Travel and Tourism

The Scottish Tourism Product: An Introduction

[HIGHER]
James Grant

abc

The Scottish Qualifications Authority regularly reviews the arrangements for National Qualifications. Users of all NQ support materials, whether published by LT Scotland or others, are reminded that it is their responsibility to check that the support materials correspond to the requirements of the current arrangements.

Acknowledgement Learning and Teaching Scotland gratefully acknowledge this contribution to the National Qualifications support programme for Travel and Tourism. First published 2005 © Learning and Teaching Scotland 2005 This publication may be reproduced in whole or in part for educational purposes by educational establishments in Scotland provided that no profit accrues at any stage.

© Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

CONTENTS

Section 1: Introduction Unit specification Evidence requirements for the unit How to deliver the unit Planning Lesson plan Approaches to learning and teaching Frameworks for induction The learning environment Opportunities for integration with other units Resources Section 2: Industry links/visits Objectives of industry links Making industry links Membership of tourism bodies Unit management: planning for industrial visits Pre-visit planning checklist Administration: visit contact sheet; participant list Section 3: OHTs 1–17 Section 4: Student workbook Outcome 1 Outcome 2 Outcome 3 Preparation for assessment Appendices: 1. A selection of hotels and restaurants in Scotland 2. A selection of Scottish festivals and events 3. External examination: specimen question A 4. External examination: speciment question B

4 4 6 7 7 9 11 12 13 14 15 16 16 17 17 18 20 21 23 43 48 81 158 186

191 195 199 203

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

3

INTRODUCTION

SECTION 1

Unit specification
The Scottish Tourism Product: An Introduction Acceptable performance in this unit will be the satisfactory achievement of the standards set out in this part of the unit specification. All sections of the statement of standards are mandatory and cannot be altered without reference to the Scottish Qualifications Authority.

Outcome 1 Identify key geographical and physical features, tourist areas and centres in Scotland.

Performance criteria (a) (b) (c) (d) Describe the geographical features of Scotland. Identify and locate the main physical features of Scotland. Identify and locate the main islands and island groups. Identify and locate the main domestic and international gateway points. Identify and locate major tourist areas and centres.

(e)

Outcome 2 Explain the nature of the tourism product of Scotland and major tourist destinations within Scotland.

Performance criteria (a) Describe accurately the key factors contributing to Scotland’s appeal as a tourist destination. Describe major tourist areas and centres in terms of their principal appeal to the visitor.
THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

(b)

4

INTRODUCTION

(c)

Describe accurately accessibility to major destinations within Scotland Identify visitor attractions and amenities in terms of type, facilities and usage.

(d)

Outcome 3 Advise on the main activity and special-interest pursuits enjoyed by visitors in Scotland.

Performance criteria (a) (b) Identify the main outdoor activities enjoyed by visitors in Scotland. Identify accurately the main areas where visitors may participate in a range of outdoor activities. Explain key factors to be taken into consideration in the organisation of activity holidays. Describe opportunities for special-interest holidays.

(c)

(d)

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

5

INTRODUCTION

Evidence requirements for the unit
Evidence requirements Evidence is required to demonstrate that candidates have achieved all of the Outcomes and Performance Criteria. The assessment for Outcome 1 will be made up of short-answer/ restricted-response questions. The evidence for this outcome should be produced under closed-book, supervised conditions within 45 minutes. The assessment for Outcomes 2 and 3 will involve completion of two case studies (one on a centre-based holiday, the other a touring holiday) which will arise naturally as the candidate progresses through the unit. The case studies will be open-book assessments completed under supervised conditions and presented in a business format. The case studies must show that candidates can satisfy client requirements for an itinerary involving a centre-based holiday and an itinerary for a touring holiday. A different area of Scotland must be used for each case study. The standard to be applied and breadth of coverage are illustrated in the National Assessment Bank items available for this unit from the Scottish Qualifications Authority. If a centre wishes to design its own assessments for this unit they should be of a comparable standard.

6

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

INTRODUCTION

How to deliver the unit
Timing • in the context of the course It is assumed that this optional unit follows or is taught alongside other units of the Higher course in Travel and Tourism. Some parts of the unit will build on knowledge and skills gained in parallel or on previous learning experiences. For example, where industry visits are carried out by a centre over a period of time, worksheets supplied for visits in other units may also be a resource for this unit. A visits programme is perceived as part of the extra 40 hours allocated to the delivery of Higher Travel and Tourism. • in terms of learning and teaching Tasks and learning activities in the support pack have been calculated to be achievable within the notional 40 hours delivery time allocated to the unit. Speed of delivery, however, can only be a guideline as this depends on the ability of learners and on learning strategy policies within centres. Accordingly there are no time guidelines given within the pack and this will allow teachers and lecturers to adapt the materials to suit their own particular timetable system.

Planning
The student workbook will assist the lecturer or teacher in planning lessons. A blank lesson plan sheet is provided to plan individual lessons based on normal teaching practice. The student workbook presents tasks under headings containing guidelines and learning goals. These give a focus when planning lessons. A ring-binder version of the workbook would allow for flexibility of use, with pages being added or taken out to suit. The sequence of the content can also be changed as appropriate to particular learner groups. In the planning stage, any changes to the pack should be anticipated so that contents can be adapted before photocopying the pack for the student. A copy of the unit descriptor would be helpful to the learner, since this states the level of competence required for a pass. The descriptor can be attached as an extra at the end of the pack. The student workbook

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

7

INTRODUCTION

reflects skills and knowledge required in the workplace and covers all competences stated in the descriptor. Student tasks prepare for the assessment tasks contained in National Assessment Bank materials produced by the Scottish Qualifications Authority. As in the Assessments, the workbook tasks also mirror the world of work by integrating the unit content and crossing boundaries between the sequence of outcomes.

8

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

INTRODUCTION

Lesson plan
Course: Travel and Tourism (Higher) Lesson no

Unit: The Scottish Tourism Product: An Introduction Topic: Outcome and PC: Objectives:

Resources

Admin

Work In: Out:

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

9

INTRODUCTION

Key points

Teaching/learning method

Materials

Time

10

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

INTRODUCTION

Approaches to learning and teaching
A candidate-centred, resource-based and practical approach should be adopted to encourage expertise in the use of source materials and to develop the skills required in the workplace. The emphasis throughout should be on the practical application of knowledge of the tourism product. Delivery of the unit should make maximum use of tourism materials in current use in the industry, and access to a wide range of up-to-date source materials – such as maps, brochures, guidebooks, trade publications, and research – is essential for the design and implementation of classroom-based activities and for the candidate to develop the breadth of knowledge required of the unit. In Outcome 1, map-plotting and route-planning exercises should be used to ensure familiarity with the places which tourists may wish to visit in Scotland. Access to video or other visual sources is also recommended, and the ability of centres to arrange visits to tourism facilities would enhance the candidate’s learning experience. The candidate should achieve the level of competence of someone who may be called upon to provide general tourist information. This unit could be satisfactorily delivered by means of a candidatecentred flexible-learning package. The student workbook approach taken in this support pack offers a student-centred focus involving learners in the responsibility for their learning in a simulated work environment. Attainment checks are provided at various progression points. Emphasis throughout is placed on actual business practice with realistic case studies, examples and roleplays. Promotional materials and other essential teaching and learning resources are listed on page 15. Sources of the materials needed to complete activities/tasks are stated. Students can therefore take responsibility for organising the necessary resources. The workbook is meant to enable the student to organise learning and teaching time for him/herself, and to back up the process with self study within a guided framework. Interactive lectures based on OHTs in Section 3 introduce key areas of new topics and concepts/facts. A visit sheet is provided at the end of the student workbook which can be used for the visit to an activity provider.

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

11

INTRODUCTION

Frameworks for induction
This unit is an option within the Higher Travel and Tourism course and it is therefore anticipated that induction can rely on the prospective participant possessing some prior knowledge. Induction is carried out because: ‘... all learning is more effective when the learner is confident about what is to be learned and how he or she might go about the tasks of learning. Time is well spent therefore on making clear what is to be undertaken, why, how and so on.’ A framework for unit induction might therefore include: introduction • to what is to be learned • to why it’s relevant • to how it will be taught • to where learning will take place information • about what is expected of students • about homework • about progress monitoring and assessment • about practicalities – materials needed • about where to get help • about levels of prior knowledge communication • to allow students to ask questions • to reassure and promote confidence and interest method – teacher input – unit descriptor – referring to workbook – timetable

– – – –

teacher input teacher input referring to workbook list of references/ websites – teacher input – brainstorming

– discussion and questions – student activity

12

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

INTRODUCTION

The learning environment
Within centres Students will benefit from an attractive and professional learning environment. Ideally, a designated classroom should be allocated for tourism classes: • allowing teachers and lecturers to customise the learning environment to the vocational area • making learning efficient through practical layout of the classroom and visible materials. Teachers will find it easier to manage the volume of tourism materials and equipment which are essential for successful delivery of the unit • allowing open access during class time to the wide range of tourism materials to which students must have access, and avoid the necessity of having to transport class sets of resources between classrooms • using one classroom is desirable throughout the Higher units because of the need for ease of storage of, and access to, previous materials worked on by students and for access to wall maps • allowing adequate desk space for students in view of practical assignments using maps and several brochures • ensuring up-to-date and efficient learning with access to PCs with DVD/CD ROM and Internet connection • allowing resources to be used and maintained by all students following travel and tourism courses in the centre at this and other levels • offering adequate classroom accommodation sufficient for the size of the learner group. Outwith centres Because of the nature of the unit, the learning environment in this case is not confined to the classroom and may include visits to visitor attractions and service providers. It may also include field trips to travel/ holiday fairs or other promotional events. Many schools and colleges have staff with experience in establishing business links who will view

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

13

INTRODUCTION

the task of setting up visits and speakers as an extension to an already existing framework. More guidance on how to get the most out of visits and speakers is given in Section 2. Schools and colleges may have existing guidelines to ensure that groups of students will make the most favourable impression when in contact with cooperative businesses.

Opportunities for integration with other units
In terms of specific learning and teaching approaches, there is scope for some integration of activities with two other units: • The Structure of the Travel and Tourism Industry • Marketing in Travel and Tourism: An Introduction. This may be achieved chiefly through the suggested approach of using industry visits and speakers to promote learning, and specific advice as to how this may be managed is provided in Section 2. Communication skills may be developed in all outcomes.

14

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

INTRODUCTION

Resources
Essential teaching and learning /materials Brochures: for updates contact VisitScotland, NTS, Historic Scotland Class sets (free of charge) • Scotland: Where to Go and What to See • Scotland: Your Essential Guide • Tourism in Scotland, Facts and Figures (available on Scotexchange.net) • National Trust for Scotland publicity leaflet • Historic Scotland, general publicity leaflet on properties • Students’ own, or class, files produced for unit: Marketing in Travel and Tourism: An Introduction Brochures – several copies: for updates contact VisitScotland Some copies in class resource base (free of charge) • Adventure Sports Guide • Cycle Scotland • Fish Scotland • Water Sports in Scotland • Pony Trekking in Scotland • Walk Scotland • Golf in Scotland • skiscotland • Wildlife Scotland • Gaelic culture brochures (Comun nan Gael) • Independent Youth Hostels leaflet • CALMAC brochure • Northlink Ferries brochure • ScotRail shortbreaks brochure Commercial resources for purchase Resource base in class of reference books/maps with several copies, video/CD-ROM, etc. For example: • Scotland – Where to Stay (VisitScotland) • Touring Map of Scotland (Collins ISBN 000716948-5) • Touring Guide to Scotland (Collins ISBN 000716947-7) • SYHA Handbook (Scottish Youth Hostel Association) • The Scotland DVD (Heehaw Publishing)

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

15

INDUSTRY LINKS/VISITS

SECTION 2

Objectives of industry links
In recommending the use of industry links to plan out-of-school or outof-college visits, it is recognised that opportunities differ in various areas. Remoteness of destinations influences the number of facilities and the type of tourism product. However, experience has shown that tourism professionals are prepared to travel to centres to share their expertise with various learner groups. An industry link has several functions: • It reinforces classroom-based activities and brings the learner into contact with practitioners. • It lends professional credibility to school- or college-based study. • It demonstrates that knowledge about the subject has utility outside the school/college environment. • It enables the school/college to market the courses and students to the trade. In addition, bringing students into direct contact with industry practitioners gives their studies an added dimension – they are able to ‘hook’ their class-based activities onto something which is real and happening. Consequently they find the assimilation of theoretical material, e.g. the nature of the Scottish Tourism Product, much easier as a result of having seen it ‘in action’. Good contacts with industry should result in meaningful and stimulating learning experiences for the student with access to up-to-date developments and practice. They also provide the teacher with staff development opportunities – updating knowledge and learning about various areas of business. Throughout the subject guide there are references to the benefits of exposure to actual industry practice. Therefore the following section is applicable to many units within the Intermediate 2 and Higher Travel and Tourism framework.

16

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

INDUSTRY LINKS/VISITS

Making industry links
Education–Business Partnerships, People First and Springboard Scotland are as keen on education/industry links as schools and colleges are on using them. Forging links with education is seen as a way of achieving important objectives in training for the industry. Many businesses already have formal or informal links with schools and colleges, e.g. as providers of work placement opportunities, or of visiting speakers. Success depends on timing of requests for visits. Autumn and winter are often the best times for members of the tourism industry. Making industry links will in general: • offer access to current information for use in investigations, case studies, projects and assignments, and class-based exercises • offer access to site visits, including guiding • offer access to speakers from industry with current knowledge of trends • benefit all tourism courses across the curriculum delivery.

Membership of tourism bodies
There are many ways of using industry links to your advantage. Some cost money, while others are free. Where costs are involved, this is indicated. Benefits of membership: ASVA • newsletter • invitations to ASVA conferences, fee for attendance • possible contact with attraction providers from all over Scotland (membership charge) The National Trust for Scotland • access to visits, education packs, speakers (educational membership charge) Historic Scotland • free educational visits can be booked in advance for sites all over Scotland.

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

17

INDUSTRY LINKS/VISITS

Unit management: planning for industrial visits
First steps Find out if there are any special events on, e.g. careers or holiday fairs. Organise a local sightseeing tour. Visit a local attraction and TIC. Invite someone from your local VisitScotland office to come in and talk about his/her job – half an hour is all it takes to get motivated! (Note that there may be a charge for this service.) Incorporating visits into teaching/learning activities Look at the course and unit content to decide how students’ learning can be made more effective through exposure to actual practice. Speakers Bring in a speaker to talk about their sector and use them as an alternative to visits if you want to extend practical knowledge which your area does not offer. Visits Visits will bring students face to face with the tourism product, thus complementing class-based work both before and after the visit. For example: 1. Visit to an outdoor activity venue A guided tour through premises offers hands-on experience of a model for all units mentioned under heading 2 below. Pre/post-tour talk by Administrator/Instructor of the activity product Through careful preparation with the activity provider prior to the visit, the talk can be tailor-made to suit any specific aspect of the Higher courses. For example, it could provides input on: The Structure of the Travel and Tourism Industry (Higher) (how the attraction interrelates with other industry sectors)

2.

18

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

INDUSTRY LINKS/VISITS

Marketing in Travel and Tourism: An Introduction (Higher) (how the activity is marketed to which markets and why, promotional techniques, etc.) A visit such as this could also be helpful where students are studying at different levels, e.g. there could be an input to: Business Practices in Travel and Tourism (Int2) (what an activity provider offers and who the customers are, how it promotes itself) Classroom follow-up Reporting on the generic operations of the product visited. Student preparation for visits The learner can prepare informal research on the venue of the visit – activity type, location, directions, facilities, equipment hire and safety regulations.

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

19

INDUSTRY LINKS/VISITS

Pre-visit planning checklist
• • • • • • • • • • Establish objectives Select suitable visit Initial contact to agree rates, dates, times, objectives Written confirmation and brief including student worksheets Organise transport if necessary Complete institution procedures for field trips Prepare worksheets Brief students Issue pre-visit tasks Discussion of issues such as dress, behaviour on visits, and industry standards.

Designated staff in a school or college organising industry links may wish to involve students in planning and arranging the visit. The amount of student involvement will depend on time available, the objectives of the activity and the level of skill of the student(s), but it could be anything from simply selecting a suitable attraction to making all the arrangements. Student participation should be carefully supervised. For example, on the sequence of organising a visit: • phone the selected activity provider for discussion on purpose of the visit or talk • request specific activities • state date of visit • state estimated numbers of participants and provide a visitor group profile, i.e. age, level of courses attending • then follow the list of pre-visit planning above.

Administration
Schools and colleges may have centralised systems and forms to be completed when organising field trips/visits. Where this is not the case, or where a departmental record is required, or where the students themselves are involved in making arrangements for visits, the following record sheets may be helpful.

20

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

INDUSTRY LINKS/VISITS

Visit contact sheet Unit: Visit to: Address: Class group: Tel: Fax: Date of booking: Contact name: Department:

Date of visit: Duration of visit: Visit objectives:

Time of arrival: Estimated numbers:

Requirements: Tour Activity Talk Other: Guided Details: Theme: Free

Cost

Materials requested

How to get there:

School/college paperwork completed:

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

21

INDUSTRY LINKS/VISITS

Participant list Visit to: Meet: at: Date:

How to get there:

Details of visit:

Participants: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28

22

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

OHTs

SECTION 3

OHT 1

People working in the Scottish tourism industry need to be able to: • give visitors information on destinations they want to visit • tell them how to get there • tell them what type of accommodation suits their needs • make suggestions as to what there is to see and do • describe geographical areas and places to the visitor • answer questions on remoteness and climate in different parts of Scotland • provide information and make suggestions appropriate to the needs of business and leisure visitors.

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

23

OHTs

OHT 2

What skills are necessary to do this efficiently? • Reading various types of maps efficiently. • Interpreting keys and geographical information correctly. • Selecting brochures/websites containing information to match the needs of the visitor. • Selecting and finding the relevant information from brochures/websites. • Using visual presentations (photos/symbols) in brochures correctly. • Using information sources confidently and swiftly.

24

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

OHTs

OHT 3

What knowledge do I need? • Knowing why people choose Scotland as a tourist destination. • Knowing the main geographical features of Scotland well. • Knowing the names of holiday and business tourism areas well. • Knowing their location on the map. • Knowing the gateways. • Knowing the climate and general population density in different areas of Scotland. • Knowing about activities that visitors can enjoy in Scotland. • Knowing where to look up what a specific visitor wants to do and see. • Knowing about schemes which ensure high standards in the industry.

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

25

OHTs

OHT 4

How does the student workbook help me to achieve the goals? • The workbook contains main reference material based on contents of brochures and guidebooks. • It contains all activities to be completed at home or in self-study tasks. • It is the most important reference for revision for internal and external assessment. • It contains a summary of the overhead projector pages. • It contains some attainment sheets to which to return in order to check progress. • It assists with reinforcing knowledge through revision. • It may reduce the necessity to depend on brochure research.

