www.lawrencesun.

com
SEPTEMBER 26-OCTOBER 2, 2012
FREE
Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Classified . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-11
Editorials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
INSIDE THIS ISSUE
Police dispatching
Employees, residents voice
concerns. PAGE 3
HEATHER FIORE/The Lawrence Sun
Lawrence High School varsity soccer player junior Jack Hargraves-Dix kicks the ball
down the field against one of Trenton Central’s players at the Cardinals’ home game
against Trenton Central on Sept. 13. Teammate junior Alberto Santiago is also pictured.
Soccer team
ready for season
BY HEATHER FIORE
The Lawrence Sun
As various school sports for the
fall season commence, student
athletes all over Lawrence begin
to acclimate to practice and game
schedules once again.
One team in particular –
Lawrence High School’s (LHS)
varsity boys soccer team, the
Lions – is welcoming a new coach
this year, who is ready to train,
play and win.
Brian Rostron, who was for-
merly the junior varsity (JV) soc-
cer coach for eight years, replaced
varsity coach PJ Barrett this year
since he took the role of vice prin-
cipal.
Growing up as the son of a
local soccer player, Rostron began
shadowing a soccer ball on the
field at a young age, and has kept
a strong connection to the sport
since he was in high school him-
self.
“I grew up in Hamilton and
played at West so I am pretty fa-
miliar with Lawrence's rich soc-
cer history and tradition of good
teams, players and coaches,” he
said. “I've been a youth coach
since I was 15 years old, so you
could say it’s definitely in my
blood to play and coach.”
With his new position in full
swing, Rostron is especially look-
ing to improve The Lions’ 8-8
record from last year.
“I am excited for the season,”
he said. “With it being my first
year and having a good group of
soccer players, I hope to finish
above .500 and win at least one
game in the state tournament.
Even if we don't, but every player
ends the season better than they
started and had fun, then it’s still
successful.”
Although the season only start-
ed about a month ago, Rostron
has been prepping the boys since
August and is optimistic about
this year.
“We have been playing a lot of
soccer during the preseason, and
our training sessions have been
very competitive,” he said. “We
are still focusing on playing to
our strengths, trying to limit our
mistakes, and playing strong for
80 minutes. Things are looking
good this year, but it’s still early.”
Although Rostron has a lot on
his plate this year as the new
coach and new leader, he has help
from a variety of people, includ-
ing Assistant Coach Michael Un-
derwood, JV/varsity Assistant
please see SOCCER, page 9
2 THE LAWRENCE SUN — SEPTEMBER 26-OCTOBER 2, 2012
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Branch Hours:
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Fri 8:30am-6pm
Sat 9am-1pm
150 Lawrenceville-Pennington Road
Lawrenceville, NJ 08648
(609) 620-1040 • www.1stconstitution.com
Township plans rabies
clinic for Sept. 29
The Lawrence Township
Health Department is holding a
free rabies clinic on Saturday,
Sept. 29 from 1 p.m. until 2:30 p.m.
at the National Guard Armory on
Eggert Crossing Road. For ques-
tions or additional information
about the clinic, call the animal
control officer at (609) 844-7092.
Used toys, clothing sale
to be held on Oct. 6
The PTO’s semi-annual Kids'
Used Toys and Clothing Sale is
held indoors at the Lawrenceville
Elementary School (LES), 40
Craven Lane, on Saturday, Oct. 6,
from 8 a.m. until noon. There will
be gently used seasonal (fall/win-
ter) children’s clothing newborn
to size 16, toys, bikes, books,
videos, sporting equipment, baby
gear, maternity clothing and
much more.
Over 100 families will be partic-
ipating by selling items. Cash or
checks only please.
Vatican enrichment
series begins on Oct. 3
In the context of the 50th an-
niversary of Vatican II, the
Church of Saint Ann in
Lawrenceville is inviting all
adults to a deeper study of the
teachings of the Vatican Council
II through a nine-session adult
enrichment series of discovery
and discussion, exploring the
main teachings of the Second
Vatican Council. Session one will
introduce the series, provide an
introduction to Vatican II, its his-
torical context, and explore the
major factors that gave rise to
Vatican II; it will be led by Msgr.
