Field Classroom Management Description TASK: To collect data related to classroom management in order to help you develop a clearer

sense of how you will manage your classroom. Take notes on the following issues during your first two visits to your field site. Answer the following questions in as much detail as possible while keeping in mind the criteria for assessment of this project (Rubric #3 Field Management Description). USE THIS TEMPLATE ONLY AS DIRECTED!! ALL

QUESTIONS MUST BE ANSWERED AND TYPED IN THE SPACES PROVIDED!!
1. Provide a complete description of the field placement, including name of school, grade level, teacher, and number of students. Draw a floor plan of the room arrangement of seats, desks (teacher & student), centers, computers, etc. Attach the seating chart for the class.

2. Classroom Rules:

What are the posted classroom rules?

The classroom rules are listed to the right of the paper. In the classroom, they are located in the front right corner of the room, right next to the class list. These rules are laminated and appear at adult level, where the students can be in proper view of them at all times.

As these rules appear to be general, run of the mill classroom rules, it appears that Miss Pavelich did not create the individual rules and the poster which they are displayed upon. If rules are not posted, what rules does the teacher refer to? As of yet (10/17/11), Miss Pavelich has not had to refer to any of the rules noted in the front of the room. However, following that date I have heard her politely guide students to rule #4 (work quietly and do not disturb others). I have also heard Miss Pavelich state that she wants her students to “give me five” during which the students put all of their attention on her. What rules appear to be in place in the classroom? Rule #1 (listen when others are talking). Similar to that she also has apple signs that hang in the front of the room that disclose whether or not the students are allowed to engage in quiet talking, normal talking, or to not participate in any talking at all. Additionally, I have also heard Miss Pavelich direct her students to “give me five” when she wants to gain the students attention in some manner.

Very organized, on the front board Miss Pavelich has different colored signs which indicate activities that students are allowed to participate in. While they are not exactly rules per say, the students know that when a designated color sign is up they are only allowed to participate in those certain activities.

3. Teacher Procedures:

What are the teacher’s procedures for distributing materials?

As of yet, Miss Pavelich has only had to pass out worksheets, and language arts books. For the worksheets, she passed them out herself, however, for the language arts books she calls on children and allows them to get up and collect their own individual books themselves.

What are the teacher’s procedures for collecting materials?

As of yet, each time Miss Pavelich has been in need to collect materials from students she either collects the papers herself (Ex: After the students were finished working on a test, she went around the room to individually collect each paper) or she provides a brief time frame

for the students to put the item back to its previous dwelling (Ex: After some student’s finish with their free time books, she allowed them time to return the books to the bookshelf.) Additionally, I have witnessed her call upon the rows to have the students return the materials (Ex: When the students are finished with a worksheet/language arts book, she called them row by row where they stood in a single file line to return items) and have even occasionally seen her allow students to freely get up and turn their papers in on her desk, after the completion of an assignment. What are the teacher’s procedures for assigning classroom helpers? To assign classroom helpers, at the beginning of the year Miss Pavelich divides the class up and presents each student with an opportunity to be a classroom helper. What are the teacher’s procedures for allowing students to go to the bathroom? What other procedures do you observe? It is very low key when the students need to use the restroom. As Miss Pavelich has bathroom passes (one boy, one girl) located to the left of the door, when students need to use the facilities they usually just get up quietly and get the pass. Occasionally though I have

witnessed students specifically go up to Miss Pavelich and ask if they can use the restroom. However, when this does occur, it is during free time. As I come in before the students have lunch, I am able to see the procedures involving the students and how/when they get their coats and lunches prior to leaving the classroom for lunch. During this time, Miss Pavelich calls on rows and presents an opportunity for the students to come up and grab their necessities needed for the upcoming lunch and recess time. As I am often in the classroom when students are diligently working on something, I am also able to see Miss Pavelich‟s procedure regarding sharpening pencils, tissue necessities and the need to throw something away. These types of procedures all depend upon the time they are asked. (Ex: When Miss Pavelich is lecturing in the front of the room, the students know in advance that they are to be paying attention and have no need to sharpen their

pencils at that time). As a result, I have never witnessed an individual student ask her to sharpen their pencil during this time. However, if they need a tissue during this time, all they have to do is raise their hand quietly and Miss Pavelich will allow them to get one (Ex: During small group, whole individual group work, all the students have to do is raise their hand and ask Miss Pavelich if they are allowed to do something).