26

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

OHTs

OHT 5

Appeal of Scotland as a tourist destination: Scotland’s image What do visitors expect to find in Scotland? • Remoteness • Landscape and scenery • Nature and wildlife • History and heritage • Culture • Legend • Friendly people • Scottish products • Emblems

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

27

OHTs

OHT 6

Strengths of the product • Accessibility to and within the destination • Range of accommodation from budget to deluxe • Range of activities and ease of equipment hire • Unspoilt natural environment, open spaces • Scenery • Quality Scottish products • Visitor attraction visits, such as: – craft workshops, factories, mills – industrial heritage sites – museums, galleries – historic houses, castles – visitor centres, information centres

28

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

OHTs

• Entertainment – theatre, arts, local festivals • Range of event organisers, ground handlers based in Scotland • Business travel – services of a convention bureau • Business travel – facilities within 2 hours of gateway airports for: conferences, meetings, exhibitions, incentive venues, ease of equipment hire, and business facilities • Pre- and post-event tours planning and service

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

29

OHTs

OHT 7

Perceived weaknesses of the product • Access difficulties to and within Scotland – true or false? • Problems with weather – true or false? • Food – true or false? • Finding suitable accommodation – true or false? • Expensive = value for money – true or false?

30

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

OHTs

OHT 8

Distinct touring areas • Burns Country: Dumfries – Ayr – Mauchline • The Borders: Peebles – Melrose – Kelso • The East Neuk: Anstruther – Crail – St Andrews • Loch Lomond and the Trossachs: Stirling – Aberfoyle – Callander • West Highlands: Oban – Glencoe – Fort William • Tayside: Perthshire – Dundee • Royal Deeside and Aberdeen: Braemar – Ballater – Crathie • Loch Ness and Inverness: Drumnadrochit – Fort Augustus • Wester Ross: Plockton – Torridon – Gairloch – Ullapool

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

31

OHTs

OHT 9

Resorts and touring centres for activities/ special interest
Dumfries Ayr / Kintyre Turnberry Oban Fort William Skye Ullapool Inverness/Aviemore Galloway Hills – walking; Burns Domestic seaside holidays, sailing; Burns Golf Western Isles – island hopping, sailing Mountaineering; skiing (Ben Nevis and Glencoe) Mountaineering; walking Mountaineering, Munro bagging Exploring Highlands, whisky trail, sailing, mountaineering, skiing, cycling, fishing Nairn Braemar Pitlochry Crieff Golf Skiing, hill walking, castles Fishing, theatre, walking Family breaks

32

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

OHTs

Stirling Gleneagles Peebles / Moffat

Trossachs, Ochil hills, touring, walking Golf, riding school Touring the Borders, golf, fishing, riding, castles, walking

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

33

OHTs

OHT 10

Island destinations and activities Shetlands and Orkneys • Bird watching – bird sanctuaries • Archaeology – pre-history – Viking culture – early Christianity • Special interest holidays – knitting courses – island hopping – wildlife • Activity holidays – sailing – fishing

34

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

OHTs

OHT 11

Island destinations and activities Western Isles and the Hebrides What the visitor can explore: • Gaelic culture • wildlife • geology • religious history • walking • fishing • whisky • island hopping • tweed weaving • bird watching • cruising • sailing • archaeology

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

35

OHTs

OHT 12

City destinations Edinburgh What Edinburgh offers to the visitor: • tourist attractions • international and local events • short city breaks • entertainment • business venues • conference space

36

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

OHTs

OHT 13

City destinations Aberdeen What Aberdeen offers to the visitor: • business venues • conference space • tourist attractions • interesting sites in the surrounding area • international and local events

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

37

OHTs

OHT 14

City destinations Glasgow What Glasgow offers to the visitor: • business venues • exhibition space • conference space • tourist attractions • quality shopping • football events • entertainment • concert space for all types of music • international and local special events
38 THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

OHTs

OHT 15

City destinations Dundee What Dundee offers to the visitor: • business venues • conference space • tourist attractions • interesting sites in the surrounding area

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

39

OHTs

OHT 16

Examples of special interest holidays Types of special interest holidays on offer in Scotland Trails • The Whisky Trail • The Mill Trail • The Trossachs Trail • The Castle Trail • The West Highland Way Nature • National parks • Forest parks/nature reserves • Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) • Exploring Wild Scotland (e.g. bird watching)

40

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

OHTs

Industrial heritage • New Lanark • Glasgow • Paisley • Museum of Scotland (Edinburgh) • Steam railways Arts and galleries • Edinburgh • Glasgow Religion • St Andrews • Abbeys, cathedrals and churches • Iona

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

41

OHTs

OHT 17

Examples of special interest holidays Architecture • Edinburgh New Town • Victorian Glasgow • Themed short breaks exploring architecture Visits to festivals and special events • Various festivals in Edinburgh and Military Tattoo • Celtic Connections in Glasgow • Rugby internationals • Golf championships • Highland Games, e.g. Braemar Gathering Study • English language courses • Gaelic language

42

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

STUDENT WORKBOOK

SECTION 4

Introduction – what do I know about Scotland and its visitors?
Task 1 Brainstorming session (5 minutes) Think of what you have learnt or what you know about the Scottish tourism product. Note down six items of the product visitors need or use when they come to Scotland. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Task 2 (5 minutes) Think of visitors’ opinions of Scotland as a holiday destination and mention four aspects they like and two aspects they might not be keen on.

+ (Positive)

+ (Negative)

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

43

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Task 3 (15 minutes) Compare your findings with the rest of the group. Tick as correct what others have contributed and note down any ideas from the other students you have not noted down. Now check the VisitScotland ‘Tourism in Scotland’ facts and figures and compare this with what you noted down about visitors’ opinions on Scotland. These are available at the following website: www.scotexchange.net

44

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

STUDENT WORKBOOK

What are the objectives of this unit?
Task 1 (30 minutes) The teacher will sum up for you on an overhead what you will achieve in this course. Make notes and make sure to ask questions so that you will be able to check your goals from time to time with this reference.

Notes

Task 2 Homework/self-study Now check your notes against the information on the next page. Make sure to ask your lecturer/teacher to clarify if you are in doubt about the objectives of the course.

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

45

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Information from OHT 1–4
Objectives of the unit When I work in the Scottish tourist industry I need to be able to: • Give visitors information on destinations they want to visit. • Tell them how to get there. • Tell them what type of accommodation suits their needs. • Make suggestions as to what there is to see and do. • Describe geographical areas and places to the visitor. • Answer questions on remoteness and climate in different parts of Scotland. • Provide information and make suggestions appropriate to the needs of business and leisure visitors. What skills do I need to do this efficiently? • Reading various types of maps efficiently. • Interpreting keys and geographical information correctly. • Selecting brochures/websites containing information matching the needs of the visitor. • Selecting and finding the relevant information from brochures/ websites. • Using visual presentations (photos/symbols) in brochures correctly. • Using all information sources confidently and swiftly. What knowledge do I need? • Knowing why people choose Scotland as a tourist destination. • Knowing the main geographical features of Scotland well. • Knowing the names of holiday and business tourism areas well. • Knowing their location on the map. • Knowing the gateways. • Knowing the climate and general population density in different areas of Scotland. • Knowing or knowing where to look up what a specific visitor wants to do and see. How does the workbook help me to achieve the goals? • The workbook contains main reference material based on contents of brochures. • It contains all activities completed at home or in self-study tasks. • It is the most important reference for revision for internal and external assessment. • It contains some reference maps. • It contains a summary of the overhead projector pages.

46

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

STUDENT WORKBOOK

• It contains some attainment sheets to which to return to check progress. • It assists with reinforcing knowledge through revision. • It may reduce the necessity to depend on brochure research. Extension materials The workbook may also contain an SQA unit descriptor and the instructions for the assessments.

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

47

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Outcome 1
Key geographical and physical features of Scotland In this section you commence the work required to cover Outcome 1. In Outcome 1 you are required to do the following: (a) (b) (c) (d) Describe the geographical features of Scotland. Identify and locate the main physical features of Scotland. Identify and locate the main islands and island groups. Identify and locate the main domestic and international gateway points. Identify and locate major tourist areas and centres.

(e)

Geographical features Task 1 If you were abroad, say in the United States, and someone asked you ‘Where is Scotland?’, how would you respond? Write your answer below

Scotland is part of Great Britain. Scotland is also part of the United Kingdom. What is the difference?

48

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Size How big is Scotland? Use an atlas and compare it to the USA, Canada, Russia or China. It is extremely small, covering only 30,500 square miles approximately. This compares to the United States at 3.6 million square miles! It is three-fifths of the size of England but only contains one-tenth of the population. Population The estimated population of Scotland (2005) is 5,047,000 and this represents a recent decline. The density of population in Scotland is relatively low, with 66 people per square kilometre, compared with 237 in Britain as a whole. It ranges from 3477 people per square kilometre in Glasgow to 8 in the Highlands. However, densities change over time. With the decline of heavy industry in the west of Scotland over the past 50 years, the population of Glasgow has dwindled from over a million to 577,350 (2001 census) whereas major growth areas in terms of population increase have been the Highlands and the east. The Livingston area has 10 per cent growth, whereas the Western Isles have experienced an 11 per cent decline. Over 80 per cent of the population lives in the Central Lowlands, often referred to as the central belt, which contains the cities of Glasgow, Edinburgh, the capital (448,080), Dundee (172,120) and Stirling (41,408). The other two cities, Aberdeen (209,270) and Inverness (c.60,000), the fastest-growing centre of population in the UK, lie north of the central belt. Glasgow: ‘The Dear Green Place’ (it has over 70 parks) is the largest city and industrial centre of Scotland and is located on the estuary of the River Clyde. The city was formerly dependent on shipbuilding and marine engineering (the two famous Queens and the last of the great passenger liners, the Queen Elizabeth II, were launched from the Clyde). In more recent years the city has had to develop new industries and new products in line with changing world markets. Significantly it has become Scotland’s premier business tourism destination. It has three universities, and is an important commercial and business centre. The city centre is notable for Victorian architecture. Edinburgh: ‘Athens of the North’, ‘Auld Reekie’, ‘Festival City’ – is the capital city and centre for tourism, banking and finance. Scottish Government including the new parliament is based in Edinburgh, also the Scottish church and legal profession. The city has three universities and traditional industries like brewing are still important. The city centre is notable for Georgian architecture.

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

49

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Aberdeen: often referred to as ‘The Granite City’, is the centre of the Scottish oil industry, while more traditionally it was a major fishing port and market centre. The city has two universities and is a frequent winner of the ‘Britain in Bloom’ contest. Dundee: traditionally famous for the three J’s of Jute, Jam and Journalism. Home of Oor Wullie, The Broons, the Beano and the Dandy. It is now also involved in a wide range of manufacturing, electronics and North Sea oil-related activities. It has two universities. Inverness: ‘The Capital of the Highlands’, is the administrative and tourist centre for the Highlands. Historically also very important – ’45 Rebellion, Culloden Stirling: ‘The Gateway to the Highlands’, dominated by Stirling Castle. It is a university town and is a local market, shopping and distribution centre. Historically very important – William Wallace, Bannockburn, etc. Other main centres include: Perth (40,893): ‘The Fair City’ – the crowning place of Scottish Kings (in Scone, on the outskirts) for more than eight centuries. It is now a market centre for the surrounding agricultural area. Its industries include whisky and glass. Dumfries (31,600): A market town serving south-west Scotland. Strong associations with Robert Burns, who is buried here.

50

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Climate Given the latitude of Scotland it has a surprisingly mild climate. At this latitude of the northern hemisphere only the west coast of Canada close to the Alaskan border enjoys a comparable climate, but there low temperatures are more severe.

Task 2 Can you explain why Scotland’s climate is comparatively mild?

Despite our comparative mildness, the climate is the main contributory factor to Scottish tourism’s seasonality problem. It is often said that Scotland does not have a climate, only weather! This is due to the rapid changes which occur in weather conditions, not just from day to day, but often within a single day, as weather fronts rapidly traverse the country bringing rain, wind and sunshine in quick succession. Rainfall is probably the most important parameter in Scotland’s climate. Poor weather is the main criticism cited by people who have visited Scotland. In a survey of people living in London and the South East of England who had never visited Scotland on holiday, cold and rain were given as the main reason for not coming.

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

51

STUDENT WORKBOOK

However, annual rainfall in the eastern part of Scotland, e.g. Edinburgh, is only around 650 mm (30") per annum – about the same as London or Rome, while on the west 950 mm (40") is more usual, with the highest totals in the Western Highlands at around 1600 mm (60") per annum – similar to rainfall totals in Florida and the Caribbean! But – many rain gauges in mountainous areas record more than 3000 mm in the average year! Wind – In case you hadn’t noticed Scotland is also a windy place! The prevailing wind is from the south west. Average wind speed varies considerably over the country, from 17 mph in the Outer Hebrides to 10 mph in the East Central Highlands. The highest-ever gust recorded on low ground was 142 mph at Fraserburgh, while 173 mph has been measured on the summit of Cairngorm in March 1986. Sunshine – June is the brightest month of the year with about 6 hours of daily sunshine on average while the dullest month is December with only 1.5 hours. Over the year Dunbar is the sunniest place in Scotland, averaging 1523 hours while the dullest parts, the mountainous inland regions have about two-thirds of this total. In the northern isles the midsummer sun is above the horizon for 18.25 hours and it is possible to read a book outdoors right through the night. The highest recorded temperature in the shade is 32.8 degrees Celsius at Dumfries in 1908. Dumfries and Galloway has the highest mean annual temperature at 9 degrees Celsius. Snow – The frequency of snow cover varies considerably from place to place, and from year to year. Tiree in the Hebrides has only about 3.5 days per year compared to 14 in Edinburgh (though Penicuik only 10 miles away has 30 days). Beattock Summit has 38 and Drumochter Pass 70. At greater altitudes the cover is more frequent and sheltered corries in the Cairngorms and on Ben Nevis remain snow covered through most summers. Fresh snow can fall as late as June and as early as September. A temperature of –27.2 degrees Celsius has been recorded at Braemar (1895 and 1982) and Altnaharra (1995).

Which activities are associated with these snowy north-eastern facing corries?

52

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Fog – The general visibility over Scotland is very good, probably because it is so windy! Edinburgh and much of the east coast suffers from ‘haar’ in spring and summer. This is a coastal fog which drifts in off the North Sea as a result of warm air off the land flowing over the colder sea and speeding up evaporation on the sea surface. When this occurs the coast has a cool and gloomy prospect, whereas 10 or 15 miles inland beautiful clear sunlight is normal. The rain-bearing winds from the south-west often result in a low cloud base of 300 m or less above sea level. This cloud can be quite dense and reduce visibility to 100 m.

Task 3 So what clothes would you advise a visitor to take to Scotland at different times of the year? Make four lists in the columns. March–May June–August Sept.–October Nov.–February

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

53

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Physical features Have to hand your Scotland Touring Map. Scotland is 275 miles long from north to south. Its maximum width is 154 miles and minimum width 25 miles between the Firths of Clyde and Forth. The country can be divided into three distinct geographical areas: • the Southern Uplands • the Central Lowlands • the Scottish Highlands Can you locate these divisions on your map of Scotland? Find the line running roughly NE to SW between Stonehaven and Helensburgh. This marks the boundary edge between the Highlands and the Lowlands, while the edge of the Southern Uplands is marked by a similar line from Dunbar to Girvan. In geographical terms they are called the Highland Boundary Fault and the Lowland Boundary Fault. The Highlands are further divided by the Great Glen Fault into the North West Highlands and the Grampian Mountains. Southern Uplands This area goes from the English border to the Lowland Boundary Fault. It comprises a rolling landscape of hills, valleys and rivers, ruined abbeys, woollen mill towns, old estates, large livestock farms and a 60mile border with England. Major rivers Hill ranges Firths Clyde, Tweed, Moorfoots, Lammermuirs, Cheviots, Lowther, Galloway Solway, Clyde

54

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Central Lowlands This is the area between the Lowland Boundary Fault and the Highland Boundary Fault. Seventy-five per cent of the Scottish population lives here. The population grew dramatically during the industrial revolution. Traditional heavy industries – shipbuilding, mining, iron and steel – have been replaced by electronics (Silicon Glen), plastics, petrochemicals and business machinery. Major rivers Hill ranges Lochs Firths Canals Highlands This is the northern half of Scotland, from the Highland Boundary Fault to the North Coast including the Great Glen Fault. It comprises over 50 per cent of Scotland’s total landmass yet only one-fifth of the population. Depopulated during the nineteenth century by the Highland Clearances. Industries include forestry, whisky, oil, fishing, tourism and hydro-electric power. Major rivers Major sea lochs Major freshwater lochs Mountain ranges Firths Canal Spey, Dee, Don Loch Fyne, Loch Linnhe Loch Lomond (largest by area), Loch Ness (largest by volume), Loch Tay, Loch Awe, Grampians (Cairngorms, Mamores, Ben Nevis, Glencoe), North West Highlands Pentland, Moray, Cromarty, Dornoch, Lorn Caledonian Forth, Tay (Scotland’s longest river at 120 miles) Campsie Fells, Kilpatrick Hills, Ochils, Sidlaws, Pentlands Loch Leven, Loch Lomond (southern end) Clyde, Forth, Tay Crinan, Union, Forth and Clyde

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

55

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Islands In all there are 790 islands of which 130 are inhabited. Significant groups include: Shetland – 100 islands, 15 inhabited, half-way to Norway and same latitude as Greenland. Orkney – approx. 70 islands, same latitude as Leningrad, and Oslo is closer than London. The Hebrides – approx. 550, stretching almost the entire length of the western side of the country. Lewis, Harris, Barra, Skye, Mull, Jura and Islay are amongst the large islands. Firth of Clyde – Arran, Bute, Cumbrae are the three main islands and there are a few outliers. Coastline Look again at the map of Scotland. You can see how jagged the west coast is. Some deep indentations are made by the main river estuaries (firths) or by sea lochs such as Loch Long and Loch Linnhe which are drowned glaciated valleys similar to Norway’s fjords. Scotland has a very long coastline in relation to its land area due to all these indentations. The west coast is about 260 miles in a straight line but has over 2000 miles of indented coastline. In total the Scottish coastline stretches for 2400 miles. Mountains Scottish mountains are very ancient, geologically speaking, and are considerably lower than much younger mountains such as the Alps or the Rockies. The highest mountain in Great Britain is Ben Nevis at 4406 ft (1344m). Munros are Scottish peaks over 3000 feet – there are 284 of these including perhaps the most frequently climbed, Ben Lomond.

Task 4 Use your touring map or atlas to locate and name on Map 1 all the physical features listed in bold type on this and the previous 2 pages. Make your printing small!

56

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Map 1

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

57

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Task 5 Here are some more geographical and physical features. Using your reference materials find out where each feature is and plot its location on Map 2. • Picturesque mountains – Suilven, Stac Pollaidh, Goat Fell, The Cobbler, The Cuillins, The Five Sisters of Kintail • Attractive hills – Criffel, Tinto, Kinnoull, Bennachie, Morven • Great glens – Glen Affric, Glen Lyon, Glen Nevis, Glen Etive and Glencoe • Best beaches – Sandwood Bay, Scarista Beach, Sands of Morar, Dornoch Beach • Lovely lochs – Loch Maree, Loch An Eilean, Loch Katrine • Classic views – The Quiraing, An Teallach, Liathach, Rest and Be Thankful, Elgol, The Summer Isles, Queens View, Scott’s View

58

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Map 2

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

59

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Designated areas National Parks Scotland’s first national parks were created in 2002 and 2004. Do you know their names?

