Box# 30

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Folder# 600
Word's Fair: China
1962- 1963
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MARCH 14, 1963
HONG KONG
ROOF RAISING CEREMONIES AT THE NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR
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Following is a transcription of remarks by Hong
Kong Pavilion and World's Fair officials at the
Hong Kong Pavilion roof raising ceremony,
New York World's Fair, Thursday, March 14,
1963.
AMBASSADOR RICHARD C. PATIERSON, JR.
(Chief of Protocol]: Ladies and gentlemen, Mr. and Mrs.
Humes, Governor Poletti, and distinguished guests. Hav·
ing lived in China for nearly three years, I can tell you
that we meet here today under a magic name -that of
Hong Kong. It would be hard to imagine any place in the
world which conjures up so much romance, such amazing
commercial development, or such a center of tourism.
This exhibit will be a symbol of the glamour, the wonder,
the beauty and the mystery of Hong Kong.
And I have the honor, ladies and gentlemen, to present
to you a man who is the Fair, who is its prophet, and who
for long years has held a high place in the hearts of all
New Yorkers; the former governor of our state- the
Honorable Charles Poletti.
GOVERNOR CHARLES POLETII: Thank you very
much. Ambassador Patterson, thank you very much for
your gracious remarks. Mr. and Mrs. Humes, and friends
of the Hong Kong Pavilion. We at the World's Fair are
of course much delighted that we are going to have a
Cover: The Hong Kong Pavilion, depicted here by Dong Kingman, will be a charming blend of modern design and traditional
Chinese architecture. Designed by Eldredge Snyder, the building will feature upswept eaves, intense colors, intricate carvings
and gilded surfaces, Inside, the pavilion will reflect all of the fascination of Hong Kong's finest shopping centers, and will include
a Chinese restaurant and the Bar of the Dragons. The contractor is E. W. Howell.
2 © 1963 New York World's Fair 1964-1965 Corporation
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Governor Charles Poletti presents Fair medallion to John Humes, president of Hong Kong Trading Company. In background are
Douglas Beaton, the Fair's International official responsible for negotiating the Hong Kong contract and Mrs. John Humes.
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Hong Kong Pavilion. We are exuberantly delighted that
we have it so far advanced, with all the steel work set up,
so that I think while we witness this steel frame we
should, each of us, commend John Humes for his fore-
sight and his aggressive spirit in getting the job so far
advanced this early in 1963.
I want in this connection also to say a word of praise
for the construltion firm, E. W. Howell. We appreciate
the splendid contribution that this firm has made. In con·
nection with this pavilion, I am reminded of the trip Mrs.
Poletti and I took to Hong Kong and that in turn brings
vividly to mind a young fellow called Johnny Kao.
Johnny is the energetic, dynamic and imaginative presi-
dent of the Hong Kong Trading Company, Inc., which is
sponsoring this pavilion. He has been working closely
with Mr. John Humes. On this occasion I think it ap·
propriate that while Johnny is far away in Hong Kong
we nonetheless want to pay our respects to him and thank
him for his assistance and cooperation.
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Hong Kong is doing mighty well without this pavilion.
I was reading in the Wall Street Journal this morning
that the number of wurists that are visiting Hong Kong
has increased greatly in the past two years. Just imagine
what is going to happen after seventy million people come
to the World's Fair in 1964 and 1965 and see this
astounding pavilion representing the spirit, charm and
glamour of Hong Kong. John, you'd better tell your
friends back there to put up a couple more hotels to take
care of the millions of Americans that undoubtedly will
want to visit Hong Kong.
We are also pleased to have a Hong Kong Pavilion
because all of us who are devoted to the way of life
exemplified in the free world, necessarily must think of
Hong Kong as an outpost of freed om - near a vast
country where freedom has been destroyed. And we hope
that the torch of freedom that is now burning brightly
in Hong Kong will someday be extended to cover that
vast mass of the mainland and the 700 million people
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who so ruthlessly have been deprived of freedom.
In closing I want to present to John Humes on behalf
of the president of the New York World's Fair, Mr.
Robert Moses, and the Exerutive Committee of the
World's Fair, a medal which has on it the Unisphere
and on the other side, the seal of the City of New York,
because as you know this Fair does commemorate the
300th anniversary of the founding of New York as a
city. So John, if you'll step up here I'd like to present this
to you, and also shake your hand and congratulate you
and wish you well. And the same congratulations and
good wishes are extended to rour charming wife, Mrs.
Humes.
JOHN HUMES: Thank you very much Governor.
Governor Poletti and John Humes point with pride to the
well-advanced steel framework for the Hong Kong Pavilion.
Completion of the exhibit is scheduled for September of
this year.
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AMBASSADOR PATIERSON: Thank you Gover·
nor Poletti. Now John Humes who has just been presented
to you by the Governor is, as you know, the chairman of
the Hong Kong Trading Corporation. He's a philanthro·
pist and a good citizen. He is a civic worker who has done
a great deal for the Gty of New York, and we are proud
to have him associated with this World's Fair. I'd like to
present for a bow the charming and talented wife of John
Humes, who had so much to do toward getting this
building started.
