Box# 30

Folder# 601
Word's Fair:
Correspondence
1961 - 1964
I
ROBERT MOSES
PRE'SIDENT
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
FLUSHING MEADOW PARK • P. 0. BOX 270
FLUSHING 52, N.Y.
TELEPHONE Ol 1·7000
AREA CODE 212
THOMAS J. DEEGAN, JR.
March '1.7, 1961
CHAIRMAN
EXECUTIVf: COMMITTEE
REPLY TO:
TIME AND L I ~ E IIUILDINO
ROCKEF'ELLER PLAZA
NEW YORK 20, N.Y.
~ ~
t { ~ h
Mr. Paul R. Screvane
Deputy Mayor
City Hall
New York, New York
Dear Paul:
On behalf of the citizens group o! bankers, John
Cahill and myself, I want to thank you !or your courteous
reception at the Board of Estimate meeting on Wednesday.
I assume you will let me know what further steps
should be taken in connection with our discussion with the
members of the Board of Estimate.
My best personal regards.
Sincerely,
TJD/ahw
ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENf
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
FLUSHING MEADOW PARK • P.O. BOX 1964 • FLUSHING 52, N.Y.
TELEPHONE WF 4·1964-AREA CODE 212 CABLE ADDRESS 'WORLOSFAJR"
Hon. Paul R. Sc revane
Deputy Mayor
City Hall
New York 7, N. Y.
Dear Paul:
May 15, 1961
Attached are copies of recent correspondence
with Frank Blaustein about the Lincoln Center of the Performing
Arts.
RM:VW
attachments
President
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ROBERT MOSES
ONE GRACIE SQUARE
New York 28, N. Y.
May 12, 1961
Hon. Francis J. Blaustein
4'700 Independence Avenue
Riverdale 71, New York
Dear Frank:
Your City Center memo looks all right to me except that you
do not mention willingness to appoint representatives of the City
Center to an advisory coordinating board functioning for the entire
Performing Arts Center. You leave out the olive branch entirely.
As matters stand the first move is to get an agreement on
a joint statement by the Governor and Mayor on the State Theatre -
Museum - Library program. I attach for your strictly confidential
information what we are working on. The Mayor discussed this
with the Board of Estimate earlier this week with no final conclusion.
I am seeing Abe Stark Monday. Joe Sharkey is still sore about the I /
judgeship rhubarb. The Governor feels that the City Center matter t;:::.
should be held in abeyance until the main issue is settled.
I am sending a copy of this letter to Newbold.
RM:MD
Enclosure
cc: Comm. N. Morris
Mr. Stuart Constable
Mr. Thomas J. Deegan, Jr.
Mr. Charles Preusse
Cordially,
/s/ ROBERT MOSES
. -
. !
·ourr OF IUOO'!STED -X>Dn' STATEMENT BY GOVERNOR ROCIC!FELU:Il
AND MAYOI WAGNER ON COOPERATION or STATE AND CITY WITH
THE LINCOUf CENTER FOR THE ARTS
At the inception of Lincoln Square, it waa agreed that thia
huge project, the most ambitious and imaginative under the Federal
HOUiing Lawa, would be aalti·purpoae, and that the entire aidtown
weat aide area north of the New York Coliaeum at Columbut Circle
would be cleared for educational, cultural and recreational
purpoaea as well ae housing.
To thit end Fordham University was allotted land for a
new campus to houae ecattered faculties and generous provision waa
made for parks and bandstand, a great cultural Center of the
Performing Arte, City High Schools of Music, Art and the Performing
Arts, aa well as middle income and full taxpaying housing. The
federal helped write down high land costs; the City
contributed &lao toward land acquisition and for other purpoaea
and private contribution• were raised for Fordham, the Red Cross
and the Arts. The coat of the basic of the
Performing Arts is $142,000,000, all being raised from generous
patron• and patron• and supporters.
Thia money provides an work load of ten million
Mn bour1, aa or.any ae 2 ,000 men on conatruction at the
aite in a ainsle day, and amounting to a payroll of $40 to $50
million. On a lingle project, such as the PhilhanDOnic Hall, the
- ) -
We are happy ae State and City ex.cutivea to rec•: end and
.upport theae contributiona to round out thia maanlflcont
eoterprlaa and public 1pirit toward• makiD& Lincoln Square tbe
eJIIbol of Mtropolitan art, culture and education.
Neleoa A. Rockefeller
Governor of the State of lew York
R.obert P. Wagner
Mayor of the Clty of llw 'fork
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Dear Bob:
FRANCIS J. BLOtJSTEIN
4700 Independence Avenue
Riverdale 71, New York
EJngsbridge 6-0065
May 9, 1961
In accordance with our recent conversation and at your
suggestion, I enclose a draft of the kind of memorandum that
the City Center should make available to the Governor concerning
its status and its outlook with relation to Lincoln Center.
At this time I am not including the enclosures mentioned
in this memorandum. If, in your opinion, the memorandum fits
the bill I shall prepare it in final form and get it to you with the
enclosures. I would be happy to get your comments.
In the meantime, thank you so much for your many
suggestions, advice, sympathy and assistance.
Eon. Robert Moses
One Gracie Square
New York, New York
Sincerely,
/sf FRANK

Ya1Q, 1981
Prq>osed City Center Statement Prepared by Frank mOdte!ft
City Center of Music Drama, Inc. is a non-prot1t,
membership corporation, incorporated in under the lavs
State of New York, to nrovide opPras, music, symphonic
concerts, ballets and educational ani cultural an-
tertainmPnt on a non-profit basis, and at a low nriee.
Annexed hereto and made oart of this memorandum are copies
or thP. of Incorporation and the By-Laws under which the
City Center of Music and Drama, Inc. operates.
The City a owned by thP City ot
New York for which, unrler State lPgislation, no rental is
paid and the Center enjoys certain othPr benefits by way or capital
improTements naid for by City because the ownership or the
building and the character of the Center's operations.
A limitation has placed on the price to be charged
for admission, which does not excePd No or officer
of the receives any salary or other compensation ror
acting in such capacity, and no from thP or the
corporation enures to the benefit of any individual, incorporate,
director or officer.
Alao annP.xei to this mPmorandum is a list or the names or
the present officers and dtrP.etors who are responsible, wnder the
By-Lavs, for opP.ration and control or the City Center. It vi11
be not&d that they constitutP an of
men and wo11en ·.rho are not only snn devoted to the Center,
but regarded in thP. community for th@ir in behalf ot
the eultural advancement of the people of the City or Rev York.
for its
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part of CA gre8t ion should re gi Vf'r. to making
such a move.
Th+> is inf!vitablP. tb.f..\t -:.r move is made, the
City Center to operate Rt its low-fixed price, as an
1ndentmdent tt-nt-"'::-pl:'ise-, ret.'.linint,: Hs name, which has
been built up ov"'r a p . .-,r1t:x1, and its publtc itaage. It must
be abl9 to in attractions and
cannot b .. vjtl·l cost!3 or chart:•'s for which 1t itse1 f is not
reiJ)Oftl!'bl@oe Ir it lS If') l inC.,ln

Related Interests

.enter, it
should do so fr·r)lll tlw City nf Nt>!W Yc•r-k. ThP ,: 1t.'l hal auff1-
ehnt eu1ty in "'""'ting 1 own ts and doji<J! not !!Mk
fro• anyon<A else and tt 'WOU:!.ri b,q to d-.flelt!
ar1s1n, not rr6m its own but frcm op,.,ration end Rd-
or the l.incol.L ·::Pn':·"!' m"'rfi!Jy t: ''lf&S to
a site within Lincoln
v:'th . in conversations 1hould
be 5o that I.incoln c.,ntE'·r m1ght tmj.)y tf-!nt-f'it of
City Center r. Cit.v rnilh';; continut5
to operat" but wtt'1tn R. fl""'"' t1.11<' C
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J:.turli: Ct'lnter tn thfl CJty
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ROSENMAN COLIN KAYE PETSCH EK FREUND
!57!5 MADISON AVENUE: NEW YORK 22
0001"1111:'1' OOLOMAIIK