Task 6 1. What is a National park? Look up the relevant websites to find a definition. – www.cairngorms.co.uk and www.lochlomondtrossachs.org

2.

Shade and name the national parks on Map 3.

National scenic areas These have been identified by Scottish Natural Heritage as areas which should be protected against types of development likely to have a significant effect on scenic interest. • • • • • • • • • • Skye/The Cuillin Mountains Ben Nevis and Glencoe Kintail and Glen Affric Royal Deeside Torridon Mountains/Wester Ross including Beinn Eighe Nature Reserve Upper Tweeddale Criffel and the East Stewartry Coast The Inverpolly Nature Reserve Arran and Mull Eildon Hills

60

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Forest parks The Forestry Commission actively encourages people to visit forest areas and it provides access to and through its woodlands, picnic sites, parking facilities, information services, etc. In pursuing this role a number of Forest Parks have been designated • • • • • • Argyll Tay Galloway Glen More Tweed Valley Queen Elizabeth.

Task 7 Locate the scenic areas and forest parks on Map 3 and make notes below of any Forest Park visitor centres. The following website may be useful: www.forestry.gov.uk/Scotland

Other designated areas include: Country Parks (Is there one near you?, Yes?) Name it here Examples National Nature Reserves such as Rum, Inverpolly or Beinn Eighe (www.snh.org.uk), RSPB reserves (www.rspb.org.uk), John Muir Trust properties (www.jmt.org), and National Trust properties (www.nts.org.uk). Examples will be studied in later sections of the workbook.

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

61

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Map 3

62

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Transport networks, gateway points, and touring routes Access forms an important part of the tourism product. If it is too difficult for tourists to get to Scotland, then they may just not bother to come at all. The availability of transport is a major factor, which the tourist will take into account when making plans. In this section we will look at the different forms of transport that can be used both to get to Scotland and also to travel within Scotland. Travelling within Scotland is comparatively easy with trains serving major towns, and an extensive bus system linking all but the most remote villages, while the road network reaches every corner of the country. Air and ferry services allow access to the inhabited islands around the coastline. Air travel The main transatlantic airport in Scotland is Glasgow. The main entry airports for European and British services are • • • • • Glasgow Prestwick Edinburgh Aberdeen Inverness

Many international visitors to Scotland come via London, through either Stansted, Luton, Gatwick or Heathrow from where they can complete their journey to Scotland by air to Glasgow, Aberdeen, Edinburgh or Inverness. The island groups are also well served by an internal air network. Scottish airports can be seen on the maps in VisitScotland brochures. There are also a number of smaller airstrips around remote coastal areas and in the Orkney Islands. Most island airports are served from Glasgow, e.g. • • • • • • • Barra Benbecula Islay Tiree Lewis Orkney Shetland

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

63

STUDENT WORKBOOK

In addition, there are services to Inverness, Aberdeen, and Campbeltown. Lewis (Stornoway) is also served from Inverness and Edinburgh. From Edinburgh and Aberdeen there are flights to Wick, Orkney (Kirkwall) and Shetland (Sumburgh). Within Orkney, Shetland and the Outer Hebrides there are inter-island air services.

Task 8 1. Use your brochures or guidebooks to locate these airports and mark them on blank Map 4. 2. What is unusual about the airport on the Island of Barra?

64

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Map 4

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

65

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Rail travel Scotland is served by two main lines from London: • the east coast London/Edinburgh/Inverness/Aberdeen route which is electrified as far as Edinburgh and • the west coast London/Glasgow/Fort William route which is electrified to Glasgow. Within Scotland the railway network extends to around 1674 miles of track linking over 300 stations. For tourists a First ScotRail Rover ticket is available, as are other local Rover tickets. Overseas visitors can buy a BritRail Flexipass which offers unlimited travel on the whole British rail network. Two of the world’s most scenic rail routes can be included in touring itineraries of the Highlands. These are: • The Kyle Line • The West Highland Line.

Task 9 1. Plot the above rail routes on Map 4. 2. Use the internet (or Great Britain Passenger Railway Timetable if you have one) to find out the following journey times (approximately): Website: www.traveline.org.uk London to Glasgow London to Edinburgh Circle the faster of the two. 3. Using the same sources find out the approximate journey times for the following rail journeys. Website: www.firstscotrail.co.uk Edinburgh – Glasgow Aberdeen – Glasgow Edinburgh – Inverness

66

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Ferry travel Superfast Ferries operate a direct vehicle ferry service from Rosyth to Zeebrugge (Belgium). Visitors on motoring tours of Scotland also enter the UK at either the English Channel ferry ports or Hull (P&O North Sea Ferries) and Newcastle (DFDS Scandinavian Seaways, Color Line). Visitors from Northern Ireland can use the various services between Belfast, Larne and South of Scotland ports, Stranraer (Stena), Cairnryan (P&O Irish Ferries) and Troon (Seacat). As Scotland is surrounded on three sides by water and has ... islands (how many?), of which 130 are inhabited, ferries are a major means of transport. The islands can be divided into two main groups – the Inner and Outer Hebrides (also known as the Western Isles) off the west coast, and Orkney and Shetland off the north coast. Caledonian MacBrayne (Calmac) currently operate the majority of ferry services on the Clyde and west coast of Scotland, sailing to 23 islands and 54 ports, including Oban, the gateway to the Hebrides. ‘God owns the earth and all that it contains, except the Western Isles, for that is MacBraynes’ ... local saying. Most ferries carry vehicles and for the visitor two flexible tickets are offered – Island Hopscotch and Island Rovers. See the Calmac brochure for details and note particularly the main routes Oban – Craignure, Oban – Castlebay and Lochboisdale; Ullapool – Stornoway; Uig – Tarbert and Lochmaddy; and Ardrossan – Brodick. Northlink Ferries sail to Orkney and Shetland. The main crossing from the Scottish mainland to Orkney is from Scrabster (Thurso) to Stromness. The main crossing to Shetland (Lerwick) is from Aberdeen. Task 10 Plot all the above ferry routes and ports on Map 5. Make sure you are familiar with these points on the map. You could research the information on the following websites: www.superfast.com www.stenaline.com www.poirishsea.com www.seacat.co.uk www.calmac.co.uk www.northlinkferries.co.uk

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

67

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Within both the Orkney and Shetland Islands local services operate and there are many small companies operating regular day trips to smaller islands around Scotland.

68

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Map 5

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

69

STUDENT WORKBOOK

A growing number of visitors come to Scotland on cruise ships. Here is the Queen Mary in the Firth of Forth.

70

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Driving in Scotland Eighty per cent of holiday trips into Scotland are made by private transport. The vast majority of visitors travel north on the M74 from Carlisle to Glasgow, entering Scotland at Gretna Green. The connecting M8 motorway can reach Edinburgh, but Scotland’s capital has poor direct road links to the south. The A1 connecting Edinburgh to Newcastle, the north east of England and Yorkshire is a slow route which does little to encourage the population in the east of England to visit Scotland. Overseas visitors to the country should always be made aware that we drive on the left-hand side of the road and that overtaking is only permissible on the right-hand side of the car in front. Obviously, on single carriageway roads, overtaking is more hazardous if driving a lefthand drive. Overseas visitors should also be advised about our single track roads with passing places which demand extra care – these are still found in many parts of the Highlands and Islands as in Glen Torridon below.

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

71

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Tourist routes In the late 1980s VisitScotland (then the Scottish Tourist Board) in conjunction with local authorities identified ten National Tourist Routes. These were introduced to meet one of the board’s main objectives which is: • to increase the geographical spread of tourism expenditure The routes are identified by White on Brown Tourism Signs

These are now featured in various leaflets published by VisitScotland. Try to get a copy of the tourist route information leaflet – add it to your collection of information. These routes cover parts of the country which, as a consequence of their location, do not attract as many visitors as the more popular parts of Scotland. Today there are 12 routes. These are: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. Borders Historic Tourist Route Forth Valley Tourist Route Fife Coastal Tourist Route Perthshire Tourist Route The Deeside Tourist Route The Highland Tourist Route Moray Firth Tourist Route Clyde Valley Tourist Route Galloway Tourist Route Argyll Coastal Tourist Route Angus Coastal Tourist Route North and West Highlands Tourist Route

72

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Task 11 On Map 5 plot the following: 1. Tourist routes All officially designated touring routes as listed on the previous page. 2. Touring centres Moffat Pitlochry 3. Coastal resorts Ullapool Dunoon Nairn Gairloch Rothesay St Andrews Portree Oban Largs Ayr North Berwick Dornoch Strathpeffer Fort William Aviemore Inverness Stirling Ballater

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

73

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Task 12 1. Speed Limits – What are the normal speed limits in Scotland? Motorway/dual carriageway: Single carriageway: Built-up areas: When planning a route for visitors to Scotland, whether by car or coach, you must be aware of distances between places and the time taken to drive between points. This will obviously depend on the type of road and volume of traffic. For example, the national tourist routes are fairly fast and a touring driver could average 50 mph. 2. Assuming an average speed of 50 mph, use the mileage chart provided to calculate average journey times between the following points: Edinburgh to Glasgow (motorway) Edinburgh to Inverness (dual carriageway/single clearway) Edinburgh to Aberdeen (motorway/dual carriageway) Travel on other trunk routes is slower as they tend to follow the landscape, e.g. Glasgow to Inverness by the A82 follows a very twisty route through the Great Glen and this obviously slows down traffic. 3. Assuming an average speed of 45 mph, use the mileage chart provided on the next page to calculate average journey times between the following points: Fort William and Thurso (single carriageway) Inverness to Kyle of Lochalsh (single carriageway) Edinburgh to Oban (motorway/single carriageway)

74

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

EE

N

RD

AB E

R

MI N

GH

AM

DI

421 687

BI

FF

VE

UM F

617 993 200 322 224 361

DO

RI

ES

529 851 113 182

CA R

R

ND

RG

214 344 234 376 335 539 436 700

D

EE

H

BU

IL

71

114 357 575 465 749 553 890 149 240

DU

LI

AM

RT

161 258 396 637 504 811 592 952 179 288 123 197 138 221

FO

GO

W

131 210 290 467 398 641 486 782 80

128 62

99

E

DI N

W

Mileage chart To find the distance from Dundee to Aberdeen, run your finger horizontally from Dundee along the line of figures until you reach the vertical column for Aberdeen. You come to the numbers 71 and 114. The former is the distance in miles; the latter shows the distance in kilometres.
AS IC W H

GL

152 243 286 461 394 634 482 776 76

122 84

134 45

72

108 173

HA R

IC

604 972 187 300 242 390 130 210 370 595 540 869 473 761 578 931 469 754

K

W

HA

SS

LL

HU

VE R

IN

E

118 189 446 717 553 890 641 1032 239 385 134 214 162 259 69

110 178 285 628 1011 209 337 444 710

OF

LO C

387 619 137 221 251 405 255 411 205 330 318 509 255 408 384 614 275 440 214 346 206 331

NE

HA

178 287 243 391 344 554 417 671 53

86

113 182 50

81

185 298 85

137 370 596

LS

H

ND

LO

NC H

MA

AN

244 390 208 336 323 519 350 563 91

147 175 280 112 179 267 427 159 254 309 498 64

102 148 237 274 438 343 549 288 461 147 237

N

EW

CA

345 556 93

150 201 324 281 453 157 252 281 453 214 345 320 515 210 338 268 431 166 267 95

154 370 595 393 633 201 322

ST

LE

549 878 118 190 150 242 75

122 349 561 481 770 412 659 514 822 406 650 78

126 358 576 216 346 573 917 590 944

ES

TE

200 320 469 755 577 929 665 1070 253 407 179 286 207 331 76

122 184 294 652 1049 254 408 459 734 82

131

KY L

ON

R

OB

RT

ES T

86 127 131 210 32 23 61 97 157 29 47 448 722 87 124 200 47 76 430 692 67 52

139 348 560 449 723 550 884 128 205 21

34

43

69

104 166 64

104 484 778 96

155 319 513 114 183 158 254 463 744 271 436 152 245 94

151

PE

W

IC PR SY
155 49 140 37 60

190 304 385 620 493 794 581 935 168 270 121 194 125 200 50

80

96

154 568 914 175 281 371 594 112 180 125 200 502 803 309 498 310 496

H

K TH

NG

RO

LI

ST

IR

TR A

120 193 313 503 414 666 514 823 92

149 55

89

38

141 284 456 145 234 172 277 427 688 236 379 143 231 87

61

99 87

26

42

NR

AE S UR
131 211 114 183

115 185 324 522 425 684 477 768 104 170 48

77

14

108 265 426 145 233 189 304 437 703 247 398 123 198 114 183 31

79

127

R SO TH N

TR

OO

343 552 132 212 246 396 273 439 151 243 279 449 191 308 318 511 208 335 233 374 152 245 41 65

367 591 391 630 208 335 70 113

90 146

307 495 237 382 226 363 212 341 230 370 477 767 218 352 231 372 421 678

M

KM

YO

RK

179 286 499 803 607 976 695 1118 293 472 194 310 222 355 119 190 238 381 681 1097 263 424 504 806 63

101 91

146 635 1016 444 710 335 536 169 270 168 270 255 411 199 320 199 320 128 205 327 523 263 423

U

LL A

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER)
486 783 105 168 279 449 201 324 204 329 418 673 228 366 168 271 120 193 96 142 475 765 125 202 284 454 265 424 272 435 419 664 224 358 161 259 172 277 149 240 54 132 126 203 35 56 450 724 106 171 285 459 209 336 200 322 429 690 237 381 121 276 116 186 101 162 5 8 80 129 63 101 60 96 316 508

STUDENT WORKBOOK

183 295 314 505 415 668 516 830 64

104 119 191 82

PO

OL

© Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

177 285 304 489 411 662 500 804 61

98

113 182 79

241 386 297 478 404 651 489 787 71

115 172 275 133 213 196 314 89

234 374 555 893 663 1066 750 1208 348 560 250 400 278 445 183 293 293 469 737 1186 319 513 559 894 112 180 177 283 690 1104 499 798 391 626 233 373 221 311 355 500 254 409 252 406 382 610

75

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Task 12 (continued) 4. Look at your touring map and using the road system describe three ways of reaching Inverness from Edinburgh, (i) (ii) (iii)

Coach services Various companies offer services within Scotland, e.g. Citylink, First Bus and Stagecoach. Some key times are shown in the information below. Various passes or Explorer tickets are available to tourists.

Task 13 Have a look at the journey times from Edinburgh to Ullapool and Thurso. Can you think why these particular services are important?

Coach journey times within Scotland (all times approximate) Glasgow to Aberdeen Aviemore Ayr Dundee Edinburgh Inverness Perth Stirling Thurso Ullapool Hours 3 3 1 1 1 3 1 0 6 5 Mins 13 10 35 45 15 30 25 40 45 00 Edinburgh to Aberdeen Aviemore Ayr Dundee Glasgow Inverness Perth Stirling Thurso Ullapool Hours 3 2 2 1 1 3 1 0 6 4 Mins 50 24 55 30 15 25 05 40 40 45

76

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Some of the remoter areas in Scotland are served by Postbus. These are minibuses which deliver mail and also carry passengers. General travel passes A Freedom of Scotland Travelpass includes unlimited travel on scheduled rail services in Scotland – plus travel on most Calmac and Western Ferries plus discounts on many bus and postbus services and Orkney and Shetland ferries.

Task 14 Research transport timetables and network maps and describe how a tourist might reach Skye from Edinburgh and return (in a circuit) using public transport.

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

77

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Task 15 Now – can you answer the following questions, typically asked in tourist information centres around Scotland? Use your brochures, guides and other reference sources to find the answers. A visitor in Glasgow enquires which ferry port will get him to the Isle of Arran.

Which ferry routes depart from Oban?

How can I get to Shetland starting from Edinburgh? I have a car.

I have a car and I would like to drive to a ferry port to spend some days in the Western Isles. Could you give me the different routes by ferry?

I have just come up from Birmingham and I would like to spend some time in the Inner Hebrides. What are the ferry ports to the different islands and where would I arrive?

A letter enquiry requires information on how to get from Edinburgh to Skye by train. Describe the route.

Can I get a train from Aberdeen to Inverness?

Can I get a train from Glasgow to Ardrossan to catch the ferry to Arran?

How do I get from Stirling to Kyle of Lochalsh with my rail rover?

cont’d on next page

78

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

STUDENT WORKBOOK

I would like to go from Edinburgh to Peebles by rail.

Is there a train from Aberdeen to Ballater?

Can I visit Kintyre by train from Glasgow?

Which is the most northerly point of Scotland I could visit by train?

Is there are train connection from Edinburgh to Oban?

Can I see Loch Ness by train?

Give alternative types of travel for the NO answers:

How do I get to the west of Scotland from the USA?

I am planning a visit for an incentive group from Norway to Inverness. How would they get there?

Planning to visit the west of Scotland from abroad, which would be the most convenient airport for arrival?

I want to spend a holiday in the eastern Borders. Where should I fly to from London?
cont’d on next page

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

79

STUDENT WORKBOOK

I want to spend a fortnight on Royal Deeside. Where is the nearest airport?

Is it possible to get a plane to the Outer Hebrides?

Study the tourist routes mentioned earlier. Pick out three and, if possible, find information in brochures or guides on things to do and see on the route. Describe the landscape the visitor might see along the route Route 1

Route 2

Route 3

80

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Outcome 2
In this section you do the work required to cover Outcome 2, on the nature of the Scottish tourism product and the appeal of major tourist destinations within Scotland. This includes the following: (a) Describe accurately the key factors contributing to Scotland’s appeal as a tourist destination. Describe major tourist areas and centres in terms of their principal appeal to the visitor. Describe accurately accessibility to major tourist destinations within Scotland. Identify visitor attractions and amenities in terms of type, facilities and usage.

(b)

(c)

(d)

Strengths of the Scottish Tourism Product In this section we look at the key factors contributing to Scotland’s appeal as a visitor destination. You will learn about these through completing a series of tasks.

Task 16 Read the promotional text on the next page. This is extracted from the VisitScotland publication: Scotland – The Incentive Planner. This text is available to potential visitors from all over the world. It creates an image of what our tourist product is about and informs clients in the travel trade what Scotland, as a destination, has to offer. The information is presented in a promotional style. Mark the key points that make up the image of Scotland.

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

81

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Information (Task 16) Promotional text Read the following text critically (source: VisitScotland publication: Scotland – The Incentive Planner). Scotland: a landscape to inspire Few countries can match the dramatic scenic variations of Scotland – or its incredible natural beauty. The Highlands offer spectacular mountains, tranquil glens, deep sea lochs, tumbling waterfalls and white sandy beaches bordering clear blue seas. The mystical islands to the north and west combine moor, mountain, loch and sea, whilst the Lowlands present magnificent rolling hills, vivid green pastures, wooded river valleys and stretches of impressive coastline. With every changing season the Scottish landscape provides an awe-inspiring palette of colour – the vivid hues of spring progressing through summer to the spectacular richness of autumn, the drama of winter. Scotland is truly a land for all seasons, a rich and unspoilt environment with beautiful wildlife and flora – an inspiration to business visitors and holidaymakers alike. Scotland: 5000 years cast in stone From the earliest beginnings, the history of Scotland has been imprinted in stone upon the landscape. From neolithic stone circles, brochs and duns (fortified stone towers), crofts and our majestic and mysterious Scottish castles, to the rich culture and stunning architecture of our ancient cities and towns. Throughout Scotland there is a wealth of beautiful and unique buildings to explore. Castles, palaces and abbeys all tell a small part of Scotland’s story. Visitors will marvel at the splendour of Edinburgh’s famous castle – home of the Scottish Crown Jewels and the Stone of Destiny, or the impressive Georgian architecture of Culzean Castle (pronounced Cul–ane), the romantic atmosphere of Eilean Donan Castle close to the Isle of Skye, and Falkland Palace – once the seat of the Scottish Court. The historical use of local materials, like the red and yellow sandstone of Victorian Glasgow and the silver-grey granite of Old Aberdeen, helps to create further the very individual character of our towns and cities which wait to be admired by our visitors. Scotland: A nation forged by its people The Scots are a friendly and hospitable people renowned for their great warmth of character and resourceful nature.

