C_LIFE

URBAN INFORMATICS WORKBOOK

ARUP INFORMATICS (SYDNEY), ARUP COMMUNICATIONS (LONDON) AND EXPERIENTIA (TURIN)

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MeTA

INTRODUCTION, CONTENTS, VERSION CONTROL AND KEY CONTACTS

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CONTeNTS

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URBAN INFORMATICS WORKBOOK MeTA
CONTENTS INTRODUCTION THIS VERSION NEXT VERSION CONTACTS

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OVeRVIeW
THE 21ST CENTURY BUILDING

PeOPle
KATERIINA TOM SEYMON NIKO MATIAS SUMMARY MARKO MINNA SARA OUTI

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PlACeS
HOME BUS-STOP GARDEN WORKPLACE COURTYARD

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PROdUCTS
COMMUNITY NOTICEBOARD ENERGY VISUALISATIONS ENERGY SCULPTURE SMART BUS STOP SMART BIKE-SHARING HUB GARDEN INSTALLATION SMART NAMEPLATE SMART HOME DELIVERY SMART WORKPLACE WATER GAUGE C_LIFE REWARDS AR OPERATIONS DASHBOARD

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PAleTTe
TEXTURES TYPE OBJECTS PATTERNS SYMBOLS

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eNCOUNTeRS
HELSINKI SMART CITY

107 STRATeGY

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INTROdUCTION

This document describes work-in-progress on the urban informatics component of the ‘low carbon lifestyle’ workstream for the c_life project. it moves from an understanding of people and place towards products and services. It is a working document and should be read in conjunction with other discussions and designs in this workstream, particularly those led by Experientia.

THIS VeRSION

2.0 DRAFT FOR COMMENT ‘Blueberry edition’ Incorporates detail on how products deliver sustainability framework and relate to service-oriented architecture, as well as additional scenarios relating to clients.

NeXT VeRSION

BEGINNINGS OF DETAILED DESIGN Respond to feedback from client and consortium. Further integration with web/ mobile services and with architecture, engineering and service-oriented architecture. Additional detail on sustainability framework and strategic benefits. Beginnings of detailed design work and procurement assessment.

CONTACTS

dan Hill dan.hill@arup.com Jason Mcdermott jason.mcdermott@arup.com Arup, Sydney

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OVeRVIeW

THE BIG IDEA

OVERVIEW

THe 21ST CeNTURY BUIldING

OUTLINE OF THE RATIONALE FOR INFORMATICS AND BEHAVIOUR CHANGE

YOUR NOTES

APPROACH Urban informatics is the practice of creating interactive buildings, spaces and cities. The area is emerging due to advances and changes in both technology and culture—specifically, pervasive connectivity enabled by mobile devices and wireless networks, and the emergence of sensor technologies to detect and understand how environments and communities are performing. Informatics describes how physical spaces are becoming digital, and how digital experiences are becoming physical in return. Our rationale for designing this approach into c_life is essentially such that it exemplifies a ‘genuinely 21st century building’, which addresses sustainable living in terms of demand management and other behavioural change approaches to carbon reduction, whilst enabling a higher quality of life. As a resident, worker or visitor, it becomes clear that the building and its urban environment is something you are intrinsic to, in that you understand the impact of your activity upon the city and can use well-designed technologies to control, enable, articulate and understand your own way of living, working and playing in this new kind of sustainable urban environment. We have pursued a ‘user-centred design’ methodology, which is common to the design of interactive products and services but little used in built environment design processes. Our premise is that as buildings and spaces become more interactive, the design process has to shift accordingly. (We explicitly recognise that the client body are also users of this space, and so have included scenarios for employees of Sitra, SRV and VVO, as well as the City.) Given that this is an emerging area, and that there are few if any prior examples of such developments in directly analogous situations, it is difficult to speak with certainty of its impact. However, there are some precedents beginning to emerge, usually at the larger, urban scale (e.g. New Songdo City) or for a particular service (e.g. smart meters or bicycle sharing schemes) or at smaller

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OVERVIEW

APPROACH scale (e.g. ‘wired-up’ environments such as fabFood). Each of these provides an indication of the value and interest in pursuing these strategies. Yet it is probably fair to say that there is no equivalent example of a building which so holistically approaches the problem of lowcarbon environments enabled not solely by good building design but also through becoming a platform that enables users to tend towards sustainable living, making better decisions on better information. In this sense, c_life could be the first of its kind, a prototype urban environment that leads the world. Without this holistic approach, it is likely that some similar solutions may emerge organically, but with the kind of incoherent, fragmented and frustrating user experience which is all too common to poorly designed or emergent technology solutions— imagine a different username and password required to access each service in the block—but also without any strategic value, meaning data could not be accessed or exchanged to enable coherent reporting, on carbon or anything else. But although the effect of the holistic, considered approach is difficult to pin down exactly, we are building on several key references as well as the projects and analogues referenced here throughout. These include the ‘enabling effect’ of smart information and communications technologies (ICT) described in the SMART 2020 report (‘SMART 2020: Enabling the low-carbon economy in the information age’, Global eSustainability Initiative/The Climate Group, 2008), which describes the effect of smart meters and similar initiatives, with ICT capable of reducing total global emissions by 15% by 2020. Further, a report by VTT describes the potential impact of an electronic rewards scheme regarding food consumption in Finland, with associated food-related carbon emission reductions in the order of 10-20% (Government Institute for Economic Research. Research Reports 143: till 6. Climate Bonus Project Report, WPI to 6. 2009). While we cannot know for sure until systems are prototyped, installed and observed—as with any contemporary technology— both of these references combine to give us the sense that such an approach would be able to garner a reduction in carbon in the order of 5-15%. We also feel assured by these numbers because the systems proposed here go beyond the simple data feedback loops of smart

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OVERVIEW

APPROACH meters, instead engaging more fully with service design and the principles underpinning behavioural change (described more fully in documentation delivered at the end of phase one.) Put simply, smart meters by themselves are unlikely to produce continued behaviour change. Simple feedback of data, divorced from context of use or too far removed from interactions with services and communities, is too easy to ignore. Our approach then is to embed data feedback into everyday life, into the heart of the systems by which people live their life. In this respect, the urban informatics strategies cannot be considered outside of the other services and approaches that comprise c_life—they are distributed interfaces to Home Assistant, or to the mobility and food services around the building, or integrated into the architecture itself. Technically, informatics services are derived from the ‘service-oriented architecture’ which underpins the development Similarly, the c_life rewards system outlined here is essentially a living version of the sustainability framework itself, producing ongoing monitoring of the building and its performance, the services and their users, the residents and workers and their activities. Just as it is an attempt to embed systems of behavioural change in everyday life, so the benefits are various and diverse. This short book suggests various ways in which an informatics product or service might enable uptake of sustainable services and reductions in carbon, how they might enrich the process of placemaking or knowledge work, reinforce social cohesion and health benefits, and so on. Similarly, those who benefit from such approaches are a diverse set, including the users of the building and the client body but also further strategic partners. Finally, c_life could describe how many buildings in general may come to be designed, built and operated, not only in terms of its architecture, engineering and construction, but also in the layers of smart services and inhabitation that define how places are used and how they evolve. This is not only of value to the client body, who may benefit from ‘first-mover advantage’ whilst preparing themselves for new regulatory environments, but to Helsinki and the pattern of urban development in Finland more generally. As similar smart buildings and neighbourhoods emerge, cities can strategically compare, construct, prototype, monitor and manage approaches to the forms of sustainable living that must come to define the 21st century.

