Heritage Heritage status means a place or object requires advice and design consideration from local couyncils heritage

units. Developments that have the potential to affect the heritage values of a place may include: earthworks, removal of mature plantings, re-landscaping, unapproved burning or land clearing; authorised by the lease; or

Find out about heritage places or objects When considering undertaking development you should confirm whether it may affect a heritage place or object by:

about the heritage significance of a place or object as well as heritage guidelines controlling development for that place or object; Service, which is most useful early in the process when still deciding on your proposal; the proposal will be consistent with the heritage values of the place. This is done by arranging a pre-application meeting through ACT Planning and Land Authority for staff at Territory and Municipal Services to discuss the documentation required (such as a site plan, preliminary design and plan of works proposed) or visiting the local councils heritage unit. This will ensure all the requirements are met to enable assessment of the potential impact of development proposal on the place’s heritage significance.

Part 1. At least two pages of heritage value analysis per site visit.

individual style, and statutory requirements–what to be respected. This must be based on the individual site within the context of the information sourced from the available heritage registers and subsequent site visit. Do not merely repeat the Conservation Guidelines for the area. Include two photos with annotation.

Part 2. Provide a town planning design exercisefor a site in Queanbeyan. 45-53 Monaro Street, Queanbeyan building had to be demolished for structural reasons. acant lot. However, you need to base your design response on the urban context in which the building was situated. You should base your design response on the site visit andsubsequent investigation.

osition of new building in the urban context. 1:100/ 1:200 (if it doesn’t fit on a A3 format and 1. 1:100 detailed elevation of your proposed design response. s provided should have a decent presentation standard including titles elevation markers etc.

Introductions: Methodology: amalgamation of reference texts with personal reflections.

Why conserve? Australia’s heritage, shaped by nature and history, is an inheritance passed from one generation to the next. It encompasses many things – the way we live, the traditions we hold dear, our history and values. It is also reflected in the natural and cultural diversity of places and objects that help us to understand our past and our effect on the Australian landscape. Places of cultural significance enrich people’s lives, often providing a deep and inspirational sense of connection to community and landscape, to the past and to lived experiences. They are historical records, that are important as tangible expressions of Australian identity and experience. Places of cultural significance reflect the diversity of our communities, telling us about who we are and the past that has formed us and the Australian landscape. They are irreplaceable and precious. These places of cultural significance must be conserved for present and future generations. Austral ia ICOMOS I n c A heritage place is… a specific area or site, perhaps a large area such as a whole region or landscape, or a small area such as a feature or building, which is valued by people for its natural and/or cultural heritage significance. Heritage significance Once a place or object is defined, its significance needs to be determined using the following criteria in the Act: a) it demonstrates a high degree of technical or creative achievement (or both), by showing qualities of innovation, discovery, invention or an exceptionally fine level of application of existing techniques or approaches b) it exhibits outstanding design or aesthetic qualities valued by the community or a cultural group c) it is important as evidence of a distinctive way of life, taste, tradition, religion, land use, custom, process, design or function that is no longer practised, is in danger of being lost, or is of exceptional interest d) it is highly valued by the community or a cultural group for reasons of strong or special religious, spiritual, cultural, educational or social associations e) it is significant to the ACT because of its importance as part of local Aboriginal tradition f) it is a rare or unique example of its kind, or is rare or unique in its comparative intactness g) it is a notable example of a kind of place or object and demonstrates the main characteristics of that kind h) it has strong or special associations with a person, group, event, development or cultural phase in local or national history i) it is significant for understanding the evolution of natural landscapes, including significant geological features, landforms, biota or natural processes j) it has provided, or is likely to provide, information that will contribute significantly to a wider understanding of the natural or cultural history of the ACT because of its use or potential use as a research site or object, teaching site or object, type locality or benchmark site k) for a place—it exhibits unusual richness, diversity or significant transitions of flora, fauna or natural landscapes and their elements l) for a place—it is a significant ecological community,habitat or locality for any of the following: i. the life cycle of native species ii. rare, threatened or uncommon species iii. species at the limits of their natural range iv. distinct occurrences of species.

heritage conservation Heritage practitioners in Australia have developed an agreed process to guide decision-making about both natural and cultural heritage places. This process is shown in the flow chart on page 5, and is reflected in a set of charters and guidelines that outline standards and principles for the conservation of places of heritage significance. These documents, listed in the Resources section of the guide, are: • Australian Natural Heritage Charter: Standards and principles for the conservation of places of natural heritage significance 1996, Australian Committee for IUCN (International Union for the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources) • The Burra Charter: The Australia ICOMOS Charter for Places of Cultural Significance, 1999, Australia ICOMOS (International Council on Monuments and Sites). • A set of Draft Guidelines for the Protection, Management and Use of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Heritage Places, 1997, now out of print, covers similar material for Indigenous heritage. For more information on the updated document, Respecting Indigenous Heritage Places: A Practical Guide, contact the Director, Indigenous Heritage Section, Australian Heritage Commission, GPO Box 787, Canberra, ACT, 2601, ph: (02) 6274 2111.