82

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

STUDENT WORKBOOK

We are a nation of entrepreneurs and adventurers – an estimated 20 million Scots are scattered throughout every continent. Scottish inventors, philosophers and scientists have been responsible for many of the ideas which have helped shape the modern world, whilst historical Scottish figures like Mary Queen of Scots, Rob Roy Macgregor, William Wallace and Bonnie Prince Charlie all have played an important role in defining Scotland. Scotland: unique by nature Scotland is an ancient and proud nation, a part of the United Kingdom, yet very different and very much its own country with a new parliament in its own right. The strong and independent nature of the Scots has kept our heritage and cultural traditions very much alive. Our three languages, Scots, English and Gaelic, are all spoken and used in colourful prose and poetry. Scotland’s distinctive heritage can be experienced in our music and dance, literature and theatre. It shows in our history, in our castles and monuments, our clan traditions, in the very tartans that have now become so much an emblem of Scotland. Scotland: experience the country life Wherever you travel in Scotland you’ll find a country that provides an unlimited choice of outdoor pursuits. ‘The home of golf’, it offers a rare opportunity to play some of the world’s legendary courses – St Andrews, Carnoustie, Royal Troon, Prestwick and Turnberry. In all, there are over 470 golf courses in Scotland, the majority of which are long established and a real joy to play. For groups or individuals there are other traditional country pursuits on offer, for example hiking, fishing and (particularly popular with ‘incentive’ clients) archery, clay pigeon shooting and falconry. Many anglers consider Scotland a paradise with some of the best salmon and trout waters in the world. Just stepping into the beautiful Scottish scenery is often all that is needed to relax and unwind – fresh-air forest walks and nature trails. There are many ways of exploring this amazing country. You could choose the comfort of a romantic steam train journeying through the Highlands. But the more energetic will delight in the choice of outdoor adventure activities that Scotland has to offer. These include white-water rafting, off-road driving, canoeing, yachting, mountain biking, horse riding – even diving and rock climbing.

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

83

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Scotland: a tapestry of arts and culture To appreciate fully the many splendours of Scotland, it is important to experience its wide-ranging arts and culture. All the major cities have fine concert halls, theatres, art galleries and museums hosting prestigious collections. There is an exciting calendar of events like the Edinburgh International Festival and the Edinburgh Tattoo; Highland Games are celebrated in many villages and towns during the summer and ceilidhs, a traditional entertainment with bagpipes or fiddle music, dancing and song can be found year-round in many places. Scotland: a superb range of memorable accommodation From beautiful and historic castles to splendid baronial mansions, fashionable city-centre hotels to secluded retreats in private country estates, bed and breakfast accommodation to camping sites, Scotland offers the ultimate choice of range in quality accommodation for groups and individual visitors. You will find properties that are modern and international in style, whilst others have a more traditional image, all of them with a unique Scottish ambience. Most extend a level of hospitality and service which is guaranteed through quality-assurance schemes run by the VisitScotland. Scotland: a taste for quality Scotland’s unspoilt environment provides some of the finest-quality food in the world – Aberdeen Angus beef, rich venison and lamb, grouse and pheasant, wild salmon and trout, shellfish and soft fruit and berries. It also helps to produce distinctive cheeses, the best smoked salmon in the world, and perhaps the most famous meat dish – haggis. Combine all this with the award-winning skills of Scottish chefs and you are guaranteed a good meal in Scotland. Malt whisky is known the world over as the national drink of Scotland, and no visit would be complete without learning some of the mysteries of its production and sampling its many subtle flavours. Scotland’s historic distilleries offer opportunities for visits and tasting as well as buying the product.

84

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Task 17 Scotland’s image. Copy Overhead 5 in the box below.

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

85

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Task 18 Write some short interesting promotional comments of 30 words for each heading from Overhead 5. To prove your point provide an example of each.

Image Example: Remoteness

Example The west coast of Harris – very few inhabitants, mountains, spectacular beaches, sea lochs

86

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Scotland’s appeal as a tourist destination to: • Leisure and business tourists • Overseas and domestic tourists In this section we continue to look at the key factors contributing to Scotland’s appeal as a visitor destination and consider the differences in the expectations of leisure, business, domestic and overseas visitors.

Task 19 The strengths of Scotland’s tourist product for leisure visitors. See Overhead 6. The important points of the Scottish Tourism Product are listed below and on the next pages. You are invited to contribute examples and take notes in the spaces below each heading. Accessibility to and within the destination

Range of accommodation from budget to deluxe

Range of activities and ease of equipment hire

cont’d on next page
THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland 87

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Unspoilt natural environment, open spaces

Scenery

Quality Scottish products

Visitor attraction visits to: craft workshops, mills, distilleries, factories, etc.

cont’d on next page

88

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Museums and galleries

Heritage sites (historic houses, castles) and industrial heritage sites, visitor centres

Entertainment – theatre, music, local festivals

Incoming tour operators (or ground-handling agents or destination management consultants) offer packages/items of the Scottish Tourism Product to individual or group tour operators abroad. Model: company profile of tour operator (create a profile of a company you have studied – you may need more space)

Company name: Location: Main business:

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

89

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Task 20 Now carry out a similar consideration of the strengths of Scotland’s tourist product for business visitors. You might find it useful to refer to the VisitScotland website – www.conventionscotland.com. Accessibility to and within the destination

Range of appropriate accommodation

Facilities within 2 hours of gateway airports for: conferences, meetings, exhibitions, incentive venues. See www.secc.co.uk, www.eicc.co.uk, and www.aecc.co.uk.

Ease of equipment hire and suitability of business facilities

cont’d on next page

90

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Services of convention bureaux

Pre- and post-event tour planning and service

Range of event organisers and destination management companies (based in Scotland) Fill in additional information on event organisers that make arrangements for the business market. 1. Company name: Location: Main business: Also deals with: Languages: 2. Company name: Location: Main business: Also deals with: Languages:

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

91

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Task 21 Using Tourism in Scotland Fact and Figures – see Scotexchange.net. Identify ways in which the domestic visitor profile differs from the overseas visitor profile in terms of visitor activity, expectations or perceptions of Scotland. Use the reference table below to illustrate the differences. An example is given to guide you. Aspects of visits Domestic visitors Overseas visitors More likely to be deterred by perceptions of Scotland as wet, windy and cold in contrast to other European destinations

Attitude to climate Less likely to be put off by considerations of climate as our climate is normal for the domestic visitor

Length of stay

Expenditure

Accommodation preferences

cont’d on next page

92

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Time of year

Attracted by

Other

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

93

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Perceived weaknesses of the Scottish Tourist Product and how to overcome them. Task 22 Read the following extracts and then complete the task which follows. Joyce McMillan of The Scotsman writes … the trouble with tourism is that it’s an industry that touches the soul, and deals in the stuff of dreams. In selling Scotland or any country as a tourist destination, the people involved sell a little piece of all of us – our heritage, our national identity for want of a better phrase, is somehow being expropriated, distorted, and degraded in the process… … two linked problems bedevil Scotland’s performance as a tourist destination: we are not sure that we like what we do in tourism, and we still do not do it well enough. Outside the main cities, Scotland is still too often a country of terrible coffee, micro-waved meals, and major hotels that can’t even rustle up a sandwich between the end of lunch and the beginning of afternoon tea; service is often grumpy and disobliging, accommodation overpriced and ugly. And the reasons for this second-rate performance are not far to seek. On the one hand, Scottish culture still contains a strand of pure hostility to sensual pleasure and beauty … And on the other … because of a deep-rooted sense of dispossession … a feeling that the place is not yours to welcome guests to, the food not the food you would have grown for them … But they also point clearly to the second great area of difficulty, which lies in our unease about what our tourist industry is selling; for there is no point in pretending that most overseas visitors arrive in Scotland with much in their heads beyond a few stereotyped images of bens and glens, castles and mist, malt whisky, and the ubiquitous tartan. Ever since the industrial revolution, Britain as a society has had its own reasons for needing to characterise Scotland as a romantic wilderness of grouse moors and mountains, inhabited by untamed heroes; and now this performance has been reinforced worldwide by the nostalgic influence of the huge North American market, where according to research by the ‘Scotland the Brand’ organisation, Scotland mainly means tartan, clans, heritage and golf.

cont’d on next page

94

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Faced with such powerful markets, and such a mighty weight of expectation that Scotland will be the place portrayed in Brigadoon and Braveheart, it’s perhaps understandable that a nation of only 5 million people, often poorly educated about its own history and culture, should feel apprehensive about its ability to hang on to a richer and more truthful image of itself; and that it should be wary of an industry that, for its very life, must play to Scotland’s recognised ‘brand image’ across the globe, and keep pumping out the kilted pipers and bite-sized haggis portions as if there were, literally, no tomorrow. To become good at tourism ... we need to be better educated, more articulate, more creative, and more aware of our contemporary strengths (in writing, painting and music) and to have a more secure sense of our own stake in our communities and our country. Research by the ‘Scotland the Brand’ organisation Six-hundred interviews involving focus groups in Scotland, England, France, Germany, Spain, the US and Japan over a period of 2 years. The research revealed that many foreigners regard Scotland as a rainy place associated with the past: a land of Brigadoon, where tartan is the dominant image. Scotland was perceived as having low-technology industries and inhabitants who were happy to stick to making traditional, quality products. Many Scots expressed concerns that their country is identified in clichés – notably tartan – and that the country is more successful at exporting its people, like Alexander Graham Bell, inventor of the telephone, than its home-grown products. Scotland the Brand wants to show the world that modern Scotland is a place that excels in computer technology, is a global finance hub and a centre of academic excellence, while at the same time retaining its traditional reputation for quality produce such as salmon, beef, whisky and textiles. The Scots’ image of themselves Stuart Cosgrove – broadcaster and cultural commentator – states that ‘some of the country’s most successful artists and writers portray Scotland as a country blighted by alcohol, drugs and violence. There is hardly one film made in Scotland by a Scot that is not cast in some dreary, awful, urban, deprived social landscape. I think this is a failure of the imagination’.
cont’d on next page

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

95

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Task 22 (continued) Summarise the perceived weaknesses of the tourism product in Scotland, i.e. aspects that visitors dislike or have low expectations of. List weaknesses evident from the previous articles and from your own knowledge. Consider the tartan image – is there anything really wrong with this so-called cliché? (This could be a subject for a classroom debate.) 1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

10.

Check your responses with those on Overhead 7. Does the host’s perception differ from the visitors’ perception? If so, in what way?

96

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Task 23 We have seen that there are aspects of Scotland as a holiday destination which potential visitors might be worried about. The main negative perceptions of Scotland are listed below. If you were working for an incoming tour operator and received negative comments about any of the above, how would you respond? Try to dispel worries by using the quality-assurance schemes where applicable. For example – An expensive tourist destination in itself is acceptable. But one should get value for money. – Assistance is available to achieve standards through VisitScotland quality-assurance schemes. – Visitors are informed of quality standards through badges displayed by tourism businesses which have passed qualityassurance scheme. • Access difficulties to and within Scotland

• Weather

• Food

• Accommodation

• An expensive destination (value for money?)

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

97

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Task 24 Work with a partner to try to provide some positive and realistic answers to the comments on the next page from a potential visitor. Take it in turns to be the visitor. Remember you are selling Scotland! Every visitor will contribute to securing the jobs of people working in the tourist industry in Scotland. Use the list below to help you with the formulation of your answers. Suggest where applicable: • Alternative routes. • Alternative places for visits and activities. • Alternative seasons for visits. • Range of accommodation with quality assurance. • Eating places as part of the quality-assurance schemes. • The use of TICs for local information and indoor visits/facilities in unfavourable weather. • Using weather forecasts for information when touring. (Explain fast-changing weather patterns in different areas – it is hardly ever wet anywhere for 24 hours.)

cont’d on next page

98

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Task 24 continued – the potential visitor’s comments ‘I have heard playing golf in St Andrews and Gleneagles is very expensive.’ ‘It is complicated to get around the Highlands when flying from the USA.’ ‘The weather in July is not very good for touring in Scotland.’ ‘I have heard about the Hogmanay festival in Edinburgh. Is it not very expensive to participate in a lot of events if I visit with my teenage children?’ ‘I am frightened to drive on the left side of the road and there seem to be single-track roads on some scenic routes.’ ‘Glasgow, Edinburgh and Inverness do not have good restaurants to enjoy.’ ‘Accommodation in general is very expensive, especially for individuals when staying in hotels.’ ‘My friend visited Scotland last year and found that the service was not very good in a hotel in Fort William.’ ‘Last year my parents could not find a petrol station open north of Ullapool.’

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

99

STUDENT WORKBOOK

The tourism product in the local area
General information for visitors You probably know the tourism product of your local area from previous studies, e.g. if you studied Travel and Tourism at Intermediate 2. However, if you do not, your teacher will tell you how to catch up on it through self-study activities. Activities Materials • Tourism in Scotland statistics (from scotexchange.net). • A file of local information. • A map, street plan and/or city centre map of your local area.

Task 25 Study the needs of the visitor below carefully. Use the materials above and provide six alternative suggestions as to what to see and do, taking into account the time it might take to get there, and also how to get there; and make suggestions as to accommodation where requested. Situation – local cafe You find two young German visitors browsing through leaflets, maps and brochures of your local area. You want to help them, and find out that they are intending to stay for one night and a day in your area. They like to go out in the evening to meet local people. They enjoy sightseeing or a walk in the countryside. They rely on public transport. They gladly accept your help with suggestions about: • reasonably priced accommodation • what sort of things to see or do • public transport to get to places. The Germans do not ask for places to eat!

100

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Task 26 Class reports on suggestions offered in Task 25. Take notes on any valid suggestions you didn’t come up with yourself.

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

101

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Task 27 Write a programme that the following visitors can do in a day and an evening, and make sure to tell them a little about the sights you are suggesting to them. Situation Your neighbours have Italian visitors who arrived by car. They find out that you are studying travel and tourism and ask you to jot down a one-day programme for them. You should cater for some of their interests which include good food, sights and tourist attractions, and give them some insight into Scottish culture, history and/or wildlife in your local area.

102

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Accommodation and catering Prior to exploring tourist destinations in Scotland we will examine the options open to visitors to Scotland when choosing accommodation and catering. In addition to the options covered below (hotels, B&Bs, youth hostels, farmhouses, and university accommodation), we must not forget that the VFR market is substantial. There is also a wide variety of other forms of accommodation used by tourists, including the tourists’ own camping and caravanning equipment, privately-owned boats and even second homes. There is also a growing market for home exchanges and the swapping of timeshare accommodation, which the industry has encouraged through the establishment of timeshare exchange companies.

Task 28 Look at your Tourism in Scotland statistics download and note where overseas and UK tourists are staying. Notes:

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

103

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Hotel accommodation Leading world chains with hotels in Scotland include companies like Marriott, Sheraton Intercontinental (www.ichotelsgroup.com), Holiday Inn, and Accor. Such hotels aim to create an international and uniform marketing image to assist their sales around the world. UK chains are also strong with leading brands represented in Scotland such as Hilton (www.hilton.co.uk), Thistle (www.thistlehotels.com), Macdonald, Paramount (www.paramount-hotels.co.uk), Moat House (www.moathousehotels.com) and Ramada Jarvis. Worldwide consortia such as Best Western and Leading Hotels of the World (www.lhw.com) also have a presence in the country.

Task 29 Identify at least one example of a hotel in Scotland from each of the chains and consortia listed above.

At the luxury end of the market, there is a growing choice of hotels and country-house hotels with the emphasis on service. Within Scotland many such hotels have got together to market themselves collectively. For example, Scotland’s Hotels of Distinction (www.hotels-ofdistinction.com) is a consortium of independent unique 4-star hotels throughout Scotland, all of which have attained high standards of quality and service, recognised by VisitScotland’s Quality Assurance scheme (see below). Similarly, Connoisseurs Scotland (www.luxuryscotland.co.uk) brings together a small group of Scotland’s finest tourism providers to promote themselves, and Scotland, to the very top end of the market.

104

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Task 30 Have a look at the Connoisseurs Scotland website and note the companies represented and their products.

Budget hotels Several chains of budget hotels are represented throughout Scotland. The largest chains are Holiday Inn Express (www.hiexpress.co.uk), Travel Inn (www.travelinn.com) and Travel Lodge (www.travelodge.co.uk). Youth hostels Youth hostels provide accommodation at the budget end of the market. The Scottish Youth Hostels Association (www.syha.org.uk) offers the largest chain and the widest choice of budget accommodation in the country with around 80 destinations to choose from. Everyone over the age of 5 can join the SYHA. There is no upper age limit. There is also a wide range of backpackers’ hostels. University residences It is now common to find educational institutions such as universities and schools hiring out their student accommodation to tourists outside the academic terms in order to make some contribution to the running costs of the institutions. Scottish universities are no exception, with all the major universities actively involved in this sector of the market, including the universities of Glasgow, Edinburgh, Aberdeen, and Stirling, together with Strathclyde, Heriot Watt, and St Andrews.

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

105

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Self-catering accommodation If you look back at the table on the accommodation used by tourists to Scotland, you will see that self-catering, rented accommodation represents an important sector, particularly for domestic tourists. Rented accommodation comes in all types, ranging from a country cottage in a remote spot to a house or apartment in the city. One way of renting such accommodation is to scour the ads in the Sunday newspapers. Alternatively, you may decide to use an agency Farmhouse holidays Farmhouse holidays are becoming more and more popular with visitors to Scotland. They offer home comforts, the opportunity to see farm activities first-hand, and good home cooking (with dinner, bed and breakfast being the norm in this sector). Quality-assurance schemes Quality is an important element of the Scottish tourism product. If the quality of the product on offer falls below visitor expectations, this will have implications for the continued success of the industry as a whole. There is a variety of schemes in operation which aim to provide the tourist with an indication of the level and quality of service that they can expect when experiencing elements of that product, whether it is a hotel, or a restaurant, or a visitor attraction, etc. Here we will look at the most important quality-assurance schemes currently operating within Scottish tourism. At the time of writing VisitScotland have reached agreement with their counterparts in the south and the motoring organisations, AA and RAC, on a commonly recognised quality-assurance system. Ratings of one to five stars are used to determine quality. However, no attempt has been made to introduce compulsory registration of accommodation in the UK.

106

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Task 31 Look at the various VistScotland schemes mentioned in your brochures and list them below.

