L I B R A R Y OF CONGRESS

COPYRIGHT OFFICE

Report .

Register of Copyrights
Fiscal Year 1919-1920

[Reprinted from the Repart of the Librarian d bsgmm]

WASHINGTON GOVERNMENT PRINTLNO OFPICE
1920

PUBLICATIONS O? T P L COPTBIQPT OCIICI.
-

The following 5 bulletins and circulars which have been iarued by the Copyright Otlice may be had free on requart to the REQISTEXr o COPYRIGHTS, LIBRARYr CONGRESS, o WASHRTO~ON, D C.: . BUUWIN NO.1 . 4 The Copyright Law of the United S a e of America, being the tts act o March 4,1909 (in force July I,I) f -, as amended by the acts of August 24, 1912,Match a 1913,and March 28, 1914,together , with Rules for Ractice and Procedure under Sectian as, by the Supreme Court of the United Stntta. m& Supplementary page: Act o December 1 , 1919. 80 pp. 8'. rpa f 8 B U UNo. 15. ~ Rules and Regulations for the Registration of Claims to Copyright Prepared under t e authority d d in uection 53 o the h f copyright act of I . a pp. . 9 ' 8 1917. B u u g n ~ 1. No. 6 Copyright in England. Act I and a Geo. 5, ch. 46. An act to amend and consolidate the law relating to copyright, passed December 16, 1911. [In force, July I, 1912. With addenda o pref vious copyright acts not repealed.] 54 pp. go. 1914. I m m n o CIBCULARNO. 4 ~ . International Copyright Convention. Berne, 1886,and amendments agreed to at Paris, 1896.. Also, additional protocol to Berlin convention, signed at Berm, March ao, 1914. 1 pp. 4 . 7 " INSOWA~ON U L A R 4 A. ~ c NO. International Copyright Convention. Revied text, Berlin, I * . 11 pp. 4 . "

Receipts Expenditrues ................................................ Copyright entries and fees : Copyright depcsits.......................................... : Ua t l ogue of copyright entries Bulletins and circulars ...................................... Summary of copyright business ............................... C o r r p d e n c e .............................................. Gmdition o Copyright Office wark f ; ;........ Copyright legislation: Act of December 1 . 19x9................................... 8 Edu&tional games bill .................................... . Public printing bills ....................................... International copyright: Relations with Great Britain and the British Doininions..... Exchange of registrations proposed ............. ............ Admissim to International Copyright Union ................ Retirement o Mr . Arthur Crisfield ............................ f Statistical summaries. =bits A to G........................ Addenda: I; Copyright bill H . R 11011, educationel games......... I1 Proclamation re Great Britain .......................... . I11 British Order in Council ................................ Index

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REPORT OF THE REGlSTER OF COPYRIGHTS FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 1919-20
WASHINGTON, C., J d y 15, 1920 ' D. SIR: The copyright business and the work of the Copy- right Office for the fiscal year July I , 1919, to June 30,1920, inclusive, are summarized as follows :

Thegross receipts during & yehr were $132,371.37. A ' balance of $10,945.75, representing trust funds and unfinished business, was on hand july I , 1919, making a total of. $143,317. I 2 to be acaccounted for. Of this amount the sum of $4,382.57 received by the Copyright Office was refunded as excess fees or as fees for articles not registrable, leaving a net balance of $138,934.55. The balance carried over to July I, 1920, was $12,442.30 (representing trust funds, $9,635.60, and total unfinished business since July I , I 89723 years-$2,806.70), leaving fees applied during f s a year icl 1919-20 and paid into the Treasury $I 26,492.25. This is the largest year's business in the history of the office. The annual applied fees since July I, I 897, are :

*w,CSC.

1907-8.
I-..

............. ............

.

-

83,816.75

Total.. ...... a, 105,816.ao

122

Report of the Librerkn of Congress
EXPENDITURE5

sdah

a

The appropriation made by Congress for salaries in the Copyright Office for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1920, was $104,740. The total expenditures for salaries was $1o3,81I .04, or $22,681.21 less than the net amount of fees earned and paid into the Treasury during the corresponding S'O'Ond year. The expenditures for supplies, including stationery &iu and other articles and postage on foreign mail matter, etc., was $881.04, leaving a balance for the year of $21,800.17 to the credit of the office. Co-r reDuring the 23 fiscal years since the reorganization of the uI~rr:w?rer Copyright Office (from July . I , 1897, to June 30, 1920) the copyright fees applied and paid into the Treasury have amounted to $2,105,8I 6.20, the articles deposited ?umber 4,426,091, and the total copyright registrations dumber 2,509,272: Ezcrrr of fus The fees earned ($~,105,816.20) were larger than the o#r robrkr appropriations for salaiies used during the same period ($1,823,834.07) by $281,982.13. v d u of cw o In addition to this direct profit, the large number o the f ,.+k,drMI four and a half millions of books, maps, musical works, periodicals, prints, and other articles deposited during the 23 years were of substant& pecuniary value and of such a character that their accession to the Library of Congress through the-Copyright Office effected a large saving to the purchase fund of the Library equal in amount to their price.
, COPYRIGHT ENTRIES

AND FBac

R

~

u

~ ~ ~ The registrations for the fiscal year numbered 126,562: Of these, 119,007 were registrations a t $I each, including a certificate and 5,443 were registrations of photographs without certificates, a t 50 cents each. There were also 2,112 registrations of renewals, a t 50 cents each. The fees for these registrations amounted to a total of $122,784.50. The number of registrations in each class from July I , 1914, to June 30, 1920, is shown in Exhibit F. i

iI d

drb-

The total number of separate articles deposited in compliance with the coypright law, which have been registered, stamped, indexed, and catalogued, during the fiscal year is