MUAJIIAV HILL 1·7100
CODE tla
AOO"I&S
"ROCOKAV NIWVOftK"
IANUIL l.ltOIINMAN
ltAI.liH f', COLIN
IYDNCY N.ltA'I'I
WALTIIII J.liii:TICHIK
MAX 'ltiEUND
AMIItOaC DOIKOW
ICYMOUIII D. LIWII
I.AWIIIIMCI III.IHO
MUIIIIIIAY CDHCN
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JCIIIIOIIIIE I..IINDI.I:II
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HOWAIID WIINITII:IN
I'I'VAIIT ROIINOWITZ »eo•ber 28, 1962
... Anhur Jl. llotlq, Pree14ent

133 ft1l« lftlale
... 1'on 17, •· Y.
Dear ....
lob ..... bu aabd • to drop JOU a DOte 4eta111n&
... or U. •:run at the fair" tlb1ob baa been 11Md up u ot now.
lt bM Men tbe ob.1eot1ve ot tbe Pair to .a the enN ratr ••
1a all 1ta 1eot1ou ·- tBerta1D1ns. It 11 tor that reuon tbat
• have &Y01de4 •••t&nat1D& thll Lab Area, 11b1oh 11111 oontaill tbe
=· ot tbe I!!! ldadaa1cm entezwtai ... nt, u !!!!. entertas.ut
Ot 00\lfte •ra• at a Pair oan •an Utterent th1Dp to
UtteNat ,.ople. !be D1reotore ot tbe ft1r 4eo14ed earl7 1a the
- tbat 1t wa pou1ble -- thoush auch .on 41tt1oult -- to pt
full 111tbout thl uaual 1114WJ or ebeap oatoh-pmnJ pl'OJeota, atrlp-
teu• bell:r-d.uloen ad h-.n treakll; that enJoJMnt wu pou1ble
atb;;t ba'fiD& rour enira1la tumect upa1d.e clown in eteep r1dea and
lnllpU. oarta. '!bat pol1o;r 4ec1a1on hal NMined the •- to date.
IJM seattle experience baa been tbat the c1rlie calul ..
ead ptep•8hoa wre a ta1lure t1n&D01al17 U llell U art1at1oal1J.
lt the lut Jew York Vorl4'1 lair tbq al1o reaultecl 1n ICM pol1oe
aotlY1t1• whiob were ver:r eabu:Tua1fts to the ra1r and ita manaa•·
MDt Ulll direotora.
leattle •• r1dea and 8Mll catoh-PeJ'IIQ' clrl1oea
..,. verr nooeaatul; but the area ._. quite ... ut
tG bebol4. A Vor14'• Ja1r need not loot like a tJP1cal rail'
or a IUburHn ..... nt part. At the pollc:r --with 11b1oh
1 apee -- baa beaD lalcS down apinat 1t.
With tbat polio,- and with the further detel'II1Dat1on that
tbe Ja1r ooutruet no bu1ld1aca, theatrea, dance halls, etc. with
llr. Arthur H. JlotleJ
-2
1te own tuDda (in order to remain eolvent) it baa not been too
..., to baYe uuaementa oonatruottd b7 private capital tdllch have
to Par out the coat or conatructlon and maintenance (and protit)
1n two au-months perioc11. and then have to be torn down.
leveswtheleea I think w are malting eome progreae toward
aD attractive Pair with manr aapeota or tun.
AI tar u the Lake Area ltlelt 11 concerned, the recent
•1&nlnc ot a leue with Ansue o. W)'nne, Jr., the president ot the
GNat louth-t Corporation and the creator ot Six Plqa Over 'l'exaa
and Collpaaa ft1r Inc., tor the conatruct1on -- out ot bia own
tun4a -- ot a dollar combtnatlon n1aht-club
aa4 rntaurant, ie evidence that there can be quality enterta111Mnt
at the J'alr. The theatre 1f111 be clevoted primarily to muelcal
lhoWII to be produced by Jl1". Oeor&e Schaefer or Compue
Procluotlona, Ino. ·- a ve17 experienced an4 qual1t1ed producer.
It 1a plumed to tranatorm the reetaurant into a night club troll
9:30P.M. to 4:00A.M. nightly, ut1liz1ns the fineat·lounge and
n1aht club enterta11111ent talent. I hope he will stq open 4ur1na
tbe winter 110ntha betwen the two eeuona or the Pair.
other attractions which have been actually a1gned up
ud depoaita lllde tor the Lllce Area are:
1. m!itheatre -- '!'he olcl lew York State .-h1theatre
aa4 lbchibit Bu1 ns known ae the Acauaoade) will be
I'Wl bJ lle,..r Davia, Leon Leon1clott and Thomu R. Rudell. 'l'he
tll'lt tw are, or couree, top aho_.n moae combined talent a an
a\lft to produce a IIIU81oal extravapnsa or the tirlt order. Jlr.
llu4ell 11 the rtnanoial 1181!, !here will be at leaat rour show
a 4q, tm or which will be in the evening. 'l'he eeat1ng cepac1tJ
la &bout 11,000.
2. Ciroua -- John R1nsl1na llorth, throuah a corporation
II:Dom u Cont1nentil Circus, Inc. , will preaent a one-rins oon-
tlaental tJP• o1roua 1n a heated and air·oon41tioned, t1reproot,
tabrlo-enoloaed. bu1ldins aeatina 5,000 persona. There will be at
leut two ahoD on weekdQ'II and at leut f'our ehowa on
SUnUp aDd holid&Ja. In adclition, a c1rcue paracle ot an11Dala,
olowna, banda, etc. will be preeented once on weekdaJa and twice
on SatUJ'!Up, Sun4ap and holida¥1 over auch routea throu&h the
J'a1r IJ'OUh4l u 1111 be directed b;y the fair Corporation, to lend
color and exo1taent to the fair. There wre two applicant a tor
tb1a tJPt ot attraction; • chose the orsanizat1on which w thouabt
- beet equipped alii With the hi&beat reputation tor the preaenta-
tion or tbe attraction.
Ill'. Arthur H. Motley
-3
3. Wax Museum ..... The Pair has signed a lease for a wax
JIUaeum. The Wax Muaeum-at the seattle world's Fair waa extremely
popular, and contained ma.n;y beautiful and moving presentations ot
h1ator1cal and. legenc.tary aoenee. The same people who operated the
Wax Museum in Seattle will operate the Wax Museum 1n the Lake Area.
It was alao a great success at the Brussels Fair.
4. American Indian Pavilion -- For the first time 1n
history-, the Aiiieri;can Indians w111 ofl'er an organized program at
a World'& Fair. this will not be merely a repetition of the usual
sea1·fake kind of Indian Village. Under the sponsorship of the
National American Indian Youth Committee of Arrow, Inc., a pavilion
will be constructed on a 35,000 square foot site in the Lake Area.
The pavilion will show aspects of the background and present-day
life or some 300 tribes. The focal point of the exhibit will be
a ceremonial center where members ot different tribes will stage
dances and other ritea, many of which will be shown the first
time to the public.
5. There will be a number of smaller projects: a tower
With cages which will lift visitors approximately 120 feet into
the air for a view or the Pair; a number or attractive outdoor
reotaurante; sightseeing boats on the Lake; a full-sized replica
or Columbus • Santa Maria, now being constructed 1n Spain. The
Santa Maria will be rigged with ita full complement of saila and
will be bathed in light from floodlights the evening hours.
The Pair has also completed arrangements for the presentation of
a t1rework8 display on Meadow Lake. In addition we are negotiating
With several people With additional ideas, such as dance halls,
oh1ldren•s areas, open-air spectacular shows, etc. We have about
190,000 square feet left.
Included 1n the Lake Area are two State exhibits --
Hawa11 and Florida. Both will feature entertainment. The Hawaiian
exhibit will include a small amphitheatre in which native dancing
and music will be presented. Florida contemplates several ehows.
We could fill the area several times over with rides, small oon-
cess1ona, eto., but have refrained -- I think px·operly -- from
d.oins so.
As far aa the Industrial Area is the General
Motora, Ford and Chrysler exhibits will be among the most interest-
ing aa well aa the most entertaining features at the Fair. You
need only recall the General Motors exhibit at the last Fair tor
aaaurance tut their exhibit at this Fair will be top-rate entertain-
ment. The Ford exhibit 18 being produced by Walt Disney, and they
are trying to outdo General Mot ora . Included in the Transport at 1on
Area will be an auto thrill show at which drivers who have very
little N&Ud tor their cnm neokl Will prove auoh lack or repr4
to ..Se:rbain the public. We urdtr'lltanct that MlV' other 1nduatr1al
uld.blt:a 11111 teat"" danoere and othe:r me.bera or the
,.-ronlll1q arta 1n conveyirla their reepeot1ve corporate 1ugee to
the publ1o.
fOreign 10vernmenta end sroupa repreeent1ns foreign
oountrS.ea oonatl'\lotins bu1.ldinsa in the lntemat1onal. Area will
&110 NlJ heav117 on the arts u tma important teatur.
ot their exb1b1te. ror exaaple, the operators ot the PIWloh
Pavilion have announced tbat the7 wUl brill& over the Poliea
lei'Pre and a replica ot llaxiM. Ma1J7 ot the bu1ld1np will
laolude theatre. and other areaa auitable ro:r auoh entertainment.
1oM or the State bu1ld1np will be equipped for ahow
aNI other torsa ot entertainment •
ODe·balf ot the *" Yo1'k City exhibit will be devoted
to tbe preaentat1on of an ice show to be produced. by D1ck Iutton,
one ot the toremoat men fiSUN skatera ot recent yeare •
'!he 11£ht and raua1o at the vatt1oua poola and tountaiM,
tt tbe model• ana draW1np I have seen are accurate, will eurpaaa
anrtbina that hU ever been seen.
!here Will be tun at the Pair. It will, I hope, be
olean, 'llholftCIIe enterta1nment tlh1oh can be enJored by a4Ulta,
Hell-asera aDd children without embarre.auent to anr ot tbefl and
wltbout tllbanunent to the people of the City Yortc lltl1oh
will be the beet tor both national and international v1a1tora
..uta to Hew York tor the l'a1r.
You have done wondera tor the Industrial Area. It J'OU
have ldeu about the Lake Area, I•4 love to a1t down with JOU
and 41aouaa thea. It wuld be 11101t helptul.
1f1th ldnd.eat regards,
IDa Alii
oo a j Ibn. Robert Noaea
11r. Stuart Conetable
Youra a1ncerel;r
Saaluel I. RoaeiBAJl
Dr. Schweitzer's Hospital is located near the town of Lambarene
1n the Republic of Gabon, West Africa. itself, is situated
1n deepest bush ·country, on a large tsland in the River, about
200 air mlles southeast of Gabon's seaport capital of Libreville. It is
possible to fly to an air strip near Lambarene from Libreville and this
I d.ld via the very efficient Trans-Gabon Airlines. In order to reach
Dr. Schweitzer's Hospital, I was obliqed to cross the River by native
boat.
Dr. Schweitzer had invited me to lunch but suggested that I first
make a tour of the grounds. This I did under the guidance of a young
SWiss nurse. The Hospital buildings are spread out over a large area.
I saw, but did not enter, the leper compound.
\

