www.themontgomerysun.

com
SEPTEMBER 26-OCTOBER 2, 2012
FREE
Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Classified . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-15
Editorials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
INSIDE THIS ISSUE
School drops in rank
Montgomery High School
ranked 61 in state. PAGE 4
Team finds a colorful way to raise funds
BY HEATHER FIORE
The Montgomery Sun
A group of six local business-
women in Montgomery recently
came together to create a team for
the renowned 5K, The Color Run
New Jersey, which was held on
Sept. 1 at Raceway Park in Eng-
lishtown.
The Color Run is an annual
run for all ages, and focuses more
on “crazy color fun” with family
and friends, rather than speed
and agility. Each kilometer of the
event is associated with a desig-
nated color – yellow, green, blue,
purple, and pink – that is thrown
on participants in the form of
powdered paint at each kilometer
marker.
Team Doin’ It. Wow! – consist-
ing of Crystal Fitzpatrick, Kris-
ten Whitmore, Casey Castronova,
Michelle Panarella, Crista Scian-
calepore and Colleen McKenna –
was created in the “spirit of
friendship, collaboration and
fun,” according to Fitzpatrick.
“Initially, our sole intention for
participating in the race was to
have a good time and do some-
thing that we don't normally get
to do every day,” she said. “How-
ever, in the early part of the in-
ception of this team of six profes-
sional women, a discussion of
running the race and having fun
with a more noble purpose was
Special to The Sun
From left, four members of Team Doin’ It. Wow! Michelle Panarella, Casey Castronova, Crystal Fitzpatrick and Kristen Whitmore are seen
during the closing ceremony of The Color Run New Jersey in Englishtown on Sept. 1.
please see TEAM, page 9
2 THE MONTGOMERY SUN — SEPTEMBER 26-OCTOBER 2, 2012
MIchac! Cnrtcsc, DMD
311 Wilhers¡oon Sl, Irincelon, N} O8542
609-751-5525 vvv.drcorlese.com
Consultant for the New Jersey State Board of
Dentistry · NJ State Specialty License #3272
PRINCETON
PRO5THODONTIC5
One Smile, One Choice
You deserve a specialist’s care. Experience quality care
second to none. 1 of 400 Certified Specialists Worldwide.
Call to learn
about your free
consultation.
®
The following reports are on
file with the Montgomery Town-
ship Police Department:
On Saturday, Sept. 8, police in-
vestigated vandalism to five mail-
boxes along Dutchtown-Zion
Road. All five mailboxes appear to
have been struck with a baseball
bat or similar implement. A wit-
ness who was in his driveway at
approximately 10 p.m. on Friday,
Sept. 7 advised investigating offi-
cers that he observed a pickup
truck with a cap headed west-
bound on Dutchtown-Zion Road
actively engaged in damaging
mailboxes. Montgomery Twp. Po-
lice Detective Bureau is investi-
gating the incident.
On Sept. 11 at 10:19 p.m., police
arrested a 35-year-old female. Off.
Christopher Bleistine observed
the woman’s vehicle fail to main-
tain a single lane on Route 206.
During the stop, Off. Bleistine de-
tected that she had consumed al-
coholic beverages and she failed
field sobriety tests. She was ar-
rested and transported to HQ for
processing. Her vehicle was im-
pounded and she received sum-
monses for DWI and Failing to
Maintain a Single Lane. She was
released to a friend and is sched-
uled to appear in Montgomery
Twp. Municipal Court.
On Friday, Sept. 14 at 1:45 a.m.,
Officer Sullivan arrested a 27-
year-old male for DWI. Officer
police report
please see POLICE, page 9
SEPTEMBER 26-OCTOBER 2, 2012 –THE MONTGOMERY SUN 3
The Corner of Route 518 and 206
Skillman, NJ
(609) 921-1776
www.1stconstitution.com
Community Banking With You In Mind
Lobby & Drive-Up Hours:
Mon-Thu 8:30am-5pm
Fri 8:30am-6pm • Sat 9am-1pm
Come to a community bank that understands
your business and wants to help you grow.
Proud supporters of the
Montgomery Business Association
Is Your bank telling you
You’re not big enough?
Walk through arboretum
planned for Oct. 7
Join Montgomery Friends of
Open Space for a walk in Mont-
gomery's unique and beautiful
Arboretum of Native Flora, next
to Montgomery Park on Sunday,
Oct. 7 at 1 p.m. as part of “First
Sundays in the Parks.”
See native trees and shrubs in
their fall colors, in their natural
setting, and learn about the bene-
fits of native plants. This will be a
leisurely walk on paved path-
ways, led by Sarah Roberts, an ad-
visor to Montgomery’s Shade
Tree Committee and a member of
the Native Plant Society of New
Jersey.
Meet at the lower parking lot in
Montgomery Park at the entrance
to the Arboretum.
For more information, contact
Mary Penney at (609) 688-0282.
Parents Anonymous/Family Helpline
(800) 843-5437
PSA
4 THE MONTGOMERY SUN — SEPTEMBER 26-OCTOBER 2, 2012
NEW
ARRIVALS
Corn Stalks,
Pumpkins, Hay,
Gourds, Squash,
Kale and
Pansies
18l lk0l1l86 0lffl8l80l l$ 18l 0lffl8l80l
8ßNll108'$ 8l$1 klF1 $l08l1
f008 08l $10F $80F
Great Cars
From Good People
SERVICE SPECIALS
DETAILING SPECIAL
$
1ë9

• Hand Wash & Wax
• Vacuum & Shampoo Carpets
• Clean Windows, Door Jambs, etc.