Vincent Gartland, and is sched-
uled for Wednesday, Oct. 3 from 7
p.m. to 8:30 p.m. in the Faith De-
velopment Center at The Church
of Saint Ann. All are welcome.
“Celebrating Vatican II” is a part
of the ongoing Faith Formation
Program and is funded in part by
the generosity of the Estate of
Mary and Peter Russo.
For more information, contact
Gary Maccaroni at (609) 882-6491,
ext. 116, or gmacc@churchofsain-
tann.net.
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Bidding for police dispatching
services met with opposition
BY HEATHER FIORE
The Lawrence Sun
At Lawrence Township’s coun-
cil meeting on Sept. 18, township
employees and residents crowded
the courtroom and voiced their
opposition to the township’s ef-
forts to gain savings by bidding
for police dispatching services
through competitive contracting.
Township Manager Richard
Krawczun introduced the idea of
competitive contracting for these
services, along with EMT servic-
es, to the council at the town-
ship’s last meeting on Sept. 4.
He explained how competitive
contracting, which is used in lieu
of public bidding, is a process
that can potentially save the tax-
payers of Lawrence Township
money.
However, he also stated that
any potential savings that are re-
ceived through the use of compet-
itive contracting would not be
able to alleviate the $725,000 budg-
et gap the township currently has
because of the way the cap law is
devised.
The majority of Lawrence
Township’s seven police dispatch-
ers attended the meeting, and
were visibly angered and upset
about the status of their jobs.
Vice president of Local Union
No. 2257 (the union that repre-
sents the white-collar workers for
Lawrence) and 10-year dispatcher
for Lawrence Township Susan
Handelman explained how Kraw-
czun approached her union and
informed them that it was their
responsibility to find $350,000 in
order to save their jobs, which she
and the other dispatchers ex-
pressed to be the township’s prob-
lem and not theirs.
“The only way possible for us
to work would be for us to work
for free, give up our benefits, and
forgo our pension contributions,”
she said. ”I wonder if any of you
would do that? I don’t think so.
And I’m also not quite sure why
we were told that we need to fig-
ure where that $350,000 should
come from.”
In response, Krawczun detailed
each of the meetings he held with
the dispatchers, and explained
how the employees have been in-
volved in the entire process and
were given ample notice of all ac-
tions taken thus far.
“I went to the employees and to
please see PRIVATIZING, page 7
Employees, residents voice concerns at meeting
4 THE LAWRENCE SUN — SEPTEMBER 26-OCTOBER 2, 2012
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NAMI Mercer NJ, an affiliate
of the National Alliance on Men-
tal Illness, will kick off Mental Ill-
ness Awareness Week (MIAW) by
hosting its fourth annual Harvest
of Hope Wellness Conference on
Saturday, Oct. 6 from 8:30 a.m. to 3
p.m. at the Presbyterian Church
of Lawrenceville. Throughout the
observance period from Oct. 7 to
Oct. 13, NAMI Mercer will con-
duct educational and anti-stigma
activities around the county.
In 1990, the U.S. Congress desig-
nated the first full week of Octo-
ber as MIAW. Since then, all levels
of NAMI – national, state and
local – have intensified their out-
reach efforts during this time. In
Mercer County this year, more
than 80 churches and synagogues
will observe MIAW by offering
special prayers for persons affect-
ed by mental illness.
On Wednesday, Oct. 10, from 5
to 6:30 p.m., NAMI Mercer will
present “In Our Own Voice”
(IOOV) at the Lawrence Public Li-
brary, 2751 Brunswick Pike
(Route 1), Lawrenceville. IOOV is
a unique public education pro-
gram, developed by NAMI, in
which two trained volunteers
share compelling personal stories
about living with mental illness
and achieving recovery. This
presentation is open to the public.
For more information, go to
www.namimercer.org or call (609)
799-8994.