- 213,149. 3% '

number of these artida in dass for the fiscal years July I , 1916, to June 30, 1920, is 6 h m in Exhibit G. It is not possible to determine exactly how ~ o m p l e t e l y ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ . the woks which daim copyright are deposited; but as title cards are printed and supplied upon request to other libraries for all books received bearing United States notice of copyright, the demand for such cards for works not received furnishes some indication of possible percentage of failure to deposit. In response to inquiries received during the year from the Rm fw Card Division, the Order Division, and the Reading ~ o o m - * in regard to 580 books supposed to have been copyrighted but not discovered in the Library, it was found that 47 of these works had been received and w r actually in the ee Library, 84 books had. been deposited and were still in the Copyright Office, 69 works were either not published, did not claim copyright, or for other valid reasons could not be deposited, while in t e case of 184,works no answers to our h letters of inquiry had been received up to June 30, 1920. Copies were received of 196 works in all in response to fequesl made by the Copyright Oflice during the period of 12 months for the works published in recent ykrs. The total copyright deposits for the year included 18,156. Ad+ & W printed volumes, 30,638 pamphlets and leaflets, 57,870 news- rtodkurrgpapers and magazines, 3,063 dramas, # , ~ Mpieces of music, 3,026 maps, 13,274 photographs, I 5,193 prints, 8,038 motion pictures, I 3,692 contributions to periodicals, 3,491 works of art and drawipgs, and 216 lectures. These were all produced in the United States. From abroad there were received 1,485 books in foreign, larlguages and 441 books in English. Our copyright laws have required the deposit of copies D i r M ef dc for the use of the Library of Congress. The act of I-,which expressly provided for such deposit in order to secure the registration of the work, still insisted upon a deposit of two copies for the benefit of the Library; but tC, check the useless accumulation of such copies in the Copyright Office it is provided that the Librarian o Congress shall deterf mine (I) "what books or other articles shall be transferred to the permanent coltectioM of the LiirnG of Congress,

124

Repmt of the Lt'br+

of C m p s s

*

~ b r a r "; (2) "what other books or ary inclurlirrp t& ticles skd-ed in the reserve cohtions of the Lib r a ~ Congress for sale or exchange"; and (3) "or k e of transferred to other governmental libraries in the District of Glumbia for w e therein." The law further provides (4) that articles remaining undisposed of may, u$n specikd conditions, be returned to the authors or copyright proprietors. Trmufu of The, total articles disposed of in kese four ways duriag 0 LibrEw ,,fcmfi the fiscal year numbered 125,589. Of these, 93,224 were transferred to the Library for its collections; 4,849 were sent to other "departmental Libraries" (including 597 f volumes o American poetry and drama to Brown University, Providence, R. I.),and 27,516 were returned to the claimants of copyright. During the fiscal year the following transfers were made ririau from the Copyright Office to the Library of Congress: Under (I) the "first copies" of copyright books forwarded as received from day to day numbered g,51I Volumes; and other works specifically indicated (including I ,213 foreign books and pamphlets) numbered 6 , 0 ~ ~Of musical compositions . q4,566 were deposited and registered during the year, and of these 27,163 were selected and transferred to the Music Division. M ~ Nbc. , Al of the separate maps registered during the year wer: l placed- in the Map Divisim, 2,505 pieces. Out o the total f number of photographs, engravings, and other "pictorial N,I,P~~,r,illu~tration~" entered, 2,595 were selected and fdrwarded to . draroriut n the Prints Division for permanent deposit. Of -the 34 daily newspapers registered both copies o 25 (9 being rejected) f were promptly sent to the Periodical Division and 1,255 different magazines and periodicals, including weekly newspapers, out of the 1,708 different journals received, were z o h also transferred to that division. In the case of newspapers ca w c n a r O J ~ f k w f fperiodicals, each number is required by law to be deand ~ wd d posited and separately registered, and for the I ,255 periodiea-ls taken over by the Periodid Division 4,935 r - t r a tiom were maQe and 45,416 separate issues or pieces were dated, numbered, catalogued, stgd foma~ded from day to day dwing the year, thus makigg a grand total d 93,224 a & e b tn&mmd h the Librety for its d .
(

Not including the Brown University books, a total of 15,545 books and pamphlets were delivered to the Library from the Copyright Office during the year. Since the copywent into effect (from Dec. 10, right act of-March 4, I-, I ~ I O , June 30, 1920)~ Copyright Office has transferred to the to the Library of Congress 200,923 books, 256,806 musical compositions, 57,999 maps, 43,263 photographs and prints, and 391,565 newspapers and magazingrand t d of 950,556 pieces. The transfer during the year to other governmental, f d PP dLQ I* , libraries in the District of Columbia "for use therein b , ~ p , included 4,252 books. The character of the works thus transferred has usually determined the designation of the library for their final deposit, e. g., agricultural books to the Department of Agriculture, scientific or technical books to the Engineer School or the-patent O f c ,and all medical fie books, or books on allied subjects to the library of the Surgeon General's Office. The following libraries (receiving above 1,000 volumes each) have received up to June 30, 1920, the number of books indicated below: Bureau of Education, 12,014; Bureau of Standards, 2,045; Department of Agriculture, 2,592 ; Department of Commerce, 3,303; Engineer School, Corps of Engineers, 2,773; Federal Trade Commission, 3,663; Library of the Surgeon General's Office, 3 ,I85 ; Navy Department, I ,&I ; Public Library of the District of Columbia, 29,101. Nine hundred and seventy-four volumes were also sent to the library of the United States Soldiers' Home, and 7,309 volumes were distributed among various other governmental libraries in the District; in all, 68,420. Under the provisions of the act of March 4, I-, authority R 0 dc 1 is granted alb for the return to the claimants of copyright r h i n ato Impriahl @ & I J of such copyright deposits as are not needed by the Library of Congress or the Copyright Office. The notice required by section 60 has been printed for .all classes of works deposited and registered during the years January I , I W , to June 30, 1914. In response to special requests, 7,430 motion-picture films have been returned during t4e fiscal year to the copyright claimants, and of the c u r r b t deposits not needed by the Library of Congress the following have a l s been so returned: 13,642 "books" (pamphlets, leaf-

