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READY TO

Presidential campaign heats up with release of Romney video

RENEAU RETIRES
Taking a look at Reneau’s future plans. PAGE 9

GLEEK OUT?

POWER PLAYER
Volleyball player Stephany Salas has new outlook after injuries.

Glee season 4 welcomes new faces and “New Directions” PAGE 6

PAGE 8

Volume 87

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September 20, 2012 www.thetechtalk.org

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The student voice of Louisiana Tech University

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Search for new president begins
MELISSA GRAJEK Staff Reporter The Louisiana Tech University Presidential Search Committee will hold its first meeting and public forum Tuesday on the main floor of the Student Center at Louisiana Tech. The University of Louisiana system Board of Supervisors Monday named 11 people to serve on this presidential search committee. At 10:30 a.m., members of the committee will be briefed on their responsibilities, draft a timeline and schedule, and discuss the next steps in the search for president, said Jackie Tisdell, assistant vice president for communications with the University of Louisiana System. At 1 p.m., the committee will open the meeting up to the pub-

Laying down Tech’s legacy
KELSY KERSHAW Staff Reporter About 1,800 bricks were added to Centennial Plaza last week, solidifying about 1,800 more legacies left at Tech. Barry Morales, director of student development, said the project was started more than 20 years ago. “The Centennial brick project is a continuation of Centennial Plaza that was started back in 1994,” Morales said. “It was in celebration of the university’s 100th year. The years begin with 1894, and now we’ve laid down up to 2001.” The brick pathway is a trademark of Tech that students and alumni are proud of, he said. “The bricks are recognition for students’ contributions while at Tech, and represent them as a part of the Tech family,” Morales said. As a member of the Tech family, Morales said he is just as proud of his not one, but four bricks he has in the pathway. “I really embrace the fact that I have a family here,” he said. “This solidifies that perspective, and it is a continuation of every student who has graduated from the university.” The family aspect is not the only thing that makes the pathway unique, Morales said. “Historically, when you look back and you can say that every graduate has a brick, it’s really cool,” Morales said. Morales is not the only alumnus proud of his bricks; Kayla McGuire, Louisiana Family, Career and Community Leaders of America state director, is a 1999 graduate of Tech and said she takes pride in her brick. “The brick represented my pride for finishing my degree and officially becoming a part

> see FORUM page 7

University keeps Tier One status
Photo by Shradha Bhandari

of the Tech family,” McGuire said. To many people it is more than just a brick: it is their legacy becoming a part of Tech’s campus, he said. “It’s something that years down the road I’ll bring my children back to see,” McGuire said. McGuire is pursuing another degree and is planning to have another brick with her name on it at the end of fall quarter. It would be another addition to her legacy already left at Tech and another brick she will be able to show her children. While McGuire works for her second brick, Maggie Guin, a junior elementary education major, said she is anxiously awaiting her first. “I’m just so excited to have my name added to the pathway,” Guin said. “It makes me feel like I’m not just a number here.” To Guin, the bricks are symbolic of students not becoming another number or face in a sea of people here. This is a major selling point for the university, along with the Tech family concept. “They make me feel like a part of me will always be here at Tech,” she said. Guin will not graduate until May 2014, so it will be a while before she receives a brick in her honor. Morales, McGuire and Guin all have pride in their bricks and the legacies they are leaving, and have left, on our university. “In the end, it is more than just a brick to all who have one: it is a reward and a symbol of students’ success and hard work throughout their years at Tech,” Morales said.

NATALIE MCELWEE News Editor Louisiana Tech remains in the Top Tier rankings among national universities for the second year in a row on the U.S. News & World Report. In 2011, Tech became part of the Tier One list for all colleges in the nation. Tech is the only school in Louisiana to achieve this status other than Louisiana State University. The criteria for the 2012 Best Colleges survey include peer assessment, retention, faculty resources, student selectivity, financial resources, graduation rates, assessments by high school counselors and alumni giving. Dave Guerin, executive director of university communications, said the ranking is a result of Tech’s hard work. “It shows that Tech is among the most respectable and academically strong institutions in the nation,” he said. “We’ve worked hard and are finally being recognized for that.” While Tech remains in the Top Tier, it has dropped down on the list. “Tech has dropped five places from No. 194 to No. 199,” Guerin said. “It’s hard to say why we’ve dropped. It might have nothing to do with a deficiency from Tech.” It may have been because more schools were included in the ranking process, Guerin said. Although Tech has dropped on the list, Guerin said the uni-

New bricks were laid down last week as a continuation of the brick project started in 1994. The brick walkways have all alumni names since Tech started in 1894 engraved in them.

Email comments to kjk016@latech.edu.

Students enjoy Tolliver additions
ALLISON EAST Staff Reporter Jack Mundi sipped his McAlister’s sweet tea as he leaned back in an armchair by a window in Tolliver, observing the hustle and bustle of students around him. New leather couches and armchairs in Tolliver Hall provide students a better place to take a break from classes and relax. “It gives it this living room experience, but you can study,” said Mundi, a senior mathematics major. “It’s just so many things happening at the same time.” Mundi said he recalls the hard chairs behind Java City before, but the new furniture creates a far more relaxing environment. “It’s not a place [where] I really study, but I can meditate here,” he said. “When I come to school too early, and I want to plan my day, I can sit here. After class, if I want to slow down, I can just come sit down here.” Megan Evans, a senior chemistry major, often sits in the area directly across from Java City. Though that area received relocated furniture rather than new furniture, Evans said she is still happy about the changes. “I don’t think they should put new furniture in Tolliver,” Evans said. “Students wouldn’t take care of it like they need to. I like the new arrangement, though.” In addition to furniture, a movievending kiosk owned by A&M Movie

Photo by Deepanjan Mukhopadhyay

Lucas Boyd, sophomore nursing major, rents “Hugo” at new kiosk in Tolliver. Group was also added. Barry Morales, director of student development, said the kiosk was bid out to several different movie-vending companies, and A&M provided the best deal. According to the A&M Movie Group website, DVDs cost $1.20 for the first 24 hours and $1.50 for each additional 24 hours. The maximum rental period is 20 days. Jimea Penton, a sophomore civil engineering major, has not yet used the kiosk but said she plans to in the future. “It’s kind of like Redbox,” she said. “I don’t have to leave campus. I can just come over here.” Penton said the new furniture and kiosk make her want to spend more time in Tolliver. The decision to update Tolliver was made because the furniture was five to seven years old and falling apart, Morales said. “It was really an embarrassment

when we had students and parents come through for orientation,” he said. “That’s when we had people mention to us that we should replace it.” Morales said technological changes are being made as well. “A new projection system will be installed this quarter,” he said. “We can now have games and movies.” Morales said Union Board and the university each contributed $10,000 to purchase the projector. He plans to ask the Student Technology Fee Board to provide six new computers for the student activities area located in the back of Tolliver. “I think it will give students more opportunities to come in and utilize the equipment we have,” he said. “We’ll get more use out of the building. We’ll finally be able to put the TVs on and show movies and Tech events.” Tolliver received a new paint job, and Bytes food service area was also renovated. Penton said the changes help Tolliver feel more comfortable and home-like. “I like the changes,” she said. “It

makes me feel like I’m in a lounge. I can relax and study.” Reflecting on the changes in his seat by the window, Mundi said he was wowed the first day and has since continued coming back. “It really changed everything,” Mundi said. “If you are ever in Tolliver, you’ll find me here.”

> see RANKING page 7

Email comments to ace007@latech.edu.

2 • The T T ech alk • September 20, 2012

Theater student on fire
Interesting INTERNSHIPS
BY MELISSA GRAJEK Staff Reporter

Campus
Counseling Services to host vision group
The Counseling and Career Services will host a vision group from 4-6 p.m. Tuesday Sept. 25 in Keeny Hall, Room 337. The group is for students interested in choosing a major, taking career assessments and obtaining career resources. The group is small with limited space so any student interested must register in advance. Registration can be obtained through the counseling services website, www.latech.edu/career_center, or stop by their office on the third floor of Keeny. For further information, contact Ron Cathey, director of Counseling and Career Services, at 318-257-2488 or email them at careercenter@latech. edu.

Pyrotechnic experience gained during summer internship
tation of the Three Musketeers, so lots of fights, big set,” he said. “Total fun right? Fantastic facial hair, by all of the men! It was great! I was so jealous of all the mustaches.” Along with studying 400-year-old swordplay techniques and marveling over majestic mustaches, Guinn said he worked as assistant fight director alongside the new artistic director from Washington, Blake Robison. Aside from being raised in the profession, Guinn said he began exploring outdoor drama in 2002, working in Blue Jacket in Ohio, Horn in the West, and eventually the Theater of West Virginia. Unlike some majors where classes provide a majority of material needed to qualify for a job after graduation, theater requires not only experience outside the classroom but connections and strong contacts within the industry. “The resume does so much for you but ultimately it’s like, ‘Hey man I need a job, do you have a position for me?’” Guinn said. “Ultimately, in the theater world what it is, is work experience.” Though Guinn did not earn any college credits for his summer’s work, as a graduating student he said he gained something more valuable: reallife experience. In a competitive industry such as theater, Guinn said, graduating from the right school provides connections but nothing may replace real life work ethics gained from having to create such contacts. “We as students have to actively go out and find work which in a way makes us more valuable because, though we may not come out with the credentials, we come out with a work ethic that is somewhat unparalleled by those other people,” he said. “Even if they may be slightly more talented, we can work a damn lot harder.”