4. Instructional Activities:

How does the teacher get students’ attention during teacher presentation?

As the students appear to be very well behaved in Miss Pavelich‟s classroom, she really does not need to do much in order to gain their attention. All that she does is stand at the front of the classroom and/or walks around the classroom to garner attention from her students.

How does the teacher monitor students’ attention during teacher presentation?

In order to monitor the students‟ attention, Miss Pavelich does the same thing that she does to gain the students attention.

How does the teacher facilitate student participation during instruction?

Miss Pavelich facilitates student participation through encouragement, using carefully instructed words that encourage students to share their answer or story. During this time the students want to participate on their own, she does not need to individually call students out to request participation. All that she does is simply call on one person from among the participants. What I have noticed though is that when a student participates and gets the answer wrong, instead of just asking another person the same question she always encourages the student to try again. This type of motivation encourages the students to want to continue to participate day after day (in my opinion, anyway).

How does the teacher encourage talk among students?

Miss Pavelich uses key phrases (“Let‟s talk to a neighbor and compare” or “What does a friend think”) that have a direct message for the students to talk with each other. Additionally, she also has the students work together in two person groups where they are to read passages from their language arts book

and discuss what went on in the story. How does the teacher expect students to obtain help from teacher? Depending on the specific time period and what is occurring in the classroom, Miss Pavelich either expects students to raise their hands, or quietly walk up to her when they need her assistance. How does the teacher monitor student work during seat time? During seat time, one can find Miss Pavelich monitoring student work by either walking around the room or carefully observing as she sits at her desk in the front of the room. How does the teacher monitor student activity after seat work has been completed? After seat work has been completed, Miss Pavelich has, in my opinion, a very clever method of monitoring student activity. Listed in the front of the room, Miss Pavelich has a sign that provides students with options on what to do during free time. By using a premade list of what students can and cannot do, Miss Pavelich is easily able to monitor student activity from anywhere around the room.

5. Monitoring Student Behavior:

How does the teacher form groups?

Miss Pavelich usually simply forms groups by having the student pair up with the person sitting next to him/her. However, on occasion she has been known to pair students up by means of ability.

During individual work:
What is the seating? In the left column there are
XXXX

four groups of four desks,
XXXX

spaced tightly together and facing the front. In the right column there are two

XXXX XXXX

XX XX

groups of two desks, spaced tightly together and facing the front. Regardless to how the desks are situated though, the students work independently. How does the teacher distribute and manage During individual work, Miss Pavelich safe use of materials? distributes materials by passing them out, having the designated student helper pass the material out, or calling on rows for the students to gather their materials themselves. What talk is allowed? Miss Pavelich has a series of apple posters which she uses to designate whether or not

talking is aloud during this particular time. While some talk is tolerated (asking the person beside you a question of some sort), the apple poster is usually fixated upon “no talking” during this time. What talk is encouraged? During this time, between students, there is not a lot of talk that is encouraged unless that talk is prompted by Miss Pavelich What movement is allowed? Some movement is tolerated, such as:     What movement is encouraged? Switching positions in their seats Getting up and going to the restroom Reading on the reading carpet Working in the computer area

Minimal movement is encouraged, unless otherwise noted by Miss Pavelich. To specify, unless she indicates that a student get up to do something, or may move to a designated area in the room, minimal movement is encouraged.

What attention signal does the teacher use for students?

Miss Pavelich has a specific poster in the front of the room that distinguishes what students are to do when she tells them to “Give me five.” This indicates that students do: 1. Eyes are watching.

2. Ears are listening 3. Lips are closed 4. Hands are still 5. Feet are quiet Not only is this poster listed in the front of the room, but Miss Pavelich also states it out loud when she wishes to gain the students attention. From my time spent in Miss Pavelich‟s classroom, it is apparent that the students behave very well and have prior knowledge regarding how to act in the classroom. When she uses this signal to gain attention, it does not necessarily mean that she used it because a student was misbehaving, rather as a means to get students attention to move on to the next activity. What attention signal do the students use? To receive attention from Miss Pavelich the students either raise their hands or get up and go directly to Miss Pavelich. The type of signal used depends upon what type of individual work is being conducted, such as individual work where free time is occurring and individual work regarding whole group

instruction.