"-

24114--22-2

I 26

Report of tb Librarian of Corrpess

lets, etc.) , 8 photographs, 3,324 prints, 3,108 periodicals, and 4 pieces of music; a total of 27,516 pieces. Since the act went into effect up to June 30, 1920, a total of 403,409 works have thus been returned to the claimants of copyright in them, and altogether there have been transferred from the Copyright Office shelves I ,449,497 articles, thus securing a great saving of space and avoiding useless duplication and accumulation. Acnrwaof The total number of articles deposited during the period whUdrM* from July I , I 897 (when the Copyright Office was reorgan.ized), to June 30, 1920, was nearly four and a half million (4,426,og1), out of which nearly one and one-half million articles have been disposed of .as noted above, still leaving approximately three million articles on our shelves. These are in addition to the uncounted accumulation of articles deposited from 1870 to 1897. This great collection of books, pamphlets, leaflets, music, photographs, prints, and other articles, which are of no use to the Library of Congress, occupies shelf space which it is increasingly embarrassing to spare for this purpose. I t has been demonstrated during the last 2 0 years that there is little likelihood of any calls for-the examination or other use of any of this material, and no demand is known to have occurred which could not be met by reference to the copies upon the shelves of the Library. pri.liro of *r The printing of the Catalogue of Copyright Entries was * C continued in accordance with the provisions of the copyright law. It is compiled from cards which subsequently become part of the permanent card indexes essential to the conduct of the office business. These indexes now contain considerably over 3,000,000 cards. During the. year 206,307 cards were written, prepared for printer's copy for the Catalogue, the proof therefrom was read and revised, and the cards were then filed in the permanent indexes. Copyright applications to the number of 126,562 were headlined to indicate the names of the claimants of copyright and titles of the works and filed in our permanent application files, which serve as proprietor indexes to all copyright entries made since I 909. During the calendar year 1919, 131 numbers of Part I , d d w m ~ U ~ ~ ~ Group I , of the Catalogue were published, containing the book titles, with complete record for all renewals for books,

,

Register of Copyrights
and complete annual index, I ,022 plus 248 pages; 12 monthly numbers of Part I , Group 2, containing tides of pamphlets, contributions to newspapers, lectures, dramatic compositions, maps, and motion pictures, and a complete annual index, 1,802 closely printed pages; 4 quarterly numbers of Part 2, containing all registrations for newspapers and magazines, - with annual index, 408 pages; I 2 monthly numbers of Part 3, musical compositions, with complete list of renewals for music and lists of music used or licensed to be used for mechanical reproduction, together with complete annual index, 2,238 compactly printed pages; 4 quarterly numbers of Part 4, containing registrations of works of art and photographs and prints, with annual index, 417 pages. The continued shortage of paper and the urgent demand for economy in its use have made it necessary to cease publishing the monthly indexes to the Catalogue of Copyright Entries for 1920. This temporary inconvenience to the users of the Catalogue will be remedied by the Annual Indexes which will be printed as usual making the sets complete for future reference. Two Copyright Ofice bulletins were reprinted during year: Bulletin No. 14 containing the copyright laws, and Bulletin No. 15 "Rules and Regulations for the registration of claims to copyright," both revised to date. There was also printed as a single-sheet circular the new copyright act of December 18, 1919.
SUMMARY OF COPYRIGHT BUSINHIS

P.MS-

/

B-

Nar.

Cirhr

Balance bn hand July I , 1919. ............ 610,945.75 Gross receipts July I, 1919, to June 30, r92o 132,371.31 Total to be accounted for. .......... 143,317.1~ Refunded . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 382.57 Balance to he accounted for. ................... $138,93455 Applied as earned fees. .................. 1a6,4gz.z5 Balance carried over to July I, 1920: Trust funds. ................ 6,635.60 Unfinished business July I , 1897, to June 30, 1920, 23 years. .................... 2,806.70

- 138,934.55

12,442.30

I 28

Repmt of the L&mrian of Congress

Total fees earned and paid into Treanuy during the 23 years from July I., 1897, to June 30, 1920. .$2,105,816.20 Total unfinished brtsiness for 23 jrcars.. ................ 2,806.70

...........

FBM FOR FISCAL YPAR
FU:

Fees for registrations, including certificates, at $I each. ............................. $119,007.oo Fees for registrationsof photographs without Z,~ZI.SO certificates, at 50 cents each. ............ Fees for registrationsof renewals, at 50 cents 1,056. oo each. ................................. Total fees for registrations recorded. ............. $122,784.50 Fees for certified copies of record, at 50 cents 851.50 each. ................................. z , 2%. oo Fees for recording assignments. ............ Searches made and charged for at the rate of . 198. 50 50 cents for each hour of time consumed. . Notices of user recorded (Music). .......... 192. 7 5 Indexing transfers of proprietorship. ....... 176.00 3,707. 75 Total fees for fiscal year ~ ~ i g - z o . ............... Number of registrations. .............................. Number of renewals recorded. .........................

126,492.25 124,450
2,112

Ewiu

Cwruwmcr

1,589 The greater part of the business of the copyright Office is done by correspondence. The total letters and parcels received during the fiscal year numbered 140,369, while the letters, parcels, etc., dispatched numbered 13g,ogz. Letters received transmitting remittances numbered 43,292, including money orders to the number of 28,668. During the last 23 fiscal years the money orders received number more than half a million (617,755).
CONDITION OF COPYRIGHT OFFICE W O R K

Number of certified copies of record. .................. Number of assignments recorded or copied. .............