This is the first in a five-part series on the unique experiences of Tech students who participated in summer internships. Each of the students left Ruston to get first-hand experience in their respective fields.
For many students, summer is a time to kick back, relax and pack as much non-school related fun into those three months before the fall quarter commences. However, for senior theater major Jake Guinn, the summer became a green light for adventure filled with travel, outstanding facial hair and 17th century style sword fighting. Guinn, son of the 15th fight master within the Society for American Fight Masters and Louisiana Tech’s Director of the School of Performing Arts, Professor Mark Guinn, began following in his father’s footsteps at the age of 12. “I took an interest in it when I was younger,” Guinn said. “There’s nothing better to be doing than playing with swords. I’d rather be a swash-buckling pirate than a bookworm.” Looking for experience beyond the classroom, Guinn traveled outside of Louisiana and worked with four theaters over the summer. Starting off in Cherokee, N.C., Guinn worked for eight weeks as the assistant fight director where he taught stage combat and served as head pyrotechnician. He also instructed actors how to properly handle firearms. As head pyrotech, Guinn said part of his job was to build and discharge various pyrotechnic effects throughout the shows. “It was a really fantastic experience,” he said. After leaving North Carolina, Guinn said he traveled

Career Day is for any sophomores, juniors, seniors or alumni seeking full-time employment opportunities, interships or summer employment opportunities. If students are interested in participating in career day, they must contact the Career Center prior to the event. For further information, call the Career Center at 318-2574336, email them at careercenter@latech.edu, stop by their office on the third floor of Keeny Hall or refer to the Career Day Guide which can be found on the Tech website.

Deadline to register for graduation Friday

Yearbook photos start on Wednesday
The first round of student yearbook photographs for the 2013 Lagniappe will be taken from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. on Wednesday and Sept. 27 in Tolliver Hall. The pictures are taken on a walk-up, first-come firstserved basis. Portraits Plus of Ruston will take the photographs and photograph packages will be available for purchase, and new options with Louisiana Techthemed backgrounds will be included. For more information, call the Lagniappe Office at 2574383.

Photo by Deepanjan Mukhopadhyay

Jake Guinn auditions in the upcoming Stone Theatre production “KAB Man.” to Beckley, W.Va., where he worked at the Theater of West Virginia. In the summer of 2011, Guinn served as the head pyrotechnician at the theater. He said he revisited the theater this past summer to serve as consultant. Guinn later joined his father in Boone, N.C., where he assisted with a stage combat workshop. Through the use of various prop weapons, advanced students were taught the advanced stage combat theory techniques. Shortly after, Guinn moved to Kentucky where he lived and studied with fight master Drew Fracher, the No. 1 student of a founding member of the Society of American Fight Directors. “He’s kind of like the grandfather to a lot of the teachers and even a lot of the fight masters who are now really big names in the industry,” said Guinn. Nestled in the hayloft of a barn on Fracher’s Kentucky farm, Guinn studied 17th century texts on swordplay and European martial arts to help develop choreography for an upcoming production at twotime Tony Award-winning regional theater Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park. “They were doing an adap-

Seniors intending to graduate at the end of fall quarter must submit a completed application to the Registrar’s Office, located on the second floor in Keeny Hall, no later than 5 p.m. Friday. Applications can be found online on the Tech website. Students who miss the deadline must see their academic dean to discuss being added to the list late. For more information call the Registrar’s Office at 318257-2176 or visit the Tech website.

Continuing Ed offers fall Karate classes

Career Day prepares students for future
The Career Center will be hosting its annual Career Day from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Sept. 27 in the Student Center.

Email comments to mag043@latech.edu.

This quarter Continuing Education will offer Karate classes taught by Loren Todd, a black belt and member of Tech’s nationally recognize Karate team. Classes are Tuesdays and Thursdays from 7:30-8:30 p.m. beginning Sept. 25. The registration fee is $100. For more information call the Continuing Education office at 318-257-4433 or visit their website at www.latech.edu/ cedl/online.

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September 20, 2012 • The T T ech alk • 3

Students send writing abroad
KAITLYN CARROLL Contributing Writer Many international students at Tech use writing as a way to remember their experiences in America. Some of these stories never leave their personal journals, but others are published in media sources throughout the world. “I like to take normal things in everyday life and think about them in a deeper and more creative way,” said MinHee Kwon, an Educational Language Service student from South Korea. Since May 2012, Kwon has written for Hyundai, the South Korean car company, as a Young Hyundai Global Reporter. Her articles are published on its blog, young.hyundai. com, and cover topics such as gun control/shooting, American breakfast, American state parks and drive-thru culture. Kwon said that she likes whenever people read her articles and repost their ideas, because “it’s kind of like we are sharing a conversation.” Kwon is pursuing a degree in political science from Ewha Women’s University in Seoul, the capital of South Korea. Like Kwon, JunJun Liu also writes on her life in America. She says she loves writing because it “allows people to see new a perspective and share experiences.” Liu is pursuing her masters in professional accountancy at Tech, though accounting has not always been her academic pursuit. In high school, Liu was an editor for her school newspaper, The Mountain, named for the mountainous landscapes of her home province, Anhui, in China. She graduated from college with a bachelor of arts in English and a minor in French. In February 2012, Liu wrote an article for World Journal, a Chinese-language

Past professors honored during gallery renaming
ADDIE MARTIN Staff Reporter In 1926, F. Elizabeth Bethea came to Tech as head director, introducing many different forms of art to the School of Art. Two years later, Mary Milfred Moffett was employed as an art professor at Tech, and together these two women helped create the School of Art that exists today. Bethea and Moffett came to Tech and made the School of Art a prestigious program said Saul Zalesch, an associate professor of art history. “They carried the school of art through the Great Depression, and they were the core of the department into the ‘60s when people began to be brought into the department,” Zalesch said. Two art galleries in the F. Jay Taylor Visual Arts Center at Tech were renamed after the former professors who aided in founding the visual arts program. “Our main gallery was called Main Gallery, so it was a chance to honor these two women, F. Elizabeth Bethea and Mary Milfred Moffett,” said Jonathan Donehoo, director of the School of Art. Bethea established freehand, measured drawing, composition, color, theory and art history as new focuses in the art department, and later hired Moffett to teach freehand mechanical drawing and areas of interior design. “When Bethea got here, the art program was small and craft-based,” Donehoo said. “With Moffett they helped establish the program.” Tech alumni Phoebe Allen Mathys and Albino Hinojosa received the honor of recollecting Bethea and Moffett at the

Photo by Sumeet Shrestha

MinHee Kwon and JunJun Liu brainstorm for their next articles. Kwon and Liu write prose to send back to their home countries, South Korea and China, respectively. newspaper targeted toward Mandarin speakers around the world. Liu’s article roughly translates into “A Peaceful and Beautiful Life,” an optimistic look at the future. When Liu was still in China, she “never could have predicted what her life would look like in America,” such as the friends she would make, the experiences she would have, where she would like to eat, study or shop. “We cannot predict the future, but we can work hard,” Liu said. “With hard work we can be sure to gain experiences, and these experiences make us who we are.” Many international students, as well as people who travel abroad, undergo a redefining of themselves and their world views. Kwon said that since she has been in America, her interest in cultural and global issues has expanded and grown. She hopes that Americans at large will continue to become more interested and aware of Korea, as well as other cultural and international topics. “Many Americans may know about the Korean political situation, and they know about companies such as Samsung, LG, Hyundai, but they may not know these companies are Korean. Korea is very small geographically, but I hope people can appreciate Korea as an upand-coming key player in our global economy.” Liu’s hopes are that Americans would always remember to think critically. “No matter what the media says, you should always keep an open mind,” said Liu. “There are always two sides to every coin, and it is up to each individual to decide what he or she believes to be right.”

Email comments to kec025@latech.edu.

ceremony. The alumni speakers were followed by comments and naming of the gallery by Tech President Dan Reneau. “The purpose of the galleries is to enhance the education of art majors,” Donehoo said. The galleries are used for shows every year, and the smaller gallery actually holds some of Moffett’s work. “The galleries are mainly the only art galleries in Ruston, so they are truly valuable regional resources,” Zalesch said. As students walk to class in the art building, they are able to see the renamed art galleries and the work inside of them. “I have seen Mary Moffett’s work, and it is exquisite,” Dorsey said. Eric Gilmore, a senior communication design major, said he is grateful for what the women have done for the program. “I have Bethea and Moffett to thank for me to be able to get my degree that I want,” he said. Donehoo said the School of Art has been fully accredited by the National Association of Schools of Art and Design. “These women have helped Tech’s art program grow exponentially,” he said. Faculty and staff of the School of Art are appreciative of the work from those women to build the program. “It is not usually the case that galleries are named after professors,” Zalesch said. “They are usually named after university leaders or large donors. It is such a great honor.” The art gallery renaming took place Friday at 4:00 PM. “We are very proud of our past and we are looking forward to our future,” Donehoo said.