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PeOPle

SCENARIOS ILLUSTRATING RESIDENTS’ INTERACTIONS WITH URBAN INFORMATICS AND EACH OTHER AT C_LIFE

PEOPLE

KATeRIINA

36 YEARS OLD SINGLE MOTHER WORKS PART-TIME AT C_LIFE

A LIFE LIVED LOCALLY

YOUR NOTES

SCENARIO 07:00 Katariina wakes up to the sounds of her 8-year old son Niko watching television—it’s ‘Energy Crusaders’, a cartoon comically highlighting the dangers of excessive energy use. Katariina showers and prepares for her day. 08:00 As she showers, Katariina watches the beautifully detailed glass water meter in her shower counting down the ideal showering time. Even though Katariina has seen it countless times, its appeal and utility still have an affect on her. Whilst Niko showers (although he’s proud of his incredibly short 2 minute showers, Katariina isn’t convinced he’s actually that clean), Katariina prepares breakfast and prepares for their day. 09:00 Katariina walks Niko to the bus stop for his short trip across town (Katariina waves hello to Seymon as Niko boards the bus), then wanders over to the local grocer. As she passes the bicycle share stand, Katariina notices that someone called Tom has been using the system for twice as long as she has. Katariina looks around but doesn’t spot a Tom. She heads off towards the bank. 10:00 Katariina only has a few errands to run this morning, a small package to mail to her cousin, some personal banking and Niko’s birthday present to consider. 11:00 Katariina stops of at the local fresh food grocer to choose and place her weekly grocery order before heading back home. Katariina likes the new system of food shopping, which allows her to see—and squeeze—the produce before placing her order, which is then delivered later by a smart bicycle delivery system. Katariina enjoys the whole experience—and Frederick the grocer

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KATERIINA usually has a good story to share—enabling her to focus on the quality local produce which is then delivered sustainably. This significantly helps her carbon profile. The shop’s smart nameplate pings and glows green as leaves, indicating a ‘+1’ to her rewards system, and a sustainable transaction. 13:00 After lunch Katariina rides her bike to the local library, stopping at the bicycle share stand to help explain how it works to newcomers to the area. The library’s website displays books based on books she’d rated highly before, but she sometimes enjoys also simply browsing through the aisles. The local library is very popular in the area, as it has access to information not easily found online, as well as free and easy wi-fi. As Katariina leaves c_life, she passes by several young men furiously typing on laptops, stopping occasionally to look at and comment on each others screens. Once at the library, Katariina’s wishlisted books are shown highlighted on her phone’s AR application, giving her a simple starting point. 14:00 Satisfied, Katariina leaves the library to pick up Niko from the bus stop. On her way out Katariina notices a glowing display whirring with activity. She pauses long enough to notice it’s a map of the library showing internet activity and local connections. She can see that the young men she walked past earlier were designers working on a 3D model, which was printed at the print-on-demand workshop in the Incubator. Katariina makes a mental note to tell Niko about this, as he’s sure to be interested. 15:00 Katariina picks up Niko from the bus stop on her way back home. They only have time for a quick snack this afternoon, as Niko’s going to the Incubator space for a computer games software workshop being run by a small start-up software company. The Incubator space has been hosting lots of events lately—Katariina really enjoyed the bicycle tinkering workshop last month—and Niko’s excited about making games of his own. 16:00 When they reach the Incubator, Katariina is surprised to see Seymon also attending, but pleased Niko will have a friend to learn with, so she relaxes by reading one of the e-books she downloaded earlier (recommended not by the librarian, but rather by her c_life social reading group).

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KATERIINA 17:00 Katariina and Niko walk home, stopping to say hello to a friend in the park nearby—she’d heard Niko’s friend finder app had hummed. Once home, Niko begins working on his homework, using his smart pad in the kitchen whilst Katariina prepares dinner. 19:00 Dinner is served! Katariina’s pleased to see how well her new recipe turned out. Niko wolfs it down. The recipe itself was a bit of a surprise, it came delivered with Katariinas smart home delivery of groceries earlier that day—the c_life community suggests interesting dishes involving the ingredients she ordered. 20:00 Katariina clears the table and does the dishes. As Katariina puts out the waste (sorted into organic for compost, recyclable and general), small LEDs near next to the chute show that the household waste consumption levels are high this month, and suggests some waste-saving tips are available on her c_life portal. 22:00 Katariina chats online with some of her friends, organising another clothes swap party. It’s a good way to add new clothes to her wardrobe without needing to buy new items—and a great excuse to socialise. She remembers that a note on the community noticeboard had indicated the c_life repair shop has extended into repairs and alterations of clothes, which opens up a whole new set of possibilities. Katariina checks in on Niko, who’s sound asleep, gently snoring underneath his real-time constellation ambient night light, then heads to bed.

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TOM

35 YEARS OLD SINGLE MALE WORKS FOR NOKIA FROM WORKSPACE AT C_LIFE

THE ADVOCATE, LIVING AND WORKING LOCALLY

YOUR NOTES

SCeNARIO 07:00 Tom is woken by a light on his desk nearby gently glowing blue, predicting a cold day ahead based on local weather data. He hops out of bed and gets dressed, taking note of the weather prediction. Over breakfast, Tom spots his coffee is getting low and quickly adds this to the smart shopping cart of his local grocer— it’ll be delivered later today to his food delivery ‘inbox’. 08:00 Tom has a quick shower, attempting to maintain his efficient realtime water use (and more importantly, cost) shown on the glass water meter built into the shower. His water efficiency is the best in his block, nearly the best in his precinct. After breakfast he checks on a few items in his pantry, swiftly using his touchphone to order items from his grocer. His rewards account, which links his green utility use with local business, gives small incentives such as free delivery and small discounts on locally sourced items. 09:00 Tom heads out to work, by-passing the smart bike share system located outside his apartment. Today he’s using the co-working office so the bike won’t be necessary. Even so, the bike-share stand recognizes his rewards card, glowing green to reflect his recent bicycle use. Walking through the courtyard, Tom doesn’t even glance at the transport congestion map displayed in front of the co-working space—as he no longer needs to commute long distances, he rarely even thinks about road traffic. Tom swipes his rewards card to sign into his shared office space. He rented this space for the week as he has an important client meeting to prepare for. His booking included a single desk hub, access to the kitchen facilities as well as space to meet with a client. The temporary working space is a good option for a designer like Tom, cheap enough to be affordable, whilst providing good facilities for

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TOM him to work, alongside what’s usually good social interaction. 10:00 Tom pauses to get a coffee, bumping into Matias, a colleague he is working with on a new prototype for Nokia. They agree to meet again later that day before the meeting, joking about how much more often they see each other since starting their new co-sharing style of work. 12:00 Tom ducks out to grab lunch from the cafe. His c_life rewards card gives him a small discount at all local retailers—which he appreciates while he’s enjoying his sandwich, sitting in the shade of the energy sculpture in the public square. 13:00 Tom returns to his work to find his notes from the meeting waiting for him to review and file, having been auto-transcribed during the meeting. Tom’s desk space brightens as he approaches it, the desk sensors reacting to his presence. Tom prefers his new work space which is customised to his preferences. 15:00 Tom meets up with Matias outside the library. There they spend some time tweaking the 3D model for printing, then stop by the on-demand 3D printer (a new start-up venture supported by the c_life FabLab) to pick up the fully-working 3D model waiting for them. Tom sent the 3D model to the other offices for printing also, so the dispersed team can all review and discuss the same model. 16:00 Tom receives a notice telling him his smart grocery delivery has arrived—his small order of coffee, milk and bread is in his ‘inbox’ courtesy of the bicycle delivery system. As his rewards card updates Tom notices his virtual c_life self has shrunk two full shoe-sizes, indicating his carbon footprint is decreasing. Reflecting on this, Tom thinks of how hard it would be to have such a small carbon footprint living in his old apartment on the edge of the city. 17:00 After Tom attends the telepresence meeting with his team, Tom relaxes by chatting with Matias. They’re both very impressed with the rapid prototyping ability their team now has, their 3D model allowed the whole team to give feedback on the design. They

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TOM both recall their days as students, when rapid prototyping meant cardboard, foam and cutting blades. 18:00 Tom makes his way home, passing by the park to watch an impromptu soccer game being played by local kids. Tom notices a friend of his also watching (whose son is on one of the teams), so he stops to chat. Some of the kids are quite good, attracting the attention of the parents, who record and upload videos of their children to the web almost as fast as the action occurs. Some of these videos are even broadcast on the beautiful glass community bulletin boards that snake around c_life—which the kids love. Their parents even more so. 19:00 Hungry, Tom finally heads home and picks up his groceries from the beautifully-carved in-boxes in the lobby of his building. After a quick dinner, he settles down to relax in front of his laptop, on which he streams the latest Veikkausliiga match. Tom’s friend Christian (who lives on the floor above his) is also watching the game, which they banter and joke about online during the match. They agree to meet up for a quick drink after the game, in the lounge bar on the ground floor. The two spend about an hour dissecting the game before heading back upstairs. 23:00 As Tom falls into bed, he sets his sleepometer (a tool which measures his sleeping patterns) before ‘checking in’ to his shared working space for the morning. He briefly attempts to read a bit more of his book, but swiftly falls asleep.