1 9

703

Cmdilimofcwrent cwrl

On July 10, 1920, the remittances received up to the third mail of the day had been recorded. The account books of the Bookkeeping Division were balanced for June, the financial statements were rendered to the Treasury Depart-

Register

of Copyrights

129

ment, and all earned fees to June 30 had been paid into the Treasury . The current work for July had been written and posted to july 9. The unfinished business amounted on June 30,1920, to $2,806.70. Of this, however, a large proportion represented business for the fiscal year, held awaiting answers to letters already mailed from the Copyright O f i e in regard to informalities, etc. At the close of business on July 10, 1920, of the works deposited and passed for copyright registration up to and including Wednesday, June 30, 1920, all had been recorded. Assignments to the number of I ,589 were received during the fiscal year, and all had been recorded. On the same date I ,997 works remained to be catalogued for the Catalogue of Copyright Entries.
COPYRIGHT LEGISLATION

In my last year's report (pp. 130-I~I), attention was,,,, A 4 of

Doc. 18,

called to the bill H. R. 3754, which had been passed by the House of Representatives on July 23, 1919. J t was reported to the Senate and passed on December 8, gig,' and was approved by the President on December 18, 1919: The purpose of the act is to secure retrospective protection in the United States for books by foreign authors published during the war but not protected in the United States because of conditions growing out of the war. The act amends sections 8 and 21 o the copyright statute of f March 4, I=, and reads in part as follows:
Provided, hozmwr, That all works made the subject of copyright by the laws of the United W e s first produced or published a b d after August I , 1914, and before the date of the President's proclamation of peace, o whieh the authors or proprietors are citizens o subjects f r o any foreign State or nation granting similar protection for worb f by citizens of the United States, the existence of which shall be determined by a copyright proclamation issued by the President o the f United States, shall be entitled to the protection conferced by the copyright laws of the United States from and after the a c c o m ~ m n t ,
-

'1919 (Dee. 8 ) . Amendment to copyright act. Mr. Norria, fran the Ccrmmittee c Patents, submitted the following report (to accompny H. R. 11~). m 66Ch Cay.. ad KU. Senate Report No. 326. P i t l 4 pp. 8.. lnu. 1939 (Dec. 18). An act to amend sections 8 and II o the copyright act, appmvbd f Mar. 4. I-. (Public No. Ion. 66thCong. H. R.3754.) Printed. 9 MI. 8..

'

130

Report of the Librarian of Congress

before the expiration of fifteen months after the date o the President's f proclamation of peace, of the conditions and formalities prescribed with respect to such works by the copyright laws of the United States: Prouided, further, That nothing herein contained shall be canstrued to deprive any person of any right which he may have acquired by the republication of such foreign work in the United S t a h prior to the approval of this Act.

The required "similar protection for works by citizens of the United States" was granted by Great Britain by an Order in Council of February 9, 1920, and was met by the President's proclamation of April 10, 1920, extending to subjects of Great Britain and the British Dominions, Colonies, and Possessions, with the exception of the d f governing dominions of Canada, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, and Newfoundland, all the benefits of the copyright act of March 4, 1909, and the acts amendatory thereof, far all of their works firit published in Great Britain after August I , 1914, and before the President's proclamation of peace. The text of the act was printed in full as it passed the House in the Register's Report f for 1918-19, pages 141-142, and the full texts o the British Order in Council and the President's praclamation are printed in this report, pages 141-147. Edicdti0a.l On January 23, 1920, Hon. William W. Venable intro@mu: Bill H. R. duced a billa to provide copyright in educational games. rwxx The text is printed in full on page 141 of this report. No o has followed. ~ ~ action by C A public printing bill was again introduced on August 9, plaric pi*r+ b i ~ ~ 1919, by Hon. Edgar R. Kiess, which contains the clause providing that "no Government publication or any portion thereof shall be copyrighted." The bill was favorably reported on August 12 ' and passed the House of RepreI9aO (JM.) A b l to provide for the copyright d e d u a t h d m . 2. 3 il a by M .Vennbk. Bl H R. Irorr. 66th Cnnc.. rd a. Printed. r pp. 4'. [Rderred r il . k~ Committee an Patmtr.1 the 4 1919 (Aw. 1) 2. A W to amend uul mte the hrr relatingto the mblic printing and b i a d i i and the distributiaa d Gnvanment pnbliatlau. .nd for otha purpaa* Bill H R.8362 (Report N .a t . qbth Chg.. 1st rcar. Printed. qB pp 4'. 1 ~ U e . o r) to the Committee d the Whole Haue on the state d the U h . 1 l 1919 (Aw.1) ~ c s s i o n aminting u u l binding. Mr. Kien. from the Cunmittee 1. on Printing, submitted the 1olbwh.g report ( o -p.my t H. R. B36r). Repat N . o sat. 66th CmG. 1st wr Printed. 52 w. 8..

d

sentatives on August 13; on August 15' it was referred to the Senate Committee on Printing. The House report explains that the bill "continues the present prohibition f against the copyrighting o Government publications." No further action on the bill is recorded. This same subject matter has been several times mentioned in my annual reports, the last time being 1,gr?r7, page I r (Librarian's report, p. 163).
INTERNATIONAL COPYRIGHT

The passing of the act of December 18, 1919, and the arrangement with the British Government to secure simiiar protection in Great Britain for American books published during the war are the only steps to be chronicled for the year in relation to international copyright. This arrangement for reciprocal protection shoukl prove of practical benefit to all American authors who have published books during the war; to American publishers who Kave an interest in these works; to British authors whose works published during the war may still be profitably rep&ted in this country, and to the American publishers who may find it advantageous to reprint in the United States such books by British authors. If similar arrangements are made with other countries, as seems probable, the benefits secured by the act of 1919 will be extended to a wider range of works, especially to many interesting and valuable books relating to the war. The act of 1919, however, is only temporary in its effects and offers no remedy for the acutely unsatisfactory copyright relations between the United States and-&eat Britain, Canada, and Australia. The present unequal and inadequate exchange of literary-property protection is a matter of nearly - 30 years' standing and requires radical change in order to effect satisfactory solution. There seems to be a general agree6 rorp (Aw.as.) An act to PmQd md revhe the l m a to the public printing and b i i and the diribution d Gorranmeat publiatims. and lor otha purH. R. h b z . 66th Cone.. r* urr. In the Seuate d the United Stab. Printed, g pp. 4 . l R a d twice and derred to the Camnittee oa Printing.]

