www.hopewellsun.

com
SEPTEMBER 26-OCTOBER 2, 2012
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Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Classified . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-15
Editorials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
INSIDE THIS ISSUE
High school ranking
School is number one public
school in county. PAGE 3
Special to The Sun
Member of the United States Pony Club (USPC) and eighth grader at the Waldorf School of Princeton Fiona Crawford successfully completed the 2012 USPC Championships
East Tetrathlon in Lexington, Va., in July, where she placed first.
Local No. 1 in nation in tetrathlon
BY HEATHER FIORE
The Hopewell Sun
Although only an eighth grad-
er at the Waldorf School in
Princeton, Hopewell resident
Fiona Crawford beat out many of
the country’s best athletes at the
2012 United States Pony Club
(USPC) Championships East
Tetrathlon in Lexington, Va.,
from July 25 through July 28, and
is now ranked in first place over-
all.
Crawford has been a member
of the Amwell Valley Hounds
Pony Club, which is part of the
USPC, since she was 9 years old.
Since members must be 11 years
old to compete in the Champi-
onships, this was only Crawford’s
second year competing.
Each year, members of the
USPC prepare for several
tetrathlons, which are essentially
two or three-day marathons, de-
pending on the level of competi-
tion (state or national), that in-
volve running, swimming, air
rifle shooting and horseback rid-
ing.
At a tetrathlon, each discipline
– running, swimming, shooting,
and riding – has 1,100 points. De-
pending on a number of factors,
including performance and tim-
ing, each competitor is allotted a
certain number of points for each
sport, which are then combined
at the end for an overall score.
At the Championships East
this year, Crawford pulled
through and took home first place
with 3,749 points, beating all of
the Novice girls (her level at
USPC) and the Intermediate and
Junior girls (the levels above her
at USPC) who participated.
“I got first overall in half of the
country, but then we looked up
scores from the other half of the
country (Championships West)
because you’re ranked by points,
and I got first there, too, so I’m
first overall in the country,”
Crawford said.
Since the USPC has such an ex-
pansive list of members, it also
holds another national competi-
tion for the West called the Cham-
pionships West, which Crawford
is referring to. She beat the first-
place winner of the West by well
over 1,000 points.
During the Championships,
Crawford participated in three
days of competition. On the first
day, she had five rounds of shoot-
please see CRAWFORD, page 9
2 THE HOPEWELL SUN — SEPTEMBER 26-OCTOBER 2, 2012
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Born in Kenya, the grand-
daughter and daughter of notable
Kenyan tea professionals,
founder of Royal Tea of Kenya
Joy Njuguna will share with us
the wonderful stories of growing
up on the tea farm, as well as the
tea production history of Kenya
and tastings of some of the most
unique teas known, including
Grandpa’s Anytime Tea, a tea
named after her grandfather and
the inspiration for her founding
Royal Tea of Kenya so that she
could share the teas of her her-
itage with the world. Grandpa
Arthur, at 111 years old, is still ac-
tively involved in the tea produc-
tion on his ancestral land, mak-
ing him the oldest tea farmer in
the world.
Njuguna will share stories of
the struggles of tea farmers over
the years and the eventual estab-
lishment of one of the largest tea
agencies in the world, which was
set up to protect the rights of the
small scale tea farmers in Kenya.
Her father Samuel is hailed as
Kenya’s tea warrior and fought
for the rights of tea farmers for
years and was a leader in the
movement to privatize the farm-
ers.
Njuguna and Shirlene Davis (a
native of New Jersey) are the
Talk about tea at Paint
the Roses on Oct. 5
please see TEA, page 4
SEPTEMBER 26-OCTOBER 2, 2012 –THE HOPEWELL SUN 3
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BY HEATHER FIORE
The Hopewell Sun
In its September issue, New
Jersey Monthly ranked Hopewell
Valley Central High School
(HVCHS) No. 31 on its list of the
state’s Top 100 Public High
Schools, making it the magazine’s
top-ranked public high school in
Mercer County.
New Jersey Monthly devised
the list, which is based on data re-
ported by the schools to the De-
partment of Education for the
2010-2011 school year, using a new
methodology.