Related Interests

About 30 people were present at luncheon. These included all of
Dr. S
1
s non-African staff, among whom were an American surgeon and
his wife, who is a nurse; a Japanese surgeon and his wife, also a nurse;
several Swiss doctors and a hardy crew of Swiss, Dutch and German
nurses. Dr. S's two chief assistants who have been with him for years
and who comprise the executive backbone of the organization are a Dutch
nurse and a Swiss nurse, aged about 80 to 65, who are really fabulous
people in the best sense of the word.
As I see it, the situation with respect to Dr. s. is the following:
1) By our standards, the Hospital is a shambles. It is spread
over numerous flimsily built houses perched on the side of a hill extending
down to the River bank. More than anything else, it resembles a not
too clean Gypsy camp. The families of the patients come to the Hospital
with their ill members and stay there during the duration of the illnesses.
The families prepare the meals for the patients. Animals roam all over
the place- many monkeys, baboons, goats, and even tame pelicans.
Reason: When the families leave their homes, they bring all their pets
with thei'9 (and such pets!). This is why Dr. S's establishment is frequently
referred to in Gabon, .and elsewhere, as The Zoo.
2) Nevertheless, you have to take your hat off to Dr. s. He and his
little band of unselfish, dedicated international humanitarians are doing
an enormous amount of good, and have been doing it, under most adverse
circumstances for decades in an isolated, trot>ical jungle, through which
e I I e e I e.
MEMORANDUM
NEW YORK WORLO·s FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
TO:
Governor Poletti DATE: December 28, 1962
PROMs Lionel Harris
•u11.11cT: Page Two
flows the River
1
a large ominous and unpredictable body of
water, full of crocodiles who do not always stay in the water.
3) Many common types of diseases are treated at the Hospital
and many common types of operations are performed, probably the
most common being hernia. There is also an active lying-in "wing".
The operating theater is limited in scope and lighting, although they
have available the most modern operating instruments and equipment
to take .care of the cases within the physical capability of the plant.
They also have adequate supplies of all the newest "Wonder Drugs".
Dr. S
1
s daughter Erika is in charge of the Pharmacy. Very important-
the Staff knows how to direct convalescences. No question about it-
this qroup renders· an almost unbelievably noble service to thousands
of primitive people living in the backwash of civilization.
4) But--
from the purely medical point of view, Dr. S
1
s establishment
is held in very low esteem, not only by official Gabonese health
authorities, but also by the many foreign medical people who, for
whatever reasons, continue to make pilgrimages to One
reason for the adverse attitude of the Gabonese authorities is that
they deplore the almost non-existence of written records and case
histories, the Gypsy camp atmosphere, the omnipresent wandering
small animals (which, personally, I found fascinating) and the compara ...
tively limited scope of Dr. S's surgical and medical potential. One of
the chief complaints against Dr. s. is that he has no public health
program, that he teaches the natives nothing about health matters, that
he tells them nothing. He only assuages their pain, cures them and
saves their lives! Although the establishment is held in low esteem at
the technical level, it is held in high esteem at the human level.
5) In view of the above, there are four reasons why, it appears
unlikely to me, that the Gabonese Government, which takes a dim
official view of Dr. S's professional activities (in spite of his unquestioned
good will and good deeds), would embrace with enthusiasm the idea of
Dr. S's Hospital being presented as a conspicious part of an official
Gabonese Exhibit:
First, because of the very primitive nature of Dr. S's entire
installation.
• •••••••
MEMORANDUM
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964·1965 CORPORATION
Governor Poletti
DATE: December 28, 1962
,ROM1 Lionel Harris
tUII.IECT: Page Three
Second, because the activity as a whole would present a phase
of Gabonese life and custom that Gabon (a very progressive litUe
country) would probably prefer not to underline.
Third, because Dr. S's activity is private and not subsidized in
any way by the Gabonese Government, which has not control over it,
and
Fourth, because the fate of the Hospital after Dr. S's death is
extremely uncertain. No one can foresee how this activity could
continue without the active, driving, inspiring presence of Dr. s.,
who is now over 85 years of aqe.
Attached is a photo of Dr. s. taken when I saw him on
September 11, 1962.
Enc.
LH:hu
cc: IAE-Staff
IAE- fUe Gabon
Reading
General file
•... ,
NEW YORK WORLD'S F'AIR 1964·1965 CORPORATION
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT f:'LUSHING MEADOW PARK
F'LUIHINCl 52, N.Y. • TELEPHONE ·AREA Coo£ 212 • WF" 4·1964 • CAlLE ADDREIII
I'U.CC 'fiiiiOUOII
u•DIII8TANOINO
ROBERT MOSES
I'IIUIDli<T
ERNI:STINit A. HAICl
THI COIIIIOaA1lOH
... ,.,.liT TO TMI Hrtiiii-T
January 28, 1963
Dear Member or Director:
For your information, in the event you were
not personally present at the annual meeting of the
Members and Directors of the Fair Corporation held
on January 24, 1963, I enclose a copy of an extract
from the minutes relating to the Official World's Fair
Terrace Club.
The full minutes of the meeting will be sent
",
\ to you in due course, but, since this is a matter of
great importance, I am bringing it to your attention
immediately.
Enclosure
-........ @---
450CAYS TO OPENING CAY
Guy F. Tozzoli, representing the Port of New York
Authority, agent of the Fair Corporation for the Transportation
Area, reported on developments in that section of the Fair. He
discussed the World's Fair Terrace Club which will be the
official private club of the Fair and will be located in the World's
Fair Heliport. He stated that the Board of Governors of the
club was opening the membership roll initially only to persons
directly associated with the Fair Corporation in order to insure
that such persons will have an opportunity to join. After this
very limited initial period the roll will be opened to representa·
tives of exhibitors and others. Mr. Tozzoli stated that each
Member and Director of the Fair Corporation would receive an
invitation in the immediate future and urged that the Members
and Directors act on the invitation promptly. The Governors
of the club are:
Chairman
Vice Chairman
Secretary
Ex-officio
William E. Robinson
HowardS. Cullman
Richard C. Patterson, Jr.
Ralph J. Btmche
John J. Clancy
Thomas J. Deegan, Jr.
Bernard F. Gimbel
James C. Kellogg m
Mrs. A1 bert D. Lasker
Matthias E. Lukens
Joseph A. Martino
Charles Poletti
Bayard F. Pope
Robert Moses
Austin J. Tobin
... ) UNISPHERE 01061
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
FLUSHING 52, N.Y. • TELEPHONE ·AREA CODE 212 • WF 4·1964 • CABLE AOORESS .. WORLOSFAIR"
1",..PIIOUGH