During small Group Work:
What is the seating? In the left column there are four groups of four desks, spaced tightly together and facing the front. In the right column there are two groups of two desks, spaced tightly together and facing the front. Students will either work with a partner sitting directly next to them or they will work with a partner in a designated are in the classroom. (Ex: When the students are working in pairs during readings of their language arts book, they are permitted to sit in certain areas of the classroom, including the
XXXX XXXX XXXX XXXX XX XX

reading area, up front, in the back, at their seats). How does the teacher distribute and manage During small group work, Miss Pavelich safe use of materials? distributes materials by passing them out, having the designated student helper pass the material out, or calling on rows for the students to gather their materials themselves.

What talk is allowed?

Miss Pavelich has a series of apple posters which she uses to designate whether or not talking is aloud during this particular time. During this time, the apple poster is set to “quiet talk”.

What talk is encouraged?

During this time, talk that is focusing on whatever material they are studying is encouraged. (EX: Throughout a lesson involving the students to read a story and discuss it with each other, Miss Pavelich encouraged the students to explain to their partner what they thought was the most important part of the story)

What movement is allowed?

Some movement is tolerated: EX: When I conducted my “Getting to Know You” activity, the students were permitted to move to the carpet and sit whichever way they pleased. EX: Sometimes students are allowed to move during their partner reading time. As a result, there are certain areas in which the students are allowed to locate to.

What movement is encouraged?

Minimal movement is encouraged, unless

otherwise noted by Miss Pavelich. To specify, unless she indicates that a student is allowed to move to a certain area, minimal movement is preferred. What attention signal does the teacher use for students? Miss Pavelich has a specific poster in the front of the room that distinguishes what students are to do when she tells them to “Give me five.” This indicates that students do: 1. Eyes are watching. 2. Ears are listening 3. Lips are closed 4. Hands are still 5. Feet are quiet Not only is this poster listed in the front of the room, but Miss Pavelich also states it out loud when she wishes to gain the students attention. What attention signal do the students use? To receive attention from Miss Pavelich the students either raise their hands or get up and go directly to Miss Pavelich.

During whole class work:

What is the seating?

In the left column there are four groups of four desks, spaced tightly together and facing the front. In the right column there are two groups of two desks, spaced tightly together and facing the front.
XXXX XXXX XXXX XXXX XX XX

How does the teacher distribute and manage Miss Pavelich distributes materials by passing safe use of materials? them out, having the designated student helper pass the material out, or calling on rows for the students to gather their materials themselves. What talk is allowed? Miss Pavelich has a series of apple posters which she uses to designate whether or not talking is aloud during this particular time. During this time, the apple poster is set to “no talk”. What talk is encouraged? During this time, between students, there is no talk that is encouraged. However, if Miss Pavelich prompts some sort of talk, that is acceptable. If Miss Pavelich asks a question and expects a response, she will ask a general question that indicates talking has been permitted at this time.

Ex: “Where do you think the boy went?” Students raise their hands. Miss Pavelich calls on one student to answer (thus encouraging the student to talk). What movement is allowed? Some movement is tolerated, such as:   What movement is encouraged? Switching positions in their seats Getting up and going to the restroom

Minimal movement is encouraged, unless otherwise noted by Miss Pavelich. To specify, unless she indicates that a student get up to do something, or may move to a designated area in the room, minimal movement is encouraged.

What attention signal does the teacher use for students?

Miss Pavelich has a specific poster in the front of the room that distinguishes what students are to do when she tells them to “Give me five.” This indicates that students do: 1. Eyes are watching. 2. Ears are listening 3. Lips are closed 4. Hands are still 5. Feet are quiet Not only is this poster listed in the front of the room, but Miss Pavelich also states it out loud

when she wishes to gain the students attention. From my time spent in Miss Pavelich‟s classroom, it is apparent that the students behave very well and have prior knowledge regarding how to act in the classroom. When she uses this signal to gain attention, it does not necessarily mean that she used it because a student was misbehaving, rather as a means to get students attention to move on to the next activity. What attention signal do the students use? To receive attention from Miss Pavelich the students raise their hands.