• Complete Vehicle Detail - Inside & Out
Coupon must be presented when car is
dropped off for service. May not be com-
bined with other offers. Expires 10/31/12.
Reg $179.95
LUBE OIL & FILTER CHANGE
$
â
00
0ff
Coupon must be presented when car is
dropped off for service. May not be com-
bined with other offers. Expires 10/31/12.
TIRE SPECIAL
$
400ff
Set of 4 Tires
$10 Per Tire/Minimum of 2
Coupon must be presented when car is
dropped off for service. May not be com-
bined with other offers. Expires 10/31/12.
PRE-OWNED SPECIALS
WE BUY CARS
2008 Chrysler Town & Country
Limited model with 4.0 V6 and auto trans, leather seating, all power
options including sunroof, sliders and hatch, amfm cd/satellite/Naviga-
tion system with dual screen rear dvd, chrome clad wheels, remote
starter, 3 zone A/C, and lots more. One owner with a Clean Carfax
History! 8R717911 Clearwater Blue with 94399 miles. $15995.
1998 Ford F150 XLT
Extra Cab 4WD with flareside bed, 5.4 V8 engine and auto
trans, a/c, air bags, ABS, cloth seats, power windows
and locks, amfm tape/cd changer, rear sliding window,
class IV tow, alloy rims, and more! WCA82918
Burgandy metallic with 132073 miles. $6995.
SEE ALL 60+ VEHICLES IN OUR CURRENT
INVENTORY AT: WWW.BELLEMEADGARAGE.COM
2454 Route 206 Belle Mead, NJ 08502 908-359-0017
www.bellemeadgarage.com
High school drops
in state ranking
BY HEATHER FIORE
The Montgomery Sun
In its September issue, New
Jersey Monthly ranked Mont-
gomery High School No. 61 on its
list of the state’s Top 100 Public
High Schools, disappointing
handfuls of residents and par-
ents, since it dropped over 50
spots from its No. 10 position in
2010.
New Jersey Monthly devised
the list, which is based on data re-
ported by the schools to the De-
partment of Education for the
2010-2011 school year, using a new
methodology.
New Jersey Monthly made
three distinctive changes when
compiling this year’s rankings –
use of the new four-year adjusted
cohort graduation rate that was
introduced by New Jersey in 2011
and mandated by the federal gov-
ernment, elimination of stu-
dent/computer ratio as a factor,
and the increase of weighting for
data on test results and the afore-
mentioned graduation-rate calcu-
lation.
The magazine detailed the rea-
soning for these changes, which
place more importance on class
size, graduation rate, and test re-
sults.
In the past, with regard to the
graduation rate, the rankings dis-
tinguished between students
going on to four-year colleges,
two-year colleges, and postsec-
ondary schools. The data for stu-
dents going to four-year colleges
was given extra weight, making it
a crucial factor in the outcome of
results; however, this year’s rank-
please see METHODOLOGY, page 10
SEPTEMBER 26-OCTOBER 2, 2012 –THE MONTGOMERY SUN 5
ACCEPTING
NEW STUDENTS
Intersection Routes 518 & 601
Skillman
Call 908-285-5331
www.peridotartstudio.com
NEED SUPPORT?
Compassionate
CounseIing and
Psychotherapy for
InfertiIity
Depression
Anxiety
Trauma
Post-Traumatic Stress
Chronic Pain
Grief & Loss
ReIationships
Major Life Transitions
Stress Management
Addiction & Recovery
Girl Scouts host
costume swap Oct. 6
Girl Scout Troop 60625 will be
hosting a costume swap on Satur-
day, Oct. 6 from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m.
at the Harlingen Church located
on Route 206 in Montgomery
Township. The troop’s enthusias-
tic members have been working
on their project over the past year
and throughout the summer.
They are working to spread the
message about “Recycle, Reduce
and Reuse,” and how little
changes can make a big impact.
In addition to being able to ob-
tain a free costume that is “new to
you,” there will be interesting
facts, displays and activities to en-
courage recycling, reducing and
reusing as well as Halloween safe-
ty. Costumes have been collected
throughout the year, and the
event will have nearly 200 cos-
tumes. Costumes will be organ-
ized by themes, and accessories
are available as well. You can also
donate a used costume on the day
of the event.
The troop’s bronze award proj-
ect is to encourage environmental
awareness. By exchanging cos-
tumes, we can reduce waste into
landfills every October. Many cos-
tumes that are thrown away each
year are in good condition and
can be used again. Not only is the
costume staying out of the land-
fill, but also, all the packaging
that comes with a new costume
too.
Troop 60625 knows we all can
make a difference by making
small changes, so please join us
on Oct. 6.
Addiction Hotline
of New Jersey
(800) 238-2333
PSA
6 THE MONTGOMERY SUN — SEPTEMBER 26-OCTOBER 2, 2012
20 Nassau Street, Suite 26A
Princeton, NJ 08542
609-751-0245
The Sun is published weekly by Elauwit
Media LLC, 20 Nassau Street, Suite 26A,
Princeton, NJ 08542. It is mailed weekly to
select addresses in the 08502 ZIP code. If
you are not on the mailing list, six-month
subscriptions are available for $39.99. PDFs
of the publication are online, free of charge.
For information, please call 609-751-0245.
To submit a news release, please email
news@themontgomerysun.com. For adver-
tising information, call 609-751-0245 or
send an email to
advertising@themontgomerysun.com. The
Sun welcomes comments from readers –
including any information about errors that
may call for a correction to be printed.
SPEAK UP
The Sun welcomes letters from readers.