PERSONAL
Mr. Abraham Feinberg
Kayser- Roth Corporation
425 Fifth A venue
New York, New York
Dear Mr. Feinberg:
ROBERT MOSES
PR£SID£NT
I have been talking to Anna Rosenberg about the Israel Pavilion
at the World's Fair or rather about the absence of such a bthldmg. She sug-
gested that I write directly to you.
I am, of course, acquainted with the previous negotiations for
such a building and for the scientific and cultural exhibits in it. A number
of prominent people, in one way or another connected with the Fair, have
CitY
been much concerned about this situation, and find it difficult to understand
why Israel should be absent from the roll of foreign countries. I have heard
various explanations, none of which seem to me to be very clear or persuasive.
We have been told th3t some of the representatives of Israel have
been very close to the so-called BIE in Paris, and have argued that since we
are not signatories, none of the countries which have joined the BIB should
have anything to do with the New York World's Fair. This is ridiculous reason-
ing in view of the fact we cannot join any such organization as the BIE without
a message from the President and the approval of the U.S. Senate under our
Constitution. No such approval could be obtained, and moreover the rules of
the BIB do not apply, nor could we possibly come under the jurisdiction of this
Bureau.
Ours is a two-year Fair, not directly operated by the Government
and in this and other respects, we cannot ask any BIE sanction. A number of
countries have ignored the BIE matter and others are coming in through various
authorities and other corporate devices entirely satisfactory to us.
I can readily understand that it might be undesirable at this time for
the government of Israel to appropriate money for a Pavilion at our World's
Fair in the face of other and more insistent demands for local public services.
This same logic applied to other countries where we were able to surmount
such difficulties.
442 DAYS TO OPENING DAY
Mr. Abraham Feinberg - 2- February 5, 1963
It seems to me that the Israel Pavilion and exhibits can get down to
a very simple business proposition. An adequate showing will cost between
$2, 500, 000 and $2, 800, 000. It can be done for $2, 500, 000 but it will be well
to have a somewhat larger sum. This sum would include rent, design, con-
struction exhibits and operation. There should be an entrance charge of 50 cents.
We figure conservatively that not less than 8, 000,000 people and probably con-
siderably more, would visit this Pavilion. This would bring in a minimum of
$4,000,000. We have figured that even if the entrance charge were reduced to
50 cents for adults and 25 cents for children, the total collected would be more
than adequate. If a loan were arranged to get this project under way, it would
cost the government of Israel nothing and would leave a surplus.
I am frankly unable to understand why an entrance charge should not
be charged. It is being done in several instances although most of the Pavilions
admit visitors free. All sorts of alternative methods which avoid government
appropriations have been adopted in other instances. The Roman Catholic Church,
for example, is receiving the greater part of the money it needs for the Vatican
Exhibit by general collection in the churches throughout the country, and by
selling artifacts, photographs, replicas, etc.
If, as I hope, you will personally take an interest in this matter,
you can verify our cost figures by talking to a distinguished architect and a
first-rate builder. I would suggest Max Abramovitz and Lou Crandall. Former
Governor Poletti is head of our International Division and is the person best
acquainted with the entire problem.
We need in this context the help of someone genuinely interested in
seeing that the State of Israel is included, but at the same time one who has had
the business experience to bring about the financing on a logical basis.
Cordially,
/1/ ..........
President
RM:gls
. ' ..... -· . ' . '

e•MI I
NtW YORK WORLD'S F'AIR 196<4-1965 CORPORATION
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
FLUSHING 62. N. 'f. • TELEPHONE-AREA CODE 212· WF 4·1984 • CAlLI ADDRUs'WORLDSF'AIR"
TH"OUOH
UNOEIItaT.NDittO
Hon. Francis J. Bloustein
Acting Chairman
City Planning Commission
· 2 Lafayette Street
New York 7, New York
Dear Frank:
January 18, 1963
ROBERT MOSES
'"IIEIIDikl

I am informed of the attitude of the City Planning Commission in
executive session, as described to me by Commissioner Newbold Morris, regarding
acquisition of potentially attractive land, presently a dump and junk yards, at
Flushing Meadow north of Roosevelt Avenue. If correctly reported, this disposition
seems to me to be unfortunate and ill-considered. Let me tell you why.
I have been identified with the establislmlent of a large centrally located
park at l'lushing Meadow for many years, first as a State official in fixing the route
of the Grand Central Parkway through the Meadow and Corona Dump, then as City
Park Commissioner in charge of parkway extensions, land acquisition and basic im-
provements :for the World's Fair of 1939 and 1940, and subsequently, as head of the
1964-1965 Fair, and as liaison ofiicer responsible for extensive expressway, park-
way, shorefront and other acquisitions and improvements in thls area, including the
Stadium and the corridors connecting Flushing Meadow, Kissena and Cunningham
Parks.
It is a primary objective of the 1964-1965 Fair management, fore-
shadowed in the agreement with the City and reflected in all Fair plans, to clear
Flushing Meadow aiter the Fair, restore the landscape and deliver to the City on or
about January 1, 1967 a usable park, including the improvements of certain adjacent
areas such as the westerly part of the Kissena Corridor, the Marina, Stadium access,
parking, etc.
The area bounded by Roosevelt Avenue, 126th Street, 34th Avenue and
VanWyck Expressway, is in deplorable condition. Only acquisition of most of it for
public purposes at this time without delay stands in the way of permanent disfigurement
as a gasoline gully, gigantic junk yard and perpetual eyesore. I see no purpose in
backbreaking efforts to obtain large Fair surplus funds to complete Flushing Meadow
Park ii the City has no genuine interest in it and no desire to protect what is for all
practical purposes an integral part of potentially the City
1
s finest park, at its very
population and geographical center.
You have only to look at the immediate surroundings of most ball parks
and stadia to see what happens when they are not in public ownership. Look at the
-.--8---
460 DAYS TO OPEN lNG CAY
.... . .
Hon. Francis J. Blaustein -2- January 18, 1968
Polo Grounds and the Yankee Stadium. Only housing and recreation have improved
the Polo Grounds
1
surroundings and the Yankee Stadium sits in a blighted neighbor-
hood. In this case, the entire Flushing Meadow Park of 1250 acres is threatened
by the mess along Flushing Creek.
If the City Planning Commission does not want 75% state aid park funds,
w h a t ~ it want? What becomes of all the talk about courageous and forthright
long range planning if stultifying compromises are made without full consideration,
and i:f promise$ of such consideration are not kept?
It is sheer nonsense to assume that the deplorable conditions south of
Northern Boulevard and north of Roosevelt Avenue will be automatically improved
by :Industrial zoning. Industrial zoning does not clean up a mess nor guarantee
anything better in the future. Similarly, making acquisition of the area east of
Willets Point Boulevard dependent on parking needs for the stadium is no solution.
Additional year round parking is in fact not needed. The parking space which I
established as City Park Commissioner serves the subway-elevated railroad, is
adequate for commuters and is largely available for stadium users evenings, Saturdays,
Sundays and holidays. There is no need of additional parking space for the Fair. We
have more than enough. After the Fair, the Stadium w-ill inherit some of the Fair
parking space. The acquisition of the land east of Willets Point Boulevard for park-
ing is therefore entirely unnecessary. It should be acquired for park purposes.
Finally, the tennis court area south of Roosevelt Avenue should not be
left 1n its present state merely because some of the owners object to acquisition.
This is no way to determine public need.
I would suggest that this subject, which Mr. Felt promised me would
be fully and sympathetically considered, be reconsidered promptly and a more
constructive solution arrived at. Pending such action, comprehensive plans for the
future Flushing Meadow Park beyond demolition and restoration, involving large
possible Fair balances and surplus funds will have to remain in abeyance.
The precise terms of our agreement with the City, noteholders, etc. of
course will be fully respected by the Fair, but park plans which encompass additional
improvements beyond ordinary restoration will have to wait.
I suggest an early meeting of the City Planning Commission at the Fair
followed by an inspection of the entire area by helicopter and car.