Miss Pavelich recognizes appropriate/inappropriate behavior through observing the students, as well as addressing it out loud and through the „Behavior Notecard Pockets‟.

6. Appropriate/Inappropriate Behavior:

How does the teacher recognize appropriate/inappropriate behavior?

Miss Pavelich recognizes appropriate/inappropriate behavior through

observing the students, as well as addressing it out loud and through the „Behavior Notecard Pockets‟. How does the teacher deliver positive reinforcement for desired behavior? To recognize desired behavior, Miss Pavelich provides rewards, in the form of tickets, and positive incentives.

Ex: When students are returning to their seats after small group reading time, Miss Pavelich addresses a student’s appropriate behavior through encouraging incentives.   “I like how ___ is sitting.” “I like how ___ got out his reading book and is beginning to read.” What are the consequence(s) for inappropriate behavior? The consequences for inappropriate behavior are a minor intervention, such as addressing the misbehavior out loud/verbal warning (“___,

will you please not talk during this time?”) and if a student is misbehaving a great deal, Miss Pavelich turns their color card from green to the color choice she deems appropriate. What incentives for behavior are used in the room? What minor interventions does the teacher use? Reward bucks and positive reinforcement and notification She gently corrects students on their undesired behavior.  Ex Miss Pavelich politely asks students to “shhh” when they are getting too loud.  Ex: Miss Pavelich states out loud to “Give me five”. What moderate interventions does the teacher use? During my time in Miss Pavelich‟s class I have never seen her use a moderate intervention on a student. However, she did inform me that she follows through with the changing of the color on the behavior chart. What extensive interventions does the teacher use? During my time in Miss Pavelich‟s class I have also never seen her use an extensive intervention on a student. However, she clarified that she would provide the student with a negative incentive, including:

Changing of their color on the color chart

  

Loss of recess Call home (In extreme cases) Suspension

7. Transitions:

Describe how the teacher transitions into the lesson.

The students in Miss Pavelich‟s class are already aware of what is expected of them in regards to the transitioning between lessons. With that in mind, Miss Pavelich is able to transition into a lesson by merely explaining what they will be doing during that time frame and then encouraging the students to carry that out. Actually, Miss Pavelich transitions throughout the entirety of the lesson using this method of providing the students with step by step instructions of what to do and the knowledge that students already know what is expected of them. Occasionally, I have also witnessed Miss

Pavelich write step by step instructions on what to do during the instruction, on the board. These instructions are listed in an easily read manner, in a (typically) 1-3 format. She begins the lesson in a variety of formats including:  Asking students to recall what they can from a previous lesson.  Asking students a question that will lead in to the lesson. Describe how the teacher transitions within the lesson. Miss Pavelich is able to transition within a lesson through a direct method of explaining to the students what they will be doing next.  Ex: “Now I would like you to take out your book and listen for the vocabulary words listed in the story.” (during a reading of story in their language arts book) In addition to that method, occasionally Miss Pavelich will write step by step instructions of what to do during the instruction, on the board. Students are expected to (and be able to) follow these directions and complete anything

listed on the board. If the transition is shifting towards small group/individual work activity, Miss Pavelich will state how much time they have to do whatever activity they are engaging in and will set the timer according to that time limit. Describe how the teacher transitions at the end of the lesson. The end of the lesson is quite similar to the transitioning in the beginning and middle portions of the lesson. Very specifically, Miss Pavelich gives step by step instructions orally, on the board, or both and the students are expected to follow. Miss Pavelich also uses a timer with a buzzer, so that the students will be aware that the end of the lesson has arrived via the buzzing noise. If she needs to transition at the end of a whole group lesson, she simply states what they must do next. However, if it is at the end of free time, independent/small group work, the buzzer usually goes off and she gains their attention by saying “Give me five”. Once that has been completed, then she moves on to orally stating what they do next.

Describe how the teacher transitions between lessons.

Miss Pavelich is very organized and has the daily class schedule listed in her classroom. As a result, the students are aware of what they have to do each day. However, Miss Pavelich also orally states what her next instruction will be.