,= * B

2

Islrrsaliosd

+timu

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132
Ahmion

Report of the Libraricrn of Conqress

(y)eretting r r

~ ~ rtmtimu

ofment that the fundamental obstacle to a better arrapgement is the requirement of American manufacture of books and prints. I t is generally agreed that copyright protection should not be subject to this kind of condition. I t is the principal obstacle to entry by the United States into the International Copyright Union. The desire has been expressed that the United States should become a member of this union. To do $0, however, would require not only the abrogation of the typesetting clause, so far as foreign books are concerned, but the abolition as well of the necessity for deposit of copies and registration. American book publishers believe that an accessible, official registration in the United States of all works in which copyright is claimed is desirable for their business interests. By express provision of law the present certificate of copyright registration is required to be "admitted in any court as prima facie evidence of the facts stated therein"; ahd this is a great convenience. So far, also, as books, music, and prints deposited in the Copyright Office are added to the collections of the Library of Congress, their use therein advertises the existence of such works, and the copyright proprietor receives the advantages which may come from the distribution to some 2,500 libraries of the printed title cards for copyrighted books. Possibly some middlef course might be adopted for foreign c ~ o ~ ~ ~ ~ books; e. g., the substitution for the deposit of copies for registration of some arrangement for the regular and systematic filing in the Copyright Office of the printed bibliographical records of works published in foreign countries, and the preservation and indexing of such foreign book catalogues in this office. The information thus made available to American publishers might be sufficient for their needs. So far as American copyright works are concerned, the Catalogue of Copyright Entries now compiled and printed under provisions of law supplies a complete, well arranged and indexed record of all works copyrighted in the United States and 'the current issues of this catalogue could be supplied to designated offices in other countries.

Register of Cop&&&
I33
If some such arrangement could be substituted for the A a i u i a r r, present requirement of deposit of copies and formal registra- C O ~ Yu-ir~l W c tion of books by foreign authors printed abroad, and the manufacturing conditions of the copyright statute of March 4, 1909, be abrogated, at least so far as foreign works ' are concerned, the United States might enter the International Copyri&t Union. If something of this kind can not be agreed upon, special arrangements should be entered' into with the English-speaking countries t o expresslyguarantee full protection in all these countries for the works. of authors, playwrights, composers, and artists (who a r e citizens or subjects of any one o them) from the date of f the production or first publication of such wwks in any oae of the countries. ' This assured protection for all intellectual works throughout all the English-speaking and reading nations should be free of any technical or merely formal requirements, except such as are mutually agreed upon as desirable. The retirement of Mr. Artbur Crisfield as the Assistant Rdir-r Register of Copyrights, with a pension under the provisionsMr. cfitFu.A* ~~~~ ' of the new retirement act, calls for some words of special notice. Mr. Crisfield has been associated with the Library . of Congress for more than 30 years, -and during that whok period has been connected with the copyright work. It has been a service noticeable in several ways. In the first place, his record for attendance is unusual. He was not absent o n account of illness a t all during the first 2 5 years of his connection with the Library, and since then only for a few days each year, except during the last few years. In the second place, his has been a service of distinct value an&. usefulness, and in the third place, his uniform courtesy,. helpfulness, and fair-mindedness have been of so fine a character that they have endeared him to each and aH of tbe members of the Copyright Office force. He has recently passed the eightieth anniversary o his birthday, and leaves f the office in such good health that his friends can hope that he may have many years before him in which to enjoy his freedom from the obligation of hours and places; with.
24114 - 2 1 4

134

Report of the Libra&% of Conpcsb

leisure to read, to travel, and to enjoy the society of his friends. He carries with him the best wishes of each member of the Copyright Office. Respectfully submitted. THORVALD SOLBERG Register of Cnbyrights HERBERT PUTNAM Librarian of Conqess
Bxa~srr A-Statement
of gross r*ts, r t f u d s , net receipb, a n d f m applied jor fiscal year ending June 30. 1920
Gnasash
rraiptr -apphed 8196.68 45670 365.70 IIOOO arb. 53 tat. 16 $10,675.~8 8,45016 9,111.08 l0~57a 14 9,9* 61 x r , k.13i.95 1o,O64.p 8,9ssoa 11,35640 9,ma.s.i ~ 10,936oo ~

Mon!h

Rdunds

pep

July.. ............................... S1o.971. 55

1919

............................. sephnber ...........................
Aumst:
'. -.

November.. ......................... lkaanhr.
1920

...........................

..........................

8,906.55 10,0678 lO~Zp714 1o,ao3.14 1~~705.84

-

Jmunw.. ............................ 14, rw 72 Ftbl'Unry............................ 10,051 74 March ; ..:............. 11,764-54

3& a 6

U,140 46
9,7&76 Il,IOl.60 "~555. p6 l0,&3. 24 9,86703 117, P8S &

..............

16698
(162.W

A d .

...............................

May.. 10,513.64 June.................................. 10,245.97
Totd

...............................

1

2

.

14 ~

& 18
45-40 37S94 4,381.57

12.500 45 9~~1.30 11,725.50 11~O64.40 1o.m.6~ KK,4Kpqb rab,49a. 25

..........................

131,371.37

Balance brought forward from June Jo. 1919.. Xet remipts Jl?ly I. 1919, to June9.1920:

Gross rece~pts.. L s amount rdunded.. es

.....:........................ 8 1 o , w s . 7 ~ ............................................S r s a , j r r . j 7 .................................... 4,382.57
12rtW.Ro

Totnl t o be amuntcd l a . Cowright fees applied July I 1919 to June30, 1910.. -Balance arried forward to r. &no: Trust funds.. -Unfinished business..

........... JAY .............................................. ......................................