...•··
Sincerely, ~
---· - · ~
-·., __....., __ .. ~ - .. ..- ~
. ' ------ c.-.·- -· '
- -
t: ....
President
WHITMAN, RANSOM & COULSON
522 FIFTH AVBNUB
NBWYORK 36, N.Y.
TELEPHONE TN 7·1700
¢0LLBY 8.WILLIAMil
SKITH February 13, 1963
JAKBS K.POLK
PATIICII H.SVI.LIVAN
CH.\R&.Ill P'. PRIIUIIlB
PRAIICII T.CARKODY
MillRY S. RBBDBR
J,BftY ROBINIOII v
FOIIIUIIl 0.$HAW
AJITIIUR L.WBDRBR

Related Interests


B.KINQALL OII,LBTT.JR.
AIIC!IIBALD H.CASIIION
WILI,IAK T. FARLIY
JOHN A.PATBRACKI,JR.
811\N.Uil L. SMIOFP
JOHN V. THORIITOII
Oo\IIIBL P. ClA!.LAHAN
JOHN D.SKYBR8
Hon. Robert Moses, President
New York World
1
s Fair 1964-1965 Corp.
P. o. Box 1964
Flushing Meadow Park
Flushing 52, N.Y.
Re: Federal Admission Tax
Dear Mr. Moses:
We are pleased to advise you that, pursuant to
our request, the Internal Revenue Service has ruled that neither
the printing nor excess charge requirements of the admissions
tax of the Internal Revenue Code are applicable to
tickets to the Fair. The ruling, in effect, also affirms the
federal admissions tax exemption previously obtained.
Accordingly, the Fair Corporation is not re-
quired to print discount prices on tickets sold at a discount.
Also, persons purchasing tickets from the Fair Corporation for
resale or redistribution will not be required to pay a separate
tax on the excess of their selling price over their purchase
price or to their name and address and certain price
information on the back of each·ticket.
This ruling will permit the immediate printing
and sale of tickets. A copy of the ruling is enclosed for your
information. We are sending a copy of this letter and a copy
of the ruling to Mr. Witt.
.,
ia/tt;:.,M
Very truly
0 vJ4/Y\.__
I
Enclosure
Copy to Executive Comrni ttee . .
1
. • 1-
2-13-03 (.J !J.
. .....
I
U. S. DEPARTME1\iT
JN·;·E.'HN1'L REVENUC SC:AVICE
DIHCCTOi'\
Whit.:r.Jl.ll, & . .c. on
.sn F'i.i'th Ji
Nall Z·jrk "jJ, N.; ·::: t)l'k
250 L.IVINGSTC/N nBt:ET
JFlrx'IKI.'V" I PIF.I' 't'

Related Interests

"'1
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}';deral .A.t.iln1s3.i.nn6 '!'u
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Y•)U bfJ a>lrt soil o.l l'\J.llng U·:d 'rry t.Le uc J.'.i6 E..·r .. Hch, ti.:m . .U.

'i'ho foll..,!i.-.i.ag fJXC':lJ.-,:>t r1t:Lin:;;, 7 > J.963, a:'lS"-'''rll
your • for a tt:lillg on yo\! h:.d :rfolised.
NThe poss1.b:Uity ot' t.icbjts t.rd.n..:; f•i':' t.:l".:.;\·n', . .:\ .\1
of t.!'lo l"(:gl!l..rl.r orlcti at pl--\C90 ot·t.;;i.'

Related Interests

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l:t·\qti.Ll•J t)::·;r Oil
c.:u .. uoction 423.1(4), '\.:.ill <.:..;:>;JJ..y .l.n
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<"-'!!IO.,N
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UNISfi'HEAE CIOOI
( J/iY1
NEW YORK WORLD'S
I
FAIR 1964·1965 CORPORATION
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
FLUSHING 52, N.Y. • TtLEPHONE -AREA COOE 212 • WF 4·1964 • CABLE AOOR£Ss"W0RLDSFAiR"
PEACt THROUGH
UNQtR'STANOINO
Mr. Robert B. Abel
Executive Secretary
February 13, 1963
Interagency Committee on Oceanography
Room 1818, Building T - 3
17th St. and Constitution Ave. N. W.
Washington 25, D. C.
Dear Mr. Abel:
ROBERT MOSES
COpy
I have your letter of February 11th with reference to oceanography
at the Fair.
The Fair does not finance or build pavilions and exhibits. It
does, of course, invite sponsors to do so including foreign governments,
states, industries and of course the U. S. government itself.
I would doubt whether the Federal building will have much, if
any space, for the subject you mention. It is possible that it might somehow
be included in the Space and Scientific Exhibit in the Transportation Area
or under some other auspices.
All of us remember what a remarkable contribution Dr. Spilhaus
made at Seattle. The U. S. Science Building and Exhibit were quite the
finest thing in this Fair. My recollection is that Dr. Spilhaus started out
as an oceanographer and branched out into many related fields of science.
/
Cordially,.
,./ . /
President
--.. @---
434
DAYS TO OPENING OAY

.•
INTERAGENCY COMMITTEE ON OCEANOGRAPHY
of the Federal Council for Science & Technology
Room 1818, Building T-3
17th Street and Constitution Ave., N. W.
Washington 25, D. C. ·
ONR: 104"RBA:c .:·:1.
11 February 1Gc3
Robert Moses, President
New York World • s Fair 1964-196.5 Corporation
Flushing .52, New York
Dear Sir:
Since the inception of planning for the New York World' s Fair of
1964 I have wondered whether the exhibit plans include any o£ the scientific,
cultural, industrial, military, or political aspects of oceanography.
About a year ago I had effected contact with your representatives in
Washington but at that time plans were apparently insufficiently crystallized
that much information could be could be given me. Since that time, at least
according to the newspapers, arrangements for your Fair have reached a high
state o£ development.
As you are doubtless aware, the ocean has impact on nearly every
phase o£ our civilization, including defense and national security, health and
safety, transportation and communications, weather prediction, engineering
development, and disaster protection. The possibilities £or exhibiting and
presenting these forms of impact are enormous. During the last few years
vehicles which have been employed for such presentations have included: Century
Twenty One, U.S. National Museum, Meetings of the American Chemical Society,
International Union o£ Geodesy and Geophysics, and other professional organiza-
tions, and literally hundreds of schools, colleges, and state fairs across the
country.
In this view I should be greatly interested in any information you
can give me concerning your own plans. Please feel free to call upon me for
whatever assistance I might be able to provide.
s ~ J : @ Z J
ROBERT B. ABEL
Executive Secretary
Interagency Committee
on Oceanography
' ~
\
,.
-
"EACit THAOIJOH
UNOEABTANDINO
01861
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
FLUSHING 52,N.Y. • TELEPHONE·AREACODE212·WF 4·1964 • CABLEADDRESs"WORL.OSFAIR"
I'llm ...... ft4fta 1 /
MEMOi«ANCtJM TO OUY 'fOZi' OLI
FROM .ROBE.:R'l' A408.t;J
I..., CllldlJ, wbola -.at ataaMI'a, -
taelp • U.S.,... 1*1111. Ba. flra NpNIJAII .. ......
-.wen tw N.;.. s.A. Lltll* ..... ....,. ...... ..
Noll ..... NO ........ ofla-.
actl& 1M Pill St.n•r 11 ._... all t1at NJ.U.e w1t1a
w• Pleul talk te ClltiiiUe Pnuaa.
&lf "'Cdal ckdltp.... CM'dttl ,..., r. 210.
RN Cnu ..... CldJ.Jr. 0Nnut .u1 tlda ......
0.. otld. lAta of bltenat Ia U. htJ. BW. R-.,.
......
I,; ROBERT MOSES
DAYS TO OPENING DAY
..