Brief and to the point is best, so we look for
letters that are 300 words or fewer. Include
your name, address and phone number. We
do not print anonymous letters. Send letters
to news@themontgomerysun.com, via fax at
609-751-0245, or via the mail. Of course,
you can drop them off at our office, too. The
Montgomery Sun reserves the right to
reprint your letter in any medium – includ-
ing electronically.
PUBLISHER Steve Miller
GENERAL MANAGER & EDITOR Alan Bauer
VICE PRESIDENT OF SALES Joe Eisele
NEWS
MANAGING EDITOR Mary L. Serkalow
PRODUCTION EDITOR Kristen Dowd
MONTGOMERY EDITOR Heather Fiore
OPERATIONS
DIGITAL MEDIA DIRECTOR Tim Ronaldson
ART DIRECTOR Tom Engle
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD Russell Cann
CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Barry Rubens
VICE CHAIRMAN Michael LaCount, Ph.D.
ELAUWIT MEDIA GROUP
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD Dan McDonough, Jr.
VICE CHAIRMAN Alan Bauer
G
ov. Christie’s long list of ethics
reforms has a fair number
that simply make sense. Prob-
lem is, state politicians can’t get past
the politics to enact them.
The governor, in his usual over-the-
top fashion, recently released a list of
reforms that, he says, have been sitting
around Trenton longer than the movie
“Titanic” was in theaters. And that’s a
shame, because some of these reforms
should be no-brainers.
The list includes:
A ban on dual office-holding. One po-
litical office is enough.
A ban on dual employment for all
state county and local officials and em-
ployees. Again, one government job in
New Jersey is enough.
Pension forfeiture for public officials
convicted of crimes that involve or
touch upon the public office. OK, if
you steal from the government, you
don’t get your government pension.
That, too, makes a lot of sense.
A rule that prohibits the use of cam-
paign funds for criminal defense costs.
That’s pretty much self-explanatory,
too. We’re guessing donors had other
things in mind when they wrote
checks other than helping out their fa-
vorite, yet criminally accused, candi-
date for public office.
These are just a few of the measures
the governor says have been hanging
around Trenton for hundreds of days.
The question is: Why? Who is opposed
to these ideas? Or, more likely, what
other politically charged ideas are
these tied to, which, effectively, kill the
chance of these measures getting en-
acted?
People are tired of talk. They want
action. Christie and the Democrats
have shown in the past that they can
work together and make reasonable
compromises. Education reform is a
good example.
We’d like to see the same approach
here. Pick the reform issues that every-
one can agree upon. Pass them. And
then go back to argue the ones that
aren’t so clear.
in our opinion
Ethics reform or politics?
A lot of common-sense reforms are just sitting in place
Ethics reform
We’d like to see the governor and
Democrats come together on some
common-sense ethics measures that
have been sitting around for far too
long.
At the Oct. 4 Township Committee meet-
ing, we will be celebrating the 40th an-
niversary of Montgomery EMS. Please
come to the Municipal Building at 7 p.m. or
watch the meeting live via the township’s
website.
Forty years of “Neighbors Helping
Neighbors” is a tremendous accomplish-
ment. Their professionalism and expertise
are second to none. I am sure everyone in
town knows someone that was directly
helped out in a time of need by the squad.
All of this is even more remarkable
when you consider that not only is the
EMS team completely volunteer, but they
also get 80 percent of their annual funding
through private donations. The squad’s an-
nual budget is $130,000, and they cover
about 1,500 calls a year. Doing some quick
math, this equates
to only $87 per call!
The emergency
services the squad
provides our com-
munity are out-
standing, but we
can’t overlook
their financial
benefit either. It
would cost well
over $1 million
(perhaps even $2
million) if the
township had to
take over EMS operations. Montgomery
EMS is protecting our pocketbooks every
bit as much as they are protecting our well-
being.
Speaking about finances, in my last
Mayor’s column a few weeks ago, I an-
nounced that we passed a debt-refinancing
plan. The details have been finalized and
the plan will save Montgomery about
$600,000. We took advantage of the histori-
cally low interest rates and will still pay off
the debt within the same time period of the
original notes.
This represents the first success of our
new budget working groups, but it won’t be
the last. We formed the groups last month
to tackle the big issues and help make
Montgomery more financially sustainable.
The debt-refinancing plan is a meaningful
step forward for us, but we have more work
to do and will stay focused on doing what’s
right for the long-term health of our
town.
Ed Trzaska
MAYOR’S MESSAGE
Celebrate 40th anniversary of Montgomery EMS
Visit us online at www.themontgomerysun.com
SEPTEMBER 26-OCTOBER 2, 2012 –THE MONTGOMERY SUN 7
1378 Rte 206

Skillman, NJ
609-252-0880
We also offer catering!
FREE
DELIVERY!
GLUTEN
FREE
GENTEEL’S
PIZZERIA
$2 OFF
Delivery Only
With this coupon.
Cannot be combined
with other offers.
Expires 10/3/12.
Valid Mon. - Fri.
Please Join Dr. Roderick Kaufmann &
1r:u.crcu 1cr¤arcícq¸ ¹ssc.:arcs
in Welcoming
1r. }. S.crr 1cuu:uq
&
1r. 1arsíau 'a:a¸a
Dr. Henning will be at our Hillsborough office.
Dr. Vaidya will be at our Monroe and Pennington offices.
Please Call Today to Make Your Appointment
with Dr. Henning or Dr. Vaidya.
307 Omni Drive
Hillsborough
908-281-6633
5 Centre Drive, Suite 1A
Monroe Twp.