Task 32 The Green Tourism Business scheme – what is it? You will find the answer on www.green-business.co.uk

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

107

STUDENT WORKBOOK

In addition to these schemes, there are numerous guides on the market which provide subjective assessment of catering in hotels and other establishments. The best known are the Michelin Guide, The Egon Ronay Guide and the Good Food Guide. Michelin guide This guide awards stars according the following criteria: * * * Exceptional cuisine, worth a special journey. ** Excellent cooking, worth a detour. * A very good restaurant in its category. Three-star establishments will offer superb food, fine wines, faultless service, elegant surroundings – and you should expect to pay accordingly! Two-star will be of first-class quality and is also likely to be pricey. Certain establishments are distinguished by red symbols, indicating that they are particularly pleasant or restful owing to the character of the building, its décor, setting, welcome, services or simply peace and quiet. Egon Ronay’s RAC guide This is a very impartial guide as it does not accept advertising from the establishments featured. Restaurants are awarded one to three stars for the excellence of their cooking. * Cooking much above average ** Outstanding cooking * * * Best in the land ↑ beside the star indicates a restaurant at the top of its star range. ↑ by itself indicates a restaurant approaching star status. Symbols are shown to indicate the following: • • • • • • • Striking modern features Outstanding wine list Good-quality wines by the glass Notable desserts Good British cheeses Traditional Sunday lunch Member of the Scotch Beef Club

108

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Restaurants in hotels are awarded a percentage mark, based on set criteria. Those scoring 80 per cent + are categorised as Deluxe. Hotels in Scotland with Deluxe rating in their restaurants include the following: 90 86 84 83 82 per per per per per cent cent cent cent cent Inverlochy Castle, near Fort William Gleneagles Turnberry Balmoral, Edinburgh Cromlix House, Dunblane One Devonshire Gardens, Glasgow St Andrews Old Course Cameron House, Loch Lomond.

81 per cent Catering

Whilst many accommodation units offer catering facilities, catering services also operate separately from accommodation. Cafes, restaurants, fast-food outlets and pubs provide a range of choices from quick snacks to haute cuisine. Restaurants may offer fixed-price table d’hôte menus, where the price of all food is included, as well as à la carte where customers pay individually for the items on the menu. One of the biggest growth areas in catering has been in pubs. They have become major providers of cooked meals, hot snacks, salads and sandwiches. Fast-food outlets have also flourished. They offer inexpensive food in an informal atmosphere and appeal particularly to families with children. Hamburgers, pizzas and baked potatoes are offered, although the traditional British fish and chips is still popular, as witnessed by the expansion of the Harry Ramsden chain of fish restaurants. The new shopping malls such as Ocean Terminal in Edinburgh or Buchanan Galleries in Glasgow now have food courts, Starbucks, Costa, etc. in a range of fast-food outlets surrounding a common seated area. Companies like McDonalds, Burger King and KFC have broadened their product ranges to remain competitive.

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

109

STUDENT WORKBOOK

EatScotland – VisitScotland Food Scheme EatScotland is a scheme which promotes Scotland as a good food destination while raising standards of food service. It is open to all kinds of catering outlets. Scottish Food Quality Certification (SFQC) is contracted by VisitScotland to operate the scheme which operates on a simple pass or fail system. EatScotland grade not only on the quality of food served in establishments, but other key aspects such as service, ambience, facilities and hygiene. Taste of Scotland (ToS) is used within the scheme as a special category of award to establishments that include Scottish produce in their menus. The Natural Cooking of Scotland – This is a quality-assurance scheme that promotes the use of Scottish produce and cuisine in restaurants around the country.

Task 33 Use the VistScotland website (www.visitscotland.com) to answer the following: Suggest a guesthouse in Edinburgh for a family with a car.

Suggest a hotel in Oban for a couple and a baby who need a double room in the price range above £60.00 per person.

What is its star rating?

What does this mean?

Suggest a B&B in Glasgow which will allow dogs and provide parking facilities.

110

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Offer a country-house hotel in the Aberdeenshire area to a honeymoon couple. Suggest a hotel to three businessmen visiting your area – they require business facilities.

A German group of five is looking for self-catering accommodation in the Borders. They want a TV, a washing machine and central heating.

A group of six Italian friends is looking for self-catering accommodation on the west coast of Scotland. They want a shower and a licensed bar nearby.

An Irish family wants to tour Scotland with their caravan. They arrive on the ferry from Larne to Troon. Give them the address of caravan sites in the Troon area, in the area around Loch Ness, and in Wester Ross.

Mark the location of all your selections on the blank Map 6 provided.

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

111

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Map 6

112

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Nature of the tourism product at major destinations Distinct touring areas – See OHT 8 There are distinct touring areas in Scotland which visitors explore on day trips or by coach tour. They are traditionally associated with places that have become known as classic destinations and are described as such in guidebooks. You are required to have available your Touring Map, Touring Guide and/or VisitScotland publication ‘Scotland – Your Essential Tourist Guide’. Read the following sections and complete the tasks within. As this is an introductory unit and time is of the essence, you may be offended because your own area has been missed out. Sorry! However, I’m sure you will have made a good job of tasks 25, 26 and 27 to compensate for this possible loss. For similar reasons, Scotland has been roughly divided into South, North, and the Islands. In doing this it is recognised that some of the destinations listed under North are arguably ‘Midland’ or ‘Central Belt’, e.g. Fife. In a more detailed study we would, of course, be more precise in our geographical analysis!

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

113

STUDENT WORKBOOK

South of Scotland

Task 34 In this and the following sections on the North and Islands, distinct touring areas and a selection of attractions are listed. The lists are not exhaustive but are limited to what you can hopefully learn in the time available. There are probably attractions which have been omitted which you feel are important. If so, write about these and list their attractions in the box on the next page, giving a brief description from your touring guide; and plot them on Map 7 of the area. Also include on your map the designated Tourist Routes through the area. Burns country: Dumfries – Ayr – Mauchline Ask any visitor about Ayrshire and two images will be evoked – a picture of Rabbie Burns enchanting a local lassie with his charm, wit and flowing words; and a television picture of distant Ailsa Craig during the Open Golf Championships taken from Royal Troon or Turnberry. Both of these features play a significant role in Ayrshire’s tourism industry.

114

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Access: Main roads from Glasgow and Edinburgh Tourist routes Rail Attractions: Attractions associated with Robert Burns

Culzean Castle

Caerlaverock Castle

Other attractions

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

115

STUDENT WORKBOOK

The Borders – Galashiels – Melrose – Scott’s View, Dryburgh Access: main road and tourist route running through the area Attractions: Abbotsford House – whose home was this?

Scottish Border abbeys

Borders Common Ridings

Lochcarron Cashmere and Wool Centre

Other attractions

116

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Task 35 Now match up the following touring centres and resorts with types of activity.

Dumfries

Touring the Borders, golf, fishing, riding, castles, abbeys, walking Walking in the Galloway Hills and Solway Coast, studying Robert Burns Golf

Turnberry

Peebles/Moffat

See OHT 9 for answer

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

117

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Task 36 City destinations in southern Scotland City destinations offer a different type of tourist experience to the visitor who, in many cases, is a business client. Here are only some aspects of the product on offer in Scottish cities. Complete the list from the overhead transparencies, and add examples from your Essential Scotland Guide and other publications. 1. Glasgow (see OHT 14)

The Warwick Vase – a major exhibit at Glasgow’s Burrell Collection If the River Clyde is not quite Scotland’s longest river, it is far and away the most influential. With its source 80 miles from Glasgow in the hills of Tweeddale, it flows slowly through lowland hills and orchards. It once powered the industries of north Lanarkshire and then the shipyards of Glasgow and Clydebank. It was instrumental in the development of a huge industrial area where millions of people flocked to work leaving behind the poverty and hardship of areas like the Highlands. In 1740 the population of Glasgow was only 17,000. In 1870 this had risen to 400,000 and by the mid-1930s over a million.

118

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Make a list of Glasgow’s attractions:

Also on the Clyde just outside Glasgow is New Lanark. A separate case study is available on New Lanark. Ask your teacher or lecturer about this. It may be possible to make a visit. What are its attractions?

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

119

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Task 36 (continued) 2. Edinburgh (see OHT 12) Edinburgh is one of the finest cities of the world. It has an old town – historic, atmospheric, compact and vibrant – and a neoclassical New Town, obviously planned well but with no room for compromise – spacious, almost symmetrical in places with ample gardens and open space. Edinburgh’s Old Town, however, was not exactly planned with aesthetics in mind; defence was more a factor as Edinburgh was of strategic importance to those who either ruled Scotland, or wanted to. Residents, not surprisingly, preferred to be within …

Try and finish this story by consulting appropriate sources. Don’t make it too long!

120

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Map 7

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

121

STUDENT WORKBOOK

North of Scotland In this section you are required to have available your Touring Map and ‘Scotland – Your Essential Tourist Guide’ or other relevant publications. Read the following sections and complete the tasks.

Task 37 Listed below are some of the distinct touring areas in Northern Scotland. Make notes on the attractions listed in the boxes giving a brief description of each from your touring guide and plot them on Map 8. Add your own notes, especially if you feel there have been notable omissions. Also include on your map the designated Tourist Routes through the area. • Loch Lomond, Stirling and the Trossachs • The East Neuk, St Andrews • The West Highlands • Perthshire and Dundee • Royal Deeside and Aberdeen • Wester Ross • Loch Ness and the Inverness area

122

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Loch Lomond, Stirling and the Trossachs

Access: Give main access road from Edinburgh and Glasgow.

Main attractions: Trossachs Tourist Trail, including SS Sir Walter Scott

Stirling Castle

National Wallace Monument

Bannockburn

Other attractions

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

123

STUDENT WORKBOOK

East Neuk of Fife, St Andrews

In ancient Scotland there were seven Celtic Kingdoms – only one remains, and it is still known as the Kingdom of Fife. Access: main roads from Edinburgh and Glasgow Tourist route: Rail: Main attractions: (Golf is covered in Outcome 3) St Andrews

Fishing villages

Scottish Fisheries Museum

The Secret Bunker

Other attractions

124

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

STUDENT WORKBOOK

West Highlands

Access: main roads from Glasgow and Edinburgh Rail: West Highland Line Tourist route: where does it start and terminate?

Main attractions: Glencoe

Oban

Fort William and Glenfinnan

Inveraray

Other attractions

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

125

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Perthshire and Dundee

Access: main roads running through the area Rail terminals: Tourist routes running through the area:

Main attractions: Loch Tay and Ben Lawers

Loch of the Lowes

Dewar’s World of Whisky and the Famous Grouse experience

Pitlochry and Dunkeld

Perth and Dundee (see OHT 15)

Other attractions

126

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Royal Deeside, Aberdeen and the north-east coast This huge area accounts for about one-sixth of the landmass of Scotland. It contrasts high mountains and barren moorland with some of the best agricultural land in Britain, it contains some of the finest salmon rivers in Scotland – and it has royal patronage. Road, rail and air access is good and, by road, one of the main routes is up the A90 or coastal A92 to Stonehaven.

Access: which two tourist routes converge on Aberdeen?

Attraction: what is this royal residence called?

Royal Deeside:

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

127

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Further notes on attractions in Aberdeen (see OHT 13), and the north-east coast. Include the Castle Trail and the Whisky Trail.

128

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Wester Ross

Access: how would you get to Wester Ross from Inverness? By road: By rail: Attractions: Inverewe Gardens

Eilean Donan Castle (see www.eileandonancastle.com)

Beinn Eighe Nature Reserve

Other attractions

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

129

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Loch Ness and Inverness – Drumnadrochit – Fort Augustus – Cairngorm National park

Access: main roads from the south: Rail termini: Air: Tourist route:

Attractions: Loch Ness (boat trips, Caledonian Canal, Urquhart Castle, permanent exhibitions)

Culloden battlefield

Inverness

cont’d on next page

130

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Great Glen Way

Fort George

Other attractions

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

131

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Map 8

132

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Scottish Islands In this section you are required to use your touring map, guide or ‘Scotland – Your Essential Tourist Guide’ again. Read the sections on the islands and complete the tasks which follow. Mark any important places on the blank maps provided. Orkney To Orcadians, of which there are about 19,000 spread over 70 or so islands, the ‘Mainland’ is not Scotland – Scotland is the ‘South’ – the Mainland is the name given to the largest island in Orkney where the majority of the population live and work This fascinating archipelago of islands lies just 6 miles north of Caithness and until the end of the fifteenth century it was under Norwegian rule – but the Vikings were by no means the first people to settle in Orkney. There are over 1000 recorded archaeological sites, with the most important monuments meriting consideration of World Heritage status. Skara Brae is world renowned – a village engulfed by sand 4500 years ago – Orkney’s own Pompeii. This well preserved Stone Age site – no metal has been found – is visited by over 50,000 people a year. Skaill House, situated next to Skara Brae, is a fine example of a seventeenthcentury country house and is now open to the public. Shetland With Bergen in Norway being almost as close to Lerwick as any Scottish mainland city, it is hardly surprising that Shetlanders see themselves as Norse, rather than British or even Scottish! Indeed, Shetland was ruled by the Vikings for 600 years before being gifted to Scotland as part of a dowry in the late fifteenth century. But this archipelago of over 100 islands, lying 222 miles west of Bergen and nearly 400 miles north of Scotland’s capital, Edinburgh, is still Norse in character and very independent. Although renowned as awesome warriors, the Vikings of Shetland were, at home, law-abiding citizens adhering to the laws of their parliament, the ‘Althing’, which met on an islet in Tingwall Loch. They were fishermen and farmers and generally settled around the coast overlooking sheltered bays. The Up-Helly-Aa Festival every January pays homage to Shetland’s Viking past and attracts many thousands of visitors every year to see this truly ‘Shetland’ experience. Use the space in the boxes overleaf to present more information, e.g. on places and activities.
THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland 133

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Task 38 Write your own notes on some of the attractions in Orkney and Shetland. Plot identified attractions on Map 9.

Bird watching: puffins, gannets, guillemots, eider ducks, curlews and cormorants.

134

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Archaeology: Skara Brae

Name some other famous archaeological sites in Orkney and Shetland.

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

135

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Special interest holidays: Viking culture, knitting courses, rock climbing

Island hopping:

Wildlife (excluding birdlife):

136

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Fishing:

Sailing/diving:

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

137

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Map 9

138

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

STUDENT WORKBOOK

The Western Isles Forty miles west of the Scottish Mainland and in an arc of 130 miles from the Butt of Lewis to Barra Head lie a string of islands known as the Outer Hebrides or Western Isles. Twelve of these islands are populated – Lewis and Harris, Great Bernera, Scalpay, Berneray, North Uist, Baleshare, Grimsay, South Uist, Benbecula, Barra, Eriskay and Vatersay – and they all share the same culture – gaeldom, and the same language – Gaelic. To many in these islands, English is a second language, but when spoken, its clarity is rarely surpassed. ‘I went to school to learn the English’ is very true of many a Hebridean.

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

139

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Task 39 1. Read the following newspaper cutting then and answer this question: Why are the Hebrides ranked amongst the world’s top ten islands?

Hebridean beauty outshines the Caribbean in world’s top islands
ALISON GRAY
CONSUMER AFFAIRS CORRESPONDENT

‘Many foreign countries have mosquitoes – far worse than our mozzies – and visitors The Hebrides may not have must take medication to ease the endless sunshine of the effects of malaria from the Mauritius, or the warm, azure mosquito bite. waters of the Caribbean. ‘And besides, the odd squall However, the islands, famed or two in the Hebrides add to for their outstanding their allure.’ natural beauty and No-one compiling a list of the world’s top The world’s top ten changeable weather ten holiday islands can ignore the Hebrides island destinations, on the edge of the PAMELA GOODMAN according to House North Atlantic, have and Garden, are: been included in a prestigious peace for those who literally 1. Harbour Island in the magazine’s top ten of the want to get away from the hustle Bahamas with its pink sand world’s most amazing holiday and hassle of town life. beach. islands. ‘Visitors can walk freely 2. The Hebrides, low in The exotic list, published in among wild land and sea birds as sunshine but high in the latest edition of House and well seeing roving deer herds and outstanding natural beauty. Garden, says Scotland’s west all kinds of natural wildlife from 3. Mauritius, direct flights coast islands provide the foxes to otters. with minimal jet lag to fantastic ultimate escape from the rigours ‘There is the sheer romantic beaches. of urban life without having to aspect of being on an island, and 4. Majorca, perfect for a long leave for more exotic locations. I think many of our customers weekend. The islands of the Inner and go for that in the Hebrides. One 5. Canary Islands, a British Outer Hebrides join the favourite is Eilean Shona – a haven for sunseekers. Seychelles, Capri, the Canaries two-and-a-half miles by one6. Lizard Island, off and the Bahamas in the and-a-half mile wooded island – Australia’s Barrier Reef and exclusive group, which was off Ardnamurchan. one for intrepid travellers. compiled by Pamela Goodman, ‘It has stunning views of the 7. Seychelles, exotic and the magazine’s travel editor. mainland and Mull, but has no romantic beaches. She said: ‘I spent most of my cars or even bicycles to disturb 8. Capri, the enchanting island school summer holidays on its tranquillity. with mouth-watering menus in Tiree, and I’ve since travelled A spokesman for famous restaurants. the world so I know what I’m VisitScotland said: ‘The 9. St Bart’s, Caribbean white talking about when I refer to the Hebrides certainly deserve to be beaches and gourmet hotels. unrivalled beauty that is special included with the best of the 10. Crete, stunning views of to the Hebrides. The colours best for island holidays. Too the White Mountains, beaches are breathtaking, with scenery much is made about midges and and rugged landscapes. that can be dramatic and rain. romantic.

‘No-one compiling a list of the world’s top ten holiday islands can ignore what the Hebrides offer.’ Mark Breed, of Ecosse Unique, who plans trips to the islands for tourists, said: ‘Islands provide a sanctuary of sheer

140

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

STUDENT WORKBOOK

2.

Below is a list of attractive features on offer to the visitor in the Western Isles. Use your brochures and identify an example of how the visitor can find out more on these features and where to get actively involved.

Feature Gaelic culture Remoteness Wildlife Geology Religion Walking Fishing Whisky Island hopping Tweed weaving Bird watching Cruising Sailing Archaeology

Places connected

3.

Plot the islands and any notable destinations within them on Map 10.

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

141

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Map 10

142

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

STUDENT WORKBOOK

The Inner Hebrides and Firth of Clyde islands These islands are particularly popular with domestic visitors staying in self-catering units.

Task 40 Identify the following attractions and name the islands on which they can be found. Description Woodland gardens and a museum telling the social history of the Isles and the Highland Clearances, a short ferry crossing from Mallaig. Burial place of ancient kings. From this base St Columba evangelised the Picts. Attraction/island

Location for BBC TV’s Balamory.

Famous for the production of a single malt whisky with a distinctive smoky flavour.

Popular mountain walk up Goat Fell in this National Trust for Scotland country park.

Stella McCartney was married here. A famous natural feature is celebrated in Mendelssohn’s Hebridean Overture.

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

143

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Visitor attractions In the unit Structure of the Travel and Tourism Industry you learned that attractions are one of the three basic factors upon which the success of a tourist destination depends. Attractions provide the single most important reason for leisure tourism to a destination. The other major components, accommodation and transport, are demands arising from the visitor’s desire to enjoy what a destination has to offer in terms of ‘things to see and do’. You will remember that we can distinguish between: • • • site and event attractions natural and man-made attractions linear and nodal attractions.

