www.usor.utah.

gov
250 East 500 South P.O. Box 144200 Salt Lake City, UT 84114-4200 Donald R. Uchida Executive Director Utah State Office of Rehabilitation

© 2011 Thinkstock/Stockbyte/John Foxx

90 Years of Service to Citizens With Disabilities in Utah

REHABILITATION

2011 Annual Report of the Utah State Office of

UTAH STA TE

ICE OF REH FF A O

ATION LIT BI

Employment

& In

depe ndenc

e

REHABILITATION
90 Years of Service to Citizens With Disabilities in Utah
250 East 500 South P.O. Box 144200 Salt Lake City, UT 84114-4200 Donald R. Uchida Executive Director Utah State Office of Rehabilitation Larry K. Shumway, Ed.D. Chief Executive Officer Utah State Board of Education

2011 Annual Report of the Utah State Office of

UTAH STATE OFFICE OF REHABILITATION ANNUAL REPORT

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Utah State Office of Rehabilitation Executive Director’s Message Utah State Board of Education

1 3 5 6 7 8

UTAH STATE OFFICE OF REHABILITATION
Organization Chart and Mission Advisory Councils Revenues Programs and Services

DIVISION OF REHABILITATION SERVICES

Organization Chart 9 Vocational Rehabilitation Program, Mission 11 Counseling and Guidance, Vocational Evaluation, Assistive Technology, Benefits Planning Assistance and Outreach, Employer Relations Specialist, Partnerships 12 Expenditures (Graph), Highlights (Chart) 13 Characteristics of the 3,587 Individuals Rehabilitated Economic Impact After Rehabilitation Services 14 Impact of the Vocational Rehabilitation Program (Map) 15 Major Disabling Conditions of the Individuals Rehabilitated (Graph) Occupations of the Individuals Rehabilitated (Graph) 16 Collaborative Partnerships 17 Successful People: Corby Campbell and Wesley Kaura 18 Successful People: Jeannie Manning 19 Independent Living Program, Mission, Independent Living Skills Training, Individual and Systems Advocacy 21 Information and Referral, Assistive Technology Services, Recreation and Community Integration Programs, Peer Support, Independent Living Older Blind Services, Nursing Facility Diversion and Community ReEntry, Accomplishments 22 Successful People: Malinda M. Ford 23

USOR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT

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UTAH STATE OFFICE OF REHABILITATION ANNUAL REPORT

Table of Contents (Continued) DIVISION OF SERVICES FOR THE BLIND AND VISUALLY IMPAIRED
Organization Chart Mission, Services Accomplishments Successful People: Glen Peel

25 27 29 30

DIVISION OF SERVICES TO THE DEAF AND HARD OF HEARING
Organization Chart Mission, Services, Accomplishments: Interpreter Program Outreach and Assistive Technology Report, Deaf Programs, Hard of Hearing Program, Mental Health Counseling/Case Management Personal Adjustment Services, Adult Education Classes, Southern Utah Program Spotlight: Summer Kids Camp Successful People: Willis Morton

31 33 34 35 36 38

DIVISION OF DISABILITY DETERMINATION SERVICES

Organization Chart Mission, Accomplishments Social Security Recognition to DDS Staff Member Van Lund, DDS Advisory Council, Impact on Utah’s Citizens and Economy

39 41 42

USOR OFFICE LOCATIONS

43

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USOR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR’S MESSAGE
I am pleased to present the Utah State Office of Rehabilitation
(USOR) 2011 Annual Report, which illustrates the importance of collaboration in working with citizens with disabilities and other agencies and organizations. This report shares stories of consumers who have benefited from the varied services that are performed by a very dedicated and committed staff. The USOR’s primary purpose is to help individuals with disabilities prepare for and obtain employment and increase their independence. The services offered help ensure that Utahns with disabilities have the opportunity to be productive and contributing citizens. Thank you for taking the time to read this report and learn about the work of our staff and the difference we are making in the lives of people with disabilities.