609-655-4544
Pennington Point West
2 Tree Farm Road
Ste. A-110, Pennington
609-737-4491
SAME DAY APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE
609-683-1700
(Research Park ) 415 Wall Street, Princeton (Opposite Princeton Airport)
www.DrJaysChiro.com
Dr. Jay Scott Horow|tz
InNetworkfor:AETNA
Cigna·BC/BSALL PLANS
UNHLTHCR·OX·AMERI
PHCS&MORE
M
O
N
T
G
O
MERY
F
A
M
¡
L
Y
C
H
¡
R
O
PRA
C
T
¡
C
Your Neighborhood
“In-Network” Provider
has MOVED!
·BackandNeckPain·SportsInjuries
·ArmandLegPain·PlantarFasciitis
·DiscProblems·Headaches
18 years of service in the Princeton area · Massage by Amy Gift Certificates Available
School leadership brings
down schools, says writer
Last month, New Jersey
Monthly downgraded the Mont-
gomery school system to my un-
pleasant surprise. We have fallen
from the 10th ranked school dis-
trict in the state, all the way down
to the 61st. This is a big deal and a
major problem. Parents and col-
leges care deeply about rankings.
About a decade ago, we were
ranked second in the entire state.
Now we are only 4th in Somerset
County. Why has this happened?
The Board of Education and past
superintendent have done awful
jobs.
In the Packet’s recent article,
our current superintendent
blames the financial problems of
a few years ago. I don’t buy that
argument whatsoever. Every dis-
trict had the same challenges.
Every district has to deal with the
2 percent cap on property taxes.
Bernards and Ridge school sys-
tems weren’t impacted. Actually,
their rankings improved.
It’s time for parents to take a
long, hard look at what is going
on with our schools. For the
money we pay, which includes
$2.5 million in additional spend-
ing this year, we deserve better.
There is one other thing that I
would like to point out. One of the
long-time Board of Education
members, Andrea Bradley, is now
running for Montgomery Town-
ship Committee. I was interested
in hearing from her this election,
but no longer. I will not vote for
someone to run our town that did
such a poor job running our
schools. She is obviously not up
for the job. Once again, we de-
serve better.
Lisa Dominick
letterS to the editor
Poison Control Center
(800) 222-1222
PSA
National Suicide Prevention Lifeline
(800) 273-8255
PSA
WEDNESDAY SEPT. 26
Montgomery Township Landmarks
Commission meeting: 7:30 p.m.
in the conference center, Munici-
pal Building. For more informa-
tion and to confirm meeting time,
visit www.montgomery.nj.us.
THURSDAY SEPT. 27
Presidential Trivia Program: 7 to
8:30 p.m. at Mary Jacobs Library,
64 Washington St., Rocky Hill. Sid
Frank, author of “The Presidents:
Tidbits and Trivia,” will chat
about the fascinating and little
known tales of our nation’s lead-
ers. Learn about the interesting
facts not found in the history
books.
Story Time: Ages 2 to 6. 10 to 10:30
a.m. at Mary Jacobs Library. This
week’s theme is “Munchy
Crunchy Veggies.” No registra-
tion needed. For more informa-
tion, call (609) 924-7073, ext. 5.
Mega Mammals: Grades kinder-
garten to second. 5 to 5:45 p.m.
at Mary Jacobs Library. Mammals
of all shapes and sizes exist in the
world. This program will focus on
the larger species and how inter-
esting they truly are. Through
activities, crafts, stories and
games, children will go home with
a good understanding of nature’s
mega mammals. Program pre-
sented by the Somerset County
Park Commission Environmental
Education. Registration required.
Call (609) 924-7073, ext. 5.
FRIDAY SEPT. 28
Rhyme Time: Ages newborn to 2. 10
to 10:45 a.m. at Mary Jacobs
Library. Nursery rhyme fun plus
play time! No registration need-
ed.
SATURDAY SEPT. 29
Flu Vaccination Clinic: 9 a.m. to 1
p.m. during Montgomery’s Adult
Health Screening, Otto Kaufman
Community Center, 356 Skillman
Road, Skillman. The Centers for
Disease Control recommends
vaccinations for all people over 6
months of age. Shots will be by
appointment. Walk-ins accommo-
dated if vaccine available. Flu
shot is free to seniors with
Medicare. Cost is $25 for non-
medicare participants. To make
an appointment: visit www.njpub-
lichealth.com; email health@twp.
montgomery.nj.us with name,
address, age, date of birth and
phone number; or call the health
department at (908) 359-8211,
ext. 227.
Rizzo’s Reptiles Adventures: Ages
3 to 6. 10:30 to 11:15 a.m. at Mary
Jacobs Library. Meet a baby alli-
gator and several other scaly
friends that will inspire partici-
pants to conserve wildlife, pre-
vent litter, think green and appre-
ciate the natural world. Program
made possible by a grant from
New Jersey Clean Communities.
Registration required. Call (609)
924-7073, ext. 5.
Lego Club: Grades one through five.
Prizes awarded to all. Registra-
tion required. Call (609) 924-
7073, ext. 5.
TUESDAY OCT. 2
Toddler Sing with Pat: Ages 1 to 3.
10:30 to 11 a.m. in the Program
Room at Mary Jacobs Library. No
registration needed.
CALENDAR PAGE 8 SEPTEMBER 26-OCTOBER 2, 2012
WANT TO BE LISTED?
To have your meeting or affair listed in the Calendar or Meetings,
information must be received, in writing, two weeks prior to the
date of the event.
Send information by mail to: Calendar, The Sun, 108 Kings Highway
East, Haddonfield, NJ 08033. Or by email: news@themontgomery-
sun.com. Or you can submit a calendar listing through our website
(www.themontgomerysun.com).
We will run photos if space is available and the quality of the photo
is sufficient. Every attempt is made to provide coverage to all
organizations.