In this section we look at visitor attractions, which are site specific. We should remember, of course, that an event at any of the attractions we will be looking at can enhance its appeal quite significantly. Some of these have been researched previously when you looked at Scotland’s distinct touring areas. VisitScotland defines a visitor attraction as: A permanently established excursion destination, a primary purpose of which is to allow public access for entertainment, interest or education, rather than being principally a retail outlet or venue for sporting, theatrical or film performances. It must be open to the public for published periods every year, and should be capable of attracting tourist or day visitors as well as local residents.

144

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Task 41 Look at Table 1 on the accompanying sheet. 1. The figure for country parks might be misleading in this context (i.e. tourism). Why?

2.

What type of visitor attraction dominates the sector in Scotland?

3.

Do you think Scotland has any internationally famous ‘mustsee’ attractions? If so, what are they?

4.

Look at Tables 2 and 3. What is Scotland’s leading visitor attraction?

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

145

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Table 1 – Distribution of visits to attractions by category Category Historic houses Castles Monuments Churches Gardens Museums and galleries Wildlife/zoo/safari park Interpretation/visitor centre Industrial/craft premises Miscellaneous Country parks per cent 4 9 1 3 5 24 5 14 5 5 27

Table 2 – Top ten visitor attractions in Scotland with paid admission Edinburgh Castle Edinburgh Zoo Glasgow Science Centre Our Dynamic Earth, Edinburgh Stirling Castle Deep Sea World, North Queensferry Royal Yacht Britannia, Leith Palace of Holyroodhouse, Edinburgh SS Waverley, Glasgow Scotch Whisky Heritage Centre, Edinburgh

Visitors in 2002 (000s) 1,153 547 443 402 386 307 301 232 224 222

146

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Table 3 – Top ten visitor attractions in Scotland with free admission Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum Royal Museum and Museum of Scotland, Edinburgh Royal Botanic Gardens World Famous Old Blacksmith’s Shop Centre, Gretna Green National War Museum, Edinburgh Museum of Transport, Glasgow Gallery of Modern Art, Glasgow New Lanark Glasgow Botanical Gardens Loch Lomond Shores

Visitors in 2002 (000s) 995 762 649 648 448 418 412 409 400 400

Table 4 – Visitor profile at Edinburgh Castle 1996 Scotland Rest of Britain Overseas ABC1 C2DE Day-trip from home Tourist

per cent 7 34 59 81 18 6 93

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

147

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Scotland has a good range of things to see for such a small country and there have been significant new additions to the mix in recent years such as: Glasgow Science Centre Scottish Museum of Football at Hampden Lomond Shores and the Loch Lomond and Trossachs National Park Cairngorms National Park Scottish Seabird Centre in North Berwick The Falkirk Wheel Museum of the Scottish Countryside, near East Kilbride The new visitor centres at Urquhart Castle, Glencoe, and Britannia at Ocean Terminal, Leith • The Scottish Parliament, Edinburgh • The Concorde Experience, Museum of Flight, East Lothian There are no Scottish attractions on the scale of Disneyworld. The economics of large-scale commercial visitor attraction operations requires large numbers of domestic residents prepared to travel from home as well as tourists. Scotland with its small population cannot support such large-scale ventures. However, the country’s strengths lie in its unique cultural and historical attractions. The importance of visitor attractions in the Scottish tourism product is often understated because of the relatively low number of people employed in the sector and the low level of revenue generated. The role of public and voluntary sectors The National Trust for Scotland and Historic Scotland have been particularly active in developing sophisticated operational approaches to managing visitor attractions. 1. The National Trust for Scotland (www.nts.org.uk) This is a voluntary organisation with charitable status and relies on the support of some 230,000 members. It has 185,000 acres of land in its care with nearly 700 buildings, more than 100 of which are open to or accessible to the public. Given its mission to conserve and to persuade others of the importance of conservation issues, the Trust has to strike a balance with its other aim of promoting access to and enjoyment of all its properties. At times this can result in policies which a commercial operator would reject. For example the Trust might not provide certain visitor services at high-amenity locations, e.g. updating outdated and faded interpretative schemes. Or it might not advertise certain properties • • • • • • • •

148

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

STUDENT WORKBOOK

unable to cope comfortably with large numbers on peak days, e.g. The Hill House, in Helensburgh; or Craigievar Castle, in Aberdeenshire. Such considerations inhibit the Trust from attempting maximum exploitation of its attractions portfolio. Its lead attraction is The Glencoe Visitor Centre, closely followed by Culzean Castle and Country Park in Ayrshire. Remember to pick up a National Trust for Scotland attractions leaflet next time you visit a tourist information centre. 2. Historic Scotland (www.historic-scotland.gov.uk) This agency is responsible to the Scottish Executive which it advises on policy matters. Its objectives are to protect Scotland’s built heritage and to present that heritage to the public. There are 330 monuments in the care of Historic Scotland, together with the Palace of Holyroodhouse and the Royal Parks, and its job is to ensure their conservation and maintenance. Historic Scotland is the country’s leading attraction operator. Its portfolio of buildings and monuments attracts approx. 3 million visitors per annum, giving it around 47 per cent of visits to the top ten sites of major paid heritage attractions. Edinburgh Castle is Scotland’s number one attraction (see Tables 2 and 3). Historic Scotland has embarked on some very costly multi-phase developments to upgrade visitor facilities and interpretation at Edinburgh Castle, Stirling Castle and various other sites. Perhaps its most controversial undertaking is the new car park and visitor centre at Urquhart Castle on Loch Ness (pictured below).

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

149

STUDENT WORKBOOK

In collaboration with VisitScotland, Historic Scotland has increased its overseas and domestic marketing efforts. The Edinburgh Castle survey (Table 4) exemplifies visitor trends across the range of their properties and it is understandable why they have made such efforts to foster the C2DE day-trip market. Remember to pick up a Historic Scotland attractions leaflet next time you visit a tourist information centre. 3. Forest Enterprise, part of the Forest Authority, is responsible for managing the forests and woodlands owned by the nation. Some of the forests have visitor centres. In Scotland these include the designated Forest Parks of Tay, Argyll, Galloway, Glenmore, Tweed Valley and Queen Elizabeth which you studied in Outcome 1. The National Museums of Scotland and National Galleries of Scotland include The Royal Museum, Museum of Scotland and the National War Museum in Edinburgh, The Museum of Scottish Country Life, East Kilbride, The Museum of Costume at Shambellie House, Dumfries and the Museum of Flight at East Fortune. Art galleries include The National Portrait Gallery, The National Gallery and the Gallery of Modern Art in Edinburgh, Duff House (pictured below) near Banff and Paxton House in the Borders near Berwick.

4.

150

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

STUDENT WORKBOOK

5.

Local authorities are also major providers of attractions, most notably museums and country parks. These vary widely in size and theme. There are the great municipal buildings such as the refurbished Kelvingrove Museum and Art Gallery or more modest undertakings such as the small, but very interesting museum at South Queensferry. Some innovative local authorities have looked at new ways of running and financing attractions. Stirling Council has set up a company with the Tourist Board and Local Enterprise Company to run five visitor attractions: • • • • • the the the the the National Wallace Monument Breadalbane Folklore Centre Old Town Jail, Stirling Rob Roy and Trossachs Visitor Centre Royal Burgh of Stirling Visitor Centre

The Tourist Board has been contracted to run these attractions and Tourist Information Centres have been incorporated in each. Other public or quasi-public agencies involved in the visitor attractions sector are: • • • • Scottish Natural Heritage The Scottish Arts Council The Scottish Sports Council The Scottish Museums Council

Private sector Relatively little in the way of new developments in visitor attractions has been carried out by the private sector in Scotland, largely because of the short tourist season and the weakness of the Scottish domestic market. Deep Sea World in Fife is a notable private-sector attraction. The Association of Scottish Visitor Attractions (ASVA) – This organisation was founded in 1988 and now boasts over 160 members. Its aim is raise standards and improve the viability of visitor attractions in Scotland. This organisation is run by the industry itself and capitalises on the experiences of the diversity of attractions within its membership. Industry- and heritage-based attractions Scotland has been very successful in the development of some industrybased attractions such as whisky distilleries, glass-making premises and

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

151

STUDENT WORKBOOK

woollen mills. Baxter’s of Speyside is probably the best example of a non-tourism business successfully providing visitor facilities in order to generate customer goodwill and promote its products. Distilleries The first distillery visitor centre was established in 1969 at Glenfiddich. By 1993 almost one in three malt whisky distilleries had visitor centres. In addition, Historic Scotland has established a visitor centre at Dallas Dhu Museum Distillery. Between them they welcome over one million visitors annually. Tourism has become so successful at Glenturret and Edradour distilleries that it now represents their predominant function. Each of the major tourist areas of Scotland has at least one distillery visitor centre accessible to it. A few miles from Edinburgh and Glasgow lie, respectively, Glenkinchie and Glengoyne visitor centres. Along the major tourist route from Edinburgh to Inverness lie Blair Atholl, Edradour, Dalwhinnie and Tomatin. Royal Deeside has Royal Lochnagar, while the west coast is served by Oban, and Ben Nevis at Fort William. In addition most of the major islands host a distillery visitor centre: Bowmore on Islay; Ledaig on Mull, Talisker on Skye; Highland Park on Orkney and the Isle of Arran distillery, Scotland’s newest, opened in 1997. Almost a third of visitor centres, however, lie in Speyside. Here (as you should know by now!) The Malt Whisky Trail guides visitors along a 70-mile scenic route that encompasses eight distillery centres. Industrial heritage Among over eighty sites or museums which are specifically dedicated to the Scottish industrial heritage, Glasgow’s Transport Museum, New Lanark, Summerlee and the Scotch Whisky Heritage Centre in Edinburgh are most popular. Robert Smail’s print workshop at Innerleithen represents the National Trust for Scotland’s first diversification into industrial heritage and in the same area is Historic Scotland’s Biggar Gas Works. Also very popular in this category are the attractions that look back at the age of steam – the popular tourist railways at Bo’ness and Strathspey, the steam excursion train, the Jacobite, which runs from Fort William to Mallaig in the summer, and trips ‘doon the watter’ (the Clyde) on the paddleship Waverley. The national maritime heritage is presented in the Scottish Maritime Museum at Irvine and the Scottish Fisheries Museum at Anstruther.

152

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

STUDENT WORKBOOK

You will be required to plan some itineraries for different types of clientele and you will have to consider the above-mentioned attractions when preparing your proposals.

Task 42 1. Make sure you know where all the foregoing attractions marked in bold type are on your touring map. 2. A selection of Scottish visitor attractions is given below. Use your reference sources to describe and locate the attraction.

Attraction Archeolink Black House, Arnol Britannia Blair Drummond Discovery Point Killiecrankie Landmark Shambellie St Mungo’s Museum The Buckie Drifter The Speyside Cooperage The Tenement House

Description/location

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

153

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Scotland’s gardens In Outcome 1 you learned about the Scottish climate and how it is temperate, very changeable, neither very hot nor very cold, with the west being generally wetter than the east. What does this mean for horticulture? What are Scotland’s gardens famous for?

Task 43 Below is a list of formal gardens open to the public. Use your resources to find out what is distinctive or of special interest about these gardens, and then mark them on Map 11. • • • • • • • • • • • Benmore Botanic Garden Branklyn Dawyck Drummond Castle Glasgow Botanic Garden Inverewe Logan Pitmedden Priorwood Royal Botanic Garden Threave

Aberdeen is also famous as a frequent winner of the Britain in Bloom competition, for the millions and millions of roses which bloom all over the city in the summer, and for its Rose Festival where even more roses are given away to visitors. The roses are at their best in the height of summer filling the parks and the roadsides, but throughout the year the glass houses of Duthie Park display a wide variety.

154

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Map 11 Scotland’s gardens

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

155

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Events attractions in Scotland Events form an important part of the Scottish tourism product, attracting millions of visitors every year and contributing substantial amounts of income to the Scottish economy. Events on offer in Scotland are many and varied, including agricultural shows, sporting events, dance, equestrian events, exhibitions, fairs, galas, festivals, highland games, military events, music, theatre and traditional historic events. Historic Scotland and the National Trust for Scotland offer a range of events at their respective sites and produce a guide annually promoting these. Local newspapers are also a good source of information on what’s happening in the local area. The most important annual events in the Scottish events calendar are included in Appendix 2 for your information. This list doesn’t represent all the events on offer in Scotland, by any means! For a fuller listing, you should obtain information from your local VisitScotland office. You should familiarise yourself with the events listed below and ensure that you can locate the towns and cities in which they are held. Highland Games These games incorporate feats of strength, fitness and agility that were practised in the Highlands, no doubt from very early times, but their formal organisation and annual occurrence in many places in Scotland (and a number elsewhere in the world) seems to have begun about 1820, as part of the romantic revival of Highlandism and tartanry encouraged by Sir Walter Scott and King George IV. The association of royalty with Highland Games dates from Queen Victoria’s attendance at the Braemar Gathering in 1848. The more civilised repertoire of events includes running and jumping, special classes of throwing stones and hammers and tossing the caber, and a wide range of piping and dancing competitions, featuring dances such as the Sword Dance and the Highland Fling. There is an extensive series of Highland games in different locations, mainly over the months of July to September each year.

156

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Task 44 There are many traditional festivals is Scotland. Write a short paragraph on each of those listed below, describing the festival and its origins. Conduct some research if required.

Common Ridings

Up-Helly-Aa

Beltane Festival

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

157

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Outcome 3
Main activity and special-interest pursuits enjoyed by visitors in Scotland. In this section you cover the knowledge and understanding necessary to complete the third and final outcome in the unit. In Outcome 3 you are required to advise on the main activities and special-interest pursuits enjoyed by visitors to Scotland. The performance criteria which must be met are: (a) (b) (c) (d) Identify the main outdoor activities enjoyed by visitors to Scotland. Identify accurately the main areas where visitors may participate in a range of outdoor activities. Explain key factors to be taken into consideration in the organisation of activity holidays. Describe opportunities for special-interest holidays.

This is a short overview of some special-interest holidays, some of which have been touched upon when you investigated Scotland’s distinct touring regions. There is a series of tasks which you can start in class and complete in directed or self-study time. Activity holidays In Scotland The main outdoor activities pursued in Scotland are listed in the statistics of ‘Tourism In Scotland, Facts and Figures’ provided by VisitScotland on www.scotexchange.net The figures provide the current trends. Many of the activities are dependent on safety rules or regulations, which clients need to know about. Advice on weather conditions and suitable clothing should be given too. Make sure you know the necessary rules and regulations. These can be found in the various activity publications produced by VisitScotland. Alternatively you can view the VisitScotland website for information: www.visitscotland.com

158

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Task 45 Investigate your home area for suppliers of activity holidays. On the grid below tick what is available and name a specific provider or site.

Activity Walking routes/ walks/walkways Cycling routes

Provider and/or site

Sailing marina and boat hire/watersports Snowsports/skiing

Pony trekking

Wildlife treks/sea safaris

Golf

Fishing

Deer stalking

Shooting

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

159

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Task 46 Group activity – research activities outwith your local area. Each student will research one of the activities listed below and produce a programme for a group of 10 participants for 2 days. Travelling times between start-off point (your local area) and destinations/activities must be correct. Provide suitable accommodation close by for one night for all the participants. Give information on rules and regulations for this particular sporting activity. At the end of the class you will present your programme to the class to check whether it is okay. Photocopies of all presentations will be distributed to everyone. • Cycling in Scotland • Fishing in Scotland • Golf in Scotland • Water-sports in Scotland • Walking/hill walking in Scotland • Wildlife in Scotland • Pony trekking in Scotland • Golf in Scotland • Shooting and deer stalking in Scotland • Skiing/snowsports in Scotland

160

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Name of student Name of brochure

Programme Day 1 – Departure:

Page reference

Accommodation:

Day 2 – Departure:

Return to:

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

161

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Name of student Name of brochure

Notes on rules and regulations, safety regulations, seasons (fishing, shooting, etc.). Specific schemes, e.g. Golf Pass, Walkers or Cyclists Welcome, etc.

162

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Special-interest holidays

Task 47 – Industrial heritage There are industrial heritage sites or museums and visitor centres where the visitor can find out about the historical aspects of industrial developments and inventions for which Scotland is noted. Use your resources to check up on the following attractions and add others you have found.

Industrial heritage site New Lanark

Notes

Strathspey Railway

Summerlee Heritage Park

Dallas Dhu Distillery

Forth and Clyde/Union Canals

Transport Museum, Glasgow

Aberdeen Maritime Museum

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

163

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Task 48 – Art galleries Almost every town in Scotland offers an art gallery to the interested visitor, but the main galleries of traditional and modern art are found in the cities. Use your resources to check out the following and add any others that you think are important.

Art gallery The Burrell Collection

Notes

National Gallery of Scotland

Aberdeen Art Gallery

GOMA

McManus Galleries

Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art

Kelvingrove Art Gallery

The Mackintosh Trail

cont’d on next page

164

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Scottish National Portrait Gallery

Others

And for budding artists, where can you find a painting holiday in Scotland?

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

165

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Task 49 – Religion More and more visitors are interested in finding out about religion. This covers visits to churches, cathedrals, abbeys, priories and monasteries. In planning a pilgrimage in Scotland you might consider visits to the sites listed below. Using your resources, note the significance of each site. Include any other sites which you feel should be included in the itinerary.

Religious site Iona

Notes

The Museum of Religious Life and Art, Glasgow Ruins of the Border abbeys

Whithorn Priory and Museum

Pluscarden Abbey and Elgin Cathedral

Samye Ling Tibetan Centre

St Andrews

Other

166

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Task 50 – Mapping Make sure you know where all the sites identified in Tasks 47–49 are located on a map of Scotland. Plot them now on Map 12!

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

167

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Map 12 – Activity and special interest-holiday locations in Scotland

168

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Task 51 Now see if you can match up the following touring centres and resorts with types of activity.

1. Skye

Trip on the Strathspey Steam Railway

2. Ullapool

Visit to Culloden Battlefield and Cawdor Castle A round of golf on a championship course

3. Fort William

4. Inverness

Health and beauty treatment at a famous hydro hotel Skiing at Aonach Mor, visit to Glenfinnan

5. Oban

6. Aviemore

Climbing in the Cuillins, visit to the Aros Centre Inverpolly Nature Reserve – hill walking on Suilven and Stac Polly The ultimate resort – golf, country club, riding, shooting. Start of an island-hopping tour.