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SeYMON

42 YEARS OLD SINGLE MALE BUS-DRIVER, ORIGINALLY FROM RUSSIA

THE OLDER RESIDENT, PARTTIME WORKER

YOUR NOTES

SCeNARIO 07:00 Seymon wakes early, slipping out of bed and into the shower quickly, keen to get a good start on his day. It’s his first day driving the new buses around Helsinki and aside from feeling a little bit nervous about the new technology, Seymon is excited, having finally completed his training sessions on the new buses. Each one has now been kitted out with a swathe of augmented reality technologies, which would have taken a lot longer to learn had he not been living in c_life. Seymon steps out of the shower, noting how quiet the precinct is at this time in the morning—all he can hear are the smart bicycles swishing around the grounds running through their early morning deliveries. 08:00 Seymon doesn’t spend long at home once dressed, only stopping long enough to consult his c_life display to check out how healthy the precinct is this morning—he notices the solar panels seem to be picking up a more sun now that summer is here. 09:00 Seymon’s first day starts well, as he easily weaves his first trip across the city. The new bus stops are each beautifully detailed, with lights that softly glow to announce his—and the bus’s—presence so he feels like he’s being welcomed everywhere he goes. The passengers are also pleased about the new system, especially little Niko, who always seems to want to know more about how things work. 15:00 Signing off from work, Seymon rides back to c_life using the smart bicycle share system. Luckily for him, the system has dropoff points at many places in Jätkäsaari (including one outside the bus depot), so he has no problem reserving one of the bikes for the ride to and from work. Some of the bicycles are electric-assisted but Seymon prefers to pedal. The ride is very pleasant anyway,

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SEYMON and is a good workout after a good day of driving. 16:00 Seymon is free this afternoon to practice his interest in tinkering in the c_life Incubator, where FabLab workshop is being run. Seymon used to be an amateur computer programmer and is amazed to see how straightforward coding has become. Niko is there, and asking too many questions to answer as usual. That is until Seymon mentions Tetris, which he has never even heard of! Seymon spends the rest of the workshop fiddling with his model. 18:00 Returning home, Seymon pauses in the courtyard to enjoy the movements of the c_life energy sculpture, as it recounts the energy flows of the day. The sculpture sways with graceful movements, its limbs a live reflection of the whole precinct’s health. Seymon’s Nokia buzzes, and he sees Niko had left him a geotagged message about the sculpture. Chuckling to himself, Seymon heads back to his apartment. On the way, he walks past one of the curving community noticeboard screens and spots that someone is driving to Tampere at the weekend, and looking for other ‘car-poolers’. He ‘bookmarks’ the request on his mobile’s c_life rewards app, thinking he might well visit his mum. 19:00 Seymon’s kitchen and living room slowly warm to life as he enters his apartment. His movements trigger a series of actions, which also feed into his activity profile. Satisfied with the green glow coming from the light above his doorway, Seymon settles down to enjoy the Veikkausliiga game before retiring to bed.

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NIKO

8 YEARS OLD SCHOOLBOY SON OF KATERIINA

ENGAGING THE YOUNGER C_LIFE RESIDENT, BUT ARE THERE TOO MANY SCREENS?

YOUR NOTeS

SCeNARIO 07:00 Niko slowly wakes up, as a warm light slowly creeps across the room, mimicking the sun rising. He heads into the living room, looking out of the large windows into the dark outside, and he notices the gentle glow of other lights emerging across c_life. 08:00 Niko heads into the kitchen for some rye bread and cheese with cranberry juice. Mum tells him the cranberries are from the garden downstairs. He’d learnt in school that Finland has to buy a lot of fruit from abroad. Great to have fruit growing right outside. 09:00 Over to the bus-stop with Mum. As they stroll through the trees heading for the edge of the apartment block, he can see the bus-stop beginning to gently glow, indicating the bus isn’t far off. They break into a trot—it’s Mr. Ahtisaari first thing today at school, and he doesn’t want to be late. 09:30—15:00 After a gossipy bus ride, Niko and friends arrive at school, where he spends all day. Most of the day is spent playing outside, as it’s a new kind of school—“from Sweden”, someone said, with a dismissive grunt—where you play outdoors a lot. He likes it. Most of the afternoon is spent on the deck using Smart Lego blocks to piece together a little toy. 15:00 He’s happy to see Mum waiting for him at the bus-stop, but is actually more thrilled by the prospect of taking his Smart Lego to the c_life FabLab. He babbles excitedly to his Mum that he can make the toy ping by waving at it. “That’s nice, dear”, she says. 16:00 The FabLab is strewn with cool things; bits of Smart Lego, Ar-

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NIKO duino, cables, batteries, solar chargers, glue. A few other kids his age are there, over in the area reserved for ‘early learning’ about hardware hacking. The other side of the FabLab has seriouslooking young men and women making Proper Things. He sees Seymon over there, who he’s friends with even though he’s Old. 18:00 His Mum drags him out of the FabLab at 6pm, and they walk back home. He feels a gentle buzz in his pocket, and he pulls his Nokia out to discover a picture of Hanna on the screen. Looking up, he sees her coming round the corner and says “Hei” as she smiles. Mum isn’t sure he should have a phone at his age, but he likes it. Homework in the kitchen on the smart pad. The app suggests a few friends in the block who are doing similar exercises, and so he knows he can go and ask them for help if he needs to. But he finds all this maths stuff easy, and races through it. He waits for a knock at the door from Olli, asking for help, but it never comes. 19:00 Dinner. He talks to his Mum about her day, and then leaves her to do the washing up. He’s surprised she lets him get away with that, but Mum seems a bit distracted. He grabs the other smart pad in the living room and fires up a local role-playing game. 19:30 His Mum comes in to the living room waving her rewards card at him again. “Niko, I’m trying to hit our energy targets again, and you’re not helping. And you’ve spent too long in front of screens today”. Niko sighs. A glance out of the window reveals the tall crane-like energy sculpture over the block is glowing green, which indicates that the off-site c_life generator is currently generating sufficient renewable energy to power the block. He’s an inquisitive boy, and wonders where the off-site generators are and what they look like. He knows he could find out if he looked at c_life community portal, which explains exactly how the apartments work. Later. Niko signs off in the game. He has three friends from c_life online in the same game and he says he’ll see them in the gardens. He asks his Mum if he can meet his friends in the gardens—Mum always says yes to this, as it’s safe, well-lit, and visible from the apartment, as well as being what she calls A Good Thing.

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NIKO “Grab some carrots while you’re there, if they’ve got any”, Mum says. Niko replies with a weary sigh, “Mum, you can see yourself.” He indicates the wall-mounted panel display in the kitchen, which has an app showing what’s growing in the garden at any one time. His Mum says he’s turning into a teenager already. He doesn’t know what this means but thinks it’s probably quite good. Down through the hallway, he notes from the gentle glow outside each doorway that his Mum’s efforts are paying off—their apartment number is glowing a soft green, whereas most others are orange, with a few even red. Well done Mum. 20:00 Niko and his mates are playing in the community garden. He sees various adults selecting vegetables for dinner, even though a glance at the garden’s live sculpture indicates that it’s running low on produce, due to the ‘soil acidity’, whatever that is. 21:00 Back in the apartment, he settles down next to his Mum on the couch. Mum is reading her book on her smart pad, and so he can’t watch TV. The TV isn’t on much these days anyway. He prefers to chat with his mates on his pad. 21:15 Bed. The night light in his room is in the shape of an old wooden house, and slowly pulsing with little pin-pricks of soft green light, which he knows means that they’re still hitting their energy targets. Unlike a lot of kids he actually has a sense of how much energy it takes to make his life. Or at least that’s how he sees it. Niko drifts off to sleep, contented.

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MATIAS

32 YEARS OLD SINGLE WORKS FOR NOKIA

ENGAGING THE RESISTANT

YOUR NOTES

SCeNARIO 07:00 Matias wakes up, his alarm ringing loudly. Bleary-eyed he pulls himself out of bed and still only half-awake, Matias steps into the bathroom hoping the shower will wake him up. 08:00 Over breakfast, Matias pores over his presentation notes, making small changes to the design. Lately Matias has found it hard to concentrate on his work, continually needing to work late into the night to complete his part of the prototype. This won’t last forever, he thinks, ignoring the orange glow of light now appearing above his door. After the prototype is finalised, he’ll just be tweaking the model—a welcome change which will give him a chance to relax and enjoy his new home. 09:00 Matias hurries to pack his bag and leave for work. He’ll be late today, but not by much since he’s now living so close. If he had more time he’d take the bus to work, but there’s a lot to do today so there’s really no option but to drive. Matias quickly leaves the apartment, leaving several lamps on in his haste to avoid the traffic. Walking out of c_life into the adjacent streets, Matias barely even notices the bicycle share stand which, according to Tom, just happens to be as fast as a car in getting to the office. 10:00 Matias triumphantly strides into the office after a slow and frustrating drive from c_life, only to see the floor mostly empty. For part of the way into work he was stuck in slow-moving traffic, an experience made worse by the steady stream of buses and bicycles moving past him in the transit lane. 11:00 Matias makes his changes quickly, editing and revising the document he needs to present with Tom. Noticing all the empty desks,