Email comments to alm085@latech.edu.

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Insight
PATRICK BOYD Editor-in-Chief

4 • The T T ech alk • September 20, 2012

IN OUR OPINION

FROM THE EDITOR
I’m feeling quite old today
feel old. Even though I am only 21, have not started my professional career yet and am on the precipice of life not centered around a school calendar, I still feel old. I observe freshmen, or “freshibabies” as all my friends like to call them, run around campus with exuberance and ease, ready to take on college and life. Oh, how I remember those days! I used to run around with ease too, but now that I am older, I have started to put on a little weight in my midsection, making my every step a step of labor. Just climbing the three flights of stairs to make it to one of my classes this quarter leaves me so winded, I can hardly breathe for the rest of the class period. You may look at me and exclaim, “You are only 21! You have your whole life ahead of you! You are young! Enjoy youth!” I would immediately say I appreciate the encouragement and then go on to elaborate that I must get home immediately to watch my shows and get in bed so I can get a full eight hours. Several of my friends feel the same way. “I was talking to some sophomores the other day and they just looked so young. That was us two years ago, Patrick,” he said. I can hardly remember myself two years ago, but let’s face it, I am having a hard time remembering much of anything these days. In the early days of college, marriage seemed so distant, primitive even, but now everyone (not me) is shopping for engagement rings and trying to decide a good locale for their wedding reception. Everyone also gets really philosophical as a senior, talking about deep things such as the path we are taking and questioning what are we really doing with our lives. There have been many warning signs about my aging lately aside from the weight. I have started to become quite forgetful with things I would have never forgotten before. When I was doing an internship in Lubbock, Texas, this summer, I went to a drive-in movie at a place out in the middle of nowhere called the Stars and Stripes. I accidentally left my car on while watching “The Amazing Spider Man” and had to plead to everyone in the parking lot to jump me off. Thanks, Omar. Then, the other morning I lost my keys, which became such a tough mystery to solve, it would have given the Hardy Boys a headache. They ended up being in my backpack the whole time. Pretty soon I will start watching daytime soap operas, fall asleep on the second page of every book I read and start going to bed at four in the afternoon. Now, I do understand that I am being pretty dramatic and I want to stress that not all seniors, or even the elderly have these problems. Honestly, those older than I look to have more energy and are doing quite well. I went to go see the movie “The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel” starring Judi Dench, Maggie Smith and every other great British actor over the age of 50. In the movie, the characters seize their life and move to India to live in a hotel there and in the process rediscover themselves and how life is never over until it is over. It was so inspiring in fact that it made me start thinking how I needed to stop complaining about how old I feel and just keep going. I am going to start marching up stairs with enthusiasm and rise out of bed with glee. I may just need to catch my breath first. Patrick Boyd is a senior English and journalism major from Choudrant who serves as editor for The Tech Talk. Email comments to gpb009@latech. edu.

I

Social media can persuade how you vote

P

REFLECTIONS IN THE RYE
Don’t rush to judge
MOLLY BOWMAN Associate Editor he school year is beginning to take off, classes are getting more difficult, football season is under way and new Greek members are getting accustomed to their sorority houses. Countless hours of preparation went into getting ready for formal recruitment, which is one of the most important parts of a sorority’s year. These new members continue the legacy of the Greek chapters on campus. There has been much speculation as to whether sororities have a desirable influence on women involved in Greek organizations. For example, I watched a segment on The Today Show last week, and the reporters and interviewees spun sororities in a negative light. Rosalind Wiseman, an author who spoke on the segment, said these women should be focusing more on getting their education than with their social lives. The segment also mentioned that some women spend hundreds and sometimes thousands of dollars to prep for formal recruitment in order to have a leg up. They hire sorority consultants and coaches to teach them what to say, what to wear and how to look in order to get into the house of their choice. This might be true for some larger schools and where recruitment can get very competitive, but it’s certainly not true of Tech’s Greek system. There are only about 450 women involved in sororities on campus and there is a place for each member. And even though they sought help before Rush to learn about these things, they are being taught communication and conversation skills that they can use their whole lives and what they need in order to be successful in the future. Sororities aren’t just about being social and looking pretty. Members are actively involved in philanthropies, and academics are a top priority. They also teach girls how to be leaders, how to be involved with events on campus and the necessary social skills that are needed in everyday life. As a member of a sorority at Tech, I find it disheartening when people speak negatively of Greeks and call sorority members materialistic. Most likely they have only seen what movies like “House Bunny” and “Sydney White” have depicted on the big screen, which is the embellished, social, mean and snobby girls. Granted some might act like this, but what group of people doesn’t have a few bad apples? Sororities are not the only organizations with these types of people; they have just been given the stereotype of it. Women such as Condoleezza Rice, Katie Couric, Georgia O’Keefe and Ruth Bader Ginsburg have all been members of a sorority. These are all successful, great women who have and still play big roles in American history. The Greek system at Tech comprises a range of girls from social and bubbly to shy and quiet. I have met some of the brightest, sweetest and most hardworking women through my sorority and I wouldn’t give up this opportunity for anything. I might not know exactly what I want to do with my life, but I know one thing—much of my success will be attributed to Kappa Delta Sorority. Being in a sorority has enhanced the person that I am and taught me to be comfortable and a more confident version of myself. It has shaped me into my own person and makes me strive for that which is honorable, beautiful and highest. Molly Bowman is a junior journalism major from Shreveport who serves as associate editor for The Tech Talk. Email comments to mmb041@latech. edu.

T

arents and teachers often mention drugs, alcohol and sex when they talk about peer pressure, but few have mentioned anything about voting in such lectures—until now. Scientists and researchers at the University of California-San Diego recently released the findings of an online experiment they conducted on Election Day in 2010 which used the psychology of peer pressure to encourage citizens to vote through Facebook. According to an article published by the Associated Press, researchers said nearly every American who listed themselves to be of voting age on Facebook was part of the study. The research team sent three types of messages out to be seen by users after logging in. Nearly 98 percent of 60 million users saw a banner that read “I Voted” next to six pictures of the user’s friends who had also seen the message and indicated whether or not they had voted. Control groups of approximately 600,000 users each either saw a simple announcement without pictures of their friends or no message at all. Researchers calculated the message that identified friends who had voted reportedly generated 280,000 voters, while the message itself increased turnout by 60,000 voters. Looking at the numbers in relation to the entire country, the study seems useless and irrelevant; however, the 340,000 votes are enough to swing an election, begging the greater question of whether or not peer pressure to vote is a good thing. It is important for citizens to head to the polling stations, but an uneducated vote is just as tantamount as no vote at all. The study shows people are more likely to vote if they see that their friends have voted; however, there was no way for them to determine whether or not the voter knew anything about each of the candidates’ platforms. American voting tradition has proven there will always be those who vote without any prior knowledge of points of debate or even who is on the ballot. If we could trust that all Americans have been keeping up with this election season, this study would be nothing but good news. The reality of the situation, however, is there is a large fraction of voters who do not keep up with elections and choose a candidate to follow suit with family and friends. This could be just as dangerous as not voting at all because the winner of the election would be falsely representing those who elected him or her. The involvement of social media could add a new and even dangerous element in group thinking to the voting tradition if messages such as these do not come with links to other sources of information for voters to view. We should vote because we care about our interests and not be afraid to defend them. Facebook can be a useful tool when it comes to spreading the word, but we need to use it to encourage an educated vote, not just a vote.

T T ech alk
The student voice of Louisiana Tech University

The

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A STEP IN THE WRITE DIRECTION
Work smarter, not harder
AUSTIN VINING Managing Editor ost students pursuing a major in the College of Liberal Arts will be required to take foreign language to complete their curriculum, whether it be six, nine or 12 hours. The exception is any student following the sociology curriculum. According to the course catalog, sociology majors are allowed to choose courses totaling nine hours from either foreign language or cultural studies. Cultural studies classes include several upper level classes in English, history and geography as well as Gender Studies 101. Cultural studies can be very beneficial to students entering the workforce, more so in many cases than foreign languages. As noted in The Tech Talk’s most recent editorial, (http:// www.thetechtalk.org/?p=6153) one could be at an advantage in the job market if he or she has a background in issues such as LGBT studies, which is covered in Tech’s own gender studies course. English has a vast geographical reach. From Canada to Australia to parts of Europe, many throughout the world speak English. “If you are a Chinese student, you start learning English in the third grade, by law,” Jay Walker, an American inventor, said in a TED speech. “That’s why this year China will become the world’s largest English-speaking country.” It is evident that English is spreading globally. http://www. framtak.com/english/facts.html offers several facts about the importance of English on its website: •Did you know that English is the most widespread language in the world and is more widely spoken and written than any other language? •Did you know that over 700 million people speak English, as a foreign language? •Did you know that the main language used throughout the world on the Internet is English? •Did you know that more than half of the world’s technical and scientific periodicals are in English? •Did you know that English is the language of navigation, aviation and of Christianity, and it is the ecumenical language of the World Council of Churches? •Did you know that five of the largest broadcasting companies in the world (CBS, NBC, ABC, BBC and CBC) transmit in English, reaching millions and millions of people? Of the small percentage of students who will go on to have a job that does require the use of a second language, most of which will have either majored in a foreign language or will seek some sort of supplemental language learning tool, many of which are readily available, and some are even free. If one is adamant about not learning a foreign language, there are several tools he or she can use: online translators, handheld translators or even nonverbal communication. With successful tools such as Rosetta Stone so attainable, more and more people are learning foreign languages outside of the classroom. Still the other side of the argument exists, Americans come off as ignorant and uncultured because of their ethnocentrism and refusal to learn another language. That is when the adage, “work smarter, not harder” comes in to play. Americans are taking advantage of the fact that they don’t have to learn other languages due to technological advances. Austin Vining is a journalism and sociology major from Minden who serves as managing editor for The Tech Talk. Email comments to acv001@latech. edu.