7. Nairn

8. Braemar

9. Pitlochry

10. Crieff

Tour the Trossachs. Sail on the Sir Walter Scott Visit the Festival Theatre, drive to Queen’s View Skiing in Glenshee. See royalty at the Highland Games

11. Stirling

12. Gleneagles

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

169

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Some aspects of Scottish culture Some visitors have a special interest in our culture, perhaps because their ancestors came from Scotland. This section summarises some aspects of Scottish culture that are likely to be of interest to visitors and may be incorporated into itinerary and programme planning. Firstly, a brief look at emblems, languages and clans; then we focus on Scottish produce, crafts and cuisine. Scottish emblems The thistle The thistle has been an important symbol in Scottish heraldry for over 500 years, but botanists are confused as to which of the several native and introduced thistles this heraldic symbol represents. The spear thistle, musk thistle, melancholy thistle, stemless thistle, Our Lady’s thistle and cotton thistle are all contenders. The first use of the thistle as a royal symbol in Scotland appears to have been on silver coins issued by James III in 1470. James VII founded the Order of the Thistle in 1687. There is no historical evidence for the popular legend of an invading Viking treading on a thistle and crying out, thus giving the Scots warning of an attack. But the motto nemo me impune lacessit (loosely translated as ‘No one attacks me and gets away with it’) is usually associated with the Scottish thistle badge. In recent times, VisitScotland has adopted a stylised thistle as the logo for its publications. The Scottish flag

Task 52 Let’s test your knowledge of Scottish flags. 1. 2. 3. 4. What is the Scottish national flag commonly called? Describe the flag. What is the Royal Flag of Scotland commonly called? Where does this flag fly?

170

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Clans and roots For almost a thousand years the clans were at the centre of the nation’s cultural and social infrastructure. They were a distinct Gaelic tribal culture, evolved from the ancient Celtic tribes – the word ‘clan’ comes from the Gaelic ‘clanna’ which means family or children. The clans lived off the land more or less self-sufficiently, with cattle as their main wealth. Stealing cattle (sometimes in order to survive) was widespread, as were territorial disputes between clans, and conflict was commonplace. The clan chief, rather than individual clansmen, owned land. The clan chief’s rule was absolute. He dispensed justice, led the clan into battle and chose his successor. The clan system survived largely intact until its dismantling in the years following 1746, a consequence of the failure of the final Jacobite uprising, led by Bonnie Prince Charlie on the battlefield of Culloden. In the wake of Culloden, the Hanoverian government sought to remove the threat posed by the Highland clans. In addition to wanton butchery and ethnic cleansing visited upon Jacobite clans, steps were taken to destroy the very foundations of clan society. Rebel chiefs suffered the forfeiture of their estates and the removal of their traditional military and legal roles while a raft of repressive legislation rigorously enforced the disarmament of the clans and banned the wearing of Highland dress and tartan. Speaking Gaelic was also proscribed. However, in 1782, a campaign led by the Highland Society of London succeeded in overturning the ban on tartan. By 1822, Scotland had even become safe enough for a visit by the reigning monarch, George IV, who delighted the crowds during his visit by turning out clad head to toe in tartan. Later in the nineteenth century, Queen Victoria’s love of the Highlands and Balmoral, and her patronage of the Braemar Highland Gathering helped restore interest in Scotland’s highland heritage. Surnames and societies By no means all people of the same name constitute a clan; a vast number of names have never been clans and could never be so in the sense of a shared ancestry. In spite of this, practically every Scottish name has now been assigned as a sept of one or more clans – a pastime assiduously undertaken by the manufacturers and sellers of tartan, so that the thirst of all with a Scottish connection ‘to belong to a clan’ can be assuaged. Several million people overseas identify enthusiastically with their Scottish origins. Such people can seek to join a clan society, thereby

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

171

STUDENT WORKBOOK

pledging loyalty to its chief. In their modern form the clans are flourishing. Interest in clan societies, particularly overseas, is strong and the desire to identify with one’s past seems to be on the increase. Many large Scottish gatherings outside Scotland take place and the number grows every year. Tracing Scottish ancestry People in all parts of the world are interested in tracing their Scottish ancestry. There are many sources of information which can be used in such a search, which you can carry out yourself or which can be carried out by a professional research team. The Scottish Genealogy Society was set up in 1953 by a group of historians and genealogists with the aim of promoting research into Scottish family history. This society undertakes the collection, exchange and publication of material relating to genealogy, but does not itself engage in record searching, acting purely in an academic and consultative capacity. www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk is the official database offering genealogical information. Scots language Modern Scotland has three languages: • English, the official speech of the country • Gaelic, the Celtic tongue introduced from Ireland in the fifth century • Scots, or Lallans, the historical speech of the lowlands. Doric is a dialect spoken in the north east; it is strongest in the Aberdeen and Buchan area. Gaelic words in Scots include bog, cairn, glen, strath, and loch. Most mountain, river and loch names in the Highlands and Islands are Gaelic. Words dating to the medieval period include capercailzie, and sonsie. Words from the Jacobite period include claymore and sporran. We see the French influence on the language in words such as ashet, gigot, tassie, gardyloo, fash, douce, vennel and hogmanay. We see the Dutch influence in words such as loun, howf, craig, golf and pinkie.

172

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Some people see Scots as the poor relation today, but in the fifteenth century it was the language of the Court, is was used to record the Acts of the Scottish Parliament, and it had replaced Latin as the main literary language. The decline of Scots is linked to the Union of the Crowns (1603) and the fact that people don’t see it as a separate language, nor does it yet attract the same kind of funding or commitment as Gaelic. Also, Scots came to be viewed as a lower-class form of expression, the use of which would inhibit personal progress. The ceilidh The word ‘ceilidh’ means a visit. In times past, crofters used to gather in a house where the women would spin or knit, the men would repair fishing nets and an older member of the community would act as bard. They would tell stories, sing songs, recite poems, and pass on legends from generation to generation. Nowadays ceilidhs tend to be more commercial and focus more on dancing. Task 53 Check that you understand the meaning of the words listed in the text above. If there are any you don’t understand then do some research to check their meaning. Scottish produce and crafts You will now take a look at some elements of Scottish industry that have become part of the ‘Scottishness’ that appeals to tourists and therefore forms an important part of the Scottish tourism product. Whisky Whisky is Scotland’s most famous product. You studied whisky in Outcome 2 when you looked at the various types of visitor attractions in Scotland. For good measure you should know the attractions of the Whisky Trail, the locations of selected distillery visitor centres, the differences between blended and malt whisky, and finally the differences between Islay and Speyside single malts. Tweeds and woollens Surveys show that shopping is a popular activity with visitors to Scotland (especially perhaps if the weather is poor). Knitwear and tweeds are amongst the most popular and sought-after items for purchase by these visitors, who associate high-quality woollens with Scotland.

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

173

STUDENT WORKBOOK

The textile industry today is still one of the largest manufacturing industries in Scotland, and the number of woollen mills and mill shops around the country is testimony to Scotland’s reputation for quality woollens in particular. Lambswools, Shetlands, Fair Isles, and Cashmeres are all sought after by visitors, and well-known makes are Pringle, Loch Carron, Lyle and Scott, Braemar and Ballantynes. Do you know where cashmere comes from? Look on www.johnstonscashmere.com to find out and write your answer here.

N.B. Aran sweaters are Irish! They are not from Arran. Tartan Tartan is linked with clans and Scottish ancestry. Many woollen mill shops now offer the tourist the services of a ‘Clans and Tartans Bureau’ where, with the help of computers, they can print out a clan’s history and tartan. Many such outlets claim that the tartans on sale are the actual patterns worn by Scottish clans throughout history. However, this is not strictly accurate – most modern tartans are in fact patterns designed in the nineteenth century. The most usual garment associated with tartan is the kilt. In its simple form this was widely worn by Highland Scots in centuries past. It is worth noting that Lowland Scots historically did not wear the kilt.

174

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Task 54 Where would you find the following? Johnston’s Cashmere Visitor Centre?

The Mill Trail?

A Harris tweed being woven? (See www.harristweed.org)

The Lochcarron Cashmere and Wool Centre?

A kiltmaker?

Trow Woollen Weaving Mill?

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

175

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Crafts We have already noted that tourists like to go shopping when they come to Scotland. As well as buying woollens, tweeds and tartans as souvenirs to take home to friends and family they also like to find items produced by local craftsmen.

Task 55 In the space below, list some of the crafts items currently produced in Scotland and say where they are made. Craft: Made in:

176

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Food and cuisine In a previous section we looked at drink, so now let’s have a look at food and the Scottish cuisine. Farming is big business in Scotland. Scotland is also one of the few European countries that is totally self-sufficient in temperate foodstuffs. The quality of Scottish agriculture and fish is well known. Products such as beef, salmon, lamb and shellfish are favoured and appreciated by chefs and connoisseurs throughout the world. Examples of regional agricultural specialities include the following: • Soft fruits produced for jams around Strathmore and the Carse of Gowrie, known to produce more raspberries than any other area in Europe • Ayrshire is best known for its early potatoes • The Clyde Valley grows soft fruits, tomatoes and other greenhouse vegetables • Beef is from the farms around Aberdeen, Angus and Orkney • Venison and game are provided from many estates both in the Highlands and Lowlands • Lamb is from the Borders and Shetland • Oats, wheat and barley from many farms up and down the land. Fishing industry With such a long coastline, fishing has always been important to Scotland. Main fishing ports include Aberdeen and north-east towns Peterhead, Fraserburgh, Stonehaven, Banff and Buckie; west-coast ports such as Kinlochbervie, Lochinver, Ullapool, Mallaig and Tobermory; the fishing villages of the East Neuk of Fife, such as Crail, Anstruther and Pittenweem and in the south places like Kirkcudbright and Eyemouth; and of course the islands where fishing has always been part of the way of life. The type of fish landed at each port depends on local conditions. Traditional catches are white fish – haddock, whiting and cod, etc., with Peterhead being the largest white-fish port in Europe. Other important species are mackerel and herring, with Ullapool the largest port. Shellfish from places like Orkney are exported to the major centres of European cuisine such as Paris.

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

177

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Fish and shellfish farming have developed on a large scale since the 1980s. Salmon and sea trout are farmed on the west coast and island inlets. Shellfish farming, in shallow coastal estuaries and sea lochs, concentrates mostly on oysters, mussels, clams and scallops. Numerous local museums tell the story of the fishing industry around the coast of Scotland, e.g. • • • • • • Mallaig Marine World Aberdeen Maritime Museum Lossiemouth Fisheries and Community Museum Peterhead Maritime Heritage Museum Scottish Maritime Museum at Irvine Scottish Fisheries Museum at Anstruther.

Scottish cuisine How would you explain to an overseas visitor the west-coast chippie selling scotch eggs and deep-fried Mars bars? Or the watery brown sauce you are offered with everything in an Edinburgh chippie? Or the strange liking in the north east for chips with curry sauce! Are these good examples of Scottish cuisine? We are told these are what many of the locals wash down with Irn Bru! Is it any wonder that we have one of the highest rates of heart disease in the world! Thank goodness we have something better than this to promote. The real Scottish cuisine is based on meat and fish. Quality produce includes wild salmon and trout, white fish and shellfish. Aberdeen Angus beef is still the best and most famous in the world.

Task 56 Scotland’s most famous dish is, of course, the haggis but do you know what haggis is made of?

178

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

STUDENT WORKBOOK

You are also probably familiar with tweed kettle, stovies, partan bree, cullen skink and cock-a-leekie which appear in the exercises later on. Here are some more specialities: Hairst Bree – harvest broth Musselburgh Pie – steak and kidney pie with oysters or mussels Skirlie – oatmeal, onions, and suet fried together Nettle Kail – chicken boiled with nettles Lobster Hebridean – lobster flavoured with Drambuie Orkney Broonies – spiced treacle cake Cranachan – a mixture of cream, oatmeal, sugar, raspberries and rum Bubbly Jock – roast turkey Selkirk Bannock – a rich shortbread with crystallised ginger Glasgow Toffee – chocolate flavoured toffee Ecclefechan Butter Tart – pastry case filled with dried fruit and nuts Scotland is also famous for raspberries. To finish a meal – perhaps cheese and biscuits. There is a tradition of cheese making stretching back through the centuries and now world class, from Orkney cheddar to Tain’s Caboc or Loch Arthur’s Criffel. Biscuits are made in Glasgow, Edinburgh and North East Scotland. Shortbread and oatcakes are the most famous types of biscuit and are often sold to tourists in tartan tins. To finish the meal perhaps a cup of Scottish blend tea? Task 57 1. A tourist wants to visit a traditional fishing village. Suggest two suitable areas and also advise on the location of major ports where commercial fishing fleets land their catches.

2.

Where is the Scottish Fisheries Museum and what can visitors see there?

3.

A local hotel offers accommodation rates which include bed and full Scottish breakfast. What is included in a full Scottish breakfast?

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

179

STUDENT WORKBOOK

4.

Who wrote ‘Fair fa’ yer honest, sonsie face, Great chieftain of the pudding race!’ and what was he talking about?

5.

What is an Arbroath Smokie or a Finnan Haddie? (see www.arbroath-smokie.co.uk)

6.

A visitor asks you where she can eat Scottish fare. Recommend a good restaurant.

7.

Which of the following are traditional Scottish fare? Underline the correct answers.

Cheeses:

Pentland Swinzie Atholl Brose Broonies Musselburgh Pie Lobster Hebridean Forfar Bridie Clam Chowder Cullen Skink Cock-a-leekie Edinburgh Rock Jeddart Snails Ayrshire Toffee

Gloucester Crowdie Pumpkin Pie Cranachan Bouillabaisse Haggis

Desserts:

Fish dishes:

Soups:

Partan Bree Scotch Broth Cream of Squash Berwick Cockles Hawick Balls

Sweeties:

180

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

STUDENT WORKBOOK

8.

Here are some visitor attractions associated with Scottish food. Make brief notes on each, mentioning their locations. Baxter’s Highland Village

Cream o’ Galloway

Walkers of Aberlour

Isle of Arran Taste Trail (see www.tastetrail.com)

Food festivals – is there one near you?

House of Bruar

Falls of Shin

9.

What town in south-west Scotland has been designated a ‘Food Town’ and why does it deserve this accolade?

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

181

STUDENT WORKBOOK

10.

Below is a menu. Circle the main ingredient for each dish.

Scottish Restaurant Menu Soups
ham/rice Cock-a-leekie chicken/leek Cullen Skink lean lamb Partan Bree crab mutton/barley

smoked mackerel

smoked haddock

cauliflower

crayfish

Main Course
liver/bacon Haggis liver/oatmeal sausage Stovies turnips/butter Tweed Kettle salmon in wine Kingdom of Fife Pie rabbit/bacon mutton

potatoes/onions

cabbage

smoked mackerel

sea trout

egg/bacon

sausage/bacon

Desserts
honey/whisky Atholl Brose raspberry/cream Border Tart custard/marzipan MacCallum ice cream/toffee sauce ice cream/strawberry sauce ice cream/raspberry sauce chocolate

shortbread

walnuts/cream

182

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Business tourism in Scotland In this section you will research information to plan for a conference. Scotland can provide meeting places for small and large groups. Conference facilities in Scotland take various forms including: • • • • Purpose-built venues Sports stadia Universities and colleges Grand hotels and resorts

There are also several businesses set up as professional conference organisers. The Scottish Convention Bureau is the Business Tourism Division of VisitScotland and serves to provide impartial information on meeting venues, facilities and services to anyone planning a conference or meeting in Scotland (see www.conventionscotland.com).

Task 58 Have a look at the following websites and make brief notes below: www.eicc.co.uk www.secc.co.uk www.aecc.co.uk www.eccscotland.com and at www.swallow.hotels.com, look for the Highland Conference centre

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

183

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Task 59 Read the following case study. A group of four businessmen from Birmingham are planning a three-day trip (two nights) in the Easter break in Aberdeen, Glasgow or Dundee. The clients want: • • • • • a good-quality hotel with leisure facilities to sample good food car rental from the airport to visit historical and cultural attractions to use their English Heritage membership card (this gives access to Historic Scotland properties) • to receive a programme for the three days that includes exact or suggested flight arrival/departure times They want to explore venues to host an international three-day conference on ‘Business Women Network in Europe’ along the following lines: • 400 delegates • the conference language will be English • the Business Woman Network conference should also include some interesting activity offered to incentive or other business groups. This should take no more than one afternoon and should be preferably in the area of the conference venue and should involve all delegates. The activity does not need to be focused on women, and original suggestions would be welcome • venue for an evening reception – stately home desirable Instructions 1. Consult any brochures or internet sites and produce an itinerary that works in terms of travelling time/lunch breaks and sightseeing. Describe the venue for the conference you are suggesting and build a visit to it into the programme.

2.

cont’d on next page

184

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Conference information Note down here two venues you have explored for the conference that would suit the requirements of the organisers. Make two suggestions as to some original activity/event for one afternoon that could be included as part of the conference programme. Itinerary Day 1 Time

Place

Day 2 Time

Place

Day 3 Time

Place

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

185

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Preparation for assessment
You have now covered the requisite product knowledge for the unit and should now prepare for assessment. To pass the unit you need to provide evidence to demonstrate that you have achieved all of the Outcomes and Performance Criteria. You will be assessed by means of one short-answer or restrictedresponse closed-book test covering Outcome 1. This will be done under supervised conditions in the classroom within 30 minutes. Satisfactory performance in this assessment is determined by a cut-off score – 13 out of 26, i.e. 50 per cent. Sixteen of the 26 marks available test your mapping skills. Therefore you should refresh your knowledge of places by revisiting Maps 1 to 12 and all the areas, places and routes you plotted on them. The remainder of the test covers the general product knowledge studied in Outcome 1. Although you finished Outcome 1 fairly early on in the unit your lecturer or teacher has probably kept the assessment until the end of the unit because much of the product and mapping knowledge is reinforced in Outcomes 2 and 3. The assessment for Outcomes 2 and 3 will involve completion of two case studies (one on a centre-based holiday, the other a touring holiday) which will arise naturally as you progress through the unit. The case studies will be open-book assessments completed under supervised conditions and presented in a business format. They must show that you can satisfy client requirements for an itinerary involving a centre-based holiday and an itinerary for a touring holiday. A different area of Scotland must be used for each case study. So you should be able to assimilate the knowledge developed in this unit to plan touring itineraries throughout Scotland. This is also a requirement for the external Higher Travel and Tourism examination. This skill is particularly appropriate if you intend to work in Scottish tourism. Many overseas and domestic tourists to Scotland see the country by participating in a coach tour. Planning programmes and itineraries: tour research The second assessment, therefore, puts you in the role of a tour planner, conference programme organiser or similar. For the purposes of this exercise we shall simply use the term tour planner.

186

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

STUDENT WORKBOOK

Once the tour planner has settled on a destination or a destination has been specified, information must be gathered for the itinerary-designing process: • • • • • which modes of transport best serve the area? which hotels should be selected? which routes should be followed? what attractions are ‘must sees’? how much will each tour component cost? (Not so important in the context of this unit.)

There are various research sources that can help this process along: • standard guidebooks – Rough Guide, Lonely Planet, Fodor, Baedeker, Fieldings, Blue Guides, AA/RAC and Michelin all possess a wealth of information which the planner can use. • industry publications – VisitScotland brochures and guides. • maps – essential for itinerary planning. Particularly useful are roadbooks. • the internet – websites can be used to provide extensive information on popular destinations. • educational visit – best possible method. You meet personally with suppliers. First-hand knowledge also generates a direct vital energy in itinerary planning. Itinerary planning This is an art that not every itinerary planner has mastered! Awkward, illdesigned, or inept tours – the kind that sell poorly or set off complaints – pepper the brochures of some tourist organisations. Although each tour has its own peculiar demands, certain general considerations apply to most successful tour planning: • • • • determine what time of year your tours should ideally take place determine what day of the week your tour should depart determine how many days your tour should run choose reliable and well financed suppliers.