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MATIAS he asks one colleague where the rest of her team is. “At home,” it seems. Matias is sure he could probably be just as productive from c_life—he’s heard the printing facilities are top-notch and the wifi is very useful – but he’s part of several teams and doesn’t want to miss any important (or subtle) changes whilst he’s away. 13:00 Matias leaves for c_life to meet up with Tom, pleased to see the roads are clearer this time round. Oddly enough, the only other driver on the road is one of the buses to c_life (which he tries his best to ignore). Matias is home again soon, and searching around for that hard-to-find parking spot—assisted by a small series of LED lights embedded in the pavement, somehow the green glow of a free spot is visible even during the day. Matias is mildly irritated by the large number of the parking spaces are allocated to the c_life car-sharing club, however. 14:00 Matias quickly walks back to c_life. He stops by home to grab a quick bite to eat. Although the lights had turned themselves off, the home energy visualisation is still glowing red, perhaps due to his driving. He makes a mental note to see what would happen to the energy visualisation if he left all appliances on. 15:00 Matias and Tom meet up in the courtyard, underneath the large energy sculpture. Tom points up to it, commenting on how much better it seems—which confuses Matias for a split second, before remembering he it relates to the whole c_life energy bill. He’s never been sure what moves the sculpture but he’s sceptical about how much impact his light bulbs would have compared to the whole precinct. Surely the café and crèche would have a bigger impact than him he thinks. 16:00 Matias and Tom meet with their UK colleagues over the free wifi, which is fast enough to handle the high-def telepresence. Matias is secretly impressed with this, thinking he should ask Tom about the temporary work space afterwards. The meeting goes very well, as both teams are able to discuss and refer to the 3D model and documentation at the same time. 17:00 Exhausted and excited about how well the project is going, Matias suggests they both head to the pub to unwind after their meeting.

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PEOPLE

MATIAS Tom agrees, pleased at how smoothly their collaboration is going over such a distance. On their way to the pub, Matias notices a change in the large scale display outside the co-working spaces, visualising the global connectivity happening over the c_life wifi network. His telepresence with London may be why that city is showing up on the whirring clock display. He also notes that one of the ‘pop-up storefronts’ is being inhabited by a new kind of music listening booth, streaming a show direct from London’s East End. He knows Olof, the guy that started it, and heard he was planning to take advantage of Sitra’s ‘14-day lease’ deal, which enables start-ups to try out risky businesses in a low-risk environment. “What could I do with such a space?” 18:00 Matias spends much of the hour pestering Tom for his opinion on the working spaces around c_life, excited about the prospect of not needing to drive to and from work each day. Tom only seems keen on discussing things Matias doesn’t want to talk about, like the amount of energy he conserves by growing vegetables in the c_life veggie patch (a few scrappy lettuce leaves don’t seem worth it), and how green his home energy visualisation has been lately. Before too long, Matias heads home, weary and tired. 19:30 Finally turning off his house lights, Matias collapses into bed and falls asleep to the sounds of small children playing in the courtyard below.

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PEOPLE

SUMMARY

SCENARIOS TRACKED AND OVERLAID

LOOKING FOR SPATIAL CONCENTRATIONS OF ACTIVITY

KATeRIINA NIKO TOM SeYMON MATIAS

Overlaying the scenarios onto a sketch of the emerging c_life design indicates various areas of interaction and concentration. This can be developed over time, as the details of both building design and service design becomes more refined, but this sketch of activity immediately begins to indicate a few key areas: apartments, workspaces, garden, courtyard/communal areas and transit environments.

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27
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Katariina Niko

PEOPLE

Tom

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up

br ea

go

kf as t

sh

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w al

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Seymon

SUMMARY

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SCENARIO INTERACTIONS ENTWINED

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Matias
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Katariina

PEOPLE

MARKO

43 YEARS OLD MARRIED VVO MAINTENANCE

INDICATING BENEFIT FROM OPERATIONAL POINT-OF-VIEW

YOUR NOTES

MINI-SCeNARIO 08:00 Marko arrives on site at c_life and enters his office at the c_life central operations centre (in practice, a small room incorporating marketing suite, management team and operational equipment.) He check all the building’s ‘vital signs’ on the real-time c_life dashboard over his phone on the way in, so is already aware that everything appears to be generally in working order, with only a few small maintenance tasks left over from last week and no new additional tasks overnight. Marko has a super-user’s view of the building, able to read all sensors in and around c_life. 09:00 After dealing with a few of the tasks via the c_life users’ dashboard—he is able to respond directly to their requests, when they haven’t been able to tap into the community’s shared knowledge base and solve things themselves, and indicate when tasks are pending or complete—Marko embarks on his first walk round of the day. 09:15 Marko stops to chat at the coffee stall outside the Sitra HQ. The coffee vendor is a constant ‘squeaky wheel’ in terms of assailing Marko about water pressure issues. Marko tries to coax him into using the c_life users’ dashboard to raise issues, and the coffee guy accedes. For now. 10:00 As part of his rounds, Marko uses the augmented reality mode of his super-user’s view c_life dashboard to view real-time sensor data from behind the various service panels. This lets him read how the building is performing without opening panels, or indeed sensors requiring dials in the first place, simply by holding his phone over the QR codes stamped on the panels, the sensors simply wirelessly communicating their data direct to his screen.

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PEOPLE

MINNA

32 YEARS OLD MARRIED HELSINKI CITY COUNCIL’S PLANNING DEPT.

INDICATING BENEFIT FROM STRATEGIC POINT-OF-VIEW

YOUR NOTES

MINI-SCeNARIO 14:00 Minna is preparing her monthly assessment of the recent urban development projects in Helsinki for her departmental meeting. Her favourite project by far is c_life, a recent mixed-use block project in Jätkäsaari, in large part due to the unprecedented level of data she is able to access about how the project is going. By logging onto the c_life API and dashboard as Helsinki City Council, Minna can pull up numerous data feeds on almost all aspect of everyday life in the block, with both real-time and longitudinal data expressed via a variety of sharp visualisations and queryable interfaces designed specifically for her. 15:30 As she’s pasting a movie of mobility patterns around c_life into her presentation, Minna notices that a recent change in the bus timetable may have had a detrimental effect on the retail patterns along the eastern edge. She decides to highlight this later. 17:00 By the time she’s approaching the end of her presentation, her colleagues are in awe at the quantity and quality of the data and visualisations that Minna has been able to draw from c_life. It’s as if she can peel open the top of the block and look inside to see what’s working and what isn’t. She pulls up the real-time city model that Helsinki City Council have commissioned (in collaboration with Sitra’s Helsinki Design Lab.) c_life appears here as a glowing block streaming with data, surrounded by pulsing veins of transit patterns and some spots of environmental data from elsewhere in the city. By the end of the meeting, it becomes clear that c_life is offering a model for urban development and ‘gov 2.0’, partly due to this real-time, ongoing post-occupancy evaluation across numerous facets, from resident satisfaction to retail patterns, air quality to food production. It becomes an interactive toolkit for prototyping possibilities in Kalasatama, Espoo, Vantaa and beyond, with the EU showing real interest too.

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PEOPLE

SARA

26 YEARS OLD SINGLE SRV MARKETING

INDICATING BENEFIT FROM MARKETING POINT-OF-VIEW

YOUR NOTES

MINI-SCeNARIO 13:00 Sara is having lunch with potential business partners after a successful presentation to the Helsinki metropolitan region urban development forum, where she’d been talking about their c_life development. She’d wow-ed the audience, not simply by indicating a successful project along all the usual statements of value involved in commercial property development, but also by foregounding how forward-thinking she felt c_life was compared to traditional—or “20th century” as she referred to them—urban development projects. Sara had been able to demonstrate several genuinely innovative aspects that, for her and SRV, positioned the block as a “truly 21st century building”, such as its food production, retail mix, and a sustainable lifestyle enabled by contemporary technologies, the kind of technologies that consumers increasingly expect to augment and enhance almost all aspects of their life. Building on the data generated by c_life’s informatics suite—a dashboard populated by the c_life API, and then visualised in compelling fashion through the Helsinki City Council-led ‘data viz Olympics’ that had been held at c_life this year—Sara had indicated not only a rapid and effective sales campaign for the units, but high levels of resident satisfaction with significant operational benefits for their partner VVO, alongside the data emerging on demand reduction from the block—a 15% decrease in carbon associated with lifestyle choices. 15:00 Helsinki Energia call to discuss the possibility of developing a variation on their successful installation at c_life—the c_life energy sculpture embedded in the façade—on another new SRV development. It recently won another sustainability award, as well as the various new media design/behavioural change awards it had won, which had moved SRV into new areas of engagement around sustainability, beyond simple building practice.