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September 20, 2012 • The T T ech alk • 5

World&Nation
B R I E F S

WORLDNEWS

French police investigate photos
PARIS (AP) — French police have opened their criminal investigation into whether topless photos of Prince William’s wife Kate — which appeared in an edition of the French Closer magazine — were an invasion of privacy. A French court ordered police to obtain information on Closer magazine employees after the British royal couple filed the criminal complaint Monday.

Obama allies continue to push secret Romney video

French cartoon inflames prophet film tensions
ASSOCIATED PRESS PARIS — A French magazine published vulgar caricatures of the Prophet Muhammad on Wednesday, inflaming global tensions over a movie insulting to Islam. In response, the French government ordered embassies and schools to close Friday in about 20 countries. The move by the provocative weekly Charlie Hebdo followed days of violent protests from Asia to Africa against the U.S.-produced film "Innocence of Muslims" and turned France into a potential target of Muslim rage. Up to now, American government sites have drawn the most ire. Violence linked to the amateurish movie, which portrays the prophet as a fraud, a womanizer and a child molester, has killed at least 30 people in seven countries, including the American ambassador to Libya. On Wednesday, several hundred lawyers protesting the movie forced their way into an area in Pakistan's capital that houses the U.S. Embassy and other foreign missions. The United States temporarily closed its consulate in an Indonesian city because of similar demonstrations and hundreds protested the film in Sri Lanka's capital, burning effigies of President Barack Obama. The French government ordered embassies and schools abroad to close on Friday, the Muslim holy day, as a precautionary measure in about 20 countries, according to the

Berlin dedicates plaque to Reagan
BERLIN (AP) — Berlin’s mayor has unveiled a plaque commemorating the 25th anniversary of U.S. President Ronald Reagan’s call to the Soviets to “tear down” the wall that then divided the German city. Reagan’s 1987 address in front of Berlin’s iconic Brandenburg Gate came at a time when Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev was encouraging reform in the Eastern bloc. In his speech Reagan said dismantling the Berlin Wall would be a powerful gesture for peace. Two-and-a-half years later the wall fell after East German authorities granted their citizens the right to travel to the West. Republican presidential candidate and former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney and Ann Romney speak at a campaign fundraising event in Dallas, Tuesday. ASSOCIATED PRESS WASHINGTON— President Barack Obama's campaign allies continued to push out an unauthorized video of rival Mitt Romney dismissing the half of Americans who don't pay income taxes, while the Republican nominee tried to turn the campaign disruption into a debate over the role of government in family finances. "My course for the American economy will encourage private investment and personal freedom," Romney wrote in an op-ed essay in Wednesday's USA Today. "Instead of creating a web of dependency, I will pursue policies that grow our economy and lift Americans out of poverty." It remains to be seen whether Romney's remarks at a private fundraiser, captured on hidden camera, would shake loose a dead heat that's persisted in the presidential campaign for months. An Associated PressGfK poll out Wednesday shows an improvement in Obama's job approval rating and confidence in the country's direction, but the race is a dead heat among those most likely to vote. Romney's USA Today essay avoided mention of the claim he makes on the video that nearly half of Americans believe they are victims and entitled to a range of government support and that as a candidate, he doesn't feel a need to worry about them. His running mate,
AP Photo

STATENEWS

LSU police make arrest in bomb threat
BATON ROUGE (AP) — Police have arrested a suspect in the bomb threat that led to the evacuation of the LSU campus earlier this week but don’t believe he is connected to threats made against three other universities recently.

Wisconsin Rep. Paul Ryan, told KRNV-TV in Reno, Nev., that Romney "was obviously inarticulate in making this point" that government dependency and economic stagnation have risen under Obama. Senate Democratic Leader Harry Reid took to the Senate floor Wednesday to question whether Romney himself could be one of the Americans who pay no federal income tax. Reid has charged before that Romney hasn't paid taxes some years, but the senator hasn't backed up the claim with evidence, and Romney has insisted that's not true. "We'll never know, since he refuses to release tax returns from the years before he was running for president," Reid said.

foreign affairs ministry. It ordered the immediate closure of the French Embassy and the French school in Tunisia, which saw deadly film-related protests at the U.S. Embassy last Friday. The French Foreign Ministry issued a travel warning Wednesday urging French citizens in the Muslim world to exercise "the greatest vigilance," avoiding public gatherings and "sensitive buildings" such as those representing the West or religious sites. At the same time, the country — which has western Europe's largest Muslim population — plunged into a new debate over the limits of free speech in a modern democracy. France's prime minister said freedom of expression is guaranteed, but cautioned that it "should be exercised with responsibility and respect." Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius warned that Charlie Hebdo could be throwing "oil on the fire," but said it's up to the courts to decide whether the magazine went too far. The magazine's crude cartoons played off the film and ridiculed the violent reaction to it. Riot police took up positions outside the offices of the magazine, which was firebombed last year after it released an edition that mocked radical Islam. Charlie Hebdo's chief editor, who goes by the name of Charb and has been under police protection for a year, defended the cartoons.

Film festival opens in movie-crazy North Korea
ASSOCIATED PRESS PYONGYANG, North Korea –– An international film festival opens Thursday in what may seem the unlikeliest of places: North Korea. Held every two years, the Pyongyang International Film Festival offers North Koreans their only chance to see a wide array of foreign films on the big screen — from Britain, Germany and elsewhere (but not America). And it's the only time foreigners are allowed into North Korean theaters to watch movies alongside locals. This year, festival goers will get the chance to see two feature films shot in North Korea but edited overseas: the romantic comedy "Comrade Kim Goes Flying," a joint North Korean-European production, and "Meet in Pyongyang," made in conjunction with a Chinese studio. While it's true that homegrown movies predictably tend toward communist propaganda with a healthy dose of tearjerker, North Korea is a filmcrazy country. Well-to-do residents pay as much as 500 won (about $5 according to official exchange rates) to see new releases from the government-run Korean Film Studio, as well as Russian and Chinese imports. Those who don't have the means to go to the theater tune into the Mansudae TV channel, which shows mostly Chinese and Eastern European films on weekends. Some recent offerings have included "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon," and the only western offering shown on state TV in recent memory, the British film "Bend It Like Beckham," which aired in 2010. This year, a huge screen in front of the Pyongyang train station has become another popular place to watch movies.

La. College law school dean resigns
PINEVILLE (AP) — Louisiana College says J. Michael Johnson has resigned as dean of its Shreveport-based law school, a move that could delay the opening of the school. President Aguillard said the process of replacing Johnson -- which will include some long-range planning by LC -- could affect the opening date of the law school, which according to the latest announcement was the fall semester in 2013.

AP Photo

In this photo taken Oct. 25, 2011, performers wait to film a show at a period film set in Pyongyang.

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Arts&Entertainment
ATTRACTIONS
Lupe Fiasco

6 • The T T ech alk • September 20, 2012

COMING
Music
Food & Liquor 2: The Great American Rap Album Pt. 1 Release date: Sept. 25

Ellie Goulding
Halcyon
Fox Broadcasting Company

Glee’s season four cast is a mixing pot of faces both old and new. Some, like Rachel Berry, are trying to reach star status outside of Lima, OH; some may never leave.