Suppliers go out of business with alarming regularity. Hotels can also go downhill fast and airline bankruptcies have been known. Think of a suitable title for a Scottish tour

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

187

STUDENT WORKBOOK

• Anchor the first and last days of your itinerary with dramatic destinations and attractions How would you start and finish a tour of Scotland?

• schedule public transport sectors with practical client consideration in mind • schedule a general city tour as one of your first activities Most city stops are for more than one overnight and the city tour lays the groundwork for later in-depth exploration. • Don’t overfill each day with activities Although tourists want to be kept busy, they don’t want to be driven into the ground. Reasonable wake-up times, free blocks of time for shopping, or a couple of hours during the day to rest, help to pace out the day. • Don’t schedule over-long sectors of the tour What is too long a tour? Depends on the country and the quality of the roads. The maximum distance advisable in any one day in the UK is 150 to 200 miles. In the Highlands and Islands of Scotland 80 to 100 miles might be more appropriate. Rest stops, meal breaks and brief attraction visits should punctuate trips, for after about two hours of touring clients can get restless and tense. • Give your tour a broad variety of features Excessive predictability can lull a group into apathy. Schedule welcome and farewell parties. Vary types of hotels and meal stops, e.g. don’t book every hotel in Scotland with the same company. Follow a day when clients walk around a vast attraction with one in which they tour from place to place by coach.

188

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

STUDENT WORKBOOK

• Before writing out the itinerary, plot out the tour activities on a day-by-day chart.
Sunday 12 June Monday 13 June Tuesday 14 June Wednesday 15 June Thursday 16 June Friday 17 June Saturday 18 June

An example of an ‘itinerary’ question in the external paper is given in Appendix 3. You are required to put together touring itineraries for visitors to Scotland. The itineraries must be laid out in business format, i.e. not essay-style and should fulfil the following criteria: • choice of destinations is valid in terms of client needs • itineraries are feasible in terms of time, distance and geographical locations • transport selected is appropriate in terms of client type, requirements and budget • accommodation and catering selected is appropriate in terms of client type, requirements and budget. (Suggested lists are provided in Appendix 1 – if you choose any of these you would have to submit further details. Provide a brief description on the property from an appropriate guide or the internet.) • range of visits and activities selected is appropriate to client type, requirements and budget • companies, organisation and support services involved must be identified

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

189

STUDENT WORKBOOK

And finally – the examination!
You may be taking this unit as a stand-alone course, but it is more likely you are taking it as part of the Higher Travel and Tourism examination. The added value of the exam over the completion of the unit comes from your ability to integrate, contextualise and retain the knowledge and skills over a longer period of time. This unit is tested in Section B of the examination. A mixture of shortanswer, restricted- and extended-response questions are used to examine the wide range of content and skills taught within the unit. All outcomes from the unit will be sampled in the Question Paper with no weighting being given to any particular areas of study. Section B will include two questions. Examples of the two questions together with detailed marking instructions are given in Appendices 3 and 4. Your teacher or lecturer may be able to give you further examples from past papers. Each question will be broken down into sub-questions ranging in value from 1 to 8 marks. The total marks available for each question will be 18. Section B will have 36 marks available in total. Up to 10 marks may be allocated to mapping exercises in which candidates are required to plot or identify features on maps. The full Question Paper is marked out of 100 with a time allocation of 2 hours 30 minutes. Section B is one of three sections – A, B and C, B and C being optional.

190

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

APPENDICES

APPENDICES

Appendix 1: A selection of hotels and restaurants in Scotland
The following list has been put together to help you select hotels and restaurants when planning touring itineraries of Scotland. It is not prescriptive. You may include any other appropriate establishment not listed (and there are many!). As the list may become dated, ask your teacher or lecturer for updates, additions and deletions. All gradings are by VisitScotland. Dumfries and Galloway Balcary Bay Hotel, Auchencairn 4* Dryffesdale Country House Hotel, Lockerbie Kirroughtree House Hotel, Newton Stewart 4* Knockinaam Lodge, Portpatrick 5*

Scottish Borders Roxburghe Hotel and Golf Course, Kelso 4* Castle Venlaw Hotel Cringletie House Hotel, by Peebles 4* Dryburgh Abbey Hotel Peebles Hydro Hotel 4* Stobo Castle Hotel (Health Spa)

Ayrshire and Arran Auchrannie Country House Hotel, Arran 4* Marine Hotel, Troon 4* Montgreenan Mansion House Hotel, Irvine 3* The Westin Turnberry Resort (Turnberry Hotel) 5* The Ivy House, Alloway 4* Restaurant and Small Hotel

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

191

APPENDICES

Greater Glasgow and Clyde Valley Hilton International and Cameron Restaurant, Glasgow 5* One Devonshire Gardens, Great Western Road, Glasgow 5* Gleddoch House Hotel, Langbank, nr Glasgow 4* Shieldhill House Hotel, Biggar 4* Ubiquitous Chip, Ashton Lane, Glasgow Pollock House (Lite Bite) Stravaigin, Gibson St, Glasgow

Edinburgh and Lothians Balmoral Hotel, Princes Street, Edinburgh 5* Bonham Hotel, Drumsheugh Gardens, Edinburgh 4* Caledonian Hilton Hotel, Princes Street, Edinburgh 5* Channings Hotel and Restaurant, South Learmonth Gardens, Edinburgh 4* Dalhousie Castle and Spa, Bonnyrigg 4* Malmaison Hotel, Leith Greywalls Hotel, Gullane 4* Open Arms Hotel, Dirleton, 4* The Scotsman Hotel, Edinburgh 5* Sheraton Grand Hotel, Festival Square, Edinburgh 5* Atrium Restaurant, Cambridge Street, Edinburgh Daniel’s Bistro, Leith Howies Restaurant, Waterloo Place, Edinburgh The Old Bakehouse, West Linton The Witchery by the Castle, Edinburgh

Fife Balbirnie House Hotel, Glenrothes 4* Old Course Hotel Golf Resort and Spa, St Andrews 5* Rufflets Country House Hotel and Garden Restaurant, St Andrews 5* The Peat Inn, by Cupar 5* Restaurant with Rooms

192

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

APPENDICES

Argyll, the Isles, Loch Lomond, Stirling and the Trossachs The Airds Hotel, Port Appin 4* Ardanaseig House Hotel, Kilchrenan Cameron House Hotel, Loch Lomond 4* Crinan Hotel 4* Enmore Hotel, Dunoon Loch Melfort Hotel Monachyle Mhor, Balquhidder 3* Small Hotel Taychreggan Hotel, Kilchrenan 4* Coach House Coffee Shop, Luss (Lite Bite) The Green Welly Stop, Tyndrum (Lite Bite)

Perthshire, Angus and City of Dundee Ballathie House Hotel, Stanley, by Perth 4* Carnoustie Hotel Golf Resort and Spa 4* Crieff Hydro Hotel 4* Cromlix House Hotel, nr Dunblane 5* Gleneagles Hotel 5* Green Park Hotel, Pitlochry 4* Kinloch House Hotel, by Blairgowrie 5* 63 Tay Street Restaurant, Perth House of Bruar, by Blair Atholl (Lite Bite)

Aberdeen and Grampian MacDonald Ardoe House Hotel 4* The Marcliffe at Pitfodels, Aberdeen 5*

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

193

APPENDICES

Highlands Inver Hotel, Lochinver Inverlochy Castle Hotel, Fort William 5* Bunchrew House Hotel, Inverness 4* Coul House Hotel, Strathpeffer Culloden House Hotel, Inverness 4* Dunain Park Hotel, Inverness 4* Golf View Hotel, Nairn 4* Isles of Glencoe Hotel, Ballachulish 4* Knockomie Hotel, Forres Mansfield House Hotel, Tain 4* Muckrack Lodge, Grantown Royal Marine Hotel, Brora Cawder Tavern, by Nairn Ceilidh Place, Ullapool (Lite Bite) The Three Chimneys Restaurant and the House Over-By, Dunvegan, Skye 5* Restaurant with Rooms Visitor Centre, Storehouse of Foulis, Evanton (Lite Bite)

Orkney Foveran Hotel and Restaurant, St Ola 3* Small Hotel Creel Restaurant, St Margaret’s Hope 3* Restaurant with Rooms

Shetland Busta House Hotel 3* Herrislea House, Tingwall

Western Isles Caberfeidh Hotel, Stornoway Pollachar Inn, South Uist (Lite Bite)

194

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

APPENDICES

Appendix 2: A selection of Scottish festivals and events
1 January Flambeaux Procession, Comrie, Perthshire Traditional New Year torchlight procession through the village. New Year’s Day Boys’ and Men’s Ba’ Games, Kirkwall, Orkney This game of mass street football has been played in Kirkwall for approximately 200 years. The ba’ is thrown up from the Mercat Cross, with the boys’ game starting at 10.00 a.m. and the men’s game at 1 p.m. Goals for the Uppies and Doonies are the site of an old castle and the harbour. More than 120 men form a massive scrum with grinds, swings and lurches over and through the narrrow barricaded streets of this old Norse town. The event is watched by large crowds. Stonehaven Fireball Ceremony Traditional ceremony of swinging fire-balls to welcome in the New Year and ward off evil spirits. Burning of the Clavie, Burghead, Moray Traditional ceremony where half a tar barrel on a stake is filled with wood and tar and carried burning through the old part of the village. Enthusiastic following by the entire population of Burghead. Burning embers are considered good luck and are sent to exiles throughout the world. International Rugby Union, Edinburgh, Murrayfield Annual New Year game of rugby. Celtic Connections, Glasgow Performances and workshops of folk and traditional music and dance throughout Glasgow and Strathclyde. Up-Helly-Aa, Lerwick, Shetland Traditional Viking fire festival which includes the burning of a Viking longship. Melrose Rugby Sevens, The Greenyards, Melrose Rugby tournament.

1 January

1 January

January

January

January

January

April

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

195

APPENDICES

April–May

Beltane Fire, Calton Hill, Edinburgh. Also Aberdeen, The Castlegate Grand Mayday Ceilidh – a re-enactment of ancient pagan festival celebrating the first day of summer. Music, dancing, fire-eating, juggling, craft stalls on the theme of a medieval street fair. Tennents Scottish Cup Finals, Glasgow – Hampden Park Final of Scottish football’s leading professional cup tournament. Glenmorangie Camanachd Shinty Cup Final The premier occasion in the shinty calendar. Lanimer Day Celebrations, Lanark streets and Racecourse Riding of the marches, street processions of tableaux and bands, displays, beating of retreats, etc. Hawick Common Riding, Hawick Various events including rideouts, the proclaiming of the Burgh Officer, the Cornet’s Walk, the Snuffing Ceremony and an official procession and Cornet’s Dinner, Ball, Horse Racing, and Athletics. Guid Nychburris Festival, Dumfries Riding of the marches, etc. Common Ridings, various locations in Borders and Dumfriesshire Annual Riding of the marches of the royal burgh lands and Casting of the Colours. Crowning of Queen. St Magnus Festival, Orkney, Kirkwall and Stromness A compact six-day festival encompassing music, drama, poetry and the visual arts. Royal Highland Show, Ingliston, Edinburgh Scotland’s national agriculture show. Open Golf Championship The World’s leading golf tournament. Five of the ten venues in the rota are in Scotland.

May

June

June

June

June

June–July

June

June

July

196

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

APPENDICES

August

Lammas Fair and Market, St Andrews, Fife One of Scotland’s oldest street fairs (closed Sunday). Fair starts Friday. Market on Monday and Tuesday. Edinburgh Military Tattoo, The Esplanade, Edinburgh Castle The Tattoo is a unique blend of music, ceremony, entertainment and theatre, set against the stunning backdrop of Edinburgh Castle. Highland Gatherings Highland Games held at various venues, notably Aboyne, Cowal and Braemar. Edinburgh International Jazz Festival, Edinburgh Jazz and blues festival. World Pipe-Band Championships (venue changes) World pipe-band competition, drum major competition, Highland dancing, tug-o-war, athletics, trade stands, etc. Edinburgh International Film Festival Annual film festival. Edinburgh Book Festival, Charlotte Square Gardens, Edinburgh Europe’s largest and liveliest book event for the public with over 200 authors, children’s events, workshops, demonstrations, all-day cabaret in the magnificent Spiegel tent and thousands of books. Beating of the Retreat and Fireworks Spectacular, Edinburgh An extravaganza celebrating the tradition of Beating the Retreat including six pipe bands and a spectacular fireworks display. Edinburgh Festival Fringe, Edinburgh Three-week long arts festival covering everything from theatre, music, comedy to children’s events, exhibitions and street theatre. Edinburgh International Festival, Edinburgh International festival of theatre, music, dance, opera and visual arts.

August

August– September

August

August

August

August

August

August

August

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

197

APPENDICES

September

Airshow – RAF Leuchars, nr St Andrews, Fife Airshow plus supporting ground exhibits, craft fair, arena events. St Andrew’s Day Celebrations, St Andrews

November

31 December Biggar Ne’erday Bonfire, Biggar, Lanarkshire –1 January Torchlight procession led by pipe band to town square to light huge bonfire. An ancient Druid custom. December Edinburgh’s Hogmanay Festival, Edinburgh Several days of events leading up to the street party in Princes Street on Hogmanay, with music in Princes Street Gardens and a firework display at midnight.

198

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

APPENDICES

Appendix 3
External examination: specimen question A (a) Mr Nolan from Northern Ireland is planning a short break in Scotland with his family. They plan to spend some time exploring Scotland and visiting friends in Edinburgh. (i) Name one of the companies that operate a car ferry service between Northern Ireland and Scotland (ii) Name the Scottish port of entry used by the ferry company identified (iii) Briefly describe the route the Nolan family would take from the arrival port in Scotland to Edinburgh (b) The family is also interested in visiting one of the following islands: • Lewis • Mull • Shetland Choose one of the above islands. Name and shade in the island on Map 1. Name the car ferry terminals at each end of the sea route connecting the island and the Scottish mainland and plot their location on Map 1. (iii) Briefly describe any two visitor attractions, produce or crafts for which your chosen island is particularly noted. (c) The family would like to spend one night in a national park. Name a national park and mark its location on Map 1. The family would also like to go canoeing or white-water rafting during their holiday. Name a suitable location that would accommodate their needs. The family is a member of the National Trust and would like to visit two Trust properties whilst on holiday in Scotland. (i) Give an example of one National Trust for Scotland property in the Edinburgh and Lothians area and one property in the Ayrshire area that the family could visit. (i) (ii) 1

1 1 2

3 1

2

(d)

1

(e)

2

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

199

APPENDICES

(ii)

Briefly describe both properties and explain their significance as visitor attractions.

4 (18)

200

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

APPENDICES

External examination: specimen question A Detailed marking instructions (a) (i) 1 mark Stena line UK (Stranraer/Belfast); P&O (Cairnryan and Troon to Larne) 1 mark Stena Line UK – Stranraer; P&O – Cairnryan and Troon

(ii)

(iii) 2 marks To Edinburgh; head north towards Glasgow then take the M8 eastward to Edinburgh Also acceptable: Follow the route east from Stranraer to Dumfries then north through Moffat or through Biggar to join the Edinburgh bypass. (b) (i) (ii) 1 mark Plot the location of the island on Map 1

3 marks Lewis – Ullapool to Stornoway Mull – Oban to Craignure or Lochaline to Fishnish Shetland – Aberdeen to Lerwick 1 mark for correct names + 2 marks for correct plotting.

(iii) 1 mark (No half marks: so you must name 2 to gain your mark) Lewis – could include Calanais Stones, Dun Carloway Broch, Harris Tweed, Lewis Loom Centre, and aspects of Gaelic culture Mull – could include Duart Castle, Calgary beach, Dervaig round tower, Mull railway, Tobermory distillery, tartan weavers, and ferry to Iona. Shetland – could include Jarlshof, Mousa, bird and wildlife sanctuaries, Up-Helly-Aa festival, traditional folk, accordion and fiddle festivals, Fair Isle sweaters

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

201

APPENDICES

(c)

2 marks 1 mark for name, 1 for accurate plotting Either Loch Lomond and Trossachs National Park or Cairngorm National Park Any appropriate castle which accepts paying guests, or a castle hotel, and accurately plot its location on Map 1, e.g. Inverlochy Castle Hotel, Culcreuch Castle

(d)

1 mark Any river suitable for either canoeing or white-water rafting, e.g. River Tay, Tummel, Dee, Don. (i) 2 marks NTS attractions in the Edinburgh area could include: Caiy Stane, Gladstone’s Land, House of the Binns, Inveresk Lodge Garden, 28 Charlotte Square (Georgian House), Phantassie Doocot. NTS attractions in Ayrshire could include Culzean Castle, Souter Johnnie’s Cottage, Bachelors Club (Tarbolton). Plot the location of both attractions on Map 1. 4 marks 2 marks per attraction

(e)

(ii)

202

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

APPENDICES

Appendix 4
External exam: specimen question B (a) A major conference is taking place in Edinburgh/Glasgow/ Aberdeen/Inverness/Dundee (select one). The conference organiser has been asked to put together a one-day excursion for the partners of conference delegates. Draft a programme that includes a minimum of three attractions and one stop where they can buy Scottish and locally produced arts and crafts. The tour will depart the city centre at 9 a.m. and return between 5 p.m. and 6 p.m. You must show timings throughout the day: e.g. 09.00 Depart hotel 09.45 Arrive… for tour, etc 11.00 Depart…, etc. (b) The conference organiser has been contacted by a large well-known American company who want to offer a trip to Scotland as part of an incentive travel package. They have asked the conference organiser to suggest a four-day three-night touring holiday to Scotland in May. Their requirements are as follows: • A minimum of 4-star accommodation • Visits to at least four visitor attractions one of which should be an industrial heritage attraction, and one a whisky distillery • The opportunity to spend half a day hill walking, golfing or fishing, depending on the individual interests of the visitors. They are flying into Glasgow, arriving at 1 p.m. on a Monday and leaving at 8 p.m. on a Thursday. Draft a programme that can be presented to the company, including your suggestions for suitable overnight accommodation and transport. For the half-day special-interest activities choose one special interest activity, i.e. golfing, hill walking or fishing. Describe the location and appeal for your chosen activity and outline any regulations that visitors may have to consider.

8

10 (18)

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland

203

APPENDICES

External examination: specimen question B Detailed marking instructions (a) 8 marks • Programme for the day is feasible • Programme content is appropriate to the general interest visitor and in terms of the area selected • Appropriate example of Scottish or locally produced arts and crafts • Timings are given with reasonable accuracy: +/– 30 minutes • Options offer sufficient contrast in content (b) 10 marks Brief description of the main appeal of Scotland to overseas visitors including: quality of scenery and landscape, opportunity for specialist outdoor activities, e.g. fishing, golf, sailing, walking, adventure sports. Friendliness and hospitality of the people, history and culture, tracing family roots. Any other factor of appeal as listed in current VisitScotland statistics. Feasibility of journey times Creativity/imagination Appropriate choice of overnight stops Appropriate visits and activities • At least four visitor attractions • Accurate identification of one industrial heritage attraction and one whisky distillery • Suitable location for half-day hill walking, fishing or golf is accurately identified and reference to regulation where appropriate 2 3 1 1 1

2 1 2 1

2 1

1

204

THE SCOTTISH TOURISM PRODUCT: AN INTRODUCTION (HIGHER) © Copyright Learning and Teaching Scotland