............................................ 138,934.55 116,*92.15
9,635.60 1,806. : o
'3%9 3 4 Sd

Register o Copyrights f
Exnrarr B-Shlement 0fees paid 1
Date
. ckEk

............. 1a5sa $1,93600 ............... ia-a j , o o a m ............. 1164. J,SPO ............. a,sm ....: .......... 11786 s . , 8 m m ............. l a b 3 70s 45 a,omm ............. 1.8.1 ............. 1a8.37 a , s a x m ............... 1,-m Mar. ................ r,soooo a64.30 5. ............. l3Wl I91ODOD: 591.30 1,80D m 8 . . ............. 13058 *.moo 15 ............... -1% 22.. ............. 11872 ~,poom a,hm 1 8q ............... 11964 a,80Dm :........... 1341 . * , m o o 0.3. 4.. ............. 1ma6 29.. ............. 133.53 2 , m m 1,255. m 6. .............. 1 . ~ 7 Apr. 5.. .......... 1342 I, 7.5. SO rJ ............... l a & ' l a . .............. 13575 3,2 , m m .so ............... 14a , & m 19.. ............. 13656 a , h m 26.. ............. 13P6 17.., ............ 121.34 2 , k . m a , m m Nw. 3.. ............. 12167 2,-m . Mny 3.. ........:...' m 137~3 2,6.. ............. 12176 65640 7.. ............... 13806 a64 CD "k,70sm lo.. ............. '13815 ............... a,soa m a , h m I?.. ............. 13878 2 , t o o m 17. .............. '1.24~ a , h m . 24.. ............ IJ+S . a , s o a m 12296 14.................. a,a, lkc. I.. ............. 1234s 1 , t o o r n June I. .............. 1-76 401.90 5.. ............. 14108 w.65 5.. ............. 1 ~ 3 6 1 . . . . ............ 12369 a . s o a m 8 7.. ............. 14113 atODom, 14.. ............. 14182 %,6co.m IS.. ............. 1a4ar . 2,s- m # I . . ............: 14271 a , h w aa.. ............. 12477 r,s=m 28 ............... 1413 a,gmm w.. ............. i2497 1 , s o a m
............. 11329 ............. 11369 . ............... 11419 88.. ............. 11510 Aug. 4 ............... 1x578 . 11............... .11600 18.. ............. 1r649 a s ............... 1x695 Sept. ............. 117d s ............... 1x777 8 ............... 11803 IS.. ............. 118.32
July 7..
1 1

I919

14..

1..

$ ~ , o o a m Jan. 1.. 1,80Dm 13 2,3000D 19.. 1,80Dm 16.. a,a3S.% Fcb. a r,qaem 6.. % , m m 9.. 1,smm 16.. a4 a,4oa m
I

rll
135
into the Trspsury

ce
12%

OD

a,

1 -

I -

22..

00

1 0

11 ) .0

.

.

J ~ 3.. Y

.............

14349, 1951440 2s

Total.. .
.

..................r&,&.

136

R e w of the Libraricln of corrgress
EXHIBIT C-Record o appliedf s f e

Month

- - - -

ber

ber

$0.50

ber

$0.9

-

Indexing

-------

EXHIBIT D--Com#arative

statement of gross cash recer'pts, a#+liud fees, number oj registrations, daily averagsr, stc.
Number of registrations and cornpaisonwith lest yenr

Monthly
receipts

Applied
1 -

DPily
avuae

355

Totnl

iwepse Deaepse

3 4

0 5
4Po

0 9
Ul

U 4 4x1

138

Report of the Librarian of Conp.ess
yearly fees, number of registrations, etc., for 23fiurl years

EXHIBIT E-Statemen* of gross cash re*&,

-

-

-

-

-- -

-

Nm.-DetPilai statement for 10 fiocnl yean, I&@, e c . to 1prrr5; by month. t. may be found in Annual Report of Register of CoWrights for year 1 9 1 r r s (pp. r t p @ . . Report ofthe Librarian d Congress for 1914-15). For subsequent years see the r a p s t i v c annual reports.

Exm~rrF-Table of registrations mode during jiLcal years 1914-15, 19r~-r6,19r6-17,~917-~8,19~8-1~, a d 1919-20,arranged by classis

C P sA. Books {including 1.
pamphlets.Imtlets, and c a r t r i b u h s to periodiib): (a) P i t d i tht United rne n
Stab

...............

( b ) Printed nbxmd m n
(c)

........... Total. ..................
c o ~ d I t

English books t c d for ad interim

sermmr. ndd-. I@ 157 C p s D.Dramatic or d-tls iabmusialwmp sitk 3,797 Stars C l a s s B . ~ u s i c a l c u m ~ax,& . 30,Chss F. M a p . . I, 772 r,6ra C p sC . Works d nfi; modcls ls or designs 2,961 a, aao Chss H Reproduaioru o f . works d art 0, o C P sI. Drawipgs or pk& 1. works d n scimti6c or technial &r-

C1P.sC. Leaurn.

..........

.

arb

.............

..............

..........

........

........ 10, s t 3 r o , W i l l u s t r a k........ x a , ~ 1a,7aa ~ Clpss L Motion-piaure p b . t o p k p , ........... a, 757 a, 934 Clps M. Motion picturn not photopkp.. ...... .IN 306 1,638 Renewah..................... I , Total ................... I I S , I ~ ~ 115,967
Cha J. Photograph.. Clpg K. P i t and pLIorkl rns
1 ~ordetniled statement d

e ...............

513

US

registrations made for 66cal yeam f m 1901 to 1 9 1 5 1 4

h d Reuwt d Reds&? d Co~y~i8hta 19-as. Lr

140

Report of the Librarian of Congress

EXHIBIT G-Table

of articles deposited durinq 1916-17,1gr7-r8,1918-r~, and r91g-20, with totals of articles def ositedfor years 1897-98to 1919-20

-r. Books:
(a) Printed in the United States:

....... ............. Total. ....................... (b) Printed abroad in a foreion hgunge.. .......................... English works registered for ad interim copyright.. ............... 174 T d . ....................... =. Periodicals.. .......................... 3. Lectum. sennoar. etc ................. 159 4. Dramatic of d r a m a t i e m u s i d cornpositions.. .......................... 3,351 5. Musical compmitioar.. ................ 31, w 6. M a ~ e ................................. 3 , 4 8 . 7. Works d art; mod& or dcsigau. ...... . 8. Repmductionsof worksd art.. .......
Pamphlets. leaflets, etc. Contributions to newspapers and wridicals. 8a. Chromoo and lithographs.
9. Drawings or plastic worts of a $ent S c or technid chnmcter..
10.

voluma ......................

..........
..........

..........