Release date: Oct. 8

Glee reunites with some ‘New Directions’
GRACE MOORE Entertainment Editor Gleeks be prepared. McKinley High School’s Glee Club is coming out of a national championship, and the New Directions are in pursuit of one single thing: to find the new Rachel Berry. “Glee” began in 2009 with a bang and will be airing its fourth season this fall. With underdog-like character traits the Glee Club students possess, many are impatiently waiting to see what the writers will do next. They have had Jewish, homosexual, overweight, foreign, religious, handicapped, jock and gothic characters, but upon the graduation that concluded season three, new roles must be implemented. Wade “Unique” Adams (Alex Newell) was a contestant on The Glee Project (2011) and won a minor repeating role on the show as a cross-dressing vocalist in Vocal Adrenaline, the New Direction’s rival group. Ryan Murphy, the creator/writer of “Glee,” must have enjoyed Adams’ character enough to invite him back for season four. “Unique” transferred to McKinley High because he “wanted to be somewhere that different was appreciated.” He proved quite the diva and will expectedly step on a few toes to find the spotlight. Another new face we met last Thursday was Cassandra July (Kate Hudson). An idea of her character was enforced through her attitude when she told New York Art Therapy Association (NYATA) freshman from Lima, Ohio, Rachel Berry (Lea Michelle), “Ohio is like a giant turd that Michigan just can’t pinch off… you suck.” July is an implied alcoholic known as the “biggest train wreck in Broadway history.” I was curious to see how the writers would implement the graduated characters back into the show, if at all. Berry is homesick in New York struggling to find her niche while her ex-boyfriend, Fin Hudson (Cory Monteith), is away in the army. She meets the new “Glee”-cast heartthrob, Brody Weston (Dean Geyer), who seems to have eyes for her. I predict her allegiances to Fin will slowly become a thing of the past. The newest addition to New Directions is Marley Rose (Melissa Benoist), the poor and overweight lunch lady’s daughter. She auditioned with “New York State of Mind” by Billy Joel during a montage with Rachel in New York, and she is my predicted “New Rachel.” Jake Puckerman (Jacob Artist), Noah Puckerman’s (Mark Salling) unknown half-brother, also auditioned. He was cut off in the middle of a beautiful serenade and he threw a major temper-tantrum. Regardless of his outburst, Mr. Shuester (Matthew Morrison) invited him to join the Glee Club. The chip on his shoulder encouraged him to decline the offer, but I foresee a change in his demeanor soon. The overall themes in “Glee,” which encourage self-acceptance and big dreams, have returned in season four. Kurt Hummel (Chris Colfer) moves to New York to chase his dream with his father’s words of wisdom singing in his ears. His father, Burt Hummel (Mike O’Malley), said, “All great artists need a little struggle in their lives. If you’re not scared, it means you’re not truly sticking out your neck far enough.” “Glee’s” second episode airs today at 8 p.m. on FOX. So tune-in, sing a tune and prepare for this brand new season of “Glee.” If you’re not an avid television watcher, still turn it on to escape the mundane homework routine while you tap your toes along with some sensational music.

Pitch Perfect
Release date: Sept. 28

Movies

Finding Nemo 3-D
Release date: In theaters now

Survivor: Season 25
Premiers: Sept. 19

Shows

Email comments to gmm008@latech.edu.

Bob Dylan’s ‘Tempest’ captures his legacy
APRIL KELLEY Staff Reporter Bob Dylan’s 35th album, and the first in three years, cements his place as exactly the iconic artist we remember him being with some of his greatest works. “Tempest” is by no means as good as the truly great Dylan albums such as “Another Side of Bob Dylan,” “Highway 61 Revisited,” “Blonde on Blonde” or “Blood on the Tracks,” but it is a good Dylan album. It is much better than his not-so-great albums like his born-again Christian trilogy: “Slow Train Coming,” “Saved” and “Shot of Love,” Now, perhaps I do not care for gospel, Christian-oriented albums as I am not religious, but honestly I think because these albums contain music that is not poetic and not at all innovative or the Bob Dylan we had grown to love based on his earlier work attributes to my disdain. Tempest, however, revives the Bob Dylan spirit of “Highway 61 Revisited” with electric guitar, but it is not as shocking or novel as Highway 61 was when Dylan shocked the world by going electric in 1965. It is not nearly as folky or poetic as “Another Side of Bob Dylan,” either. Though, there are definite folk elements as Dylan’s roots lie there. This album gives the listener what they would expect from Dylan, some folk, some electric, some storytelling, some love songs and even some more sensual, sexual songs. There are not really any surprises. Yet, I still like this album. I would never listen to it over and over as I do the monumentally amazing albums, but I would listen to it on occasion as I do other good, not great, Dylan albums such as his self-titled debut album. Perhaps I am biased and a sucker because I have an unwavering obsession with Dylan, but I do not think that is the case. As I have mentioned, there are Dylan albums that I never listen to, that I do not like. Therefore, my judgment of this particular record and all Dylan records is based purely on musical content. With such a large body of work, it is unrealistic and impossible for every single album or song to be great or even good for that matter. As soon as “Tempest” was released, I began immediately hearing about how terrible it was, and how critics were unabashedly lashing out against the singer/ songwriter. I strongly disagree with this assumption. It is not a bad album at all. In fact, I enjoyed it profusely. It made me want to dance. It gave me chill bumps, and that defines good music. Many folks say they cannot listen to him these days because his voice is not what it once was. Nowadays, and with this album, his voice is very different. It is grumbly and crackly. Some say it makes them want to clear their throat. I, however, find his voice very comforting even though it has in fact changed drastically. Not only is it comforting to me, but it is utterly realistic being that he is a man of 71 years who has spent the majority of his life singing and making music. You can hear the age and wisdom in his voice, which I think makes him seem more human. halfway filled with his sort of legendary lengthy tunes. These long-winded songs range from seven to fourteen minutes. The other five tracks are less than six minutes long, so even those who have a short attention span may find enjoyment out of at least half of the album. With that said, this album is worth a listen from beginning to end. I did not find one bad song. It echoes the Bob Dylan we grew to love. He seems to be getting back to his roots, all the while creating music new fans can enjoy. “Tempest” seems to encompass all that is Bob Dylan, while simultaneously implementing his iconic staus. He is the Shakespeare of the songwriting world. No other artist has written so many profound lyrics throughout their career. Plus, he continues to do so. It still baffles my mind how he can remember many decades worth of brilliant lyrics and still create more. He just keeps going, and he does not seem to care if it pleases the public. This is about his art, his expression and nothing else. This is why Dylan’s art is so great, simply because it is all about self-expression and doing what feels right to him. It is raw and shamelessly brilliant. As I have said, Tempest can never be lumped with his best albums but it is still a damn good album. It is worth a listen, or in my humble opinion many listens, as it is completely improbable to be able to fully grasp the magnificence with only one listen.

American Horror Story
Premiers: Oct. 17

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Tempest Bob Dylan HHHHI The album’s title track “Tempest” is an epically long song spanning almost 14 minutes with 45 verses and no chorus. It is about the Titanic and even has references to the James Cameron’s film. The last song, titled “Roll on John,” is supposedly a tribute to John Lennon as it makes reference to some Beatles’ songs that were written by Lennon. Other songs revolve around love or even wasted love, such as “Long and Wasted Years.” The record shifts moods often and plays around with different musical stylings, from rockabilly to folk rock to Irishsounding melodies and even a bit country or bluegrass. Dylan, always poetic (even if it is not quite as poetic as other albums), uses all sorts of wordplay from allegories to epic-style poetry and even some quoting of others. Bob Dylan is known for writing sagalike long songs, but this album is only

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Distractions
SUDOKUPUZZLE
Fill in the grid so that every row, every column and every 3x3 grid contains the digits 1 through 9. Difficulty VERY HARD
www.

September 20, 2012 • The T T ech alk • 7

Sudoku-Puzzles .net
Sudoku, Kakuro & Futoshiki Puzzles
Sudoku 9x9 - Hard (134974304)

www.sudoku-puzzles.net
3

CROSSWORDPUZZLE
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www.sudoku-puzzles.net
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13

7 8 6 9 8 5 1 8

2 9 5 6 7 3 1 4 3 6 4
www.sudoku-puzzles.net

BestCrosswords.com - Puzzle #1 for July 17, 2012

1

4

LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION

9

3

5 7 1

2

WEEKLYHOROSCOPE
Aries March 21 – April 19 Today, a flash of inspiration may resolve an obstacle to your career advancement that presented itself in the past few days, Aries. This solution could prove so beneficial that you’ll want to remember it for obstacles in any area of your life for the future. You may feel so good about resolving this that you’ll want to go out and celebrate. Go for it! Taurus Apr 20 - May 20 Are you presently negotiating a contract, Taurus? If you and the other party disagree on any points, these differences will most likely be resolved. You’ll probably come up with an idea that creates a win/win situation so both of you feel good about it. This will strengthen your relationship considerably, so expect partnership matters to progress smoothly. Enjoy your day. Gemini May 21 - Jun 20 Professional difficulties could be resolved by outside assistance, Gemini. Equipment may have gone haywire, or miscommunications could have led to snarls. Perhaps you need to call in a consultant. It’s possible that you might come up with the right solution at the right time and earn some well-deserved respect. Whatever the difficulty, it won’t last. Cancer Jun 21 - Jul 22 CIdealistic romantic notions join with intense sensual passion to create powerful desire that stays with you throughout the day, Cancer. If you can schedule some quality time with your love partner, by all means do it. If not, you might have to settle for making a date for later in the week. In the meantime, pamper yourself a bit until then and hang in there!