New Jersey Monthly made
three distinctive changes when
compiling this year’s rankings –
use of the new four-year adjusted
cohort graduation rate that was
introduced by New Jersey in 2011
and mandated by the federal gov-
ernment, elimination of stu-
dent/computer ratio as a factor,
and the increase of weighting for
data on test results and the afore-
mentioned graduation-rate calcu-
lation.
The magazine detailed the rea-
soning for these changes, which
place more importance on class
size, graduation rate and test re-
sults.
In the past, with regard to the
graduation rate, the rankings dis-
tinguished between students
going on to four-year colleges,
two-year colleges, and postsec-
ondary schools. The data for stu-
dents going to four-year colleges
was given extra weight, making it
a crucial factor in the outcome of
results; however, this year’s rank-
ings were based on the new “four-
year graduation rate,” which puts
more emphasis on the number of
students in each graduating class.
Also, because personal comput-
High school ranked number
one public school in county
please see METHODOLOGY, page 5
4 THE HOPEWELL SUN — SEPTEMBER 26-OCTOBER 2, 2012
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A unique fall festival where
visitors earn their share of the
harvest will take place at Howell
Living History Farm during the
weekend of Oct. 6 and Oct. 7.
The Farm’s 28th Annual Fall
Festival is reminiscent of a time
when giant threshing rigs rum-
bled through the Mercer country-
side stopping at farms to help
families thresh their wheat. Visi-
tors to this festival take on the
role of “helping neighbors,” join-
ing farmers as they plant, thresh,
winnow and grind wheat.
Special maps with correspon-
ding field markers are used to
guide visitors to areas where they
can watch or help with the har-
vest before sampling the finished
product – freshly baked wheat
bread. Visitors who have their
maps stamped at each of six
“Help-the-Farmer” stations will
take home their share of the har-
vest – a bag of freshly milled
whole wheat flour complete with
recipe.
A highlight of this year’s festi-
val will be a threshing operation
powered by a 10-ton Case steam
engine. Children can help the en-
gineer carry wood and water
needed to run the big steamer.
In keeping with the festival’s
theme, “A Celebration of Wheat,”
there will be a whole wheat bake
sale, crafts and wheat straw
wagon rides. The Jugtown Moun-
tain String Band will provide live
music during the Saturday pro-
gram.
A children’s craft program,
“Pumpkin Decorating,” will be
held from 11 a.m. until 3 p.m. on
Saturday, and from noon until 3
p.m. on Sunday. The cost of deco-
rations for the craft is $2. Pump-
kins are sold according to size.
Howell Farm is located on Val-
ley Road in Hopewell Township,
just off Rt. 29, two miles south of
Lambertville. Hours are 10 a.m.
until 4 p.m. Tuesday through Sat-
urday, and noon until 4 p.m. on
Sunday. Parking and admission
are free. For more information,
call (609) 737-3299 or visit www.
howellfarm.org or www.mercer
county.org.
principal partners at Royal Tea of
Kenya. Njuguna is the founder
and COO acting as the primary li-
aison between Kenya and the U.S.
retailers. Davis is chief of staff
and works tirelessly to ensure
that the quality of the teas is un-
rivaled and is responsible for the
branding of their products.
Please join us on Friday, Oct. 5,
at 5:30 p.m. at the Tea-For-All
Shoppe at Paint the Roses Tea
House and Café located at 37 West
Broad Street in Hopewell for a
private tea tasting. She invites all
tea lovers to have the chance of
experiencing her specialized teas,
including purple tea – tea that is
exclusively Kenyan, extremely
healthy, and very tasty.
The event will cost $30 and will
include Njuguna’s presentation,
tasting, samples, buffet, taxes and
gratuities. Please reserve a spot
by calling (609) 466-8200 or (609)
577-8038, or by emailing debo-
rah.TeaForALL@gmail.com.
Fall festival coming up
TEA
Continued from page 2
Tea event planned for Oct. 5
ers have become widespread
among the high school popula-
tion, New Jersey Monthly elimi-
nated student/computer ratio as
a factor. Rather, it increased the
weighting for data on test results
and the new graduation-rate cal-
culation; the change in weighting
is intended to emphasize the im-
portance of student results in a
time of budget cutting, which is
essentially shown to see which
schools did more with less.