.......... ..........
137

15% 2,961 54,874 a,sw 1.554 40,332 n,319
S,&S

w,sq
x,d,~% 79,393

44,566 3,026

Photographs.. rr. Prints and pidorial illustrations.. 11. Motion-pidue photoplay$.. r ~ Motion picture6 not photoplays.. . 14. Misrrllaneous (unclassSed a N d a ) . 1s. Foreign boob d v e d under act d

......... 814 773 891 1,354 ........................ ..... ........... ...... ................................... IKar.3.r~ ......................................................... -T O ~ . ..............................
.

Nor=.-For

1914-15 see Annual Report of Register o Copyright. for 1914-15. f see the respective annual reports.

detailed statement o articlm demited during fiscal yenn 1%f to For subsequent yan

The classi6cation "Chmmos and lithouravhr" is not given in l w a f t a July r. rpop. a

ADDENDUM I
COPYRIGHT BILL
(66th Coup., t d w s . H. R.rtorr. In theHouseod Representatives. Jnnuaryr3, zpro.)

Mr. Venable introduced the following bill; which was referred to the Committee on Patents and ordered to be printed.

A BILL to provide for the copyright of educational games.
Be it enacted by the Senate and House o Re@esenletives o f f the United States o America in Congress a s s d e d , That f any author, inventor, or originator of any game o distinct f educational value and character may, by complying with the terms of the law as provided for the copyrighting of literary productions, secure for himself with respect to such games the same rights, privileges, and protection as is accorded by the copyright laws of the United States to authors of such literary productions. SEc. 2. That upon the application for registration of such game, the Register of Copyrights shall have the power and authority to determine whether the game for which such registration is sought is of fidutational vague, with the right to the author, inventor, or originator of such game to appeal from his decision to the Commissioner of Education, whose decision on this point shall be final.

Edvca#iond
va

ADDENDUM 1 1
C O P Y R I G H T 4 R E A T BRITAIN
I '

BY T H 8 PRESIDENT OF

THE

UNITED STATES OF

AMERICA
~ g r i ro, rpw l

A .PROCLAMATION Whereas i t is provided by the act of Congress of March
4, I 909, entitled "An act to amend and corlsoiidate the acts

respecting copyright," that the provisions of section
141

I

(e)

.of said act, "so far as they secure copyright controlling the

J

42

Report of the Librarian of Congress

parts of instruments serving to reproduce mechanically the musical work, shall include only compositions published and copyrighted after this act goes into effect, and shall not include the works of a foreign author or composer unless the foreign state or nation of which- such author or composer is a citizen or subject grants, either by treaty, convention, agreement, or law, to citizens of the United States similar rights "; And whereas it is further provided' that the copyright secured by the act shall extend to the work of an author or proprietor who is a citizen or subject of a foreign state or nation, only upon certain conditions set forth in section 8 of said act, to wit:
(a) When an alien author or proprietor shall be domiciied within the United States at the time of the &st publication of his work: or (b) When the foreign state or nation of which such author or proprietor is a citizen or subject grants, either by treaty, convention, agreement, or law, to citizens of the United States the benefit of cdpyright on substantially the same basis as to its own citizens, or copyright protection substantially equal to the protection secured to such foreign author under this act or by treaty; or when such foreign state or nation is a party to an international agreement which providesfor reciprocity in the granting of copyright, by the terms of which agreement the United States may, at its pleasure, become a party thereto;

'

And whereas it is further provided by the act of Congress approved December 18, 1919,' "that all works made the subject of copyright by the laws of the United States first produced or published abroad after August I , 1914, and before the date of the President's p~oclamationof peace, of which the authors or proprietors are citizens or 'subjects of any foreign state or nation granting similar ptotoction for works by citizens of the United States, the existence of which shall be determined by a copyright proclamation issued by the President of the United States, shall be entitled to the protection conferred by the copyright laws of the' United States from and after the accomplishment, before the expiration of fifteen months after the date of the President's proclanlation of @ace, of the conditions and fom~alitiesprescribed with respect to such works by the copyright laws of the United States: Provided further, That nothing herein contained shall be construed to deprive any person of any right which he may have acquired

'

Register of Copyrii~hts

I43

by the republication o such foreign work in the United f States prior to the approval of this act"; And whereas the President is authorized to-determine and declare' by proclamation the existence of similar protection for works by citizens of the United states as the purposes of the act may require; And whereas satisfactory oEcial assurance has been given by the Government of Great Britain that, by virtue of the authoritv conferred by the British copyright act, 191I , a British order in council was duly issued on February 9, 1920, directing thatI. The copyright act, 1911, shall, subject to the provisions of the said act and of this order, apply to works fmt published in the United States of America between the 1st August, 1914,and the termination of the war, which have not been republished prior to the commencement of this order in the parts of His Majesty's Dominions to which this order applies, in like manner as if they had been first published within the parts of His Majesty's Dominions to which the said act extends: Provided that the enjoyment by any work of the rights conferred by the copright act, 1911, shall be conditional upon publication of the' work in the Dominions to which this order relates not later than six months after the terminatjon of the war, and shall commence from and after such publication, which shall not be colourable only, but shall be intended to satisfy the reasonable requiremenb of the public. 2. The provisions of section 15 of the copyright act, 191 as to the I, delivery of books libraries shall apply to works to which this order relates upon their publication in the United Kingdom. 3. In the case of musical works to which this order relates and pro- , vided that no contrivances by means of which the work may be mechanically performed have befo~ethe commencement of this order been lawfully made, or placed on sale, within the partsof His Majesty's Dominions to which this order applies, copyright in the work shall include all rights conferred by the said act with respect to the making of records, perforated rolls and other amtrivances by means of which the work may be mechanically performed. 4 This order shall-apply to all His Majesty's Dominions, 61onies. . and Possessions with the exception o those hereinafter named, that is f to say: The Dominion of Canada; the Commonwealth of Australia; the Dominion of New Zealand; the Union of South Africa; Newfoundland. 5. Nothing in this order shall be construed as depriving any work of any rights which have been lawfully acquired under the provisions of the copyright act, 1911, or any o r b in council thereunder. 6. This order shall take effect as from the 2nd day of February, 1920, which day is in this order referred to a the commencement o this s f order.

.