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PEOPLE

OUTI

28 YEARS OLD SITRA INCUBATOR MANAGER

INDICATING BENEFIT FROM AN INNOVATION POINT-OF-VIEW

YOUR NOTES

MINI-SCeNARIO 09:15 Outi slips her bike into the bike-sharing pod, hearing the subtle >ping< which indicates another ‘+1’ on her c_life rewards. Stepping out she looks across to the global connectivity installation over Sitra’s front doors. It indicates that much of the data flowing in and out of Sitra is centred on China—it’s 14:00 in Shanghai— with small bursts of activity to the US, where it’s the middle of the night. Outi loves this installation—it makes some of the otherwise invisible patterns of Sitra’s activity publicly visible in engaging fashion. The hands on the faux-clock face currently set to ‘Shanghai’ are spinning wildly, indicating how much business Sitra—and Finland—does with China these days. 11:00 Outi is evaluating the tenancy and activity patterns across the c_life incubator. She looks across the smart nameplates the incubator presents to ‘the street’ outside, which indicate the grain of activity going on within, drawn from real-time network data. It’s evident that labs 2-3 have new craft activities going on within, whereas 4 has a new information design business in it. Lab 1 looks like it might be a financial services start-up. Once you can read these simple, and rather beautiful, visualisations, it’s clear what the incubator is doing for the c_life milieu, without compromising the privacy of the businesses within. 14:30 A workshop evaluating potential urban developments in Vantaa, Oulu and Tampere. They’re using data from c_life’s ongoing realtime post-occupancy, via c_life API and dashboard, and Outi is indicating the effect of tenancy arrangements on occupancy rates in the incubator. She’s able to show the increased performance after they switched to a super-short-term leasing arrangement, in terms of data transfer and footfall—a proxy for activity—but also in the number of businesses and patent applications emerging from the site. c_life is replicable across these facets of activity.

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SECTION

PlACeS

ILLUSTRATION OF HOW URBAN INFORMATICS SCENARIOS AND SERVICES MAP ONTO SPACE

PLACES

HOMe

TYPICAL C_LIFE APARTMENT

ALL SCENARIOS

‘SMART PAd’ INTeRFACe ONTO VARIOUS C_lIFe APPS IN-SHOWeR WATeR MeTeR ReWARdS eNeRGY MONITOR SIMPle, FURNITURe-BASed FOOTPRINT FeedBACK lOOPS

WASTe SeNSORS SMART HOMe delIVeRY IN-BOX APARTMeNT NUMBeR CORRIdOR FOOTPRINT VISUAlISATION

33

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PLACES

BUS-STOP

TRANSIT ENVIRONMENT

KATERIINA, NIKO AND SEYMON SCENARIOS

INTeRACTION VIA MOBIle PHONe ANd PROXIMITY SMART BUS-STOP ROOF BUS PReSeNCe INdICATOR IN-SITU ReAl-TIMe TRANSIT PlANNeR INCl. lOW-CARBON SMART BIKe-SHARING HUB IS NeARBY ANd INTeGRATed SMART PARKING led lIGHTING dISPlAYS 34
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PLACES

GARdeN

COMMUNAL PRODUCTIVE ENVIRONMENT

NIKO AND TOM SCENARIOS

ReAl-TIMe INSTAllATIONS INdICATING ‘PeRFORMANCe’ OF NATURAl SYSTeMS VARIOUS eNVIRONMeNTAl SeNSORS MONITORING PROdUCTION/ACTIVITY COMMUNITY NOTICeBOARd FOR AllOTMeNT ReQUeSTS ANd GARdeNING ClUBS 35
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PLACES

WORKPlACe

COMMERCIAL PRODUCTIVE ENVIRONMENT

TOM AND MATIAS SCENARIOS

FRee PUBlIC WI-FI eNABleS CO-WORKING ANd FleXIBle USe OF SPACe ReAl-TIMe TRAFFIC CONGeSTION ANd lOWCARBON TRANSIT MAP CO-SHARING HUBS ReAl-TIMe INSTAllATION MAKeS VISIBle PATTeRNS OF CONNeCTIVITY & ACTIVITY

36

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PLACES

COURTYARd

CIVIC ENVIRONMENT

ALL SCENARIOS

C_lIFe CARBON OR eNeRGY SCUlPTURe/INSTAllATION ReWARdS SYSTeM FOR ReTAIl INCl. FOOd MIleS ANd lOCAl PROdUCeR CRedITS COMMUNITY NOTICeBOARd SMART HOMe delIVeRY SeRVICe

37

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SECTION

PROdUCTS

DESCRIPTIONS OF PROTOTYPE URBAN INFORMATICS PRODUCTS AND SERVICES

PRODUCTS

COMMUNITY NOTICeBOARd

BESPOKE DISPLAY FOR GENERAL PURPOSE COMMUNITY INFO

TOM, MATIAS, NIKO SCENARIOS

-10%
CAR BON ReS O Rel URCeATe d SO COH CIAl eSIO N

SYNOPSIS A series of strips of long display screens, designed as integral part of the building architecture, curving around corners of communal spaces (stairwells, lobbies, gardens etc.), and so derived from emerging architectural language of c_life. The display screens elements are contrasted with strips of other relevant materials (wood, stone, clear glass etc.) which also enables traditional (paper-based) noticeboard. Unusual aspect ratio on purpose in order to avoid non-community co-option and display blindness. Provides c_life community with collaborative space for announcements, calendars, events (wayfinding), apps, games, streaming video, audio. ‘Strips’ of displays can have particular functions—and some are at kids’ eye-level—and be combined in multiple ways. When in ‘sleep mode’ reverts to large scale energy visualisation purpose-designed for these displays. 39
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PRODUCTS

COMMUNITY NOTICEBOARD

TECHNICAL DRAFT

ROLE Social cohesion Civic feedback loop Activation of space Wayfinding Public art

BENEFITS Carbon reduction through uptake of public transport Social cohesion Health benefits Detailed customer/ user information Strategic value to Sitra and Helsinki

INTERACTION Ambient, glancing Responds to presence (via proximity) and ID (via mobile phone) Multi-touch Upload via cloud, Bluetooth or wi-fi Filtered API for external collaboration OWNERSHIP HIGH HIGH MED HIGH HIGH

BEHAVIOURAL Civic feedback loop works only as part of series of other services addressing energy use Public display element enables social proof and positive reinforcement

SUSTAINABILITY FRAMEWORK Inspired Design Social Innovation Environmental Connectivity Economic Vitality Replicability

Could be commissioned, owned and developed by Sitra as part of Sitra HQ building Possibly also funded by advertising NB: should be designed in context of architectural and wayfinding design

SERVICE-ORIENTED ARCHITECTURE IT infrastructure usage information Messaging and alerting service c_life social networking service Device state information Real-time & historical data service

DATA REQUIRED Community information database Calendar modules Aggregate energy model User ID

RELATED SERVICES Platform for ‘Resource Share’

REFERENCES

RISD noticeb’d

Tokyo Midtown

Wood Design Hotel

Maciachini

40

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PRODUCTS

eNeRGY VISUAlISATIONS

REAL-TIME FEEDBACK LOOPS ON ENERGY/ FOOTPRINT

ALL SCENARIOS

-10%
CAR BON eNe Rel RGYATe d

8

SYNOPSIS Apartments have a series of small interactive installations that provide interfaces onto various activities, ranging from energy to waste to food. Interaction is built into physical devices—avoiding screens where possible—which feel at home in the apartments due to sharing design language, and often built into furniture or other interior elements (avoiding reliance on screens where possible). These might include features such as simple night lights in kids’ rooms conveying a simple aggregate performance indicator, traditional Helsinki-style apartment numbers over the door which double as simple energy visualisations placed in the semi-public environment of a corridor, sensors tracking waste feedback performance in situ, and so on. Behavioural modes are centred on social proof and behavioural convenience.