Donald R. Uchida
Executive Director

USOR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT

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USOR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT

UTAH STATE BOARD of EDUCATION

District District 1 District 2 District 3 District 4 District 5 District 6 District 7 District 8 District 9 District 10 District 11 District 12 District 13 District 14 District 15

Name Tami W. Pyfer Keith M. Buswell Craig E. Coleman Dave L. Thomas Kim R. Burningham Michael G. Jensen Leslie B. Castle Janet A. Cannon Joel Coleman Laurel O. Brown David L. Crandall Carol Murphy C. Mark Openshaw Dixie Allen Debra G. Roberts Teresa L. Theurer Wilford Clyde Tim Beagley
2 1 1

Address 52 Ballard Way 1027 West 3800 North 621 South Main Street 7875 South 2250 East 932 Canyon Crest Drive 4139 South Aubrey Lane 2465 St. Mary’s Drive 5256 Holladay Blvd. 3740 Bawden Avenue 5311 S. Lucky Clover Lane 13464 Saddle Ridge Drive 463 West 140 North 3329 Piute Drive 218 West 5250 North P.O. Box 1780 33 Canterbury Lane 1324 East 950 South 3974 South 3550 West 1029 East 11780 South 5657 West 10770 North 526 South 170 West Executive Officer Secretary

City Logan, UT 84321 Pleasant View, UT 84414 Genola, UT 84655 South Weber, UT 84405 Bountiful, UT 84010 West Valley City, UT 84128 Salt Lake City, UT 84108 Salt Lake City, UT 84117 West Valley City, UT 84120 Murray, UT 84123 Draper, UT 84020 Midway, UT 84049 Provo, UT 84604 Vernal, UT 84078 Beaver, UT 84713 Logan, UT 84321 Springville, UT 84663 West Valley City, UT 84119 Sandy, UT 84094 Highland, UT 84003 Springville, UT 84663

Phone (435) 753-7529 (801) 510-1773 (801) 754-3655 (801) 479-7479 (801) 292-9261 (801) 955-5550 (801) 581-9752 (801) 272-3516 (801) 634-6251 (801) 261-4221 (801) 501-9095 (435) 729-0941 (801) 377-0790 (435) 789-0534 (435) 438-5843 (435) 753-0470 (801) 802-6900 (801) 969-6454 (801) 949-0858 (801) 599-1095 (801) 489-6935

Isaiah (Ike) Spencer3 James V. (Jim) Olsen4 R. Dean Rowley Lorraine Austin
1 2

5

Larry K. Shumway

Board of Regents Representatives Charter Schools Representative 3 Coalition of Minorities Advisory Committee (CMAC) Representative 4 UCAT Representative 5 Utah School Boards Association (USBA) Representative 1/8/2012

USOR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT

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UTAH STATE OFFICE OF REHABILITATION ANNUAL REPORT

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USOR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT

UTAH STATE OFFICE OF

REHABILITATION
si M is
o o n: T

t a s si s

al s w ith d d i vi d u in

isabilities to prepare for a

nd ob

t ai n

e mp

loym

ent

Utah State Board of Education

and inc

reas e the ir ind epende nce.

UTAH STATE OFFICE OF REHABILITATION
Advisory Councils Governor’s Committee on Employment of People With Disabilities

Division of Rehabilitation Services (DRS) Vocational Rehabilitation

Division of Services for the Blind and Visually Impaired (DSBVI) Training and Adjustments

Division of Services to the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (DSDHH) Robert G. Sanderson Community Center of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Individualized Services Program Outreach and Technology Program Utah Interpreter Program Southern Utah Services

Division of Disability Determination Services (DDS)

Adjudications

Specialized Services

Vocational Rehabilitation

Hearings

Independent Living

Business Enterprise Program

USOR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT

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UTAH STATE OFFICE OF REHABILITATION

ADVISORY COUNCILS
Advisory Councils work with staff members to establish direction and implementation of the various USOR service delivery programs.