Because the methodology was
tweaked for this year’s list, an as-
sortment of schools on the list ei-
ther rose or dropped drastically.
HVCHS, which was ranked No.
38 in 2010, rose seven spots to No.
31, which is something that the
school staff and residents are
happy about.
“My staff and I are very proud
that our high school is ranked
31st out of 328 high schools in
New Jersey,” HVCHS Principal
Michael Daher said. “It’s well-de-
served recognition for our teach-
ing and support staff and for our
students, who work together very
hard to make our school a special
place.”
Superintendent Tom Smith
echoed Daher’s comments, and
explained how Hopewell’s school
district takes these rankings into
account.
“We always tend to take these
rankings with a grain of salt be-
cause different rankings use dif-
ferent methodologies, so we don’t
think about how we’re going to do
on the rankings when were devel-
oping revisions or developing
programs,” he said. “However, we
do look to balance our class sizes
and the rigor of our programs
and opportunities for our kids to
succeed. This ranking we im-
proved because of the efforts
we’ve been able to sustain over
the last couple of years through
our school performance and grad-
uation rate.”
Smith further detailed how
HVCHS is one of the few compre-
hensive high schools in the area,
with a wood shop and auto shop
on school grounds, and explained
how important it is to support
every student “no matter what
they’re going and what they’re
doing.”
“We have more kids going to
college, and by the number of AP
classes, we’ve done a lot of work
in expanding those opportunity
for students,” he said. “For us, it’s
about taking every student and
supporting them where they are
and challenging them and provid-
ing them the support so they can
be whomever they want to be.”
SEPTEMBER 26-OCTOBER 2, 2012 –THE HOPEWELL SUN 5
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METHODOLOGY
Continued from page 3
Methodology changed for rankings
6 THE HOPEWELL SUN — SEPTEMBER 26-OCTOBER 2, 2012
20 Nassau Street, Suite 26A
Princeton, NJ 08542
609-751-0245
The Sun is published weekly by Elauwit
Media LLC, 20 Nassau Street, Suite 26A,
Princeton, NJ 08542. It is mailed weekly to
select addresses in the 08560, 08525 and
08534 ZIP codes. If you are not on the mail-
ing list, six-month subscriptions are avail-
able for $39.99. PDFs of the publication are
online, free of charge. For information,
please call 609-751-0245.
To submit a news release, please email
news@hopewellsun.com. For advertising
information, call 609-751-0245 or email
advertising@hopewellsun.com. The Sun
welcomes suggestions and comments from
readers – including any information about
errors that may call for a correction to be
printed.
SPEAK UP
The Sun welcomes letters from readers. Brief
and to the point is best, so we look for letters
that are 300 words or fewer. Include your
name, address and phone number. We do not
print anonymous letters. Send letters to
news@hopewellsun.com, via fax at 609-751-
0245, or via the mail. Of course, you can drop
them off at our office, too. The Hopewell Sun
reserves the right to reprint your letter in any
medium – including electronically.
PUBLISHER Steve Miller
GENERAL MANAGER & EDITOR Alan Bauer
VICE PRESIDENT OF SALES Joe Eisele
NEWS
MANAGING EDITOR Mary L. Serkalow
PRODUCTION EDITOR Kristen Dowd
HOPEWELL EDITOR Heather Fiore
OPERATIONS
DIGITAL MEDIA DIRECTOR Tim Ronaldson
ART DIRECTOR Tom Engle
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD Russell Cann
CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Barry Rubens
VICE CHAIRMAN Michael LaCount, Ph.D.
ELAUWIT MEDIA GROUP
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD Dan McDonough, Jr.
VICE CHAIRMAN Alan Bauer
G
ov. Christie’s long list of ethics
reforms has a fair number
that simply make sense. Prob-
lem is, state politicians can’t get past
the politics to enact them.
The governor, in his usual over-the-
top fashion, recently released a list of
reforms that, he says, have been sitting
around Trenton longer than the movie
“Titanic” was in theaters. And that’s a
shame, because some of these reforms
should be no-brainers.