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PRODUCTS

ENERGY VISUALISATIONS

TECHNICAL DRAFT

ROLE Real-time ambient resource use information for apartments Creates civic awareness of patterns of use across corridor/ block as well as individual

BENEFITS Carbon reduction through demand reduction Strategic information to SRV, VVO, Sitra and Helsinki

INTERACTION Ambient, glancing Civic and personal Web- and mobilebased overlay Mobile interaction

BEHAVIOURAL Civic feedback loop works only as part of series of other services addressing energy use Public display element enables social proof and positive reinforcement

SUSTAINABILITY FRAMEWORK Inspired Design Social Innovation Environmental Connectivity Economic Vitality Replicability HIGH MED HIGH LOW HIGH

OWNERSHIP Multiple ownership models possible, such as owned by or leased from resource provider, or open platform with costs shared between resource provider, service provider, developer, housing management Such components should ideally be built as part of the fit-out of apartments, in order to sit sympathetically with the interior/wayfinding design

SERVICE-ORIENTED ARCHITECTURE Energy source information and selection service Messaging and alerting service c_life social networking service Built environment and device sensors REFERENCES

DATA REQUIRED Aggregate resource use for apartments Access to rewards API

RELATED SERVICES c_life rewards Home Assistant Civic-scale c_life feedback loops

Place-stat*

Place-stat*

House numbers

House numbers

42

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PRODUCTS

eNeRGY SCUlPTURe

CIVIC-SCALE FEEDBACK LOOP ON COLLECTIVE C_LIFE FOOTPRINT

ALL SCENARIOS

-10%
CAR BON ReS O Rel URCeATe d SO COH CIAl eSIO N

SYNOPSIS Landmark energy visualisation for the complex, driven by realtime aggregate performance of c_life. Visible from inside and outside of the complex, the installation should be derived from the emerging architectural language for c_life, whilst also referencing the previous incarnation of the site, and the shift in economic and productive focus from port/trade to carbon/energy. One such visualisation could be projected colour from balconies displaying each unit’s energy profile. While the installation is essentially sculptural, and so only interactive in the sense that a resident’s energy profile drives the performance of the sculpture (i.e. it is genuinely interactive in terms of residents’ behaviour), it also has a ‘digital shadow’ in the form of aggregate data made available via the c_life API, such that others can build upon the data. 43
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PRODUCTS

ENERGY SCULPTURE

TECHNICAL DRAFT

ROLE Civic feedback loop Energy/footprint display Place-making Public art

BENEFITS Demand management Marketing Placemaking

INTERACTION Ambient, glancing Web-based version enables longitudinal analysis API for external collaboration

BEHAVIOURAL Civic feedback loop works only as part of series of other services addressing energy use Public display element enables social proof and positive reinforcement

SUSTAINABILITY FRAMEWORK Inspired Design Social Innovation Environmental Connectivity Economic Vitality Replicability HIGH LOW HIGH LOW MED

OWNERSHIP Core part of public realm Possible interest from energy providers such as Helsinki Energia

SERVICE-ORIENTED ARCHITECTURE Energy source information and selection service Built environment and device sensors

DATA REQUIRED Footprint data for c_life apartments

RELATED SERVICES External c_life API for digital art

REFERENCES

Nuages vert

Barangaroo

London CLOUD

Calder sculpture

44

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PRODUCTS

SMART BUS STOP

REAL-TIME TRANSIT INFORMATION

TOM, KATERIINA AND NIKO SCENARIOS

-10%
CAR BON MO B Rel IlITYATe d

HeA BeN lTH eFIT

SO COH CIAl eSIO N

SYNOPSIS The bus-stops adjacent to c_life—and ultimately tram stops and metro stops—can become physical visualisations of the activity in the transit system, specifically enabling users to see, from a distance, when buses are going to arrive, as well as enabling more detailed interaction in situ. The bus-stop roof subtly pulses, with increasing frequency, as the next bus is approaching, enabling residents and visitors to perceive the performance of the system. In the stop itself, a multi-touch live transit map enables more detailed interaction (including l0w-carbon multi-modal journey planner, location of smart bike-sharing hubs etc.). The system also recognises and counts users, via mobile phones, in order to provide real-time feedback to c_life dashboards on activity and transport-related carbon profile specifically, as well as rewards in the form of c_life rewards credits. 45
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PRODUCTS

SMART BUS STOP

TECHNICAL DRAFT

ROLE Real-time transit information Encouraging lowcarbon transit use

BENEFITS Carbon reduction through uptake of public transport Social cohesion Health benefits Detailed customer/ user information Strategic value to Sitra and Helsinki

INTERACTION Ambient, glancing Multi-touch Web- and mobilebased overlay Presence and ID Ivia mobile phone)

BEHAVIOURAL Behavioural convenience increases likelihood of public transit uptake Reflexive analysis of personal informatics Reward system

SUSTAINABILITY FRAMEWORK Inspired Design Social Innovation Environmental Connectivity Economic Vitality Replicability HIGH MED HIGH MED HIGH

OWNERSHIP Multiple ownership models possible, such as owned by or leased from service provider, or open platform with costs shared between service provider, developer, housing management Possibly also funded by advertising, such as JC Decaux or equivalent Such components should ideally be designed in context of architectural and wayfinding design

SERVICE-ORIENTED ARCHITECTURE Community services booking service Messaging and alerting service c_life social networking service Built environment sensors

DATA REQUIRED Access to Helsinki bus services data (actual location, timetables etc.) Presence of people (via mobile phone) Access to rewards API

RELATED SERVICES Link to Helsinki transit services Link to general c_ life monitoring and dashboards around public transit use c_life rewards

REFERENCES

Sydney Metro

Sydney Metro

AcrossAir

Paris Metro map

46

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PRODUCTS

SMART BIKeSHARING HUB

REAL-TIME TRANSIT INFORMATION AND RESOURCE SHARING

TOM, KATERIINA AND NIKO SCENARIOS

-10%
CAR BON MO B Rel IlITYATe d

HeA BeN lTH eFIT

SO COH CIAl eSIO N

SYNOPSIS Bike-sharing hubs (as per Vélib et al) are equipped with basic recognition of users—via either rewards card or mobile phone— which tracks usage of the system, and rewards frequent users, both with visual and aural recognition as the users appear within range (a basic reinforcement of ‘social proof’) and via additional credits on c_life rewards card, at appropriate thresholds. This sculptural element is designed to fit the bike-sharing hub specifically, but also is in accord with the emerging architectural language for c_life. The hub is also equipped with multi-touch display enabling interaction with a low-carbon journey planner— see also smart bus stop—enabling trip planning, connectivity etc. The bike-share system generates data on usage (against targets, potentially), interaction with other users etc., enabling a form of social and personal informatics around the use of the system. 47
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PRODUCTS

SMART BIKESHARING HUB

TECHNICAL DRAFT

ROLE Increase uptake of active transport Socialises patterns of activity Enables visibility of bike-sharing patterns

BENEFITS Carbon reduction through uptake of active transport Social cohesion Health benefits Detailed customer/ user information Strategic value to SRV, VVO, Sitra, Helsinki

INTERACTION Ambient, glancing Multi-touch Web- and mobilebased overlay Presence and ID Ivia mobile phone)

BEHAVIOURAL Social proof increases likelihood of public transit uptake Reflexive analysis of personal informatics Reward system

SUSTAINABILITY FRAMEWORK Inspired Design Social Innovation Environmental Connectivity Economic Vitality Replicability HIGH MED HIGH MED HIGH

OWNERSHIP Multiple ownership models possible, such as owned by or leased from service provider, or open platform with costs shared between service provider, developer, housing management Possibly also funded by advertising, such as JC Decaux or equivalent Such components should ideally be designed in context of architectural and wayfinding design

SERVICE-ORIENTED ARCHITECTURE Community services booking service Messaging and alerting service c_life social networking service Built environment and device sensors

DATA REQUIRED Access to Helsinki bike-sharing system data (location of hubs, numbers of bikes etc.) Presence of people (via mobile phone)

RELATED SERVICES Link to Helsinki bike-sharing services Link to general c_ life monitoring and dashboards around mobility c_life rewards system

REFERENCES

Access to c_life rewards API

London bike share

Bike share locator

SmartBiking

48

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PRODUCTS

GARdeN INSTAllATION

SENSORS MONITORING PERFORMANCE, FEEDBACK LOOPS

KATERIINA AND NIKO SCENARIOS

-10%
CAR BON FO Rel OdATe d SO COH CIAl eSIO N

pick me!