Lindsay Boerens, Salt Lake City Vickie Brenchley, Ogden Stephen Carnegie, Salt Lake City Linda Collins, Bountiful Garth Eldredge, West Jordan Richard Eversull, Nibley Ralph Glathar, American Fork Bart Hill, Farmington Pam Knighton, Logan Peggy Milligan, Salt Lake City Louise Ogden, Salt Lake City Sachin Pavithran, Providence Holly Williams, Salt Lake City Tammy Wood, Salt Lake City Jim Sterzer, Salt Lake City Karim Mardanlou, Salt Lake City Maren Alitagtag, Syracuse Jan Carter, Salt Lake City Scot Ferre, Salt Lake City Diane Lovell, Salt Lake City Debra Mair, Salt Lake City

REHABILITATION SERVICES COUNCIL

STATEWIDE INDEPENDENT LIVING COUNCIL
Sonja Evans, Helper Leslie Gertsch, Woods Cross Andrew Riggle, Salt Lake City Jeff Sheen, Logan Debra Mair SLC Andrea Pitts, Washington Terrace Trish Smith, SLC Richard Luke, SLC Minda Bills, SLC Donna McCormick, SLC

DIVISION OF SERVICES FOR THE BLIND AND VISUALLY IMPAIRED ADVISORY COUNCIL
Bill Clapp, Ogden Ron Gardner, Bountiful Leslie Gertsch, Woods Cross Richard Greenwood, Roy Lisa Nelson, Salt Lake City Deanna Osborn, St. George Sachin Pavithran, Providence Glen Peel, Mount Pleasant Adam Reynolds, Salt Lake City Cindi Vega, Salt Lake City

DIVISION OF DISABILITY DETERMINATION SERVICES ADVISORY COUNCIL

Clay Anderson, Taylorsville Alisa Ensign, Lehi Suzette Pollock, Layton Chip Royce, Saratoga Springs Christine Timothy, Salt Lake City Adam Shafer, Salt Lake City Holly Nelson, Salt Lake City Jeff Pollock, Salt Lake City Bryan Eldrigde, Pleasant Grove

INTERPRETER CERTIFICATION BOARD

Kathy Franson, Salt Lake City Marilyn Hammond, Logan Nonie Lancaster, Salt Lake City Matthew Nielson, Salt Lake City Vanya Mabey, Salt Lake City Kent Palmer, Salt Lake City Gordon Richins, Logan Jeff Sheen, Logan Mark Smith, Salt Lake City Karen Houmand, Salt Lake City

DIVISION OF SERVICES TO THE DEAF AND HARD OF HEARING ADVISORY COUNCIL

Janice Deelstra, Lewiston Scott Ferre, Murray Kimberly Gullickson, Salt Lake City Diane Larsen, Bountiful Cindy McDougal, West Jordan Philippe Montalette, Lehi Brett Atkinson, Salt Lake City Stacey Butler, Salt Lake City Enoch Cox, Salt Lake City Chelle George, Salt Lake City

Arturo Chavarria, Sandy Frances Reagan Copinga, Salt Lake City Kirby Croyle, Salt Lake City David M. Davis, Salt Lake City Greg Ellis, Orem Diane Mansfield, Salt Lake City Brian Nelson, Salt Lake City Max E. Neves, Sandy Ken Reid, Salt Lake City Phil Riesen, Salt Lake City Eric Schultz, Salt Lake City Brian Small, Draper

GOVERNOR’S COMMITTEE ON EMPLOYMENT OF PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES

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USOR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT

UTAH STATE OFFICE OF REHABILITATION

REVENUES
TOTAL REVENUE
FEDERAL OTHER STATE

$76,084,419
(75%) (2%) (23%)

$57,311,848 $1,096,571 $17,676,000

DISTRIBUTION OF REVENUE
Administration DSDHH DSBVI DDS DRS $2,100,884 $2,265,504 $7,574,690 $11,855,435 $52,287,906 (2.8%) (3.0%) (10.0%) (15.6%) (68.7%)

USOR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT

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UTAH STATE OFFICE OF REHABILITATION