The list includes:
A ban on dual office-holding. One po-
litical office is enough.
A ban on dual employment for all
state county and local officials and em-
ployees. Again, one government job in
New Jersey is enough.
Pension forfeiture for public officials
convicted of crimes that involve or
touch upon the public office. OK, if
you steal from the government, you
don’t get your government pension.
That, too, makes a lot of sense.
A rule that prohibits the use of cam-
paign funds for criminal defense costs.
That’s pretty much self-explanatory,
too. We’re guessing donors had other
things in mind when they wrote
checks other than helping out their fa-
vorite, yet criminally accused, candi-
date for public office.
These are just a few of the measures
the governor says have been hanging
around Trenton for hundreds of days.
The question is: Why? Who is opposed
to these ideas? Or, more likely, what
other politically charged ideas are
these tied to, which, effectively, kill the
chance of these measures getting en-
acted?
People are tired of talk. They want
action. Christie and the Democrats
have shown in the past that they can
work together and make reasonable
compromises. Education reform is a
good example.
We’d like to see the same approach
here. Pick the reform issues that every-
one can agree upon. Pass them. And
then go back to argue the ones that
aren’t so clear.
in our opinion
Ethics reform or politics?
A lot of common-sense reforms are just sitting in place
Ethics reform
We’d like to see the governor and
Democrats come together on some
common-sense ethics measures that
have been sitting around for far too
long.
letters to the editor
Writer: Lawns look nice, but
do not serve community well
While I agree with some of the state-
ments about lawns in this (Sept. 19 through
Sept. 25) issue, I also take exception to oth-
ers.
It is not accurate to say that lawns
“maintain soil permeability.” Any engi-
neer will tell you that lawns, while not as
problematic as blacktop, are classified as
impervious surfaces.
It defies common sense to say they “play
a critical role in conserving water.” In ad-
dition to their poor permeability, they
often require a great deal of watering, es-
pecially for people who demand green per-
fection.
Natural meadow plantings or plain old
leaf litter do a far better job of allowing
precipitation to recharge the soil and the
aquifer.
Then there are the herbicides, insecti-
cides, and chemical fertilizers, many of
which run off into our headwater streams
or soak into the ground and ultimately into
our drinking water supply.
Lawns may be nice to look at, but they
do not serve the community well.
Andrea M. Bonette
Presentation on Danube set
for Oct. 3 at train station
Local Hopewell resident, Roseline Flem-
ing, will be giving a talk and slide presenta-
tion showcasing the beauty and history of
the Danube while touring through Ger-
many, Austria and Hungary.
The event is Wednesday, Oct. 3, at 7 p.m.
at the Hopewell Train Station, part of the
Hopewell Pubic Library’s “Wednesday
Night Out” series. This event is free and
open to the public.
Life of Lenape Indians topic
at luncheon on Oct. 5
“Life of the Lenape Indians in New Jer-
sey” is the topic for the Friday, Oct. 5
Brown Bag Luncheon at the Pennington
Presbyterian Church. Dr. William Guthrie
will take us into the world of the Lenape
before the “European Invasion.” Providing
actual artifacts for examination, he will de-
scribe how the Lenape made common tools
and used them in everyday life.
The brown bag lunch is at 12:30 p.m.,
with fruit, dessert and beverages provided
by the church’s Older Adult Ministry Com-
mittee. The presentation begins at 1 p.m.
The public is welcome and encouraged to
attend.
BRIEFS
SEPTEMBER 26-OCTOBER 2, 2012 –THE HOPEWELL SUN 7
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The Foundation of Morris Hall/St. Lawrence Inc. PRESENTS
WITH SPECIAL GUESTS
JODI BENSON SAL VIVIANO
Saturday, September 29, 2012 8:00pm
Patriots Theater at the Trenton War Memorial
Tickets: $35-$85 Visit www.thewarmemorial.com or call 609-791-9451
Patron tickets, including a Champagne Reception with Peter Nero, Ms. Benson and Mr. Viviano
can be purchased by calling 609-896-9500, ext. 2215, or jmiller@slrc.org.
Friends of Hopewell Valley
Open Space (FoHVOS) is pleased
to announce that it is celebrating
its 25th anniversary of preserv-
ing the rural character of
Hopewell Valley with a Fall Gala.