SYNOPSIS Augmented garden experience designed to encourage uptake and awareness of processes around food production and the ‘natural environment’, such as closed nutrient cycles, closed water cycles and social cycles (interactions with garden and allotments, including tracking and rewarding usage.) Several showcase areas include a tool display/resource, which also incorporates cheap sensors for tracking growth and plant activity alongside traditional gardening equipment. Also a ‘takehome’ pack which enables people to track growth and productivity at home, such that cuttings from the garden can spread across across c_life, Jätkäsaari and Helsinki. Data from garden (and community) ‘performance’ is made available via c_life API. 49
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PRODUCTS

GARDEN INSTALLATION

TECHNICAL DRAFT

ROLE Indicates levels and types of produce available via food production Illustrates processes of growing, harvesting Highlights seasonality Encourages gardening

BENEFITS Demand reduction (through local production) Social cohesion Reinforces sustainable supply chains Detailed customer/ user information Strategic value to SRV, VVO, Sitra, Helsinki

INTERACTION Ambient, glancing Observation via noticeboard Web-based version enables longitudinal analysis API for external collaboration

BEHAVIOURAL Social proof and positive reinforcement capability around engagement with gardening

SUSTAINABILITY FRAMEWORK Inspired Design Social Innovation Environmental Connectivity Economic Vitality Replicability SERVICE-ORIENTED ARCHITECTURE Community services booking service Messaging and alerting service c_life social networking service Built environment and device sensors MED HIGH HIGH MED HIGH

OWNERSHIP Possible subsidised ownership/rent solution between Sitra, SRV, VVO, Helsinki City Council and relevant stakeholders Could extend to similar plots elsewhere (and share food/services accordingly)

DATA REQUIRED Sensor-driven data on environmental performance (soil moisture, soil acidity, air and water quality, image analysis etc.) rewards data to track usage

RELATED SERVICES c_life rewards Communal garden and pocket balcony Café Retail

REFERENCES
DIGITAL CYCLE

SOCIAL CYCLE

NUTRIENT CYCLE

Brisbane backyard

Brisbane backyard

fabFood

Natural Fuse

50

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PRODUCTS

SMART NAMePlATe

REAL-TIME DISPLAYS EMBEDDED IN RETAIL

ALL SCENARIOS

ReS O Rel URCeATe d

-5%
CAR

BON STR A INIT TeGIC IATI Ve

SYNOPSIS Retail units and shared services (laundry, sauna etc.) outlets alike are adorned with discreet, elegant active OLED slabs which provide a consistent layer of identity and behaviour across these diverse spaces. The functionality of the nameplates cycles around a few core functions, its multi-touch displays sharing a) resource use (how the greywater from the laundry is heading for the garden, for instance), b) rewards system activity (visibly flashing green as you leave the grocers, having shopped sustainability), and c) basic information such as opening hours and booking functionality (using multi-touch or mobile to casually reserve space in the sauna). The quick functionality enables behavioural convenience—access to shared services—while the interactive display works as a civic feedback loop, positively reinforcing actions. 51
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PRODUCTS

SMART NAMEPLATE

TECHNICAL DRAFT

ROLE Signage feature unifies identity, wayfinding, retail info, community info, resource info and rewards across retail and shared service spaces.

BENEFITS Identity and branding Wayfinding Demand reduction Reinforces local economy

INTERACTION Ambient, glanceable data Multi-touch to enable transaction Web- and mobilebased interface for longitudinal data OWNERSHIP HIGH MED HIGH HIGH HIGH

BEHAVIOURAL Reward/targets system Positive reinforcement Behavioural convenience

SUSTAINABILITY FRAMEWORK Inspired Design Social Innovation Environmental Connectivity Economic Vitality Replicability

Multiple ownership models possible, such as owned by or leased from service provider, or open platform with costs shared between service provider, developer, housing management Possibly also funded by advertising, such as JC Decaux or equivalent Such components should ideally be designed in context of architectural and wayfinding design

SERVICE-ORIENTED ARCHITECTURE Community services booking service Messaging and alerting service c_life social networking service Built environment and device sensors

DATA REQUIRED Retail/service unit resource use information Service provide database Presence of people (via mobile phone) Access to c_life rewards API

RELATED SERVICES c_life rewards

REFERENCES

Cannes multitouch

N Building, Tokyo

Tokyo Midtown

52

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PRODUCTS

SMART HOMe delIVeRY

DELIVERY SERVICE FOR LOCAL RESIDENTS

KATERIINA AND TOM SCENARIOS

-15%
CAR BON FO Rel OdATe d

STR A INIT TeGIC IATI Ve

SYNOPSIS The delivery system integrates local retailers and suppliers— including resource shares, repair shops and any other local business requiring movement of goods—with the c_life rewards system and bespoke ‘electronic concierge’ in-boxes in apartment lobbies. Ideally, deliveries are conducted via bike or trolley i.e. low or no-carbon, and arranged at point-of-purchase, where the rewards transaction can transmit details such as apartment number and ideal delivery time. Delivery can be re-arranged if necessary via mobile and other platforms—deliveries can also be visualised on the community noticeboard. Deliveries are made to lobbies of blocks, where each apartment has a large, wooden ‘smart pigeonhole’ known as an ‘in-box’, and sized such that it is capable of taking vegetable box deliveries. RFID (or other) recognises delivery and signals resident. Each smart in-box socialises data about, say, average food miles of food delivery and so on. 53
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PRODUCTS

SMART HOME DELIVERY BENEFITS Demand reduction Stimulates local economy Reinforces sustainable supply chains Detailed customer/ user information Strategic value to SRV, VVO, Sitra, Helsinki

TECHNICAL DRAFT

ROLE Low/no-carbonbased delivery service for various aspects of c_life, including food and drink, other retail, laundry etc.

INTERACTION Touch (NFC) to enable transaction Web- and mobilebased controls to track/coordinate delivery Ambient, glanceable data on ‘in-boxes’

BEHAVIOURAL Reward/targets system Positive reinforcement Social proof

SUSTAINABILITY FRAMEWORK Inspired Design Social Innovation Environmental Connectivity Economic Vitality Replicability MED HIGH HIGH HIGH HIGH

OWNERSHIP Possible subsidised ownership/rent solution between Sitra, SRV, VVO, Helsinki City Council and relevant stakeholders While such a service could be prototyped at small-scale for low2no, the service could and should scale to Jätkäsaari and beyond, ultimately to city-scale.

SERVICE-ORIENTED ARCHITECTURE Community services booking service Messaging and alerting service c_life social networking service Built environment and device sensors

DATA REQUIRED Indicator of shower usage Access to c_life rewards API

RELATED SERVICES c_life rewards Garden Café Retail

REFERENCES

Bikesharing

Ocado OnTheGo

Veggie box

Electric delivery van

54

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PRODUCTS

SMART WORKPlACe

CO-WORKING, WIRELESS AND KNOWLEDGE CONNECTIVITY

TOM AND MATIAS SCENARIOS
PlAC eMAK ING

-15%
CAR BON MO B Rel IlITYATe d

STIM INN UlATe OVA S TIO N

London 11 12 10 9 8 7 6 5 1 2 3 4 10 9 8

New York 11 12 1 2 3 4 7 6 5 10 9 8 7

Paris 11 12 1 2 3 4 6 5 10 9 8 7

Milan 11 12 1 2 3 4 6 5

SYNOPSIS Knowledge work can often be largely invisible compared to other kinds of industry, yet social proof is required to make productive statements about what c_life’s workplaces are about (‘place-making’) and to demonstrate patterns of innovation activity occurring within. Pervasive wireless connectivity and bespoke book-able hubs enables co-working to occur, producing what SMART 2020 calls ‘dematerialisation’ effects in terms of carbon reduction. Given that this work leaves clear traces in c_life’s digital networks, a global connectivity installation comprises large displays (‘world clocks’ and maps) tracing patterns of network activity globally in real-time. In this way, patterns of global activity—New York waking up, Shanghai stock exchange etc.—can be perceived in subtly engaging fashion. The grain of knowledge work, from Sitra’s HQ and through the site, emerges in these patterns. Use of the hubs is enabled, tracked and rewarded by the c_life rewards system. 55
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PRODUCTS

SMART WORKPLACE

TECHNICAL DRAFT

ROLE Distributed workplace Civic feedback loop Making invisible knowledge work visible Innovation stimulus Place-making Activation of space Public art

BENEFITS Placemaking, by describing ‘grain’ of activity of Sitra Stimulates innovation (through API) Activation of public space through wi-fi Branding Strategic value to Sitra and Helsinki

INTERACTION Ambient, glancing Web-based version enables longitudinal analysis API for external collaboration Direct interaction around booking services

BEHAVIOURAL Public display element enables social proof around knowledge work, innovation and connectedness Behavioural convenience

SUSTAINABILITY FRAMEWORK Inspired Design Social Innovation Environmental Connectivity Economic Vitality Replicability SERVICE-ORIENTED ARCHITECTURE IT infrastructure usage information Messaging and alerting service c_life social networking service Device state information Real-time & historical data service HIGH HIGH MED HIGH HIGH

OWNERSHIP Could be commissioned, owned and developed by Sitra as part of Sitra HQ building, or as part of Incubator service Possibly also funded by advertising NB: should be designed in context of architectural and wayfinding design DATA REQUIRED Aggregate data for all relevant network access IP address mapping RELATED SERVICES Sitra and its various innovation activities Incubator

REFERENCES

Dr. Strangelove

Roppongi Hills

Smartwork centre, Amsterdam

London CLOUD email viz

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PRODUCTS

WATeR GAUGe

FEEDBACK ON REAL-TIME RESOURCE USE

TOM, KATERIINA AND NIKO SCENARIOS

ReS O Rel URCeATe d

-5%
CAR

BON

SYNOPSIS Part of the overall suite of services distributed across apartments, the water meter also avoids the use of simplistic screens, designed more as a beautiful brass and glass gauge that nods to both the materials used through the building as well as the Jätkäsaari’s maritime past. It is a physical device driven by data, in this case data on average shower times, and so one aspect of water use in the apartment. The gauge displays both personal averages as well as averages for the block and c_life as a whole. Data on water usage is also taken into account in overall footprint/targets for the apartment and block, and aggregated into ‘scores’ for c_life overall. Simple game-like elements—including local targets and/or rewards—can be incorporated into the interaction design.