PROGRAMS AND

SERVICES
ServiceS For the Blind and viSually impaired
in addition to vocational rehabilitation services, the uSor offers a variety of training and adjustment services for individuals who are blind or have significant visual impairment. these services include skills training, psychological and social orientation, adaptive equipment, Braille training, mobility training, independent living, and computer training.

vocational rehaBilitation program
the vocational rehabilitation (vr) program provides rehabilitation counseling and related services to individuals whose disability is a substantial impediment to employment. the vr program is designed to assist these individuals to achieve employment outcomes. Services are available according to individuals’ needs, abilities, and choices. vocational rehabilitation services are provided through the uSor’s division of rehabilitation Services and division of Services for the Blind and visually impaired.

independent living program
the independent living program provides services to individuals with disabilities who need opportunities to maintain or increase their independence. Services are provided through a cooperative effort of the utah State office of rehabilitation, the utah Statewide independent living council, and nonprofit centers for independent living. a variety of services are provided to assist individuals to maintain or increase their independence and community integration.

ServiceS to the deaF and hard oF hearing
many services designed for individuals with hearing loss are provided through the Sanderson community center for the deaf and hard of hearing. these services include an interpreter referral service, assistive technology, and a variety of social and educational programs.

governor’S committee on employment oF people with diSaBilitieS
the governor’s committee’s mission is to facilitate communication and cooperation, and promote public and private efforts to increase equal employment opportunities for qualified utahns with disabilities. its main responsibilities are to promote employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities; advise the State Board of education and the governor on issues that affect employment; advocate for full and equal rights for individuals with disabilities; educate the public through information and public relations; recognize exemplary contributions in the areas of employment, job placement, and public relations; recognize personal achievements of individuals with disabilities; and provide training, support, and technical assistance to employers. 8 USOR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT

diSaBility determination ServiceS
the division of disability determination Services is a state-administered federal program that develops, adjudicates, and processes disability claims of utah residents for social security disability benefits, including Social Security disability insurance and Supplemental Security income.

DIVISION OF

REHABILITATION SERVICES
DIVISION OF REHABILITATION SERVICES
Russell Thelin Division Director

VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION PROGRAM

INDEPENDENT LIVING PROGRAM

Northern Utah District Ogden District

Specialized Services Programs Choose to Work

Employer Relations

Russell Thelin
Division Director

Davis District Downtown Salt Lake District Valley West District South Valley District Provo District Central Utah District Eastern Utah District Southern Utah District

Ticket to Work

Vocational Evaluation Supported Employment Center for Assistive Technology Benefits Planning Assistance & Outreach

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USOR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT

DIVISION OF REHABILITATION SERVICES

VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION PROGRAM
Mi ssi on: To a

ssis

t e l ig

ible in d

ividuals wit

liti abi h dis

pa pre o es t

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Vocational Rehabilitation—A Program of Economic Impact What impact does a state program have on the people it serves and the larger community?
This question was asked by the Utah State Office of Rehabilitation’s (USOR) Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) program, which was created to assist eligible people with disabilities to achieve and maintain meaningful employment. A subsequent study by the University of Utah Center on Public Policy and Administration provided the answer. For working individuals who received VR services, there was a significant increase in income. For those receiving services and not yet working, the study predicted an increase in the likelihood of employment and earnings. The overall economic impact on Utah was equally positive. The study concluded that for every dollar of state funding allocated to the VR program, $5.64 are returned to the state in increased tax revenue and decreased benefits from public programs—a 564% return on investment! The overall conclusion: Funds spent to provide employment training services to people with disabilities benefit both the individual and the entire Utah community. To view the full 2010 USOR Economic Impact Study, see www.usor.utah.gov.