FoHVOS is a non-profit land
trust that is dedicated to preserv-
ing open space and farmland in
the Valley as well as protecting
natural resources. Since its incep-
tion in 1987, FoHVOS has part-
nered with landowners, govern-
ment and non-profit organiza-
tions to preserve over 4,000 acres
of open space and farmland. In
addition to continuing to protect
land in the Valley, FoHVOS is an
active land steward, with a focus
on not only protecting biodiversi-
ty but also committed to protect-
ing public access to open space.
The Fall Gala will be held on
Saturday, Oct. 6, under the tent at
the Hopewell Valley Vineyards on
Yard Road in Hopewell Township.
Cocktails begin at 6 p.m., featur-
ing locally grown and produced
wines and entertainment provid-
ed by locally grown singer/song-
writer Sara Lewis. A dinner will
follow at 7:30 p.m.
FoHVOS is excited to feature
New York-based Sara Lewis at the
Gala. She is a graduate of
Hopewell Valley Central High
School and has recently released
her first album, “Birds without
Cages.” There will be a live auc-
tion featuring a getaway to Col-
orado, a weekend getaway in New
York City, a dinner party, a wine
tasting party, and much more.
Tickets are $100. Information and
online tickets can be found at
http://fohvos.org.
Fall gala set for Oct. 6
Parents Anonymous/
Family Helpline
(800) 843-5437
PSA
WEDNESDAY SEPT. 26
Movies for Adults: Watch “A Joyful
Noise” from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. or
from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at
Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. Rated
PG-13.
THURSDAY SEPT. 27
Hopewell Township Planning Board
meeting: 7:30 p.m. the fourth
Thursday of the month in the
Municipal Auditorium. For more
information visit hopewelltwp.
org.
SUNDAY SEPT. 30
Hopewell Presbyterian Church:
Worship service at 10:30 a.m.
Intergenerational Sunday School
from 9 to 10:15 a.m. Coffee fellow-
ship from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
80 West Broad St., Hopewell.
Hopewell United Methodist
Church: Worship service at 10
a.m. Teen/adult education from 9
to 9:45 a.m. Sunday school at 10
a.m. Youth group at 6:30 p.m. 20
Blackwell Ave., Hopewell.
St. Alphonsus Roman Catholic
Church: Mass at 7:30, 9 and 11:15
a.m. 54 East Prospect St.,
Hopewell.
Word Christian Fellowship Interna-
tional: Worship service at 10 a.m.
Sunday school at 10:30 a.m. 44
Van Dyke Road, Hopewell.
MONDAY OCT. 1
Voter Registration: 3:30 to 5 p.m.
at Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. The
League of Women Voters will be
at the library to provide informa-
tion and help register voters.
Yoga: 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. at Hopewell
Branch of the Mercer County
Library System. Bring yoga mat
or large towel. Registration
required; call (609) 737-2610.
Tai Chi: 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. at
Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. Learn
this ancient art to promote good
health and relaxation. No regis-
tration required.
Story time: 10:30 a.m. at Hopewell
Public Library. For toddlers and
pre-schoolers. Stories, songs and
fingerplays. Registration is not
required.
Getting Comfortable with Comput-
ers: 1 p.m. at the Hopewell Public
Library. Get comfortable with
computers, the Internet, the
World Wide Web and the digital
world. The library’s technologist
will answer questions, provide
demonstrations and guide partic-
ipants.
TUESDAY OCT. 2
Hopewell Seniors Connect:
Google+: It’s More than a Social
Network: 10 to 11 a.m. at Hopewell
Branch of the Mercer County
Library System. Explore the ins
and outs of Google+, including
creating circles of friends,
uploading (and editing) photo-
graphs and video chatting with
multiple people in a hangout. This
program is open to all ages and
no registration is necessary.
Yoga: 5 to 6 p.m. at Hopewell Branch
of the Mercer County Library Sys-
tem. Bring yoga mat or large tow-
el. Registration required; call
(609) 737-2610.