Harvest of Hope Wellness
Conference is on Oct. 6
SEPTEMBER 26-OCTOBER 2, 2012 – THE LAWRENCE SUN 5
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The Foundation of Morris Hall/St. Lawrence Inc. PRESENTS
WITH SPECIAL GUESTS
JODI BENSON SAL VIVIANO
Saturday, September 29, 2012 8:00pm
Patriots Theater at the Trenton War Memorial
Tickets: $35-$85 Visit www.thewarmemorial.com or call 609-791-9451
Patron tickets, including a Champagne Reception with Peter Nero, Ms. Benson and Mr. Viviano
can be purchased by calling 609-896-9500, ext. 2215, or jmiller@slrc.org.
The next Lawrence Ewing
Trenton Girl Scouts open house
will be held on Monday, Oct. 1,
from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Ewing
Branch of the Mercer County Li-
brary. The last open house is
Tuesday, Oct. 2, from 6:30 to 8 p.m.
at the Lawrence Branch of the
Mercer County Library.
As a Girl Scout, a girl grows in
an environment that will nurture
her creativity and intellect, pro-
viding both encouragement and
resources to develop life skills
and follow her dreams. She will
have the opportunity to share ex-
periences with other girls and
form long-lasting friendships.
She will visit exciting places,
learn new things, and participate
in fun activities. In addition, Girl
Scouting gives a girl added sup-
port to build her self-confidence,
helping her become a resourceful
young woman. Just like we have
for the past 100 years, many Girl
Scouts meet in traditional troops.
Others experience Girl Scouting
through local ZIP Troops and in-
dependent scouting. Our pro-
grams begin with Daisy Girl
Scouts in kindergarten right
through Ambassadors as 12th
graders!
Can’t make it to an Open
House? No worries, you can visit
us online at www.LETGirlScouts.
com on the “Join Us” page and
complete your interest form on-
line!
Girl Scouts to host open
house on Oct. 1 and 2
6 THE LAWRENCE SUN — SEPTEMBER 26-OCTOBER 2, 2012
20 Nassau Street, Suite 26A
Princeton, NJ 08542
609-751-0245
The Sun is published weekly by Elauwit
Media LLC, 20 Nassau Street, Suite 26A,
Princeton, NJ 08542. It is mailed weekly to
select addresses in the 08648 ZIP code. If
you are not on the mailing list, six-month
subscriptions are available for $39.99. PDFs
of the publication are online, free of charge.
For information, please call 609-751-0245.
To submit a news release, please email
news@lawrencesun.com. For advertising
information, call 609-751-0245 or email
advertising@lawrencesun.com. The Sun
welcomes suggestions and comments from
readers – including any information about
errors that may call for a correction to be
printed.
SPEAK UP
The Sun welcomes letters from readers.
Brief and to the point is best, so we look for
letters that are 300 words or fewer. Include
your name, address and phone number. We
do not print anonymous letters. Send letters
to news@lawrencesun.com, via fax at 609-
751-0245, or via the mail. Of course, you can
drop them off at our office, too. The
Lawrence Sun reserves the right to reprint
your letter in any medium – including elec-
tronically.
PUBLISHER Steve Miller
GENERAL MANAGER & EDITOR Alan Bauer
VICE PRESIDENT OF SALES Joe Eisele
NEWS
MANAGING EDITOR Mary L. Serkalow
PRODUCTION EDITOR Kristen Dowd
LAWRENCE EDITOR Heather Fiore
OPERATIONS
DIGITAL MEDIA DIRECTOR Tim Ronaldson
ART DIRECTOR Tom Engle
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD Russell Cann
CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Barry Rubens
VICE CHAIRMAN Michael LaCount, Ph.D.
ELAUWIT MEDIA GROUP
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD Dan McDonough, Jr.
VICE CHAIRMAN Alan Bauer
G
ov. Christie’s long list of ethics
reforms has a fair number
that simply make sense. Prob-
lem is, state politicians can’t get past
the politics to enact them.
The governor, in his usual over-the-
top fashion, recently released a list of
reforms that, he says, have been sitting
around Trenton longer than the movie
“Titanic” was in theaters. And that’s a
shame, because some of these reforms
should be no-brainers.