JOHN HUMES: Thank you very much, Ambassador
Patterson. I should like to reciprocate in presenting Gov·
ernor Poletti a lirtle token of the handicraft and the skills
of the people of Hong Kong - a small teak and jade
cigarette box.
GOVERNOR POLETI'l: Thank you very much. I'm
very grateful.
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JOHN HUMES: This is a very happy day for all of
us who are connected with the Hong Kong Pavilion at
the World's Fair. We are celebrating here today the roof
raising of this pavilion, rather than the groundbreaking,
because fortunately it has proceeded so well under the
able direction of the E. W. Howell people. Shottly we
hope to set off some firecrackers - the traditional way of
celebrating things in Hong Kong and in China. It is our
hope that after this building has been completed and the
exotic Oriental restaurant and bar have been decorated,
there will be many more occasions when it properly can
be said that this roof will be raised.
Those of us who have sponsored the pavilion have been
very fortunate in securing the exceptional talents of Mr.
Eldredge Snyder, our architect; in consultation with the
distinguished internationally renowned artist, Mr. Dong
Kingman, Mr. Snyder has designed a spectacular and eye·
catching building which we hope will be one of the
brightest stars in the lovely firmament of this Fair. I
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should also like to mention with sincerest thanks, our
deep appreciation ro Governor Poletti, and all of the
members of the World's Fair staff and particularly Mr.
Douglas Beaton, for the wonderful cooperation and
efficiency which has marked all of our relations with them.
It is perhaps appropriate to mention that one of the
finest restaurants in Hong Kong has signed up with our
company to operate the restaurant and the bar in this
building. Among those in Hong Kong who have leased
space in the pavilion, is an outstanding tailoring concern
from the Crown Colony, and many other leading mer·
chants and manufacturers. We have every expectation that
this pavilion will accurately reflect all of the glamour and
fascination and the multiple trades and crafts of the great
Crown Colony of Hong Kong. Thank you very much.
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THE HONG KONG PAVILION
is located on a 9,011 sq. ft. site
in the Fair's
International Area
between the French
and Venezuelan
pavilions.
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NEW
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YORK
HONG KONG PAVILION
HONG KONG TRADING COMPANY, INC.
JOHN P. HUMES, Chairman of the IJoard
JOHN C. Y. KAO, President
WORLD'S
FAIR
1964-1965
CORPORATION
Flushing 52, N.Y.
Tel. 212-WF 4-1964
ROIJERT MOSES, Prericlent
THOMAS J. DEEGAN, JR., Chairman ol tho fxecutl•e Committee
WILLIAM E. POTTER, Eucuti•e VIce Prericlent
CHARLES POLETTI, Vice Prerldent, lnlernaliannl Affoirr and Exhl&itr
STUART CONSTABLE, Vice Prerident, Operatlonr
WILLIAM A. BERNS, VIce Preridenl, Communications and Public Relatlanr
ERWIN WITT, Comptroller
MARTIN STONE, Director ol lndurtrial Settion
GUY F. TOZZOll, /Pori of New York Authority) Transportation Section
ERNESTINE R. HAIG, Secretory of the Corporation and
Aulrlant to the Prerldenf
WILLIAM WHIPPLE, JR., Chief Engineer
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GROUNDBREAKING AT THE
NEW YORK WORLD'S F'AIR 1964-1965
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AJ the Rep11blic of China'J Com11l Gmeral Hon. Kie11
liVen ¥11 watcheJ, gro1111d iJ broke11 for the ChitleJe pavil·
ioll by Gloria Chill, Wyman Jo11g a11d Cheryl Choy.
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MESSAGE RECEIVED IN AMBASSADOR ADLAI
STEVENSON'S OFFICE FROM U. S. AMBASSADOR
IN TAIPEI ON BEHALF OF MADAME CHIANG
KAI-SHEK, AT THE OCCASION OF THE REPUB-
LIC OF CHINA'S GROUNDBREAKING CERE-
MONIES.
I am pleased to learn of the groundbreaking ceremony
of the Chinese Pavilion in the New York World's Fair,
the first of such ceremonies of the participating nations.
I only regret that I am unable to be with you in person.
The Fair, I understand, will celebrate the tercentenary
of the founding of New York City. It is almost inconceiv-
able that in a brief span of 300 years the tiny trading
spot has arisen to be one of the largest cities in the world
as well as one of the most inspiring and beautiful. In-
deed this metropolis is the best expression of man's free
spirit and creative power.
The Republic ot China is happy to participate in the
World's Fair. She will show the best she has in the realm
of culture, history, industry and the arts. It is my hope
that she will make a fine and worthy contribution. The
Fair, I understand, will exhibit the best products of free
labor. It will, I am sure, fire the imagination of man and
contribute to a free exchange of ideas and experiences.