Lic #10199 • Cont Lic #13VH01382900
The Foundation of Morris Hall/St. Lawrence Inc. PRESENTS
WITH SPECIAL GUESTS
JODI BENSON SAL VIVIANO
Saturday, September 29, 2012 8:00pm
Patriots Theater at the Trenton War Memorial
Tickets: $35-$85 Visit www.thewarmemorial.com or call 609-791-9451
Patron tickets, including a Champagne Reception with Peter Nero, Ms. Benson and Mr. Viviano
can be purchased by calling 609-896-9500, ext. 2215, or jmiller@slrc.org.
Statewide Domestic
Violence Hotline
(800) 572-7233
PSA
discussed. Since five out of six
members are currently working
and specialize in the field of sub-
stance abuse treatment and re-
covery, we thought it would be a
grand idea if we combined the 5K
run with a fundraiser that will
help a local transitional housing
facility.”
Fitzpatrick, who is the clinical
director and owner of the Skill-
man-based substance abuse re-
covery company Fitzpatrick Con-
sultation and Treatment, LLC,
has been working with patients in
substance abuse for over a
decade.
Because she wanted to inter-
twine her work with a notable
event, she gathered five of her
friends who also work in related
fields to create a team for The
Color Run New Jersey. Aside
from helping the organization
partnered with The Color Run,
the Multiple Sclerosis Associa-
tion of America (MSAA), the
members of Team Doin’ It. Wow!
wanted to have a local impact as
well, which is why they decided to
initiate their own fundraising ef-
forts.
“What we wanted to do was col-
lect something specifically relat-
ed to our work and donate toward
that, so it was something that was
separate from the run,” Fitz-
patrick said. “Of the six of us,
five of us are going to be special-
izing in substance abuse and ad-
diction, and we work with Craw-
ford House quite often, so we
thought they were doing good
work and thought this would be
the perfect thing to raise some
funds to help them.”
The Crawford House, which is
located in Skillman, was estab-
lished in 1978 to provide residen-
tial treatment to homeless and in-
digent women who are in early re-
covery from alcohol and drug ad-
diction, and uses the 12-step re-
covery model of Alcoholics
Anonymous to facilitate physical,
emotional and spiritual healing.
“Many of our patients in the
past have entered Crawford
House and with the facility’s help,
were able to fully transition back
into society to live productive
lives in sobriety and recovery,”
Fitzpatrick said. “So, we wanted
to help the Crawford House in
any way we could so that they can
continue doing their good work in
the community.”
In an effort to make fundrais-
ing more accessible in today’s day
and age, Fitzpatrick created Team
Doin’ It. Wow!’s own website
through gofundme.com.
“Since everybody is on the In-
ternet, and since email and social
networking websites are so readi-
ly available to people, instead of
doing cold calls or letters, I
thought this would be the most ef-
fective way of reaching as many
people as we could,” she said. “So
I happened to find this website
where you can do this.”
Fitzpatrick explained how
nearly 75 percent of the total
funds they raised were generated
through their website on go-
fundme.com.
Team Doin’ It. Wow! raised
funds for one month, from Aug. 1
until Sept. 1, and managed to
gather a total of $2,060.
“We never really had a goal, we
were just hoping we could at least
collect $500,” Fitzpatrick said.
“And, we actually reached the
$500 mark in three days, so we
started inching our way up to
$2,000.”
Whitmore detailed the overall
experience of The Color Run and
the importance it held to Team
Doin’ It. Wow!
“The Color Run was a great ex-
perience,” she said. “We had a lot
of fun running the race, especial-
ly knowing that there was such a
great cause behind it. It was very
rewarding knowing that our team
raised so much money for Craw-
ford House. I don't think any of us
were expecting to raise that
much, but we are so grateful to
everyone who donated.”
For The Color Run and
throughout the entire fundrais-
ing process, Team Doin’ It. Wow!
had one important mission – to
raise awareness about substance
abuse – which is something that
all members take very seriously,
according to Castronova.
“It is so important for people to
be educated about the disease of
addiction because it is currently
running rampant in our society,”
she said. “Often times, people do
not understand the severity of
this disease until a loved one is af-
fected directly by drugs and/or al-
cohol. Addiction does not dis-
criminate, and it actively affects
people of all ages, races, reli-
gions, and sexual orientations. I
hope with more awareness and
education, society can be more in-
formed and make healthier deci-
sions regarding what they put
into their body.”
Fitzpatrick echoed Castrono-
va’s comments on how Team
Doin’ It. Wow! did this to raise
awareness about substance
abuse, and with the amount of
success they received, they’re
thinking of making it an annual
tradition.
“We haven’t decided if we’re
going to continue to always do the
fundraising for Crawford House
or change it around and help
other facilities within the addic-
tion services in the future, but we
would love to plan to do this next
year,” she said.
Although Team Doin’ It.
Wow!’s fundraising is over, you
can still make a donation to the
Crawford House at crawford-
house.org.
SEPTEMBER 26-OCTOBER 2, 2012 –THE MONTGOMERY SUN 9
Ms. Andrea BradIey (D)
Ms. Christine Madrid (R) - Incumbent
Mr. Mark Petraske (D)
Mr. Chris Sugden (R)
Wednesday, October 3rd
Doors Open at 7:00 PM
HarIingen Reform Church
34 West Dutchtown Harlingen Road · Belle Mead, NJ 08502
(908) 359-3555
PIease submit questions in advance by: September 26th to:
generaI@tmtp-nj.org
Montgomery Township Committee
Candidates Night
TEAM
Continued from page 1
Sullivan, who was driving south
on U.S. Highway 206, heard the
sound of skidding tires from a ve-
hicle behind him and observed a
2010 Kia Soul nearly impact a
NJDOT crash truck with activat-
ed warning lights and directional
arrows at the rear of a moving
work zone. Officer Sullivan initi-
ated a motor vehicle stop and
made contact with the drive who
had an odor of an alcoholic bever-
age on his breath.