The list includes:
A ban on dual office-holding. One po-
litical office is enough.
A ban on dual employment for all
state county and local officials and em-
ployees. Again, one government job in
New Jersey is enough.
Pension forfeiture for public officials
convicted of crimes that involve or
touch upon the public office. OK, if
you steal from the government, you
don’t get your government pension.
That, too, makes a lot of sense.
A rule that prohibits the use of cam-
paign funds for criminal defense costs.
That’s pretty much self-explanatory,
too. We’re guessing donors had other
things in mind when they wrote
checks other than helping out their fa-
vorite, yet criminally accused, candi-
date for public office.
These are just a few of the measures
the governor says have been hanging
around Trenton for hundreds of days.
The question is: Why? Who is opposed
to these ideas? Or, more likely, what
other politically charged ideas are
these tied to, which, effectively, kill the
chance of these measures getting en-
acted?
People are tired of talk. They want
action. Christie and the Democrats
have shown in the past that they can
work together and make reasonable
compromises. Education reform is a
good example.
We’d like to see the same approach
here. Pick the reform issues that every-
one can agree upon. Pass them. And
then go back to argue the ones that
aren’t so clear.
in our opinion
Ethics reform or politics?
A lot of common-sense reforms are just sitting in place
Ethics reform
We’d like to see the governor and
Democrats come together on some
common-sense ethics measures that
have been sitting around for far too
long.
Library plans various programs for month of October
The following programs are free and
open to the public and take place at the
Lawrence Headquarters Branch of the
Mercer County Library System located at
2751 Brunswick Pike in Lawrence. Regis-
tration is suggested.
For more information about these and
other library programs, call (609) 989-6920,
or email lawprogs@mcl.org.
“Off the Page” will be held on Mondays,
Oct. 1 and Oct. 15 at 6:30 p.m. Try out your
acting chops (or indulge your secret pas-
sion) to play one of the great characters
from dramatic literature or contemporary
comedy – without the threat of performing
in front of a live audience! We will “cast”
and read a play aloud, around a table, as ac-
tors and production teams typically do at
the first rehearsal of a play. Registration
suggested.
There will be a “Friends of the
Lawrence Library” meeting on Monday,
Oct. 1 at 7 p.m.
“Memoir Writing Workshop for Sen-
iors” will be held on Tuesdays, Oct. 2
through Oct. 30, from 2:30 p.m. until 4:30
p.m. A memoir is a personal story and any-
one can write one. This introductory
course, facilitated by Maria Okros, is de-
signed for seniors to reflect on a significant
life experience and put it on paper. Regis-
tration suggested.
“Knitting Circle” will be held
on Wednesdays, Oct. 3 and Oct. 17 from 7
p.m. until 8:30 p.m. Knitters who already
know the basics are invited to drop in to so-
cialize with other knitters and work on a
project of their choice. Instructor Ann
Garwig will be available to assist individu-
als. Other needle crafters are welcome to
join the circle, too. Registration suggested.
“Crochet Corner” will be held on Thurs-
days, Oct. 4 and Oct. 18, from 3 p.m. until 5
p.m. Needle crafters who already know the
basic crochet stitches are invited to drop in
to socialize and work on a project of their
choice. Experienced needle crafter Mar-
garet Woo will be available to assist indi-
viduals. Registration suggested.
“Foreign and Independent Films at Your
Library” will feature Queen of Hearts
(2009) on Thursday, Oct. 4 at 6:30 p.m. This
romantic comedy set in Paris centers on
Adele, who is devastated after a painful
breakup. With no close friends or family,
her distant cousin, Rachel, reluctantly
takes her in and graciously attempts to sal-
vage Adele’s personal and professional
lives. French with English subtitles. Not
rated. 84 minutes. Refreshments will be
served. Registration suggested.