Going Solar 101: Leasing vs. Buy-
ing, Incentives and Technology
Overview: 7 to 8 p.m. at Hopewell
Branch of the Mercer County
Library System. Independent
Solar will provide an overview of
how a solar array works, explain
what a solar lease is and how it
differs from an outright pur-
chase, review the process of
going solar in New Jersey and
answer questions.
Hopewell Township Agricultural
Advisory Committee meeting:
7:30 p.m. at the Township Build-
ing first Tuesday of the month.
Public is invited. For more infor-
mation contact: Lucia Huebner at
466-0277 or
lucia@doorposter.com; or John
Hart at 737-2008 or
ihart89@aol.com.
CALENDAR PAGE 8 SEPTEMBER 26-OCTOBER 2, 2012
Please Join Dr. Roderick Kaufmann &
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307 Omni Drive
Hillsborough
908-281-6633
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Monroe Twp.
609-655-4544
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2 Tree Farm Road
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609-737-4491
Visit us online at www.hopewellsun.com
ing at a piece of paper that was
half the size of a piece of comput-
er paper from 30 feet away. On the
second day, she had to ride
through a pre-determined course
and successfully land nine jumps
and two walking actions off of
her horse, and then she had to
swim 100 meters. Lastly, on the
third day, she had to run 1,000 me-
ters, and then ride another course
on her horse with the same re-
quirements as the second day.
And, to top it off, Crawford
woke up sick with a fever on the
last day of competition, but decid-
ed to persevere to the end.
Crawford believes that her im-
provement this year is a direct re-
sult of being experienced.
“Last year, I got sixth overall,”
she said. “I think the reason I got
first is because I was just more
ready. It was really confusing last
year because it’s so big; there’s so
many horses, times, schedules,
and I think after you’ve done it
once, it should be much easier. I
think that’s why it was so easy for
me.”
This year, Crawford also placed
first in New Jersey at the state
competition with a total of 4,040
points out of the 4,400 possible
points.
“I definitely feel like I’m more
prepared now,” she said.
Now, as Crawford prepares to
“level up” to the Juniors level in
the USPC (the next level) – the or-
ganization ranks riders by levels,
depending on their experience
and knowledge – she’s concentrat-
ed on obtaining a horse that is
able to jump higher, since that’s
one of the requirements.
“Swimming and running will
be longer be her hurdle,” Craw-
ford’s mother Jennifer Curtis
said. “Our hurdle, as a family, will
be figuring out an opportunity for
her to ride a horse that can jump
that high.”
As if Crawford’s placing isn’t
impressive enough, she also tack-
les a feat that the majority of rid-
ers don’t even have to worry
about – riding a different horse
every time she competes in a com-
petition. Since Crawford doesn’t
have her own, personal horse, she
basically adapts to any horse that
is provided to her at the state and
national competitions.
The current horse that she
rides can only jump 2’9, which is
the required height that she
needs to be able to jump at the
level she’s on now, however, next
year she is going to have to be
able to jump 3’3, so the hunt for a
new horse has commenced.
In the mean time, while riding
is temporarily on hold, Crawford
is focusing on cross-country at
the Waldorf School, but is already
looking forward to the future of
her optimistic athletic career.
“Right now, I’m in cross-coun-
try for my school, but next year
when I go to high school, I want to
do track,” she said. “I think cross-
country is great training, but for
me personally, I like sprinting.”
SEPTEMBER 26-OCTOBER 2, 2012 –THE HOPEWELL SUN 9
NOT ENOUGH TIME
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NEED SUPPORT?
Compassionate
CounseIing and
Psychotherapy for
InfertiIity
Depression
Anxiety
Trauma
Post-Traumatic Stress
Chronic Pain
Grief & Loss
ReIationships
Major Life Transitions
Stress Management
Addiction & Recovery
CRAWFORD
Continued from page 1
Crawford feels prepared
The death of a loved one is like-
ly the single most difficult chal-
lenge that humans experience.
Grief is universal, and the nat-
ural confusion of emotions often
leaves one feeling overwhelmed.
The need to find new meaning in
living, developing, and improving
relationships is pivotal to regain-
ing normalcy. Support groups as-
sist individuals in expressing, un-
derstanding, and coping with
their emotions.