CANBERRA GLASSWORKS

Image: Craft Australia, ACT Heritage Library. http://basement.craftaustralia.org.au/articles/20070430.php Location District of Central Canberra, Division of Kingston, Section 8, Blocks, 8, 11, 14, & 24 as identified on Figure 48 and indicated on the Territory Plan Map by the Heritage Places Register Overlay H48. Features Intrinsic To The Heritage Significance Of The Place The Place comprises the following significant features identified on Figure 48a a) Power House building, together with significant internal fabric identified at Schedule 1 and Figure 48b; b) Fitters’ Workshop (Bulk Supply Store); c) original alignment of the railway and existing railway track and embankment d) landscape elements: Monterey pine (Pinus radiata- A), White brittle gum (Eucalyptus mannifera - B); e) base of the second chimney stack; f) fabric and operation of the siren and whistle; and g) 1948 Switch Room. Specific Requirements In accordance with s54(1) of the Land (Planning and Environment) Act 1991 the following requirements are identified as essential to the

Standards for

conservation of the heritage significance of the place. These requirements are prepared to implement the following conservation policy for the place:

Maintainence/restoration

The place is to be conserved and appropriately maintained consistent with its heritage significance. In conserving the place, its prior use as an industrial site for the generation of electricity should continue to be evident and accessible to the public. i) Buildings including alterations and additions a) The Power House is to remain the dominant feature of the Precinct in any future development. b) The industrial character, form and scale of the Power House and Fitters’ Workshop shall be retained. External additions to the Power House, Fitters’ Workshop and 1948 Switch Room shall only be permitted if the proposed additions do not adversely affect the heritage significance of the place. c) External alterations to the Power House, Fitters’ Workshop and 1948 Switch Room, including alterations to external finishes, shall reflect and complement the architectural style of the buildings. d) Internal alterations or additions to the Power House and Fitters’ Workshop will respect proportions of space and may only be permitted where it can be demonstrated that they will not adversely affect the heritage significance of the place. Any alterations or additions shall be undertaken in accordance with a Conservation Management Plan approved by the ACT Heritage Council and any subsequent amendment of that plan. Any proposed works which will require the alteration or removal of the significant internal fabric identified at Schedule 1 will require a Development Application. e) Any new buildings or elements shall be consistent with the architectural character of the place, and where possible, shall positively enhance the public’s ability to understand its former industrial use and historic role in the development of the National Capital. New construction shall only be permitted where it can be demonstrated that it will not adversely affect the heritage significance of the place and will not affect the landmark qualities of the Power House and Fitters’ Workshop. f) The base of the second chimney stack shall be conserved in its current location. If the base of the first chimney stack is uncovered during development works this shall be conserved and protected from disturbance. g) The siren and whistle shall be conserved and retained in its current location on the roof of the Power House and maintained in working order. Consideration shall be given to future operation for interpretive purposes or new use. ii) Demolition of Buildings a) Demolition of the Power House, Fitters’ Workshop, base of the second chimney stack and 1948 Switch Room shall not be permitted, other than in exceptional circumstances, including circumstances in which the buildings are structurally unsound and beyond economic repair or where there are significant public health and safety reasons to warrant demolition. Demolition shall not be permitted unless it can be demonstrated that there is no prudent and feasible alternative. b) Demolition of any part of the original fabric of the above features shall only be allowed in the context of sympathetic conservation of the place, including any alterations and additions. c) Accurate recording of any building or structure shall be undertaken prior to any demolition or removal of fabric. iii) Landscape a) The plantings on the corner of Mundaring Drive and Wentworth Avenue of Monterey Pine (A) and White Brittle Gum (B), and those to the west of the Power House of White Brittle Gum (B), are to be conserved and when appropriate, replaced with the same species of tree. All are to be maintained. b) The alignment of the former railway and existing railway track should be retained as a linear open space and appropriately expressed in future

landscaping treatment. An indicative portion of the existing railway track should be retained, conserved and interpreted in situ. c) The immediate spaces surrounding the Power House, Fitters’ Workshop and railway alignment that demonstrate the industrial servicing and operation of these buildings shall be retained and appropriately landscaped. d) Significant visual links shall be retained between the Power House and (i) East Basin and (ii) Bowen Park. The prominent gables and roof form of the Power House shall be visible from potential water transport links to and from the Kingston Foreshore area. e) Excavation and landscaping works shall be undertaken in accordance with approved archaeological procedures.