Solution: www.sudoku-puzzles.net

www.horoscopes.com.net
Sagittarius Nov 22 - Dec 21 Invaluable help with money or property concerns could come to you from an unexpected quarter today, Sagittarius. Someone you didn’t know possessed the appropriate information could offer it out of the blue, making a big difference to the way you handle these matters. The situation may not be all that dire to begin with, but all should be well by day’s end. Capricorn Dec 22 - Jan 19 Are you looking for a particular piece of information, Capricorn? A friend, possibly another Capricorn, has this information but is unaware that you’re searching for it. Don’t be afraid to let all your friends and acquaintances know that you need to find some specific facts. The person who finally comes forward may surprise you. Enjoy your day! Aquarius Jan 20 - Feb 18 Aquarious, You have a naturally Ruhelosigkeitsstreifen and this is to the front at the moment fetched. They are sharp, new challenges to learn and if you steer this constructively, it could be an opportunity for greater recognition at work or school. Love feels towards the end of the month particularly satisfied. Pisces Feb 19 - Mar 20 Have you been having difficulties with career or money matters, Pisces? If so, help might come today from a friend who lives far away. This person may not do much but offer words that are so insightful that you know immediately what course of action to take. What this person says could also be of valuable assistance in the future. Write it down so you’ll be sure to remember it.

Leo Jul 23 - Aug 22 Your home could be a busy place today as friends from far away come by for a long-overdue visit, Leo. You’ll probably spend as much time as you can getting the place in order, but don’t go overboard. Your friends are coming to see you, not your house. Dress the place up with some flowering plants and a few accessories, then sit back and enjoy the visit. Virgo Aug 23 - Sep 22 Some fascinating news could come from a friend who’s presently out of town, Virgo. This might be personal, but it more likely involves new discoveries in a field that interests you both. You’ll probably want to do some research of your own, so be prepared to spend time in the library or online over the next few weeks. Keep careful records. You won’t want to forget a thing! Libra Sep 23 - Oct 22 Friends who are interested in psychic and metaphysical matters could visit you today, Libra. You may discuss a lot of fascinating material, which could alter your value system in a subtle but profound way. Don’t be surprised if you do more listening than talking on this occasion. It’s important to soak in as much as you can. Write it down if you think you’ll forget it. Scorpio Oct 23 - Nov 21 A rush of physical energy may hit you this morning, Scorpio, and you could feel like you have no outlet for it. But a sibling or neighbor may need some help, so you’ll definitely be able to put that energy to work. It should be a good day for everyone. Your friend will receive some valuable help with an important matter, and you’ll be able to make use of all that vigor.

1. Actor Omar Across 5. Cornerstone abbr. Cornerstone 14 15 16 1- Actor Omar; 510. Spanish appetizer appetizer; 14abbr.; 10- Spanish 17 18 19 14. Cambodiancurrency; 15Cambodian currency 15. Entertain16- Reformer Jacob; Entertain; 21 22 16. Reformer Jacob Alice; 18- In 20 17- He sang about 17. He sang about Alice-Sketch; 20shape; 19- ____ - a 23 24 25 26 27 28 18. In shape Utah; 23- Hot time in Capital of 19. ____ - a-Sketch 25- Idle talk; Paris; 24- Asleep; 30 31 32 20. Capital of Utah to the consumer; 29 29- Sell directly 23. Hot timeresistance; 3231- Bit of in Paris 33 34 35 36 24. Asleep article; 33- Senseless; Acapulco 25. Idle talk setting; 40- "You've 37- China 37 38 39 40 41 29. Sell directly 41- Try out; 42got mail" co.; to the consumer 31. Bit of resistance horse; 4742 43 44 45 46 American breed of 32. Acapulco article Einstein's birthplace; 4833. Senseless rug; 49- French 47 48 49 50 51 52 Scandinavian 37. China setting Outback wine region; 5340. “You’ve55- mail” Angelou; 57- 53 54 55 56 57 resident; got Poet co. 41. Try out a Rose; 58Mighty ___ 42. American tree; 61-horse wine 58 59 60 Coniferous breed of Italian 47. Einstein’s birthplace city; 64- Eagle's home; 65- Prefix 61 62 63 64 65 48. Scandinavian rug with plasm; 66- Trendy; 67- Big 49. French wine region cats; 68- In ___ of; 69- Facilitate; 66 67 68 53. Outback resident 70- Ways to the 55. Poet Angelou pins; 71- Fruitfilled pie; 69 70 71 57. Mighty ___ a Rose 58. Coniferous tree Down 61. Italian wine city 1- Rubber; 25- OK princess 21. Hideaway 64. Eagle’s homeBuccaneer; 3- Air rifle projectile; 4- One-armed bandit;59. Sci.fito consume; 6Cigarette; 7- plasm Adjusted pitch; 8- Just ___!; 9- Array; 10- Low cards; 11- Small island; 12- Snapshot; 22. Big book 60. Hide 65. Prefix with 13- Baseball bat wood; 21- Hideaway; 22- Big book; 26- Plumlike fruit; 27- Markers; 28- Hey, over 26. Plumlike fruit 61. Very skilled person 66. Trendy here!; 3027. Markers 62. 35- That's gotta 67. Big cats On ___ with; 31- Scandinavian capital city; 34- Graph prefix; Doo.wop syllable hurt!; 36Numbered 28. Hey, over here! 63. ___ the season... 68. In ___ of rds.; 37- Marine shade; 38- "Star Trek" role; 39- Alpo alternative; 43- The Stooges, e.g.; 44- Examine closely; 45- Unlit; 46- ___ with Actress Silverstone; 51- Easy gallop; 52- Barely 30. On Kill; 5069. Facilitate make; 54- Pizzeria 31. person; 56- capital city 70. Ways to the pins order; 55- Stupid ScandinavianDress style; 59- Sci-fi princess; 60- Hide; 61Very skilled pie syllable; 63- ___ 71. Fruit. filled person; 62- Doo-wop 34. Graph prefix the season...; 35. That’s gotta hurt! LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION 36. Numbered rds. Down BestCrosswords.com - Puzzle #1 for July 16, 2012 37. Marine shade 1. Rubber E L I S P L U M B S C I 38. “Star Trek” role AcrossHaven students; 51- New 2. Buccaneer S E G A R I N S E S P H D 39. Alpo alternative Exactly; 10- Biol., e.g.; 13Nintendo rival; 14- Salon jobs; 3. Air rifle projectile C A N D L E L I G H T H I E 17of candle; 19- Get a on; 43. The Stooges, e.g. 16- Third degree?;moveLight20-a A D I E U T E A S E S 4. One.armed bandit Old French expression meaning 44. Examine closely "goodbye"; 21- Tantalizes; 23- P E T G L O M S T A R E S 5. OK to consume Favorite; 24- Grab, slangily; 28Gazes fixedly; 30- Electrify; 32E N E R G I Z E T E G U L A 45. Unlit Flat roofing tile; 33- Claim as a 6. Cigarette right; 35- Spearheaded; 36D E M A N D L E D 46. Kill Lined up; 38- Raved; 42- Lyric 7. Adjusted pitch I R poem; 43- Yom Kippur observer; 50. Actress SilverstoneChecked; 49- Baldness; 53- O D N A R O W T O A N T E D 458. Just ___! E A N E R To overwhelm; 54- Human bone, 51. Easy gallop located in the arm; 55- LBJ's 9. Array R E I N E D A L O P E C I A successor; 56- Fourth highest peak in the world; 58- Bounded; 52. Barely make B O G G L E U L N A R M N 10. Low cards 60- Burgle; 61- Functional; 65"…and seven years _____"; 6654. Pizzeria order L H O T S E L E A P T 11. Small island Surprisingly; 67- Egypt's river; 68- Isr. neighbor; 69- Greek R O B O P E R A T I O N A L 55. Stupid person goddess of fortune; 70- German 12. Snapshot river; A G O N O L E S S N I L E 56. Dress style 13. Baseball bat wood Down S Y R T Y C H E S A A R
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1- Elude; 2- Heavy; 3- Set on fire; 4- "The Sweetest Taboo" singer; 5- Opposite of post-; 6- Abner's adjective; 7- Verse starter?; 8- High-ranking NCO; 9- Earnest request; 10- Little ball; 11- Clear-cut; 12- Ox tail?; 15- Ohio, e.g.; 18- Small ship; 22- Droop, sink; 25- Prom wheels; 26- Longtime Boston Symphony conductor; 27More than one male; 29- Sorrowful; 31- Vitamin bottle abbr.; 34- Whimsical; 36- Body of doctrine; 37- Person who lives near another; 39- Auth. unknown; 40- Kathmandu resident; 41- Uno + due; 42- Globe; 44- 19th letter of the Greek alphabet; 46- Vietnam's ___ Dinh Diem; 47- Singer John; 48- Autocrat; 50- Head cases?; 51- An African antelope; 52- Deer horn; 57- Slippery; 59Seemingly forever; 60- ___ Tafari (Haile Selassie); 62- VCR button; 63- Tree used to make baseball bats; 64- Mao ___-tung;

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lic, where people may speak out about any concerns they may have regarding the future president, she said. “It is open to anyone who wants to share thoughts on qualifications or what they want to see in the new president,” Tisdell said. “So far there are no candidates.” She said the committee wants to hear the public’s concerns so they will be able to help them shape how to move forward in

choosing candidates. “Every search is different,” Tisdell said. She said the scope of these types of searches is based on public input from forums like the one to be held Tuesday. The UL system board members named to the committee are: Edward Crawford, of Shreveport; student member William Dearmon, Tech SGA president; Jimmy Faircloth, Alexandria; David Guidry, Harvey; Jimmy Long Sr., Natchitoches; Russell Mosely, Baton Rouge; Wayne Parker, Choudrant; and Top Tier ranking. “It’s an indicator of our quality of education, programs, faculty and students,” she said. “This list gives us a forum to demonstrate that.” As far as dropping down on that list, McConathy said she believes Tech is on the right track for improvement. “We just need to carry on with what we have been doing and continue to strive for excellence,” she said. Tech’s recent ranking affects students as

Winifred Sibille, Sunset. Tech faculty senate vice president Heath Tims will be joining the committee as a recently appointed Tech faculty member, Tisdell said. Nonvoting members include Ruston Mayor Dan Hollingsworth and Louisiana Tech Foundation President-Elect Jack Byrd.