Within a trusting safe environ-
ment, participants are encour-
aged to explore their reactions to
loss, learn about the grieving
process, develop strategies for
coping, and begin to integrate
this change into their lives in
order to move forward.
A grief support group is being
offered at the Hopewell Borough
Hall located at 88 East Broad
Street in Hopewell. The group
will begin on Monday, Oct. 15, and
will run until Nov. 26 from 1 to
2:30 p.m. There will be no group
on Nov. 5 or 11.
The group will be facilitated by
Davida Barr, LSW of Community
Education and Outreach of
Greenwood House. This group is
sponsored by Greenwood House,
a nonprofit, nonsectarian organi-
zation providing care and servic-
es to seniors. Registration is re-
quired by calling (609) 737-0605,
ext. 692, or by emailing
awaugh@hopewelltwp.org.
Grief support group set to begin on Oct. 15
Addiction Hotline
of New Jersey
(800) 238-2333
PSA
National Youth
Crisis Hotline
(800) 448-4663
PSA
This information was provided
to The Sun by the Hopewell Town-
ship Police Department:
On Sept. 7 at 6:27 p.m., Officer
Lincoln Karnoff responded to
Route 31 at the intersection of
Route 612 for the report of a
three-car motor vehicle crash. A
52-year-old male driving a 2001
Chevrolet Cobalt was stopped in
the northbound lane waiting to
make a left turn onto Route 612.
His car was struck in the rear by
a 2009 Lincoln MKS being driven
by a 51-year-old male. This impact
forced the first vehicle into the
southbound lane where it struck
a 2007 Toyota Corolla driven by a
65-year-old male. The 52-year-old
male suffered neck pain and was
transported to a local hospital by
the Hopewell First Aid Squad.
The 51-year-old male received a
summons for careless driving,
which will be heard in municipal
court.
On Sept. 7 at 6:59 p.m., Officer
Michael Toth responded to Aval-
on Road for the report of a motor
vehicle crash. An 89-year-old fe-
male driving a 2010 Buick along
Avalon Road jumped a curb and
struck a mailbox in front of a pri-
vate residence. She received sum-
monses for careless driving and
driving while suspended, which
will be heard in municipal court.
She was not injured.
On Sept. 10 at 11:28 p.m., Officer
Kevin Koveloski responded to the
Hopewell Bistro for the report of
an assault. Officer Koveloski ar-
rived and found a 22-year-old
Hopewell Township man with fa-
cial injuries. The man reported
that he had been assaulted in the
restroom by a male with brown
hair. This unidentified man was
gone prior to police arrival. The
injured man was transported by
the Hopewell First Aid Squad to a
local hospital where he was treat-
ed and later released.
On Sept. 6 at 2:35 p.m., Officer
William Gaskill responded to a
Lambertville Hopewell Road ad-
dress for the report of an assault.
An investigation found that a 19-
year-old male had physically as-
saulted a 15-year-old boy at the
residence causing minor injuries
to him. During the investigation,
the 19-year-old grabbed Officer
Gaskill, elbowed him in the chest,
and attempted to push him down.
After a brief struggle, Officer
Gaskill and Officer Sara Erwin
took the man into custody. He was
transported to police headquar-
ters for processing where he was
charged with simple assault on
the 15-year-old boy and aggravat-
ed assault on a police officer. He
was later released after being ar-
raigned in municipal court. This
case will be forwarded to the Mer-
cer County Prosecutor’s Office for
review.
On Sept. 8 at 2:05 p.m., Officer
Robert Sparano responded to a Di-
verty Road address for the report
of an attempted theft. A resident
reported that a 17-year-old male
had attempted to take a bicycle
from a neighbor’s property. The
boy dropped the bicycle and ran
toward Route 31 when confronted
by the neighbor. Officer Sparano
found the teenage boy moments
later walking along Pennington
Road. After further investigation,
the boy was placed under arrest
and processed at police headquar-
ters. The boy was charged with
theft and criminal attempt, which
will be heard in Family Court.