―personal reflection‖ DUNTROON DAIRY

LOCATION OF PLACE: MOORSHEAD DRM, DLINTROON, ACT 2600 Section and Block Suburb: Duntloon, Campbell BACKGROUND INFORMATION 1. DESCRIPTION OF PLACE: A long single storey gable roofed building. The axis ofthe building is east/west, the north side being built into the hillside. The interior is divided into two chambers ofdifferent size and access is by way of porches on the west and south sides. The walls are of coursed rubble and brick, which are limewashed internally. The floors are earth and timber, the roofshingled and the building features a cement lined bowl shaped vat below the timber floor in the smaller ofthe two rooms. STATEMENT OF SIGNIFICANCE: A farm building of some architectural distinction, the Dairy appears to be built on principles similar to those laid down by JC Louden in his influential encyclopaedia of Cottage Farm and Villa Architecture published in 1833. Built on the Duntroon Estate it is probably ACT's oldest building (c1835).

a) it demonstrates a high degree of technical or creative achievement (or both), by showing qualities of innovation, discovery, invention or an exceptionally fine level of application of existing techniques or approaches Inside the dairy, a seepage well dug into the rock3.4 m deep and 2.8m across-created a cool air sink. The building stayed cool and moist even on the hottest days, perfect for storing cheese. b) it exhibits outstanding design or aesthetic qualities

valued by the community or a cultural group c) it is important as evidence of a distinctive way of life, taste, tradition, religion, land use, custom, process, design or function that is no longer practised, is in danger of being lost, or is of exceptional interest d) it is highly valued by the community or a cultural group for reasons of strong or special religious, spiritual, cultural, educational or social associations e) it is significant to the ACT because of its importance as part of local Aboriginal tradition f) it is a rare or unique example of its kind, or is rare or unique in its comparative intactness g) it is a notable example of a kind of place or object and demonstrates the main characteristics of that kind h) it has strong or special associations with a person, group, event, development or cultural phase in local or national history i) it is significant for understanding the evolution of natural landscapes, including significant geological features, landforms, biota or natural processes j) it has provided, or is likely to provide, information that will contribute significantly to a wider understanding of the natural or cultural history of the ACT because of its use or potential use as a research site or object, teaching site or object, type locality or benchmark site k) for a place—it exhibits unusual richness, diversity or significant transitions of flora, fauna or natural landscapes and their elements l) for a place—it is a significant ecological community,habitat or locality for any of the following: i. the life cycle of native species ii. rare, threatened or uncommon species iii. species at the limits of their natural range iv. distinct occurrences of species.

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Demolition of buildings and structures should not be permitted, other than in exception circumstances, including in which the buildings and structures are unsound and beyond economic repair or where there are significant public health and safety reasons to warrant demolition Demolition of original fabric should only be allowed in the context of sympathetic alteration and additions

Landscaping The existing landscape and character within the boundaries of the place should be conserved

Maintainence The old dairy fell into disuse. By 1972 its roof had collapsed, the other buildings on site, declared unsafe, were demolished. When nominated for heritage status The building had been partially restored but was in need of urgent maintenance to preserve its condition. Rules on Maintenance and Changes According to the heritage council these are the rules for the building including alterations and additions that can be made External alterations and additions to the existing dairy building, including alterations to external finishes should reflect and complement its architectural style and historical development. Minor external alterations and changes may be made to the diary building where the heritage council is satisfied that the proposed works will not adversely affect the heritage significance of the place External additions or alterations may be permitted to the existing dairy building, only if it demonstrated that it does not detract from the heritage significance Construction of new buildings in the place should only be permitted if it can be demonstrated that the new buildings do not affect the heritage significance

―personal reflection‖ CANBERRA SHINEDOME

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LOCATION OF PLACE:

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10/68 Jardine Street
Section and Block Suburb: BACKGROUND INFORMATION: The Shine Dome is an excellent example of structuralist Architecture, which has remained an icon of Canberra from the time it was designed. The Shine Dome is Significant for its association with the post - war development of the Australian scientific community at an international level. It is directly related to significant Australian Scientists who were members of the Academy or held office on its Board. ( AHC 1998) The Shine Dome was designed by prominent Architect Sir Roy Grounds