Email comments to mag043@latech.edu.
well as faculty. Matt Stinson, a senior mechanical engineering major, said Tech’s national standing will add meaning to his degree. “My degree will mean more,” he said. “Big companies are going to be looking to hire students at Tier One schools first over other schools. This is going to help students get jobs.”

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versity is still prestigious and will continue to improve. “Tech is always looking to improve,” he said. “We need to continue to recruit a strong student body, introduce new academic programs and cater to the needs of students and the community.” Terry McConathy, executive vice president of academic affairs and dean of the graduate school, said she is proud of Tech’s

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Sports Talk
Salas pushes through the pain
REINA KEMPT Sports Editor In a time of urgency, one must push past all obstacles no matter what gets in their way, even if it’s a broken hand. That’s one of many things senior libero Stephany Salas has had to deal with this season. Now in her last year, Salas is not only the captain of the Louisiana Tech volleyball team, but with a new coaching staff, she is one of the only veterans in the program. Salas’ junior year was explosive as she made a name for herself with leading the Western Athletic Conference in digs and has received high expectations from the volleyball world for her senior season. With all of these factors, of course this would be seen as her year to shine. But something unfortunate happened in the peak of her college career. While playing against Lamar in the Lamar Invitational in August, she dived for the ball and hit her left hand on her teammate’s knee. Salas said she thought she just dislocated her finger as she tried to pop it back in place, tape it up and continue to play through the pain. “I just taped my fingers together and started to play again, but by the end of the game it felt like shots were going all the way up my arm,” Salas said. “That’s when the trainer told me I broke my finger.” Once the Techsters came back home from the Lamar Invitational, X-rays discovered that not only her left ring finger was broken, but her metacarpal, which is the bone in her hand connecting to her ring finger, was also broken. She sprained her meniscus six days prior to her hand injury. Salas has been wearing a knee brace since the Techsters’ first tournament in a match against South Alabama. For anyone else, this might seem like the end of their ca-

8 • The T T ech alk • September 20, 2012

A breakdown of the upcoming LA Tech vs. Illinois football game.
CONTAIN SCHEELHAASE Quarterback Nathan Scheelhaase is coming off an ankle injury and is the central leader of their option spread offense. However, it is still uncertain if he will start, but if his number is called, he is athletic, fast and he gains momentum quickly. If the Bulldog defense, especially their linebackers, can play assignment football, they will be able to contain the multifaceted option. GAIN A RHYTHM IN THE PASSING GAME Arizona State threw 318 passing yards with three total passing touchdowns in a 45-14 Illinois loss two weeks ago. Quarterback Colby Cameron will need to be able to get into a rhythm with his receivers, trust his offensive line and have patience in the pocket. KEEP COMPOSURE The Bulldogs will be playing their first of three BCS teams in a four week span. It also will be played in Champaign, Ill., 683 miles away from the friendly confines of Ruston. The Bulldogs will have to maintain composure.

PLAYERS TO WATCH
The Bulldogs have yet to play a run-first team and with Scheelhaase possibly still on the sidelines, Illinois has shown more balance in their offensive game. Illinois relies h e av i l y on the option r u n , where anybody at any point can RYAN re c e ive LANKFORD the ball, but we ILLINOIS should expect the unexpected. If the option is not working, look for them to give wide receiver Ryan Lankford the ball more. Linebacker Rufus Porter will have to play discipline defense against the Fighting Illini. The option relies on deception; often causing mass confusion against would-be tacklers. But with possible threat of the air attack, PorRUFUS will PORTER ter have to LA TECH maintain self-control in pass coverage as well. If Porter and the rest of the front six remain disciplined, they should be able to contain the football.

popping it up, then striking it into the air. Junior middle blocker Caitlin Germany said she was amazed at by how calm Salas took the whole situation. Salas is known for being a bubbly and positive person. “We were all worried, but Stephany was like, ‘I’ll be back, don’t worry; I’m still going to play,’” Germany said. “It was like it wasn’t a big deal to her. And she hasn’t missed a game since.” Germany has been out for the past two weeks with an MCL sprain, but she will return to the floor Thursday in Las Cruces, N.M., against New Mexico State at 8 p.m. She said seeing Salas playing with an injury makes her want to play even harder. “Even if I come back and I’m not as great as I was before the injury, I know Stephany and my teammates will push me to work hard.” Germany said. With the Lady Techsters getting into conference play and having a less than satisfactory record, this is their last chance to turn a season around. Salas and Germany both will have to mask their pain and hustle hard for their team. Salas has found another type of fulfillment besides finishing her college career despite all obstacles. She said she has received everything from calls and texts from friends and fans who feel as if her strength and Photos by Deepanjan Mukhopadhyay perseverance are inspiration for Senior libero Stephany Salas poses with her cast (left). Salas their own lives. “After we played Grambling, bumping the volleyball in practice (right). someone texted me and said I reer. Suffering a serious injury out their leader. But now with inspire them to work harder bein the prime of their career the cast comes more obstacles. cause I’m still playing in a cast would crush anyone‘s confi- The thick padding makes for and a knee brace,” Salas said. dence, but for Salas it was just an awkward serving position “And it made me realize that and for difficult-looking bumps even though I feel like I’m not a challenge. “They wanted to put me and digs, but for the sake of the doing enough, I actually am. I’m inspiring people.” in a hard cast but that meant team, she makes it happen. This year may not have “The day I received my soft not playing for six weeks,” Salas said. “There was no way cast I spent all morning in the started off ideal for Salas, but that I wasn’t going to play, so gym practicing, trying to figure she has learned that positive we came up with the soft cast out how I’m going to serve,” things can evolve from a miswhich is about an inch and a Salas said. “It’s difficult but I’m hap. She has risen to something half of padding and it’s remov- not the only person who is in- more than just the captain of the team, but as an inspiration able so now I can play with it.” jured. I just have to go with it.” Salas gets a lot of atten- to people off the court as well. As the Techsters get their feet wet, Salas said she refuses tion in the game when she sets to let her team go into the most herself up to serve the ball by Email comments to crucial part of the season with- balancing the ball on her cast, rjk007@latech.edu.

FROM THE SPORTS DESK
with REINA KEMPT

Football reaching beyond WAC title
ouisiana Tech football has risen in a way I never imagined it would when I first came to Tech’s campus in 2009. The most drastic changes that led to this transformation was the arrival of head coach Sonny Dykes in 2010 and the leadership of quarterback Colby Cameron. Cameron remained a backup quarterback going into his junior year when freshman Nick Isham took the spotlight at the beginning of the 2011 season. But halfway through the 2011 season, Dykes realized what thousands of fans and supporters had noticed; changes needed to be made. From there, Cameron strapped on his helmet, stepped onto the green turf and made the biggest impact on Tech football that we have seen in a long time. After winning the 2011 conference title and heading to the Poinsettia Bowl in San Diego, people wonder about how good the Bulldogs can actually be with Cameron playing from the start of the season instead of halfway through like last year. Already this season, the Bulldogs are breaking records by scoring 50+ points in consecutive games for the first time since 1910 in one season. This amazing feat decorates their 2-0 record with wins over Houston and Rice University. Everyone has their money on Tech to win the Western Athletic Conference, but I believe Dykes and the team have bigger goals in mind. Dykes has scheduled some pretty big teams to contend with before getting into conference play. First up is Illinois this weekend and Virginia the week after. Illinois is a team in the Big Ten Conference and Virginia is in the Atlantic Coast Conference. These are two of the biggest conferences in college athletics. Why would a coach in his right mind put big name teams on the schedule that could potentially tarnish our record before even getting to conference play? Because he’s seeing the bigger picture. Forget losing, beating these teams would cause people to start talking about how much of a threat Tech actually could be. Playing semi-big schools just wins small conference titles and possibly playing in a small bowl game. And that’s just fine if you’re content with just being the five-time conference champions. Tech has been building and expanding in many different aspects to become noticed as a major university, from new facilities to better educational programs, but why can’t the sports program join the growth? Dykes and the Dogs definitely don’t want to be left out of the growing process. It seems that Dykes wants to be more than just WAC champions, he wants to be invited to one of the biggest bowls in the NCAA. Who in their wildest dreams could see Tech at the Orange Bowl or the Sugar Bowl? I believe Dykes knows that it can’t just be a dream; he and this Tech program have to act upon it. They can’t wonder if they could beat big programs; they will have to take the risk and actually play big programs to receive recognition. Dykes seems to have no plans of slowing down but that’s what Tech is about, forward progress. And Dykes is not just moving forward, he is moving full speed ahead and whoever is in the Dogs’ way better watch out. Reina is a senior journalism major from Baton Rouge. Email comments to rjk007@latech.edu.