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PRODUCTS

WATER GAUGE

TECHNICAL DRAFT

ROLE Real-time resource use information Encouraging efficient water/ resource use

BENEFITS Demand reduction Detailed customer/ user information Strategic value to SRV, VVO, Sitra, Helsinki

INTERACTION Ambient, glancing Web- and mobilebased overlay

BEHAVIOURAL Feedback on personal activity Reward/targets system

SUSTAINABILITY FRAMEWORK Inspired Design Social Innovation Environmental Connectivity Economic Vitality Replicability HIGH MED HIGH LOW HIGH

OWNERSHIP Multiple ownership models possible, such as owned by or leased from resource provider, or open platform with costs shared between resource provider, service provider, developer, housing management Such components should ideally be built as part of the fit-out of apartments, in order to sit sympathetically with the interior design DATA REQUIRED Indicator of shower usage Access to rewards API RELATED SERVICES c_life rewards

SERVICE-ORIENTED ARCHITECTURE Energy source information and selection service Community services booking service Messaging and alerting service c_life social networking service Built environment and device sensors REFERENCES
2405 2404 2403 2402 2401 2400 2399
barangaroo.com

67%
barangaroo.com

CURRENT CHARGE

Will provide light from DUSK until 04.34AM

2403kl
Enough to flush 1423 toilets Tank is 43% full

WATER STORED IN BARANGAROO TANK

Brass gauge

Barangaroo

Shower meter

Maritime markings

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PRODUCTS

C_lIFe ReWARdS

REWARD AND FEEDBACK SYSTEM BASED ON C_LIFE INTERACTIONS

ALL SCENARIOS

-15%
CAR BON ReS O Rel URCeATe d

STR A INIT TeGIC IATI Ve

+1

+1

SYNOPSIS The c_life reward and token system serves as a general purpose platform for c_life residents and users (and potentially beyond c_life, throughout Jätkäsaari and other developments, before spreading across Helsinki). A smart card-based interaction— either near-field communication (NFC) or touch—that keeps track of various interactions throughout c_life, it’s designed to encourage sustainable behaviour through monitoring and rewarding. This can include encouraging use of local independent retail or production (registered at point-of-sale, it credits both retailer and producer, as well as rewarding resident/user), or logging hours put in in the community gardens, or enabling tracking of food purchases, or accessing shared cars or bikes, and so on. Each transaction builds local profiles in real-time, and aggregates to block. (The system could actually be an application running on NFC-enabled mobile phones, rather than an actual smart-card.) 59
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PRODUCTS

C_LIFE REWARDS

TECHNICAL DRAFT

ROLE General-purpose token for c_life interactions, representing overall footprint/ activity including ‘modules’ around food miles, local businesses

BENEFITS Demand reduction Stimulates local economy Reinforces sustainable supply chains Detailed customer/ user information Strategic value to SRV, VVO, Sitra, Helsinki

INTERACTION Touch-based (RFID) and/or near-field communication (NFC) Web/mobile interaction

BEHAVIOURAL Reward system Personal learning and positive reinforcement

SUSTAINABILITY FRAMEWORK Inspired Design Social Innovation Environmental Connectivity Economic Vitality Replicability HIGH HIGH HIGH HIGH HIGH

OWNERSHIP Potentially, partnership with data shared between Sitra, VVO, SRV and Helsinki City Council (as service could extend) Membership of local retailers, services and supply chains Business model could be self-funding after pump-priming, given scale Possible interest from technology providers/developers such as Nokia

SERVICE-ORIENTED ARCHITECTURE Energy source information and selection service Community services booking service Messaging and alerting service c_life social networking service Built environment and device sensors

DATA REQUIRED Access to c_life API (sensor data, all interaction data) Access to all services (bike- & car-sharing, delivery etc.) incl. off-site services (e.g. public transit)

RELATED SERVICES Helsinki transit smartcards Potentially other loyalty schemes

REFERENCES

Oyster card

Octopus card

Interra card
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PRODUCTS

AR OPeRATIONS dASHBOARd

AUGMENTED REALITY METER READERS

MARKO SCENARIO
OPe RAT BeN IONAl eFIT

SYNOPSIS Maintenance and operations can be enhanced through deploying sensors throughout the service layers, and then accessing these wireless sensor networks on web/mobile dashboards. Additionally, the ‘rounds’ for maintenance staff can be simplified by a bespoke augmented reality application running on a smartphone. This can access the real-time data from the wireless sensors behind panels, overlaying performance data, including historical data as well as current values. In this way, status checks need not include opening service panels while services need not include dials or displays.

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PRODUCTS

AR OPERATIONS DASHBOARD BENEFITS Reduces cost of operational equipment (no need for built-in displays) Enables easier maintenance Strategic value to VVO, Sitra, Helsinki

TECHNICAL DRAFT

ROLE Simplifies and enhances operations and maintenance functions

INTERACTION Augmented reality app over smartphone, triggered by barcode

BEHAVIOURAL n/a

SUSTAINABILITY FRAMEWORK Inspired Design Social Innovation Environmental Connectivity Economic Vitality Replicability HIGH MED MED HIGH HIGH

OWNERSHIP Potentially, partnership with data shared between Sitra, VVO and Helsinki City Council (as service could extend) Possible interest from technology and resource providers/developers

SERVICE-ORIENTED ARCHITECTURE Energy source information and selection service Messaging and alerting service Built environment and device sensors

DATA REQUIRED Access to c_life API (sensor data, all interaction data)

RELATED SERVICES n/a

REFERENCES

Pachube porthole

QR code

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SECTION

PAleTTe

DESIGN CUES FOR URBAN INFORMATICS DRAWN FROM LOCAL CONTEXT

PALETTE

TeXTUReS

EXAMPLES OF FOUND TEXTURES IN HELSINKI

PAINTED WOOD, BRUT CONCRETE, GLASSWORK, BURNISHED BRONZE, AALTO’S MARBLE, GRANITE

64

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PALETTE

TYPe

EXAMPLES OF TYPOGRAPHY AND LETTERING DRAWN FROM LOCAL URBAN ENVIRONMENT

NOTE BOTH STYLE AND FORM I.E. SKYLINE SILHOUETTE, SIGNAGE AND STONEWORK

65

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PALETTE

OBJeCTS

DISTINCT OBJECTS AND SHAPES FOUND IN HELSINKI

KIOSK, TEAPOT, DOOR HANDLES, CLOCKS, CRANES, SAARINEN LIGHTS

66

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PALETTE

PATTeRNS

SHAPES, PATTERNS COLOURS AND FORMS

BELLE EPOQUE ORNAMENTATION, PACKAGING, WOODWORK, FABRIC

67

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PALETTE

SYMBOlS

INTERFACES, CHARACTERS, ICONS, MARKS

LIT HOUSE NUMBERS; SIGNAGE, WEB, NAUTICAL MARKINGS, STATUES

68

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SECTION

eNCOUNTeRS

PHOTOGRAPHIC STUDIES OF PUBLIC LIFE AND INTERACTIONS IN HELSINKI

SECTION

STRATeGY

THE WIDER VALUE OF URBAN INFORMATICS IN THE CONTEXT OF SMART CITIES

STRATEGY

HelSINKI SMART CITY

C_LIFE SITE AS PROTOTYPE OF RESPONSIVE CITY

ALL SCENARIOS

RESPONSIVE AND REPLICABLE Imbuing c_life with the capacity to measure its own progress, the urban informatics strategies outlined here suggest both how c_life can become a genuinely ‘21st century building’ and how Helsinki itself might become a 21st century ‘smart city’. The array of sensors sprinkled across the building and its surrounds will provide a new way of understanding how the city is performing across numerous facets, from resource use to retail to productivity. While data is used to drive real-time, responsive services that enable positive behavioural change, it also enables longitudinal analysis and strategic insight. An informatics-enabled c_life can enable a kind of ongoing ‘postoccupancy evaluation’, in sharp contrast to traditional design and development practices which generally stop observing and learning before people move in. This data can provide c_life’s strategic partners—Sitra, SRV and VVO—as well as Helsinki City Council, with the formula for replicability. It enables these partners to understand what is working and why, upon which parametric models of urban development can be built, benefiting developers, managers and planners. Each subsequent informatics-enabled development builds toward real-time city models enabling measurement, comparison and projection, and providing a strategic platform for sustainable urban development across Finland and beyond. 108
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