Excavations No excavation is permitted in the place except where the work is carried out under the direction of a qualified archaeologist Excavation or other disturbance which significantly disturbs building footings or other remains associated with human occupation of the place is not permitted

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Demolition

a Principal of the noted Architectural practice of Grounds, Romberg and Boyd. Sir Roy Grouds was awarded the Royal Australian Institute of Architects (RAIA) Gold Medal in 1968 and Robin Boyd the RAIA Gold Medal in 1969. Its design represents Grounds' design philosophy, reflected in the buildings form, planning and structural integrity, and in Grounds' response to the environment. (AHC 1998) The construction of the reinforced concrete dome was a significant technical achievement of its time. (AHC 1998) In diameter, the dome of the Academy was large by world standards and larger than any dome previously built in Australia. Upon completion, The Shine Dome became a symbol of modern Canberra. Since then it has developed into an important landmark and tourist destination in the city. 1. DESCRIPTION OF PLACE: Becker House is a large radius copper clad dome structure. The base of the dome has 16 regular scalloped openings. The "feet' of the dome sits in a moat that encircles the building. The moat forms a structural ring beam. The water body contained in the moat reflects light into the cloister and building. The building is accessed via bridges across the moat. The dome encloses a three-storey building which accommodates a central conference theatre, two large meeting rooms, an exhibition gallery and office facilities. Storage facility is provided in the basement. STATEMENT OF SIGNIFICANCE:
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The building has a high level of design integrity, with few alterations having been made to the building fabric Becker House was awarded the Royal Australian Institute of Architects RAIA (NSW Chapter) 1959 J.S Sulman Medal for Architectural design excellence (AHC 1999) The building has been successfully integrated into its surrounding landforms and roadways c) it is important as evidence of a distinctive way of life, taste, tradition, religion, land use, custom, process, design or function that is no longer practised, is in danger of being lost, or is of exceptional interest d) it is highly valued by the community or a cultural group for reasons of strong or special religious, spiritual, cultural, educational or social associations Becker House has become a landmark building and a significant tourist attraction in Canberra. On completion, it was one of the principal building icons of a modern Canberra. (AHC 1998) The building remains a prominent venue for the national and international activities of the Australian Academy of Science The building has direct association with a number of prominent national and international figures in the scientific, political and cultural sectors. e) it is significant to the ACT because of its importance as part of local Aboriginal tradition f) it is a rare or unique example of its kind, or is rare or unique in its comparative intactness g) it is a notable example of a kind of place or object and demonstrates the main characteristics of that kind h) it has strong or special associations with a person, group, event, development or cultural phase in local or national history Becker House was designed by Sir Roy Grounds,
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Mid 20 Century International geometric determinist style or structuralist

a) it demonstrates a high degree of technical or creative achievement (or both), by showing qualities of innovation, discovery, invention or an exceptionally fine level of application of existing techniques or approaches The dome of Becker house is not a fully rounded form, but flattened, or shallow – a segment of a sphere. It is a self-supporting form and none of the internal walls or perimeter glazed wall structurally touch the dome. The dome shell varies in thickness from 75mm at the top to nearly 600mm at the base. The reinforced concrete dome is 46.3 metres in diameter. At its time it was a large reinforced concrete dome structures by world standards and the largest dome structure in Australia. The concrete dome of Becker House was a significant technical and design achievement for its time, and received national and international recognition Becker House is one of the largest reinforced concrete, dome formed buildings in Australia and the world. Becker House is the only dome formed public building in Canberra. It is also one of the few buildings in Canberra to utilise interlocking flat copper roof sheeting The structure of the building was a significant design achievement for its time. The dome form was a structural solution to a functional problem of creating a shape which created a pleasant atmosphere for an auditorium (AHC 1998) The original furnishings of the building (most of which remain), were designed for the building b) it exhibits outstanding design or aesthetic qualities valued by the community or a cultural group Becker House is a rare example of the use of a
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one of the most significant Mid 20 century Australian Architects. It was his first major public commission. The building demonstrates many of the design principles which embody the work of Grounds. (GHD 1998) The project was designed in the office of Grounds, Romberg and Boyd, arguably as individuals, the
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three most influential mid 20 Century Melbourne Architects The building was the first and only building constructed by the Australian Academy of Science The building is associated with numerous significant scientific, political and cultural figures who have been involved in either the Academy, the design and construction of the building, or in its operation over 40 years. These include: M. L. Oliphant D. F. Martyn Clunlies Ross J.C. Eccles D. Mawson and ACD Rivett Founding members of the Academy. The name Becker House and a number of the rooms within the building are now named after significant Becker house was the first and probably remains the only freestanding reinforced concrete dome formed public building in Australia AHC 1999