Describe how the teacher transitions into next lesson.

Miss Pavelich is able to transition into a lesson by merely explaining what they will be doing during that time frame and then encouraging the students to carry that out. As she states this, depending on what type of lesson it is, she will also usually depict how much time the students have to work during this specific time frame. Very rarely, if the directions are listed on the board and if the previous lesson included small group/individual work, the students understand that when the timer goes off they know to look at the schedule listed on the board and carry out the next activity. However, I have only witnessed this occur once as she also usually vocally states what will entail during the upcoming lesson.

Course Grade

/30 (Total Points Possible

Miss Genell Pavelich’s second grade class Class List Suffield Elementary School

View from back of classroom

View from front of classroom

Right side of room – Reading Area

Left side of room – Computer Center

Rear right – Lockers & Reading Carpet

Rubric 3: Field Management Description
[ 3 = Accomplished; 2 = Acceptable; 1 = Needs Improvement ]

Candidates will create a classroom management description/report that they will use in their field placement. They will develop this plan by answering the questions in Appendix D as they participate as an observer during Week 7 in the classroom. Candidates will take notes according to the guidelines provided for this assignment in Appendix D and write up their observations in a report. This report should be typed, using the headings identified for each section and responding as much as possible to the questions provided. Rubric: Missing = 0: feature is missing. Needs Improvement = 1 SelfAssessment Points Instructor Points

Feature

Acceptable = 2

Accomplished = 3

A. Introduction & Room Arrangement

Incomplete description of field placement and classroom arrangement

Introduction includes a basic description of field placement that is missing one or more elements. A map of the classroom is provided that displays room arrangement.

Introduction includes a complete description of field placement that includes name of school, grade level, teacher, and number of students. A detailed map of the classroom is provided that clearly displays room arrangement as well as traffic patterns.

3

B. Classroom Rules

The posted classroom rules are included.

The posted classroom rules are included as well as a description of the location of these rules.

The posted classroom rules are included as well as a description of the location of these rules and information as to how they were developed.

3

C. Teacher Procedures

Incomplete description of the classroom teacher procedures

Narrative is missing one or more elements of the classroom teacher procedures.

Narrative provides a detailed and complete description of the classroom teacher procedures.

3

D. Instructional Activities

Incomplete report of the instructional activities

A basic report of the instructional activities is provided that is missing one or more elements of the teacher‟s facilitation of student attention, participation, staying on task, and completion of tasks.

A comprehensive report of the instructional activities is provided that includes the teacher‟s facilitation of student attention, participation, staying on task, and completion of tasks.

3

E. Monitoring Student Behavior

Incomplete report of monitoring student behavior

A basic report of monitoring student behavior that is missing one or more of the elements of the formation and monitoring of groups.

A comprehensive report of monitoring student behavior is provided that includes the formation of groups and monitoring individual, small group, and whole group work.

3

F. Interventions for Appropriate/ Inappropriat e Behavior

Incomplete narrative concerning teacher‟s management of appropriate/inappr opriate student behavior

Narrative that is missing one or more elements of the description of teacher‟s recognition of appropriate/ inappropriate student behavior and incentives as well as interventions used.

Comprehensive narrative that describes teacher‟s recognition of appropriate/inappropriate student behavior and incentives as well as interventions used.

3

G. Transitions

Incomplete narrative concerning teacher transitions

Narrative that is missing one or more elements of the description of teacher transitions into, within, and at the end of a lesson as well as

Comprehensive narrative that provides a description of teacher transitions into, within, and at the end of a lesson as well as between lessons and into next lesson.

3

between lessons and into next lesson.

H. Guidelines, Organization , Mechanics, and Conventions

Fails to follow assignment guidelines/Poorly organized; several violations of spelling and/or grammar

Follows assignment guidelines/Organized content presented with clarity of expression; appropriate language skills (grammar, spelling) used throughout; very few violations of spelling and/or grammar

Follows assignment guidelines /Well-organized content presented with clarity of expression; appropriate language skills (grammar, spelling) used throughout; error-free narrative; double spaced, 12 point font

3

TOTAL (24 PTS. POSSIBLE)

24

Course Grade 1.25 x instructor total points = course grade Course Grade /30 (Total Points Possible)

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