He subsequently failed field so-
briety tests, was arrested and
transported to police HQ for pro-
cessing. He was issued summons-
es for careless driving and DWI
and released to a family member
pending an appearance in Mont-
gomery Twp. Municipal Court.
The driver’s vehicle was im-
pounded and towed from the
scene.
POLICE
Continued from page 2
police report
Team Doin’ It. Wow! raised $2,060 for Crawford House
Please recycle this newspaper.
10 THE MONTGOMERY SUN — SEPTEMBER 26-OCTOBER 2, 2012
NO TIME
to sell your valuable items online?
We can help.
www.NoStressSales.com
(609) 792-0606
Skip the hassle. Just get paid.
ings were based on the new “four-
year graduation rate,” which puts
more emphasis on the number of
students in each graduating class.
Also, because personal comput-
ers have become widespread
among the high school popula-
tion, New Jersey Monthly elimi-
nated student/computer ratio as
a factor. Rather, they increased
the weighting for data on test re-
sults and the new graduation-rate
calculation; the change in weight-
ing is intended to emphasize the
importance of student results in
a time of budget cutting, which is
essentially shown to see which
schools did more with less.
Because the methodology was
tweaked for this year’s list, an as-
sortment of schools on the list ei-
ther rose or dropped drastically,
including Montgomery, which fell
from within the top 10 to outside
of the top 50.
However, despite the town-
ship’s placing on the list, Superin-
tendent Nancy Gartenberg de-
tailed how New Jersey Monthly’s
newly adapted methodology
skewed results.
“From 2010 to 2012, they [New
Jersey Monthly] changed the way
that they were going to put this
report together and that had
some of the impact – the gradua-
tion rate calculation is brand new,
the way in which they double
counted class size (we have a
large senior class), and the way
they calculated net size to
teacher-student ratio,” she said.
“They co-mingled academic and
non-academic data, and went
kind of apples to oranges. What
they didn’t do is show individual-
ly where Montgomery was
ranked as far as SAT scores were
concerned and the success of our
students’ AP scores compared to
others.”
Gartenberg further explained
how these rankings don’t define
Montgomery as a school district,
and how she’s confident that the
district is doing an excellent job
academically.
“We have an outstanding edu-
cational institution and the par-
ents of our community should
have confidence in what were
doing today and what we will be
continuing to do,” she said.
She also detailed how Mont-
gomery continues to be among
the highest performing in areas
of Advanced Placement (AP)
tests, College Admission Tests
(SAT), and the New Jersey Stan-
dardized Tests (HSPA), with its
high school graduation rate close
to 100 percent.
And, although New Jersey
Monthly reported that one of the
new adjustments it made to its
methodology was meant “to em-
phasize the importance of stu-
dent results at a time of budget
cutting,” Gartenberg explained
how Montgomery wasn’t recog-
nized for its efforts.
“There was no credit given to
those schools that seem to be in-
credibly successful academically
and are ‘doing more with less,’”
she said. “Montgomery remains
one of the top performing dis-
tricts in the state, while remain-
ing one of the lowest per-pupil
spending districts. In fact, Mont-
gomery Township Schools, when
compared with the top 10 on this
list, spends $2,400 less than the av-
erage of those top 10.”
Gartenberg is willing to openly
discuss the report with anyone,
and wants to assure residents of
Montgomery that the quality of
education being offered won’t be
affected in any way.
“We’re not going to be distract-
ed and it’s not going to change
our focus,” she said. “Mont-
gomery is proud to be among the
many school districts in New Jer-
sey that continue to work dili-
gently to provide top-notch educa-
tion and opportunities to the stu-
dents of New Jersey.”
Methodology changed for new school rankings
METHODOLOGY
Continued from page 4
Please recycle this newspaper.
As part of a Girl Scout Gold
Award project, Montgomery High
School student Grace Coogan or-
ganized and led a work day at
Seer Farms, a Jackson animal
shelter, with a group of high
school students from the Mont-
gomery/Princeton area in August
as an effort to expose people in
this community to Seer Farms.
With the primary goal to help
improve the facilities, two proj-
ects were chosen for the workday
to paint a mural for one of the
outdoor animal enclosures, and
to construct a paved pathway to
help preserve the lawn that was
getting worn down from the ani-
mals.
The artistically inclined stu-
dents of the group quickly
sketched out the “Wizard of Oz”
themed mural and began paint-
ing, while the less artistically in-
clined people dug the base of the
path and carted the other materi-
als over. In the end, the workday
was a huge success; the group
completed both projects in less
than six hours, and the shelter di-
rector loves them. It was a great
opportunity and experience for
all of the volunteers involved;
each of them were glad to be a
part of such a rewarding project
for a good cause while still having
fun with friends.
Seer Farms, the location of
this workday, is an animal sanctu-
ary that desires to spread its sup-
port base throughout New Jersey.
They have a unique cause – they
take in animals for extreme cir-
cumstances and extended emer-
gency care, like home foreclosure,
health-related situations, domes-
tic violence, and other life crises.
The need from around the coun-
try is too great with the resources
and facilities they have.
For more information on Seer
Farms, visit their website at seer-
farms.org, and “Like” their Face-
book page.