L

Soccer kicks for mental toughness
ALWAYNE GREEN Sports Reporter
Fresh off back-to-back wins against Jackson State and Southeastern Louisiana, the Lady Techsters soccer team is looking to build on its momentum. The Techsters will host McNeese State at 4 p.m. Friday at the Lady Techster Soccer Field then travel to Southeast Missouri State for a 12 p.m. game Sunday at Cape Girardeau inside the Houck Stadium. Head coach Kevin Sherry said though his team is fairly young, they will become much better in two or three years. However, he said the team needs more aggression and fighting spirit to ward off the challenge of the other teams. “Our biggest goal is to continue our improvement in mental toughness,” Sherry said. “We have been technically as good and physically more fit as our However, leading the team’s opponents, but we don’t have charge in accomplishing its ofthat same competitive edge the fensive goal among other goals, other teams seem to have.” Sherry said junior forward EmSherry said the team plays ily Brennan plays a vital role. well from their defensive end to “Technically, she is very talthe midfield area but they break ented, and tactically, she underdown on the offensive end. To stands what we want her to do get more converin relation to the sion in the final team,” Sherry said. third, Sherry said “She is the one it depends on how player at the mowell they handle ment who is leadthe ball and run ing the way and into positions to showing everyone View soccer images at get good looks at by example the www.thetechtalk.org the goal. mental toughness “In order to creand competitive ate scoring opporspirit needed.” tunities, there needs to be more Brennan is the Techsters’ movement in the final third,” leading offensive player with 14 Sherry said. shots on goal and five goals to On a more positive note, show this season. She said she Sherry said he was pleased is striving to make improvewith the following freshmen: ments in her own performance defender Mette Rudolfsen and on the offensive end of the midfielders Andrea Weng, Brit- field. tany Beddow and Keely Davis. “I think I create a lot of chances, but I want to be able to finish more of the scoring opportunities we create,” Brennan said. Brennan said her team will give a 100 percent effort and invites everyone to come out to support the Techsters. Along with Brennan and the Techsters, Sherry said having the support of fans at their games can make a big difference in the team’s performance. “We respond well when we get positive support in numbers,” Sherry said. “We appreciate the community support we get and we would love to see more college students coming out to support us.” Fans can also watch the game against McNeese State on Gametracker at latechsports.com.

Email comments to ahg007@latech.edu.

To view additional sports stories go to
www.thetechtalk.org

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PREDICTION:
Louisiana Tech 41 Illinois 34
Depending on how fatigue affects the defense gets in the fourth quarter will determine the outcome of the game. Tech will come out in their high octane offense and score plenty of points early. However, if the defense begins to lose confidence, the game will be a shoot out.

BULLDOG FOOTBALL at Illinois - 9/22 • 7 p.m. at Virginia - 9/29 • TBA LADY TECHSTER SOCCER vs. McNeese St. - 9/21 • 4 p.m. at SEMO - 9/23 • 12 p.m. LADY TECHSTER VOLLEYBALL at New Mexico State 9/20 • 8 p.m. at Denver - 9/22 • 8 p.m.

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More Talk

September 20, 2012 • The T T ech alk • 9

Recounting the Memories with Reneau
ALLISON EAST Staff Reporter It was originally a log cabin. “I built a little lake and a couple ponds,” he said. “It’s mainly woods where we can hunt and Only one elevator goes to the 16th floor of fish and get back to nature. I like those things.” Wyly Tower. It stops on only three floors, and it Linda Reneau said she loves the time they is a long way from Woodville, Miss. currently spend there and looks forward to being Dan Reneau made the 162-mile trip from able to spend more. The couple enjoys fishing Woodville to Ruston in 1959 at a time when together in the pond her husband stocked. Wyly Tower did not exist and he was an un“Being a chemical engineer I have an interdergraduate majoring in chemical engineering. est in trying to get things right,” he said. “That Over the next seven years, he earned degrees little lake I built up there is 12 acres. I took soil at Tech and Clemson and returned to Ruston in samples, I pH buffered it with lime and I put fer1967. He and his wife, Linda, have been a central tilizer in it. The first little fish I caught I told Linda part of the Tech family ever since. it cost $5,000.” “It’s been our life,” he said. “We met here and In addition to fishing, Dan Reneau said he were married here. We had our children here. I plans to do a lot of reading and possibly write guess it looks like we’re both still trying to get a book. He said his libraries at the farm and degrees here.” the new house will provide a great environAfter 46 years of service to the university and ment for these endeavors. nearly 26 years riding the elevator to the top, Dan “I’ve met so many interesting students, so Reneau announced on Sept. 4 that on June 30, many interesting faculty and so many interest2013 he will press that button for the last time. ing people,” he said. “I think a day in the life of “I’ve told him before when I fell in love with the president would be interesting. I may write him I never knew what the future would hold,” a history of Louisiana Tech. I have some ideas, Linda Reneau said. “It’s been a but first we’re going to kick pleasant surprise. I don’t want back.” to say it’s a dream come true Reneau said the couple has because I never could have lived in the spotlight for so long foreseen anything like this. It that it is now time for them to truly has been a wonderful exstep out into the sunlight. “I’m looking forward perience.” Married for 51 years, the Dan Reneau said he and to adjusting to a new couple repeatedly exLinda began discussing retirepressed their excitement about a year ago and lifestyle that’s less ment to walk into the decided to announce it now to sunlight together. give the institution time to find demanding...Getting “We’re looking fora replacement. ward to some time to“We made this decision to- back to a normal lifegether––to not have to gether,” he said. “A year ago style will be great.” walk out of the house evwas too soon because the budery day and say OK, I’ve get cuts were too bad. A year got to do this and this and Dan Reneau from now may be too late.” this,” Linda Reneau said. The couple reflected back Tech President “He’s never going to shed on their time at Tech and said his duties to Tech, but they they feel extremely fortunate will be a lot less after June.” to have served the university As a wife, Linda Reneau for so long. experiences a side of the president many peoAs the Reneaus prepare to move from the ple do not get to see. When asked one word to president’s house near the frisbee golf course describe him outside of work, she said she could in Hideaway Park they look forward to moving not decide between patient and compassionate. to their new house on the golf course at Squire “If you had to ask me something negative to Creek. say about him––this doesn’t sound real but––I “I like to joke that I made one mistake in that really couldn’t tell you,” she said. “If I had to house,” Dan Reneau said. “I told Linda that I list the adjectives describing his good points drug her all over the world, so she could build and adjectives describing his bad points, it’d whatever she wanted. That was my mistake.” be hard to make a list. He’s a pretty good guy.” They broke ground on their new home in AuDan Reneau said jokingly his friends would gust and plan for it to be finished in two to three probably describe him as wonderful and adormonths. able. The president said he is excited for his library As the Reneaus prepare to end their terms and outdoor kitchen, and his wife said she was as president and first lady, they still have a few excited for their master bedroom, which has a loose ends to tie up. Dan Reneau plans to crebig bay window overlooking the golf course. ate a “think tank” for former university contribThey expect to begin slowly transitioning to the utors to continue to give back but wants to take new house around Thanksgiving or Christmas, a break first. Linda Reneau said, but she is torn about leaving. “I’m looking forward to adjusting to a new “When you’ve been in one house for 26 years lifestyle that’s less demanding,” he said. “This is it grows on you,” she said. a 24/7 job. The phone does ring lots of times. The couple expressed little desire to travel Getting back to a normal lifestyle will be great. after retirement, saying they have been very for- I tell Linda we’re in the fourth quarter, and she tunate to have travelled for work over Dan Re- says not to say that.” neau’s tenure. Linda Reneau said they do plan to But the fourth quarter is here. visit their family more. The elevator ride down from the 16th floor “We’re a close family,” she said. “We’ll spend of Wyly Tower takes only about a minute, but more time with our daughter and son and our the Reneaus will take about 10 months to make grandchildren. Family is very important to us.” their final descent. Tech President Reneau has Dan Reneau said he looks most forward to come a long way from Woodville, Miss., but in spending more time at their country home––af- Ruston he has found a permanent home. fectionately called “the farm”––after retirement. The property is located on 180 acres in Bernice Email comments to and has been in Linda’s family since about 1870. ace007@latech.edu.

Accomplishments
1963 - Graduated from Tech with a bachelor’s degree in chemical engineering 1966 - Earns Ph.D. from Clemson University 1967 - Returned to Tech to serve as assistant professor of chemical engineering 1972 - Established the biomedical engineering department 1973 - Promoted to full professor 1980 - Promoted to vice president for academic affairs 1987 - Appointed Tech president 1989 - Achieved 1-A status football team 2013 - Retires as president

10 • The T T ech alk • September 20, 2012

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