cc: Hon. Paul R. Screvane
UNiei'HIEIUt oa•••
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1985 CORPORATION
. INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
f'LUIHINO 51, N. V. • TILIPHONE ·AREA CooE 212 • Wf' 4·1884 • CAIIut AoDRIII.WOFILDSrAIR•
-IETMIIOUOH
IIIIOCitaTANDINO
,w(
· \\ · February 28, 1963
Mr. William J'. Tracy
1· Broadway ·
New York, New York
Dear Bill:
ltO.IIIT MOIII
l'ttUIDI .. T
Blessinqs on you for beinq a grand friend, even if your
judgment has qone awry.
Best,
- .... ·8--...
419 DAYS TO OPENING DAY
... ~ ·
..
WILLIAM J. TRACY
One Broadway
New York
Dear George
February twenty-first
1963
·Here are the remarks I made at the Panel Dinner
last Wednesday in so far as they relate to our mutual
friend.
It seemed to me a very good time and place to bring
out these remarks.
Sincerely
/s/Bill
enc
Mr. George E. Spargo
Triborough Bridge & 'funnel Authority
Randall's Island, Box 3 5,
New York
"MANY IN THIS ROCM HAVE SAID IT BETTER THAN I.
ROBERT MOSES CRYSTALLIZED IT WHEN HE OBSERVED RECENTLY THAT "OUR PEOPIE
ARE NC7l' GOING TO CHANGE THEIR WAY OF LIFE, GIVE UP THEIR NCRMAL PURSUITS
AND CRAWL UNDERGROUND BECAUSE THEY ARE INTIMIDATED BY THE CCio1MUNISTS AND
ARE FEARFUL OF AN ATOMIC HOLOCAUST".
BOB MOSES IS GIVING LIVING TESTIMONY TO WHAT WE ALL FEEL AND
IN HIS OWN INIMITABLE WAY. HE IS BUILDING A WCRLD
1
S FAm BASED UPON A
THEME OF "PEACE THROUGH UNDERSTANDING". IF YOU DRIVE PAST FLUSHING
MEADOW PARK YOU WILL SEE RISING MONUMENTS TO THAT FAITH IN THE AMERICAN
HERITAGE WHICH HAS LED EACH GENERATION TO PERFCRM S()!ETHING WCETHY TO
BE REMEMBERED.
WITHIN TWO MONTHS FOLLOWING NEXT YEAR
1
S DINNER, WE WILL ALL
HAVE AN OPPatTUNITY TO WALK WITH PRIDE AS THE HOST CITY TO THE W<ELD
THROUGH THE GATES OF THAT GREAT INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION. MAKING IT
POSSIBLE IS THE SAME KIND OF VISION, CONFIDENCE AND DEDICATION WHICH
HAVE REALIZED SO MANY orHER BIG DREAMS IN THIS THE GREATEST em OF THE
WORLD."
2/20/63
UNISPHCRC 0 1 ~ 6 1
/ ..\
l_.
l /;...._..__.{'
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
FLusH INO 52. N Y. • TELEPHONE ·ARE.A Coo£ 212 · WF' "·1964 • CA&Lr. AODRIII wWORLDSFAIR"
"lACE THROUGH
UN01£tllafAHOtNO
Hon. Jacob K. Javits
110 East 45th Slreet
New York 17, New York
Dear Jack:
April 5, 1963
ROBERT MOSES
ltiii81DCN'
I have your letter of March 29th with reference
to the closing of our Washington office. We have found that
all the business of the Fair is best transacted at Flushing
Meadow. We have every facility for commllllication at the
Fair headquarters. We decided not to have an office in Man-
hattan although there was great pressure to have us operate
one. The same logic applies to Washington. As to informa-
tion, we are providing additional facilities at the Fair, and we
can furnish answers, literature, etc. on a few hours' notice.
I have found that branch offices do not expedite matters, but
they merely make for confusion.
You may be sure that we will make special efforts
to meet promptly any inquiries that will come from your office,
and we certainly welcome your assistance.
Cordially,
President
RM:MR
383 DAYS TO OPENING DAY
..

LISTER HIU.., ALA., CHAUtM.U.
rAT MCNAMAIIt'A, MICH. BAJtQOOLDWAT'Ut AMa..
WAYNE MOMIE, OfttO. JACOII tl. .IAVfftt M.Yt
lto\LI'H VARIJOROUOH, TEX. WlftiTDH L. PftOUr(, vr.
JOIU'H a, C&..ARK, PA, IOMff 0. 'rOWS"' TCXo
JEttHINGe ltANDOU'H, W, VA, UN I.MNIDANt IOAMO
HA1.,II_,. lit,, N.J,
QUINTIN H. I)URotCK, N, DAMt
CLAI- ........ M.I,
IOWAftD M. KIDtHIDY, au.aa.
ITEWAJn'" 1L MCCLUfll, CHill' a..ERK
.IOHH I. ,.,.IYTHW. -a.
!!on. Robert Hoses, President
Horld
1
s Fair Corpora ti,m
Administration Building
Box 1964
Flushing Park
Flushing 52, ::-;lew York
Dear Bob:
COMMITTEE ON
LABOR AND PUBLIC WEt.FARII:
liarch 29, 1963
Jim Delaney has receritly advised mr that the Fair Corporation
presently intends to close its Washinstan office sometime this year
on grou:H.! s of t>conomy.
These <Jre r;rounds I can ,,,e 11 appreciate, but I you to
:1:1Ve my opini.o:1 that in t:1c next t\Jo anc a half years a Fair office
in would prr.Corm <Jn invaluable and constructive service
\·::1ich could not be aclrq•.1atc ly dot1e from New There will be
innumerau le matters nnd inquil.·ies here regarding the Fair from
visitors <Jnd Federal offici.ols on a variety of subjects,
:ucJ part:.cularly the Federal e:·:hibit. l·ihile I can speak J:no7ledge-
·3:,!y only about my mvn office, I am quite sure that no Congressional
u:fice c.:Ll or should be e:,pected to these inquiries beyond a
•;c -.:_· qui.c1: rt'ferral to some informed source here in H<Jshington.
I :wpe ver:• much t:-tat the Fair Corporation \li.ll review its
re;_.;ardi.ng the Washingt.o.1 office 0efore acting finally to
ciose Lhe office down.
. :."J:csm
Sincer ly,
m_.,i
. .,/ ..1
/
--
u.s.s .
(a£ACE THROUGH
UNDER&TANOINO
01861
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
FLUSHING 52, N.Y. • TELEPHONE ·AREA COD£ 212 • WF' <4·1964 • CAlLE ADDRESS wWORI.DSF'AIR"
April 15, 1963
ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT
MEMORANDUM TO GEN. W. E. POTTER
FROM ROBERT MOSES
In order to settle our construction program, May 11
has been fixed as the date on which there will be no further major
space allotments and no more pavilions or large concessions and
amusements. Minor additions and changes recommended by the
Variance Committee may of course be made as needed. The
remaining open spaces will be devoted to landscaping, planting,
greenery, shade, benches, etc. for which provision is at best
inadequate.
President
RM:gls
- ......... @---
373 DAYS TO OPENING DAY
~ - ~ ~ ~
- ~
THE CITY OF NEW YORK
DEPARTMENT OF PARKS
Arsenal
64th Street and Fifth A venue
CENTRAL PARK
New York 21, N.Y.
April 22, 1963
The Honorable Robert Moses
President
The New York World's Fair 1964-1965 Corporation
Flushing Meadow Park
New York 52, N. Y. ·
Dear Bob:
I have your memorandum of April 18th about plans
for the scale model of the City after the Fair.
I wrote you long ago about the location we proposed
in the new Municipal Building which is planned for construction
at the north end of the proposed Civic Center which is to project
City Hall Park as far north as Worth Street. I have discussed
this with Peter Reidy and Frank Bloustein. I have also been
discussing the possibility of shipping the model to every major
cit in the world for a few ears assuming there will be a lag
between the end of the air and the completion of the proposed
Municipal Building.
Very sincerely yours,
/s/ Newbold Morris
Commissioner
MEMO TO NEWBOLD MORRIS
------·This is a terrible idea. It would be enormously
costly. The model is far too large for shipment. It would
become obsolete in the process and would be damaged in
transit. Can it up.
RM
c
0
p
y
COPY
TELEGRAM
, COMMJ881010R ROBERT MOSES
' HBW YOU WORLD'S FAIR WUX SWD CD NYK
'
; )l '
' '1
II "'--'V
. v-C t.c· P--d"/'v-L--
WublattoD. D. C.
Ma)' 10, liU
11:&1 A.M.
HELD MEETING AT WHITE HOUSE NINE THIRTY THIS MO.RNING WITH PRESlDDT
KElUODY. HE STATED TO PRESS AND TELEVISION COMMEMTA'OORS THAT
-··
AI PRESIDENT OF TJm UNITED Bl'ATES HE WOULD BECOME PATRON Of
"OPERA'l'ION BAIL" SI'OP OPERATION SAIL WILL BE CONVOCATlON OF SQUARE
lUOGED AND TALL-MASTED WINDlAMMERS FROM MANY COUNTIUES WBICJI
WILL RINDBZVOUS JN NEW YORK HARBOR POR APPROXIUATELY NDO: DAYS
01' SAILING AND PAGEANTRY DURING MIDDLE OF lULY liM. PRESIDENT AS
PATRON WILL FORMALLY ACCEPT THE SALUTE OF ARMADA OF ~ ' O A R E
IUQGDS PASSING IN REVIEW BEllt>RE ~ A TOE OF LIBERTY. PRimDENT
JCIMNIDY'S trrATEM!NT QUOTE FROM MY FIRBT RACE ON IUN'l'UCKET 80UND
MANY YEARS AGO TO MY MOST RECENT OUTING AS A WEEKEND SAILOR,
SAILING HAS GIVEN ME OOME OF THE MOST PLEASANT AND EXCITING UOMENTS
OF MY LIFE. IT AUD HAS TAUGHT ME SOMETHING OF THE COURAGE, RE•
IK>URCIFULNESS AND STRENGTH REQUlRED OF MEN WHO SAIL THE SEAS IN
IBIPS, TBUS, I .AM LOOKING FORWARD EAGERLY TO "OPERATION SAIL". THE
S[GBT OF lJ.) MANY SHIPS GATHERED FROM THE Dl8l'ANT CORNERS OF TBE
WORLD SHOULD REMIND US THAT STRONG DISCIPLINED AND VENTURESOME
MIN STILL CAN FIND THEIR WAY SAFELY ACROSS UNCERTAIN AND STORMY
SEAS IND QtJOTE SIGNED lOHN F. KENNEDY. PRESIDENT SENDS HIS PER·
OONAL GOOD WIBliES TO YOU AND GOVERNOR POLF:M'l FOR PR01ECTED TRIP
TO ROME.
/s/ lOHN B. YOUNG
'···:'