Girl Scout earns Gold Award
with work day at Seer Farms
Statewide Domestic Violence Hotline
(800) 572-7233
PSA
Come skate with us! The
Princeton Skating Club will have
two Open House events at the
Princeton Day School Rink locat-
ed at 650 Great Road in Princeton
– Saturday, Oct. 13 from 11:15 a.m.
until 1:15 p.m.; and Sunday, Oct. 21
from 1 p.m. until 2:30 p.m. Coach-
ing staff will be available to dis-
cuss group and private lessons for
adults and children.
There will be 1 1/2 hours to 2
hours of free ice time and skate
rentals available. From the time
of our founding in 1933, Club
members have appreciated the
warm, family atmosphere of this
(non-profit) club designed espe-
cially for families and figure
skaters. Social events are planned
during the year. For more infor-
mation, see our web site
www.princetonskatingclub.org,
or email princetonsc@aol.com.
SEPTEMBER 26-OCTOBER 2, 2012 –THE MONTGOMERY SUN 11
20 Nassau Street | Princeton, NJ 08542
609-751-0245 | sales@elauwit.com
www.elauwit.com
Hopewell
Lawrence
Montgomery
Princeton
Robbinsville
West Windsor
Crawford House, a halfway
house for women in early recov-
ery from alcohol and drug addic-
tion, is pleased to announce its
2012 Harvest Dinner to raise
funds for its services and pro-
grams for homeless and indigent
women. The dinner will be held
on Thursday, Oct. 18 at 6 p.m. at
the Marriott at Forrestal in
Princeton.
This year’s event will showcase
the crucial contributions made by
area businesses that have provid-
ed employment opportunities to
Crawford House residents.
Obtaining and maintaining
employment during treatment
and recovery is emphasized by
Crawford House in order to foster
self-worth, economic independ-
ence and self-sufficiency.
“We are privileged to honor
area businesses as our neighbors
and long time supporters of
women in early recovery,” Execu-
tive Director of Crawford House
Linda Leyhane said. “We have
benefited from their willingness
to employ women recovering
from addiction, enabling them to
learn new, healthy behaviors that
allow them to lead independent,
productive and happy lives.”
“The Harvest Dinner is always
an inspiring evening as former
residents share their stories of re-
covery and success as they
achieve sobriety, stability and
family reunification,” Leyhane
said. “The need for women to re-
ceive addiction treatment is
greater now than it has ever
been.”
To participate in this year’s
Harvest Dinner or become a spon-
sor, call (908) 874-5153 or email de-
vdirector@crawfordhouse.org.
Additional information can be
found at www.crawfordhouse.org.
Crawford House in Skillman
was established in 1978 to provide
residential treatment to homeless
and indigent women who are in
early recovery from alcohol and
drug addiction. Based on the 12-
step recovery model of Alcoholics
Anonymous, the program is de-
signed to facilitate physical, emo-
tional and spiritual healing in a
safe and mutually supportive
community.
Participants sought for
Crawford House Harvest Dinner
www.artsparksstudio.com • email : info@artsparksstudio.com
(609) 466-5437
33 Railroad Place, Hopewell Borough right across from Railroad Station
Find Your Inner Art Spark at
• Art Classes
• Parties
• Workshops
• Camps
Register Now for Fall Classes
Ages 18 months – 10 years
Learn! Explore! Create! Get Messy! Grow!
Visit us online at www.themontgomerysun.com
Van Harlingen Historical Soci-
ety hosts Tales of the Presidents
presented by Sid Frank of the
Liberty Hall Museum at Kean
College, Thursday, Sept. 27 at 7
p.m. at Mary Jacobs Library,
which is located at 64 Washington
Street in Rocky Hill. The program
is free and open to the public. For
more information, call (908) 874-
4820.
Frank, author of The Presi-
dents: Tidbits and Trivia will chat
about the fascinating and little
known tales of our nation’s lead-
ers. Learn about the interesting
facts not found in our history
books as voters approach the 2012
presidential election.
Liberty Hall Museum has long
been the beneficiary of Frank’s
writing talent. He brings to his
position as museum educator a
history as an author, playwright
and lyricist.
He has written 33 one act plays,
including Life & Tragic Death of
Union County’s Fighting Parson,
James Caldwell, and the Trial of
His Killer, which is performed at
the museum. He has written sev-
eral musical reviews, including
one about New Jersey called Jerz,
which traveled throughout the
state.
He wrote the lyrics for the Gold
Record “Please, Mr. Sun,” fea-
tured in the Last Picture Show.
Frank has also written songs that
were recorded by Frank Sinatra,
Billy Ecstine and Sarah Vaughan,
and is the author of Jews in Jer-
sey, a speech describing the con-
tributions of Jewish New Jer-
seyans.
Tales of Presidents set for Sept. 27
Princeton Skating Club to hold open houses
20 Nassau Street
Princeton, NJ 08542
609.751.0245
elauwit.com
Fall Clean Up
Snow Contracts
Full Line of Landscape Services
Fully Licensed & Insured
609-516-0259
Blue Garden Landscaping
20% OFF ANY COMPETITORS PRICE
Landscaping
classified
T HE MO N T G O ME R Y S U N
SEPTEMBER 26-OCTOBER 2, 2012 PAGE 14
W H A T Y O U N E E D T O K N O W
All ads are based on a 5 line ad, 15-18 characters per line. • Additional lines: $9, Bold/Reverse Type: $9 • Add color to any box ad for $20. • Deadline: Wednesday - 5pm for the following week.
All classified ads must be prepaid. • Your Classified ad will run in all 10 of The Sun newspapers each week! • Be sure to check your ad the first day it appears.
We will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, so call us immediately with any errors in your ad. • No refunds are given, only advertising credit.