I44

Report of the Librarian of Congress

And the lords commissioners of His Majesty's trkasury are to give the necessary orders accordingly.

Now therefore, I , Woodrow Wilson, President o the f United States of America, do hereby declare and proclaimI . That one of the alternative conditions specified in sections I (e) and 8 @) of the act of March 4, 1909, and acts amendatory thereof, including the act of December I 8, 1919, now exists and is fulfilled and since February 2 , 1920, has been fulfilled in respect to the subjects of Great Britain and the British Dominions, Colonies, and Possessions, with the exception of the self-governing Dominions o Canada, f Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, and Newfoundland, and that such British subjects are entitled to all the benefits of the copyright act of March 4, 1909, and the acts amendatory thereof, including the act of December 18, 1919, for all of' their works first published in Great Britain after August I , 1914, and before the President's proclamation of peace, and not already republished in the United States: Provided that the enjoyment by any work of the rights and benefits conferred by the copyright act of March 4, I W , and the acts amendatory thereof, including the act of December 18, 1919, shall be conditional upon compliance with the requirements and formalities prescribed with respect to such works by the copyright laws of the United States before the expiration of fifteen months after the date of the President's proclamation of peace, and shall commence from and after compliance with these requirements, constituting due registration for copyright in the United States. 2. That in the case of musical works to which, this proclamation relates, and provided that no contrivances, including records, perforated rolls, and other devices by means of which the work may be mechanically performed, have been lawfully made or placed on sale within the United States before February 2, 1920, copyright shall include the special benefit of section I (e) of the copyright act of March 4, ~ g o g , namely " copyright controlling the parts of instruments serving to reproduce mechanically the musical work." 3. Nothing in this proclamation shall be construed to abrogate or limit any rights and ben6fits conferred under the reciprocal arrangements with Great Britain or its self-

Register of

.Copy'zgks

I45

governing Dominions providing for copyright pt.otectian heretofore proclaimed. 4. This proclamation shall take effect as from the 2nd day of February, 1920. In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be ailbred. Done a t the City of Washington the tenth day of April, in the year of our Lord one thousand [SEAL.] nine hundred and twenty and of the Ihdepen8a c e of the United States of America the one hundred and forty-fou*. , WOODROW WILSON By the President : 3AINBRIDGB CO~BY
Secrefary of State

'

ADDENDUM 111
GREAT BRITAIN--COPYRIGHT ORDER IN COUNCIL

At the Court at ~uckinghamPalace, the 9th day of FebNary, 1920 Present, the King's Most Excellent Majesty; Lord President; Earl Curzon of Kedleston; Lurd Colebrooke; Sir Frederick Ponsonby. Whereas by reason of conditions arising out of the war difficulties have been'experienced by citizens of the United States of America in complying with the requirements of the copyright act, 191I , as to first publication within the parts of His Majesty's Dominions to which the act extends of their works first published in the United States of America during the war: ; And whereas His ~ a j e s t ) is advised that the Government of the United States of America has undertaken, upon issue of this order, to extend the protection afforded by the United States law of December 18, 1919, entitled "An act to v e n d sections 8 and 21 Of the copyright act, approved March 4, I gog," to British subjects: And whereas by reason of the said undertaking of the Government of the United States of America His Majesty

~

c

b

.

~

.

~

~

146 Report of the Li6rarian of Congress
'-

is satisfied that the said Government has made, or has undertaken to make, such prdvision as it is expedient to require for the protection of works first made or published between the 1st August, 1914, and the termination of the war in the parts of His Majesty's Dominions to which this order applies, and entitled to copyright under Part I of the copyright act, 191I : And whereas by the copyright act, -191I , authority is conS ferred upon H ~ Majesty to extend, by order in council, the protection of the said act to certain classes of foreign works within any part of His Majesty's Dominions, other than self-governing Dominions, to which the said act extends: And whereas by reason of these premises jt is desirable to provide protection within the said Dominions for literary or artistic works first published in the United State5 of America between August I, 1914, and the termination of the war which have failed to accomplish the formalities prescribed by the copyright act, 1911, by reason of conditions arising out of the war: Now, therefore, His Majesty, by and with the advice of His Privy Council, and by virtue of the authority conferred , upon him by the copyright act, 1 9 ~ 1 is pleased to order, and it is hereby ordered, as follows: I. The copyright act, 1911, shall, subject to the provisions of the said act and of this order, apply to works first published in the United States of America between the 1st August, 1914, and the termination of the war, which have not been republished prior to the commencement of this order in the parts of His Majesty's Dominions to which this order applies, in like manner as if they had been first published withip the parts of His Mqjesty's Dominions to .which the said act extends :Provided that the enjoyment by any work of the rights conferred by the copyright act, 1911, shall, be conditional upon publication of the work. in the Dominions to which this order relates not later than six months after the termination of the war, and shall commence from and after such pub1ication;which shall not be colourable ~ n l ybut shall be , intended to satisfy the reasonable requirements of the public, .-- .

Register of CopyrigMs

'

I47

2. The provisions of section 15 of the copyright act, 191I, as to the delivery of books to libraries, shall apply to works to which this order relates upon their publication in the United Kingdom. 3. In the case of musical works to which this order relates and provided that no contrivances by means of which the work may be mechanically performed have before the commencement of this order been lawfully made, or placed on sale, within the parts of His Majesty's Dominions to which this order applies, copyright in the work shall include all rights conferred by the said act with respect to the making of records, perforated rolls, and other contrivances by means of which the work may be mechanically performed. 4. This order shall apply to'all His Majesty's Dominions, Colonies, and Possessions with the exception of those hereinafter named, that is to say: The Dominion of Canada; the Commonwealth of Australia; the Dominioh of Nkw Zealand ; the Union of South Africa ; Newfoundland. 5. Nothing in this order shall be construed as depriving any work of any rights which have been lawfully acquired under the provisions of the copyright act, 191I, or any order in council thereunder. 6. This order shall take effect as from the 2nd day of February, 1920, which day is in this order referred to as the commencement of this order. And the lords commissioners of His Majesty's treasury are to give the necessary orders accordingly.

~MERIC FITZROY