“Meditation Circle” will be held on Fri-
days, Oct. 5 through Oct. 26, from 2:30 p.m.
until 3:30 p.m. Stress and a fast-paced life
see many of us seeking alternative ways of
escape. Slow down and join Reference Li-
brarian Ann Kerr and reduce stress using
please see KNITTING, page 9
SEPTEMBER 26-OCTOBER 2, 2012 – THE LAWRENCE SUN 7
their union rep before the resolu-
tion was even adopted,” he said.
“That gives them 20 days notice;
we went well above and beyond.”
Krawczun further explained
how he held two separate meet-
ings with the union to discuss al-
ternatives, including opening
their contract and increasing con-
tributions for health benefits and
considering a “wage giveback” on
the cost of the living increase for
the next year, both of which
would generate only about $35,000
in savings.
Councilwoman Cathleen Lewis
revisited the idea of consolida-
tion, and asked Krawczun
whether discussions have been
held about that option.
“If there was to be consolida-
tion, both civil service and non-
civil service employees get the
protection as if they were civil
service employees, including sen-
iority,” Krawczun said. “So, as
much as our dispatchers may be
proponents of consolidation, it
would clearly be that all of our
dispatchers would not remain
employees after a consolidation
due to the fact that we may have
dispatchers that don’t have that
much seniority. And under a con-
solidation, with that lack of sen-
iority, they would be treated ac-
cordingly.”
Along with Handelman, two
additional police dispatchers de-
scribed their concern about pri-
vatization and how it will nega-
tively affect the township and
cause a plethora of problems.
“We know the streets. We know
the people. We know the culture,”
15-year dispatcher Ellen Marie
McGinley said. “We have been
trained, retrained and recertified
in police procedures, policies and
CPR. We care about the residents
because they are our friends, they
are our neighbors, and they are
our families.
If a private company comes in,
will their responses be as fast or
as caring as those who already
live and work here? Sure, they
can be trained in the computer
systems and the policies, but they
are not already an integral part of
Lawrence Township.”
Senior Communications Offi-
cer and 17-year dispatcher Crystal
Simsack echoed Handelman and
McGinley’s comments, and rein-
forced the privatization will only
make things more complicated.
“You cannot replace our expe-
rience,” she said. “I’ve been here
a long time, so I’ve seen them
come and go, and that’s what’s
going to happen with privatiza-
tion.”
Along with the dispatchers,
concerned residents also articu-
lated their apprehension about
competitive contracting, includ-
ing Lawrence resident and
teacher Stephanie Barinowski,
who spoke about the potential
vendor that Lawrence Township
is currently speaking with.
“The same company that you
are thinking about using to priva-
tize these dispatchers is running
in Georgia, and as of 2011, there
are 51 complaints about this com-
pany and 21 of them are substan-
tiated,” she said. “So, you are will-
ingly comprising the future of
our mothers, our brothers, our
sisters.”
Aside from suggestions of pri-
vatizing the trash collection in-
stead of dispatching, Barinowski
proposed privatizing public works.
“Frankly, I’d rather have an
under-qualified person sweep the
streets than answering the phone
calls for emergency situations,”
she said. “You’re really sacrific-
ing quality for money.”
Despite the points that each of
the dispatchers and residents
made, the council passed the reso-
lution, which now authorizes the
use of competitive contracting for
the providing of emergency dis-
patch services.
Krawczun also stated how the
council is also looking into the
EMT services, which is the other
service being considered for com-
petitive contracting.
“Right now, I am working on a
couple of items with the EMTs
with their union and the employ-
ees, and we are waiting for the
outcome of that, but that will be
known by the first couple of days
in October,” he said.
Councilman Michael Powers
asked Krawczun what the dis-
patching employees could do in
regard to their participation in
the competitive contracting
process to attempt and keep their
jobs instead of losing them.
“Under competitive contract-
ing, if employees are organized,
the employees have the opportu-
nity to do one of two things,”
Krawczun said. “One, make an
act as a bidder themselves; they
can form a group to be able to re-
spond. Or, they can offer wage
concessions or other contracted
considerations that would equate
to the same savings that a compet-
itive contract vendor may be able
to generate.”