The final purpose, if I may say so, of all artistic,
intellectual and scientific achievements must be the en-
hancement of the dignity and value of the human person.
Every person must be able to choose his work and develop
his talent without the dictates of the powers that be. Every
person must be able to live, breathe and have his being
in an atmosphere of freedom. May this theme of the Fair
prevail throughout the length and breadth of the planet.
Madame Chiang Kai-Shek
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REMARKS BY CHINESE AND WORLD'S FAIR OF-
FICIALS AT THE REPUBLIC OF CHINA GROUND-
BREAKING CEREMONIES, NEW YORK WORLD'S
FAIR, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 1962.
CONSUL GENERAL YU: Commissioner Moses, Gov-
ernor Poletti, distinguished guests, as an official repre-
sentative of the Republic of China, I am very proud that
China is the first participating foreign nation to break
ground for its pavilion. It also gives me personal satisfac-
tion, as I have from the very beginning almost two years
ago, played a small part in making this initial progress.
A groundbreaking is but the beginning. Nevertheless,
it indicates that the Chinese Government has followed
closely the schedule which the World's Fair authorities
have so well prepared for us. It also shows that my gov-
ernment attaches great importance to this Fair. China
will send the best it has in the realms of culture, history,
industry and the arts. It is our hope that our participation
will make a tine and worthy contribution to the Fair.
This Fair might well be considered as a mirror of the
human race: its artistic creations, its technical achieve-
ments, its evolution from the stone age to the nuclear
age, its ascendencies from the kingdom of necessity to the
kingdom of freedom. You all represent the best- the
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best man has accomplished. It might well be, I am sure,
one of the most meaningful dramatizations of the story
of man. A Fair of this grand conception cannot but exer-
cise a great influence in the mind of man and stimulate
further his artistic and scientific development.
Commissioner Moses, in your long years of service,
you have accomplished many tasks which at first were
thought impossible. Under your dynamic direction, the
World's Fair is bound to be another of your crowning
achievements. Thank you.
ROBERT MOSES: Thank you, Mr. Yu. We have rwo of
these medallions and one is for you and one is for the
Ambassador and we hope that it will be sent on to him.
[Presenting World's Fair medallion] This is our symbol.
It has the U nisphere on one side and it also marks the
300th anniversary of the founding of the City of New
York. I am delighted to give them to you on behalf of
the executives of the Fair.
CONSUL GENERAL YU: Thank you so much, Com-
missioner Moses.
GOVERNOR POLETTI: President Moses, Consul Gen-
eral Yu, Mrs. Yu and friends- we are delighted that
the Republic of China is the first international partici-
pant as far as a nation is concerned, but that's in keeping
because Consul General Yu was the first one to sign a
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contract with the New York World's Fair, so he's heping
right up to schedule and plus.
It's particularly delightful for me to be here today be-
cause the Consul General and I and a few other people
I see around here first got to know each other when I
was in Albany, and as one untactful gentleman said today,
our hair has gorten a little gray since.
That's right, but it's very, very nice co have you here
Consul General because I've had the greatest admira-
tion and warm feeling for you and we are sure that the
Pavilion of China will be something stunning and edu-
cational. We are happy that your country is going co be
here because of our friendship coward your country.
Your country and its many problems are in our minds
every day. We know that your country is the bastion of
freedom and liberry in a part of the world that is very pre-
carious, and we feel that your presence in the Interna-
tional area of the World's Fair in 1964 and 1965 will
serve to cement and strengthen the friendship between
the people of your country and the people of the United
States.
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During the Chme.re gr-oulldbreakill!!, ceremonies pre.rident
of the Fcur Robert MoJe.r is pre.rented tl'ith .ri/z•e1· Chine.re
;unk h) Glori,/ Chm and Cheryl Choy.
While Fair Vice Governor Poletti looks on,
Rober/ Moses presents official Fair medallions to Comul
General Yu a11d, in abmllia, to His Excellency Dr.
Tingfu F. Tsiang, AmbaJJador of the Republic of China.
UN I SPHERE
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PAVILION OF THE REPUBLIC OF CHINA
HONORABLE KIEN WEN YU
Mini1ter Plenipotentiary Consul General, New York
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
Flushing 52, N. Y.
ROBERT MOSES, President
Tel. 212-WF 4-1964
THOMAS J. DEEGAN, JR., Chairman of tho EJ<eculive Committee
WILLIAM E. POTTER, Executi<e Viet President
CHARLES POLETTI, Vice President, International Alfaln and E•hlbits
STUART CONSTABLE, Vice President, Operations
WILLIAM A. BERNS, Vice President, Communications and Public Relations
ERWIN WITT, Comptroller
MARTIN STONE, Director of lndu1trlol Section
GUY F. TOZZOLI, IPort of New York Authority) Transportation Section
ERNESTINE R. HAIG, Secretary of tho Corporation and
Assistant to tho President
WILLIAM WHIPPLE, JR., Chief Engineer
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