Hwy. 92 at
Foster City Blvd. Exit
Foster City
(650)570-5700
SUNSHINE CAFE
Breakfast •Lunch •Dinner
1750 El Camino Real
San Mateo
(Borel Square)
(650)357-8383
THE AMERICAN BULL
BAR & GRILL
19 large screen HD TVs
Full Bar & Restaurant
www.theamericanbull.com
1819 El Camino, in
Burlingame Plaza
(650)652-4908
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
Sunnyvale
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Fitness
DOJO USA
World Training Center
Martial Arts & Tae Bo Training
www.dojousa.net
731 Kains Ave, San Bruno
(650)589-9148
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
General Dentistry
for Adults & Children
DR. ANNA P. LIVIZ, DDS
324 N. San Mateo Drive, #2
San Mateo 94401
(650)343-5555
Health & Medical
JANET R. STEELE, LMFT
Marriage & Family Therapist
Behavior, Chronic Pain or
Illness, Trauma & PTSD, Family,
Couples, Teens, and Veterans
Welcome!
(650)380-4459
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STRESSED OUT?
IN PAIN?
I CAN HELP YOU
Sessions start from $20
Call 650-235-6761
Will Chen ACUPUNCTURE
12220 6th Ave, Belmont
www. willchenacupuncture.com
TOENAIL FUNGUS?
FREE Consultation for
Laser Treatment
(650)347-0761
Dr. Richard Woo, DPM
400 S. El Camino Real
San Mateo
Home Care
CALIFORNIA HOARDING
REMEDIATION
Free Estimates
Whole House & Office
Cleanup Too!
Serving SF Bay Area
(650)762-8183
Call Karen Now!
Insurance
HEALTH INSURANCE
Paying too much for COBRA?
No coverage?
.... Not good!
I can help.
John Bowman
(650)525-9180
CA Lic #0E08395
Insurance
AARP AUTO
INSURANCE
Great insurance
Great price
Special rates for
drivers over 50
650-593-7601
ISU LOVERING
INSURANCE SERVICES
1121 Laurel St.,
San Carlos
BARRETT
INSURANCE
www.barrettinsuranceservices.net
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues,Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$48 per Hour
New Customers Only
For First 20 Visits
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
GRAND OPENING
ASIAN MASSAGE
$50 for 1 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
GRAND OPENING!
CRYSTAL WAVE SPA
Body & Foot Massage
Facial Treatment
1205 Capuchino Ave.
Burlingame
(650)558-1199
HAPPY FEET
Massage
2608 S. El Camino Real
& 25th Ave., San Mateo
(650)638-9399
$30.00/Hr Foot Massage
$50.00/Hr Full Body Massage
SUNFLOWER MASSAGE
Grand Opening!
$10. Off 1-Hour Session!
1482 Laurel St.
San Carlos
(Behind Trader Joe’s)
Open 7 Days/Week, 10am-10pm
(650)508-8758
TRANQUIL
MASSAGE
951 Old County Road
Suite 1
Belmont
650-654-2829
YOU HAVE IT-
WE’LL BUY IT
We buy and pawn:
•Gold •Jewelry
•Art •Watches
•Musical Instrument
•Paintings •Diamonds
•Silverware •Electronics
•Antique Furniture
•Computers •TV’s •Cars
Open 7 days
Buy *Sell*Loan
590 Veterans Blvd.
Redwood City
(650)368-6855
Needlework
LUV2
STITCH.COM
Needlepoint!
Fiesta Shopping Center
747 Bermuda Dr., San Mateo
(650)571-9999
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes •Multi-family •
Mixed-Use •Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
O’DOWD ESTATES
Representing Buyers
& Sellers
Commission Negotiable
odowdestates.com
(650)794-9858
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
STERLING COURT
ACTIVE INDEPENDENT &
ASSISTED LIVING
Tours 10AM-4PM
2 BR,1BR & Studio
Luxury Rental
650-344-8200
850 N. El Camino Real San Mateo
sterlingcourt.com
28
Thursday • Sept. 20, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Coins ª Dental ª Jewelry ª Silver ª Watches ª Diamonds
1Z11 80fll0¶8M0 ß90 ª ëâ0·J4¡·¡00¡
Expert Fine Watch
& Jewelry Repair
Not affiliated with any watch company.
Only Authentic ROLEX Factory Parts Are Used
t%FBMWJUI&YQFSUTt2VJDL4FSWJDF
t6OFRVBM$VTUPNFS$BSF
XXX#FTU3BUFE(PME#VZFSTDPN
Tuesday - Saturday
11:00am to 4:00pm
www.BestRatedGoldBuyers.com
KUPFER JEWELRYsBURLINGAME
(650) 347-7007
$â0
OFF ANY
ROLEX SERVICE
OR REPAIR
MUST PRESENT COUPON.
EXPIRES 9/30/12
WEBUY