The council is looking to imple-
ment the changes to emergency
dispatching services by January,
which is not enough time, in the
residents’ and employees’ eyes, to
attain and train a new team of
dispatchers.
“This is a major decision with
not enough research and findings
done,” Handelman said. “I don’t
think people realize how impor-
tant it is to have seasoned and
competent people doing this job.”
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Not valid with other offers. Present coupon
at time of purchase. Exp. 10/31/12.
The Original
PRIVATIZING
Continued from page 3
Residents: Don’t sacrifice quality for cost-savings
THURSDAY SEPT. 27
Traditional Chinese Culture: 7 p.m.
at Lawrence Branch Library. The
Shen Yun Performing Arts organ-
ization will present this program
focusing on traditional Chinese
culture: the myths and legends,
rich traditions and diverse art
forms. Shen Yun Performing Arts
is a non-profit organization based
in New York whose mission is to
revive these majestic Chinese tra-
ditions. Refreshments served.
Registration is suggested.
Story time: Ages 2 to 5. 9:35 a.m.
and 7 p.m. at Lawrence Branch
Library. Story time and a craft.
Caregiver supervision required.
FRIDAY SEPT. 28
Meditation Circle: 2:30 p.m. at
Lawrence Branch Library. Slow
down and join Reference Librari-
an Ann Kerr and reduce stress
using meditation. Light stretch-
ing at the beginning of the medi-
tation hour will relax your mus-
cles and allow you to be more
comfortable and focused. Regis-
tration suggested.
Posture Perfect: 3:30 p.m. at
Lawrence Branch Library. Refer-
ence Librarian Ann Kerr and cer-
tified fitness trainer Maria Okros
will share some simple exercises
to improve your posture and
increase your flexibility. Registra-
tion suggested.
Story time: Ages 2 to 5. 9:35 a.m. at
Lawrence Branch Library. Story
time and a craft. Caregiver super-
vision required.
SATURDAY SEPT. 29
Free Rabies Clinic: The Lawrence
Township Health Department will
hold a free rabies clinic from 1 to
2:30 p.m. at the N.J. National
Guard Armory, Eggert Crossing
Road. Visit www.lawrencetwp.
com for more information.
Jersey Transit A Capella Concert:
2 p.m. at Lawrence Branch
Library. Jersey Transit performs
without instruments, using only
their voices and assorted claps,
grunts and Aboriginal clicking
noises to augment the pure inter-
action of complex and beautiful
vocal harmonies. Refreshments
served. Registration is suggested.
Story time: Ages 2 to 5. 11 a.m. at
Lawrence Branch Library. Story
time and a craft. Caregiver super-
vision required.
SUNDAY SEPT. 30
Township Cat Licenses Due: Any
cat over the age of seven months
is required by law to be licensed.
Visit www.lawrencetwp.com for
more information.
Presbyterian Church of
Lawrenceville: Traditional wor-
ship service at 10 a.m. Preschool
Sunday school at 9:45 a.m. Sun-
day school (kindergarten through
fifth) at 11 a.m. Worship in a New
Key at 5 p.m. 2688 Main St.,
Lawrenceville.
Lawrence Road Presbyterian
Church: Summer air-conditioned
worship at 10 a.m. The church is
wheelchair accessible. 1039
Lawrence Road, Lawrenceville.
The Church of Saint Ann: Roman
Catholic mass at 7:30, 9:30 and 11
a.m. and at 12:30 p.m. 1253
Lawrenceville Road.
Hope Presbyterian Church: Sunday
school at 9:15 a.m. Morning wor-
ship service at 10:30 a.m. 140
Denow Road, Lawrenceville.
Harvest Chapel of Lawrenceville:
Coffee and hospitality at 9:15 a.m.
Adult Sunday school at 9:45 a.m.
Worship service at 10:30 a.m.
Kids ministry for ages 5 through
12 during service. 64 Phillips Ave.,
Lawrenceville.