L I NE
ADS
Only
$
20per week
H O W T O C O N T A C T U S
Call us: 609-751-0245 or email us: classifieds@elauwitmedia.com
Hopewell Sun • Lawrence Sun
Montgomery Sun • Princeton Sun
Robbinsville Sun • West Windsor Sun
BOX
ADS Only
$
25per week List a text-only ad for your yard
sale, job posting or merchandise.
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 9/30/12.
$1,000 OFF
UP TO
Any new
complete roofing
or siding job
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 9/30/12.
10% OFF
UP TO
Any
roofing
or siding job
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 9/30/12.
FREE
ROOF AND
GUTTER
INSPECTION
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 9/30/12.
FREE
GUT TERS
With any new roof
and siding job
Virtual Home
Remodeler
www.tricountyexteriors.com
609-882-S800
BOOF LBAHINO?
WE CAN REPAIR IT!
"We'llfixyourdripinjustonetrip!"
Lic.#13VH06774500
WE OFFER:
·NewShingleRoofs·SeamlessGutters· Skylights
·Siding·SlateRoofRepairs·RubberRoofs
·Windows&Doors·Capping·Soffits
Licensed · Insured · ResidentiaI & CommerciaI
FBBB BSTImATBSI
NO mONBY DOWN
0¼ FINANCINO
ASH FOB DBTAILS.
TBI-CO0NTY BNTBBIOBS
CIeaning
MiIa's CIeaning Service
Reliable, Affordable
Free estimates
Call Mila
609-620-0849
Email:
mila.iaskevich@gmail.com
Concrete Masonry
Swim Pool Closing
On|y $250
Since 1955 Only Pools
908-359-3000
Home Improvement
1oo pooped 1o scoop?
We provide weekly scooper service s1or1ing o1
$
I3/week
saving our planet, one pile at a time
856-665-6769
www.alldogspoop.com
GET $10.00 OFF YOUR FIRST SERVICE!
Locally owned and operated.
Pet Care
BIG BOYS INC
Nasoo - 8estorat|oo
8r|ck - Po|ot|og
Steps - Fo0odat|oo - 0h|moey
609-672-4145
Free £st|mates
Roofing
CHECK OUT THE SUN CLASSIFIEDS!
Place your
classified today!
856-427-0933
Auto Services
* MD Mobile Windshield Repair *
Nationally Certified
Top Quality • Lifetime Warranty
Repairs + Replacement
Contact & Inquiries:
609-462-3692
www.mdglassrepair.com
EducationaI Services
Big FIREWOOD
De||ver & Dump
Sa|e $190
908-359-3000
856-356-2775
Board Your
Dog In A
Loving Home
Not A KenneI
www.OurHome-DogBoarding.com
Dog Boarding
Academic Success:
Tutoring
Certified K-12 Honors
Graduate
Over 25 years exp.
Caring,Ìndividualized
Ìnstruction
SAT Reading, Writing,
Math, Subject Tests
H.S. Eng. Lit. and Writing;
Math to Pre-Calc., History
Elem. Phonics, Reading,
Math; Study Skills; E.S.L.
Excellent Ref.
609-924-2610
THINK
ABOUT
IT…
This space
could be yours!
Hmmmm…
To advertise
call us at
856
427
0933.
CLASSIFIED SEPTEMBER 26-OCTOBER 2, 2012 - THE MONTGOMERY SUN 15
If you’re reading your
competitor’s ad?
Who’s making money…
YOU OR THEM?
Advertise with us!
Special Classified offers available.
Don’t delay! Call today!
(856) 427-0933 x 512
INTO ACTION!
(609) 751-0245
2 MONTHS FREE
OMEGA
SELF STORAGE
300 Lawrence Station Road
Lawrenceville, NJ 08648
609-584-1133
Services
PIANO LESSONS
Teacher with Piano
Pedagogy degree from
Westminster. Welcoming
ages 5 and older.
Call 908-874-4530
MisceIIaneous
Combining print advertising with an online advertising campaign is the most comprehensive
way to reach all your local customers. But it was an expensive proposition… until now.
Sun Newspaper print customers can now take advantage of special online packages and
pricing. Our online advertising packages combine local exposure on well-known national
websites such as Discovery, Comedy Central, Time, Rachael
Ray, Facebook, USA Today and The Weather Channel with advertising on Elauwit’s hyperlocal
websites in South Jersey, Central Jersey and Philadelphia.
So whether your customers are catching up on local happenings on our websites or checking
in on their friends
on Facebook, they’ll be seeing your business.
Elauwit offers 3 digital advertising packages:
• Special online advertising packages available
to Sun Newspaper print customers only
• 3-month contract required
• Pre-payment required
B0Y AN AD
If you want in on this, just pick up the
phone or drop an email:
p: 856-528-4703
e: sales@elauwit.com
w: www.sunne.ws
Your Customers Are OmIIme.
Are You?
It’s a fact of today’s society – more and more people spend time online.
Are you there when they are?
Local exposure on national sites.
BRON2E PACKAOE($100/month):
• 300 x 250 ad that clicks through to your website
• 30,000 impressions per month
• Target your ads on the national website directory to 3 Zip Codes
• Pick either South Jersey, Central Jersey or Philadelphia for your Elauwit web presence
8ILVER PACKAOE($200/month):
• 300 x 250 ad that clicks through to your website
• 60,000 impressions per month
• Target your ads to 5 Zip Codes
• Pick 2 of either South Jersey, Central Jersey or Philadelphia for your Elauwit web presence
OOLD PACKAOE($300/month):
• 300 x 250 ad that clicks through to your website
• 100,000 impressions per month
• Target your ads to 7 Zip Codes
• Get all 3 Elauwit websites: South Jersey, Central Jersey and Philadelphia
300
x
250