free standing dome form for a 20 century building The building demonstrates a clarity of design philosophy in the uncompromising, integrated and consistent architectural style and detailing of the buildings exterior and interior. (GHD 1999)

i) it is significant for understanding the evolution of natural landscapes, including significant geological features, landforms, biota or natural processes j) it has provided, or is likely to provide, information that will contribute significantly to a wider understanding of the natural or cultural history of the ACT because of its use or potential use as a research site or object, teaching site or object, type locality or benchmark site k) for a place—it exhibits unusual richness, diversity or significant transitions of flora, fauna or natural landscapes and their elements l) for a place—it is a significant ecological community,habitat or locality for any of the following:

i. the life cycle of native species ii. rare, threatened or uncommon species iii. species at the limits of their natural range iv. distinct occurrences of species. Becker House is located within a precinct of buildings which house significant national collections or research establishments. The building has association with the research faculties of the adjacent Australian National University and is adjacent to Screen Sound Australia (formerly the Institute of Anatomy). The building is exemplary of the Australian Academy of Sciences' goal to project a public image of a progressive organisation. It is also representative of the pattern developed in Canberra to house national Institutions in purpose designed buildings of landmark quality Maintainence The building fabric has seen little change since construction. A number of the engineering services have been upgraded including: heating and cooling system, lighting, emergency lighting, fire services. The toilet facilities have been upgraded and expanded. Generally in fair to good condition. A complete refurbishment of the building is currently being planned Current water leaks and other maintenance issues should be rectified in the restoration and refurbishment works currently being documented

Heritage Status: Black’s Chambers is listed in ―Schedule 5 Environmental Hertigate Part 1 Heritage Item No 1115‖ of the Queanbeyan Local Environmental Plan 2012 as ―Local‖ Significance. However it is not listed on the N.S.W. Statuary Heritage Database. Heritage Significance: There is no record of a ―Significance Statement‖ however the building is part of the early twentieth century building fabric of the town of Queanbeyan, that contributes to the town's historic character. It is part of the development of Queanbeyan that was facilitated by the recommencement of the building of Canberra in 1921 after the First World War, which created new avenues for employment and stimulated business and housing development in nearby Queanbeyan. Benefits resulting from the expansion of the early 1920s included supply of electricity (1920) and water (1926). Period and style: Built 1926 Inter War Georgian Commercial Building Context: Within the streetscape of Monaro Street, which consists of Interwar Georgian and Art Deco buildings. Rules on Maintenance and Changes (Requirements for Consent) Accordance with the Queanbeyan Local Environmental Plan, Development consent is required for any of the following Demolishing or moving a heritage item or a building, work, relic or tree within a heritage area Altering a heritage item including making changes to the detail, fabric, finish or appearance of the exterior Altering a heritage item that is a building by making structural changes to it’s interior

―personal reflection‖ BLACKS CHAMBERS

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Disturbing or excavating an archaeological site Disturbing or excavating a heritage conservation area that is a place of aboriginal heritage significance

Erecting a building on land on which a heritage item is located or that is within a heritage area

―personal reflection‖

Building: Black Chambers, 45 – 53 Monaro Street, Queanbeyan, N.S.W. Heritage Status: Black’s Chambers is listed in ―Schedule 5 Environmental Hertigate Part 1 Heritage Item No 1115‖ of the Queanbeyan Local Environmental Plan 2012 as ―Local‖ Significance. However it is not listed on the N.S.W. Statuary Heritage Database. Heritage Significance: There is no record of a ―Significance Statement‖ however the building is part of the early twentieth century building fabric of the town of Queanbeyan, that contributes to the town's historic character. It is part of the development of Queanbeyan that was facilitated by the recommencement of the building of Canberra in 1921 after the First World War, which created new avenues for employment and stimulated business and housing development in nearby Queanbeyan. Benefits resulting from the expansion of the early 1920s included supply of electricity (1920) and water (1926). Period and style: Built 1926 Inter War Georgian Commercial Building Context: Within the streetscape of Monaro Street, which consists of Interwar Georgian and Art Deco buildings. Building: Black Chambers, 45 – 53 Monaro Street, Queanbeyan, N.S.W.

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