MONDAY OCT. 1
Off the Page: 6:30 p.m. at Lawrence
Branch Library. Try out your act-
ing chops (or indulge a secret
passion) to play one of the great
characters from dramatic litera-
ture or contemporary comedy –
without the threat of performing
in front of a live audience! Library
will “cast” and read a play aloud,
around a table, as actors and pro-
duction teams typically do at the
first rehearsal of a play. Registra-
tion suggested.
Story time: Ages 2 to 5. 10 a.m. at
Lawrence Branch Library. Story
time and a craft. Caregiver super-
vision required.
Lawrence Township Planning
Board meeting: 7:30 p.m. on the
first and third Monday of the
month. Visit www.lawrencetwp.
com for more information.
TUESDAY OCT. 2
Memoir Writing Workshop for Sen-
iors: 2:30 p.m. at Lawrence
Branch Library. A memoir is a
personal story. Registration sug-
gested.
Books & Babies: Ages 6 to 23
months. 11 a.m. at Lawrence
Branch Library. Join us for a fun,
upbeat program of songs,
rhymes, finger-plays, board
books and activities to promote
early literacy in infants and
young toddlers. Led by a librari-
an; caregiver participation
required.
Lawrence Township Council meet-
ing: 7 p.m. on the first and third
Tuesday of the month. Visit
www.lawrencetwp.com for more
information.
CALENDAR PAGE 8 SEPTEMBER 26-OCTOBER 2, 2012
WANT TO BE LISTED?
To have your meeting or affair listed in the Calendar or Meetings,
information must be received, in writing, two weeks prior to the
date of the event. Send information by mail to: Calendar, The Sun,
108 Kings Highway East, Haddonfield, NJ 08033. Or by email:
news@lawrencesun.com. Or you can submit a calendar listing
through our website (www.lawrencesun.com).
20 Nassau Street | Princeton, NJ 08542
609-751-0245 | sales@elauwit.com
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Hopewell
Lawrence
Montgomery
Princeton
Robbinsville
West Windsor
SEPTEMBER 26-OCTOBER 2, 2012 – THE LAWRENCE SUN 9
Jeff Molinelli, and Volunteer As-
sistants Scott Schuman and Steve
Ciosek.
“I would like to thank them for
their countless hours of time and
effort, as well as the athletic staff
at Lawrence High School, Ken
Mason and Cindy Dunn, for help-
ing me with the things outside
the lines,” he said.
This year, Rostron has a hand-
ful of returning players on his
roster, as well as a new list of
players that he’s looking forward
to training and molding.
But, most importantly, Rostron
is looking to his returning sen-
iors – Jess Russo, John Turner,
Connor Springstein, Colm
Humphreys, Kevin Keegan, and
Addison Lemus – to help the
younger, more inexperienced
players progress and succeed.
“We are looking for these boys
to stay healthy and lead the
younger boys through the ups
and downs of the hard CVC (Colo-
nial Valley Conference) sched-
ule,” he said.
Aside from his experienced
group of seniors, Rostron also
has a big group of juniors this
year, some who are returning var-
sity players and some who are
new.
The former sophomores who
are continuing on varsity for
their junior year include Zach
Weyand, Anthony Scardeletti, Al-
berto Santiago, and Cameron Baf-
futo. The extensive list of juniors
who are new to varsity this year
include Pat Sheehan, Jack Har-
graves-Dix, Andrew Takasugi,
Arek Szolowolski, Lucas
Swilinksi, Isaac Martinez, Jacek
Zarski, and David Kraszewski.
“I’m looking for them to contin-
ue to grow and develop as soccer
players and leaders for next year,”
he said.
Rostron further detailed how
there are no sophomores on the
team this year, but how the one
freshman who made it, Kyle
Springstein, will be the new start-
ing goalkeeper.
“It is a big deal for a freshman
to be on the varsity team, espe-
cially as the goalkeeper,” Rostron
said. “We have seen great
progress so far, and are excited
about his potential for the fu-
ture.”
Since Rostron has a full line-up
this year, he’s preparing all play-
ers for the vigorous competitors
that are in the CVC.
“The CVC is a tough group,” he
said. “There are no real roll-
overs. Any team can beat you on
any day. Regardless of what you
see on paper, you have to play the
game.”