.... - ./
v /
I
lhA,.I OP' New VOIUC
EXECUTIVE CHAMBER
A&.RANV
April 24, 1963
Dear Mr. Deegan:
Governor Rockefeller has asked me to thank
you for your letter of April twenty-second, reminding
him of the opening of the New York 1964-65 World's Fair
on April 22, 1964. The Governor is very much aware of
this date since the State will be having ceremonies in
connection with the Fair both at Flushing Meadow and
Lincoln Center that week. The Governor very much
appreciated your thoughtfulness in writing him about the
opening,
Sincerely,
l; ' ,. }
/: ft tt' tt;'G · ) '-- ffz _
Mr. Thomas J. Deegan, Jr.
Chairman, Executive Committee
c. Fowler
Calendar Secretary
New York World's Fair 1964-65 Corporation
Time and Life Building
Rockefeller Plaza
New York 20, New York
WUE20S 41 DL o
CNT OTTAWA ONT 30 219P EDT
ROBERT f-lOSES PRES NY WORLDS FAIR 1964-195.5
CORP
THANK YOU FOR YOUR TELEGRAM AND KIND GOOD WISHES STOP I HAVE
~
DELEGATED MY DUTIES IN CONNECTION WITH WORLDS FAIR TO MY MINISTER
OF PUBLIC WORKS MR JEAN PAUL DESCHATIL.ETS. AND HE WILL BE IN
TOUCH WITH YOU STOP REGARDS
LESTER B PEARSON
..
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I
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STATE OF NEW YORK
DEPART1\I£NT OF PUBLIC WORKS
BABYLON, L. I., N.Y.
June 4, 1963
Mr. Arthur s. Hodgkiss
Assistant General Manager
Triborough Bridge & Tunnel Authority
Triborough Station, Box 35
New York 35, N. Y.
Dear Arthur:
Your suggestion set forth in your letter of May 24 re-
commending a meeting with the principals of the various
consulting firms supervising the work around the World's
Fair is excellent and I have taken steps to hold these suggested
meetings.
I want to meet with the members of the respective firms
who are most active in the supervision but it was impossible
to arrange a meeting at which all could be present. However,
I have already met with some and have scheduled meetings in
the immediate future for the remainder.
AMS:rs
Sincerely,
/s/ AUSTThl
A. M. SARR
District Engineer
-
I
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964·1965 CORPORATION
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
F'wtHtNO II, N.Y. • TILIPMOHI:·AfiiA CoolE Ita• WF 4·tee4 • CAIIu
-
-..--@---
May 1, 1963
Mr. Mil ward W. Martin
Pepsi-Cola Company
600 Park Avenue
New York 22, New York
Dear Mr. Martin:
Thank you for your letter of April 30th.
ROBERT MOSES
I' .. lSI DENT
All of us at Flushing Meadow are delighted with the
result. I believe that this will be one of the great things at the
Fair and that it represents the very finest kind of advertising
and public relations on your part. We couldn't be more pleased.
I need hardly add that we think very highly of Martin
Stone around here.
Cordially,
President
357 DAYS TO OPENING DAY
PEPSI-COLA
COMPANY
I
500 PARK AVENUE NEW YORK 22, NEW YORK -8-4500
MILWARD W. MARTIN
SENIOR VICJI PRBSIDBNT
Mr. Robert Moses, President
New York World's Fair 1964-1965, Corporation
Flushing 52, New York
Dear Mr. Moses:
Apri: 30, 1833
We seem at last to be straightened away with Walt :Jisney and UNICEF --
thanks in very large part to you,. Oral understandings have been reached all
around, and final signings should follow by tomorrow or Thursday.
It was your help that did it. For when you made concessions, Disney
did likewise - but not until you had moved first. With those moves, our com-
mitments were reduced to the level where our Directors could ap;_)rove and
yesterday they did.
Everyone in Pepsi-Cola is deeply appreciative, fro:::-1 ::1o r::.odel
Disney has made we feel we may steal the show, and certainly, t:::.e success
should be great enough to guarantee, far more than guarantee, that the Fair's
risk is a safe one.
Thank you again -and thank you not only for your r;enerous concessions
but for the use you let us have of Mr. Martin Stone, who was certainly a tower
of strength. I wish we could steal him for Pepsi.
Sincerely yours,
\ )7;'1 ;t) .)_,'1 L ._-.-,
'-- -1 t v '--\./ / J \
I
MWM:ja
Milward W. Martin
COPY
1
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
May 15, 1963
Hon. Lewis W. Douglas
17 40 Broadway
New York 19, N. Y.
Dear Mr. Douglas:
In Commissioner Moses' absence from the
country, I wish to express his appreciation and the
appreciation of the Executive Committee and the Finance
Committee of the World's Fair Corporation for your
efforts on behalf of the Fair, and to extend to you and
all of the Trustees of Mutual of New York our thanks for
your expression of confidence by the subscription to
$200,000 in World's Fair Notes.
ges/g
I have also written to Mr. Roger Hull.
Sincerely,
/s/ GEORGE E. SPARGO
Chairman, Finance Committee
COPY
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
Mr. Roger Hull
President
Mutual of New York
17 40 Broadway
New York 19, N.Y.
Dear Mr. Hull:
May 15, 1963
I was extremely pleased to learn that your Finance Committee
had today approved the purchase of $200,000 in World's Fair Notes. I
speak for the Executive Committee, the Finance Committee and the
President of the Fair Corporation when I say that we all appreciate the
expression of confidence shown by the Trustees of Mutual of New York,
and we assure you that the Fair will be a success financially and other-
wise.
Enclosed is a copy of the latest progress report on the Fair,
which I am sure will be of interest. I£ you wish, I can arrange to send
copies to all of your Trustees.
I am also enclosing copy of subscription agreement and two
copies of the subscription form, which should be signed and returned to
Erwin Witt, Comptroller of the Fair. It would be helpful if 80% of the
amount could be paid now, or as many of the subscribers have done, you
may pay the entire amount.
call me.
ges/g
encl.
If you need any further information, please do not hesitate to
Sincerely,
/s/ GEORGE E. SPARGO
Chairman, Finance Committee
UNISPHERE
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
FLUSHING 52, N.Y. • TELEPHONE ·AREA Coot 212 • WF 4·1964 • CABLE ADOAESS .. WORLDSFAIR"
PlACE T.-.ROUOH
UNOC-..fANDINO
PERSONAL
Mr. Norman Newhouse
Long Island Daily Press
92-24 168th Street
Jamaica, L. I. , N. Y.
Dear Norman:
June 13, 1963 ROI£RT MOSC&
PRES I DEN'
Needless to say, I was greatly pleased with your
editorial about renaming Flushing Meadow Park and am most grate-
ful to you and to our editorial friend.
I am apprehensive, however, about it. Flushing Meadow
is an old, simple, established, appropriate local name with genuine
World's Fair and other associations. There will be opposition in
Flushing and no doubt in Corona. It all adds up to criticism and con-
troversy.
The suggestion made by other friends, whose hearts,