On Sept. 5 at 3:10 p.m., Officer
William Gaskill responded to
West Broad Street at the intersec-
tion of North Lanning for the re-
port of a struck bicyclist. An in-
vestigation found that an 11-year-
old Hopewell Borough girl at-
tempted to cross Broad Street
near Lanning Avenue while a car
was traveling westbound through
the intersection. A 2004 Mercedes
Benz, driven by a 64-year-old fe-
male, struck the rear tire of the
bicycle causing the girl to fall off
of the bicycle onto the ground.
The girl was transported by the
Hopewell First Aid Squad to a
local hospital where she was
treated for minor injuries and
later released. The driver of the
vehicle wasn’t injured. Further
investigation found that the bicy-
clist didn’t stop at the stop sign on
Lanning Avenue as required and
proceeded into the intersection in
front of the Mercedes, which had
the right of way. A painted cross-
walk was located just east of this
crash but was not utilized by the
bicyclist. No summonses were is-
sued.
10 THE HOPEWELL SUN — SEPTEMBER 26-OCTOBER 2, 2012
Now Enrolling For Fall
ACCEPTING
NEW STUDENTS
Intersection Routes 518 & 601
Skillman
Call 908-285-5331
www.peridotartstudio.com
Visit us online at www.hopewellsun.com
police report
National Suicide
Prevention Lifeline
(800) 273-8255
PSA
Pet Friends – Grief
support for pet owners
(800) 404-7387
PSA
SEPTEMBER 26-OCTOBER 2, 2012 –THE HOPEWELL SUN 11
Come Dance With Us!
THERE'S STILL TIME TO REGISTER!
CLASSES
STARTING!
www.artsparksstudio.com • email : info@artsparksstudio.com
(609) 466-5437
33 Railroad Place, Hopewell Borough right across from Railroad Station
Find Your Inner Art Spark at
• Art Classes
• Parties
• Workshops
• Camps
Register Now for Fall Classes
Ages 18 months – 10 years
Learn! Explore! Create! Get Messy! Grow!
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Special to The Sun
Hopewell Valley Soccer Association’s (HVSA) U-8 Bolts started the season with an exciting away
game on Saturday, Sept. 15, that ended with a 1-1 tie. Above, Nathan Haldeman and Kevin Ellis run
to assist Bryce Ansari, with the ball, and Shane Finnegan. U-8 is the youngest travel team with the
HVSA and is comprised of players ages 7 to 8.
Strong start to season for U-8 Bolts
20 Nassau Street
Princeton, NJ 08542
609.751.0245
elauwit.com
20 Nassau Street | Princeton, NJ 08542
609-751-0245 | sales@elauwit.com | www.elauwit.com
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Lawrence
Montgomery
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T HE HO P E WE L L S U N
SEPTEMBER 26-OCTOBER 2, 2012 PAGE 14
W H A T Y O U N E E D T O K N O W
All ads are based on a 5 line ad, 15-18 characters per line. • Additional lines: $9, Bold/Reverse Type: $9 • Add color to any box ad for $20. • Deadline: Wednesday - 5pm for the following week.
All classified ads must be prepaid. • Your Classified ad will run in all 10 of The Sun newspapers each week! • Be sure to check your ad the first day it appears.
We will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, so call us immediately with any errors in your ad. • No refunds are given, only advertising credit.
L I NE
ADS
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H O W T O C O N T A C T U S
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Hopewell Sun • Lawrence Sun
Montgomery Sun • Princeton Sun
Robbinsville Sun • West Windsor Sun
BOX
ADS Only
$
25per week List a text-only ad for your yard
sale, job posting or merchandise.
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 9/30/12.
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Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 9/30/12.
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609-882-S800
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Home Improvement
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Pet Care
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856-427-0933
Auto Services
* MD Mobile Windshield Repair *
Nationally Certified
Top Quality • Lifetime Warranty
Repairs + Replacement
Contact & Inquiries:
609-462-3692
www.mdglassrepair.com
EducationaI Services
Big FIREWOOD
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908-359-3000
856-356-2775
Board Your
Dog In A
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PIANO LESSONS
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call us at
856
427
0933.
CLASSIFIED SEPTEMBER 26-OCTOBER 2, 2012 - THE HOPEWELL SUN 15
If you’re reading your
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Special Classified offers available.
Don’t delay! Call today!
(856) 427-0933 x 512
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