Rostron explained how
Lawrence’s only other high
school and LHS’ rival, Notre
Dame High School, is one of the
teams that they’re looking out for
this year.
“Notre Dame is one of our
greatest rivalries because of skill
level and closeness, plus the fact
that a lot of their players went to
Lawrence elementary schools
and the middle school,” he said.
“We played them already, and we
played well, but we lost 3-2. If we
had five more minutes, I think we
could've won. I was very proud of
the boys that day.”
All in all, Rostron hopes to
make it to the state champi-
onships this year, and explained
how the biggest hurdle of the
boys’ season is what the actual
season entails.
“To train six out of seven days
a week, stay healthy, and get excit-
ed for each game is mentally and
physically exhausting,” he said.
“Throw in some injuries and you
have a recipe for a tough game
every game.”
The Cardinals’ next game will
be on Thursday, Sept. 27 at 7 p.m.
at Lawrence High School against
Shawnee Mission South High
School.
NOT ENOUGH TIME
to watch your child play soccer and list
your baseball cards in an online auction?
We can help.
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(609) 792-0606
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SOCCER
Continued from page 1
Lawrence plays Shawnee Mission South on Sept. 27
meditation. Light stretching at
the beginning of the meditation
hour will relax your muscles and
allow you to be more comfortable
and focused. Registration sug-
gested.
“Posture Perfect” will be held
on Fridays, Oct. 5 through Oct. 26,
from 3:30 p.m. until 4:30
p.m. “Stand up straight, pull your
shoulders back, don’t slouch!”
Your mother was right, good pos-
ture is important for good health
and for feeling good. Reference Li-
brarian Ann Kerr and certified
fitness trainer Maria Okros will
share some simple exercises to
improve your posture and in-
crease your flexibility. Registra-
tion suggested.
“Drum Circle Friday” will be
held on Oct. 5 at 4:30 p.m. Ange
Chianese of Mercer County’s Zip-
A-Dee-Doo-Dah Entertainers will
facilitate a beginner’s drum cir-
cle. Bring your own drum or use
one of ours. Shakers, gongs, bells
and other percussion also wel-
come. Refreshments served. Reg-
istration is suggested.
“Boomers and Seniors Satur-
day Morning Wii Bowling
League” will be held on Satur-
days, Oct. 6 and Oct. 20, from 10
a.m. until noon. Wii, an interac-
tive video game, is a fun and easy
way to get some light exercise and
socialize with friends. Refresh-
ments served. Registration is sug-
gested.
KNITTING
Continued from page 6
Knitting, writing and more planned
Terhune Orchards invites
photographers of all ages and
abilities to submit photos for its
sixth annual photo contest.
Capture your favorite farm ac-
tivity or scene on camera.
The theme for the contest
this year is “Shades of Fall at
Terhune Orchards.” Deadline
is Oct. 1 at 5 p.m. The photo
show will open on Saturday,
Oct. 6, at 9 a.m., when the win-
ners will be revealed. The pho-
tos will remain on display in its
winery tasting room in its 150-
year-old barn until Nov. 4.
Photos must have been taken
at Terhune Orchards and be
relevant to the theme; there is a
limit of two entries per person.
The first place winner will re-
ceive a $100 Terhune Orchards
gift certificate. Honorable men-
tion winners will receive $50
gift certificates.
For complete rules and entry
information, visit terhuneor-
chards.com. The farm is locat-
ed at 330 Cold Soil Road in
Lawrenceville.
Enter photo contest now
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T HE L AWR E N C E S U N
SEPTEMBER 26-OCTOBER 2, 2012 PAGE 10
W H A T Y O U N E E D T O K N O W
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All classified ads must be prepaid. • Your Classified ad will run in all 10 of The Sun newspapers each week! • Be sure to check your ad the first day it appears.
We will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, so call us immediately with any errors in your ad. • No refunds are given, only advertising credit.
L I NE
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CLASSIFIED SEPTEMBER 26-OCTOBER 2, 2012 - THE LAWRENCE SUN 11
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