if not judgment, are in the right place, was to rename the Throg
1
s
Neck Bridge and approaches. If this were pursued, I doubt whether
there would be any serious opposition. It would have to have the com-
plete approval of my Triborough associates. Throg, of course, was
Throckmorton and the name has little significance, although there
may be residents of the Neck who know little of Throckmorton but
naturally like their small community mentioned. This would be an
approach to Flushing Meadow Park and a nice, if undeserved, compli-
ment.
All this has a touch of retirement and the morgue. As
to the future Flushing Meadow Park, in which I am deeply and vitally
interested, we h,.ave plenty of problems before us on which we count
on your active support, for example amending the lease with the city
so that an earned Fair surplus, if large enough, can be used to
complete the park with many new recreation facilities as distinguished
from merely restoring it, rounding it out by the acquisition of the
- .. - .. @---
314 DAY 5 T 0 0 P EN I N G DAY
Mr •. Norman Newhouse
-2-
June 13, 1963
Creek frontage and dumping ground east of the Stadium, adding a Zoo
or nature trail, insv.ring proper long range management of the Bo-
tanical Garden and Science Museum, etc. , etc.
It would be a great mistake to jeopardize these objectives
at Flushing Meadow py an argument over names.
Again
1
with many thanks,
Cordially,
....
President
LONG ISLAND SUNDAY PRESS
JUNE 9, 1963
EDITORIAL
Let's Call It
Robert Park
Once upon a time-about 30 odd years
ago-there was a swampy wasteland and
__ garbage dump in the geographical center
ot New York City.
Thanks almost to the vision
and the ca t'alytic powers of a. man
-Robert Moses-that sn1elly bog has been
transformed into t.he World's Fair of to·.·
morrow and a park for the
day after tha,t tomorrow.
The hundreds of thou,sands of young
motorists who drive by all the contusion
and excitement of the fair construction
today little realize that back in the 30&
there was nothing there, no bu!ld· ·
ings, no roads (no, junior. Grand Central
Parkway didn't come the Incllans)
but garbage and .rats T.HAT big.
, Largely through the vision of Bob
Moses this land was filled in and by
1939 Island had Its first great
World's Fair. After the fair, plans for
the full development of the grounds
lagged because of the war and lack of
funds. But thanks to that. fair, we had
.parkways and the groundwork for what
will eventually be one of the finest parks
1n the c1ty.
And n(>W, literally thousands of work·
men are deployed over the area preparing
tor a. new World's Fair. '
If we through the awful road
jams on the way each night be-
cause of the construction, perhaps lt will
help to bear the inconvenience if we con-
template that when the job is done we
wlll have wider and better· roads to make
traveling to and from work easier than
It was before the work began.
In addition to a vastly Improved net-
work of roads, we are also to inherit an
enlarged Botanical Gardens, the city's
first Museum of Science and Industry, an
enlarged marina, that too-top long de-
layed children's zoo and hundreds of acres
ot park facUlties !or the most rapidly
growing area of Queens.
And along with all this there ·wm be
a baseball stadium, the home ot our Mets.
• * •
Back before the dump became known
as Flushing Meadow Park, it was known·.
as the Corona Dump. Now the good people
ot Corona want the name changed to
Corona Meadow .. Park. It the !ilame of
Corona could be invoked when it was a
dump, they say, it's only right that the
name of Corona . .be used when it's a glori-
ous park.
We would say the Corona folk have a
good case If their agitation' for a change
1n name didn't stimulate us tp think Qf
suggesting a truly significant name.
Let's call that ROBERT
MOSES PARK. .
Let's not walt for some dismal day in
the future when he's gone before we
thank him. Let's do it now, while he's
.still a young and vigorous 74, while he's
still in there making nice things !happen
for us.
There are those who could write cat-
alogue of grievances about things Bob
Moses has done. But when the balance
sheet Is totted up, not even his most
venomous critic could deny the magnitude
of his accomplishments In providing places
in the sun and roads to get to these places ;
tor our proliferating millions. His critics
tend to blame Bob Moses for all the sins
ot the auto age rather than see him as
a man who has done his extraordinary
best to make that age just a bit more
livable.
Be that as It may, a park is a living,
vibrant thing, a place of }'epose, a place
of play, a place of grass and trees in a
world Increasingly encrusting itself in de-
humanizing steel and concrete. What.
more fitting m?nument than to give the
name of Robert Moses to one o! the many
parks he gave to this Long Island he
loves so much?
-/
01061
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964·1965 CORPORATION
INTER NATIONAL EX FIOSI TIO N AT FLUSHING M EAOOW PARK
FLUSHING 52, N.Y. • TELEPHONE·AREA CODE 212·WF 4·1964 • CABLE ADDREss"WORLDSFAIR"
PCACC. THIIIOUGH
.........
June 14, 1963
Mr. Hugo Gellert, Chairman
Committee of Artists' Societies
150 Fifth Avenue
Room 842
New York 11, New York
Dear M:r. Gellert:
I have your letter of June 13th.
ROBERT MOSE:S
PRESIDENT
To be quite frank about it, I see no useful
purpose which can be served by a meeting of the kind you suggest,
unless you know some source of funds for a Fine Arts Pavilion
of Contemporary American Art such as you suggest. We have
stated repeatedly that the Fair has no money for such an objec-
tive. Much as we admire it and would welcome a contribution
from other sources, it is futile to make gestures in this direc-
tion. Incidentally, the hour is very late to accomplish anything
of this kind. What I mean is that there are not enough normal
working days left to design, build and equip another structure with-
out heavy overtime expenses.
All I can suggest to you at the moment is
that you discuss this matter with Norman Winston, Commissioner
of the United states Pavilion, and with Lt. Governor Malcolm
Wilson, who is Chairman of the New York State World's Fair Com-
mission.
Cordially,
----- /
...
President
313
DAYS TO OPENING DAY
..
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OF ARTISTS' socmnJPPY ·.·.·.
HH\ A F!:',T: :\RTS PAl IL:O'. OF C'O';TLM!'UI<ARY MdERit'A!': :\RT
,\T T!ll: YORK 1\DRLD'S 1":\lH. OF
150 Fifth Avcnu..:. Ronm S42. N..:w Y,)rk II. N. Y. • CHdsl!a 3-2802
June 13, 1963
The Honorable Robert
:':evt Yorl{ \.orld' s :cair 196.;-.s::, Cor:;>o:>a tion
P.o. 3ox 1964
N.Y.
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