VOCATIONAL

REHABILITATION

(VR)

services are provided by the Utah State Office of Rehabilitation (USOR) through programs located in both the Division of Rehabilitation Services (DRS) and Division of Services to the Blind and Visually Impaired (DSBVI). Through professional counseling with qualified rehabilitation counselors, eligible people with disabilities are provided with services that are individualized to meet their particular needs. Eligibility is based upon having physical or mental impairments that result in substantial impediment to employment, and on requiring VR services. Services include rehabilitation counseling, guidance and assessment, restorative interventions, vocational skills training, assistive technology, job development, placement and follow-up. For the 2011 program year, the DRS provided VR services to 29,509 individuals, while DSBVI served 661. Of those served, the DRS placed 3,521 into employment, and the DSBVI placed 66 into employment. A mutual determination of services needed is developed into an Individualized Plan for Employment USOR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT 11

DIVISION OF REHABILITATION SERVICES

(IPE). These outlined services are then provided, with ongoing counseling, to achieve a vocational goal and meaningful employment outcome in accordance with the personal needs and objectives of each individual. To assist in these outcomes, a number of specialized resources are offered. A few are summarized below:

BENEFITS PLANNING ASSISTANCE AND OUTREACH (BPAO)
BPAO provides beneficiaries of the Supplemental Security Income and Social Security Disability Insurance programs with information regarding work incentives available through the Social Security Administration to enable individuals to make informed choices about returning to employment.

COUNSELING AND GUIDANCE
Counseling and guidance are core vocational rehabilitation services provided to people with disabilities. They are provided by licensed, highly trained specialists who understand disability issues and how a disability can affect employment and independence. These counseling services play a crucial role in supporting eligible clients through the process of identifying needed interventions and supporting those interventions in order to achieve vocational and independence goals.

EMPLOYER RELATIONS SPECIALIST
This specialist provides a networking initiative to connect job-ready individuals with disabilities to employers who are hiring or looking to hire. This is done through local and national partnerships between employers, community resources and government entities. The network establishes contacts designed to coordinate services and support for the purpose of meeting the needs both of employers and of their potential employees with disabilities.

VOCATIONAL EVALUATION
Vocational evaluation is a service for eligible individuals with disabilities that provides career information to enable them to make meaningful choices for employment, taking into account their disability as well as interests, aptitudes, abilities and values.

PARTNERSHIPS
To meet the needs of those receiving services, the Vocational Rehabilitation program works with multiple agency and community partners. Through collaboration with these programs, the rehabilitation counselor builds with each individual a network of services to help him or her achieve success in employment and independence. The valued partners of the VR program include, but are not limited to, Utah School District, institutions of higher education, the Department of Workforce Services, the Department of Health, the Department of Human Services, the Department of Corrections, and multiple community programs.

ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY
Assistive technology services are provided to individuals with disabilities who need technology to pursue, attain, and maintain their vocational goals. Examples include, but are not limited to, voice recognition software, ergonomic tools, screen readers, lifts, assessment, custom modification, and training in the use of technological devices.

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USOR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT

VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION PROGRAM

EXPENDITURES
This pie chart shows the percentage of case service funds utilized for services that assisted people with disabilities in preparing for and obtaining employment. 3,587 TOTAL EMPLOYED
Family Members Diagnostic/Evaluation Other Goods and Services Assistive Technology Maintenance/Transportation Physical/Mental Restoration Training Interpreter Services 0.5% 1.0% 1.5% 2.0% 3.0% 35.0% 57.0% 0.0%

HIGHLIGHTS
The following information demonstrates the individual and program success Vocational Rehabilitation achieved during 2011:
3,587 individuals with disabilities were successfully employed. 30,170 individuals were provided with vocational rehabilitation services. 99 percent of those employed were severely disabled. 183 public assistance recipients were successfully employed. 688 Social Security Disability Insurance recipients were successfully employed. 38 individuals were successfully employed through supported employment services. $15,860,825 in estimated annual taxes were paid by 3,587 employed individuals after vocational rehabilitation services were provided. USOR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT 13

VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION PROGRAM

CHARACTERISTICS of the 3,587 Individuals Rehabilitated
GENDER Male Female TOTAL Number 2,080 1,507 3,587 Percent 58% 42% 100% MARITAL STATUS Married Widowed Divorced Separated Never Married TOTAL AGE AT REFERRAL Less than 20 years 20 through 34 35 through 44 45 through 64 65 and over TOTAL Number 835 73 808 250 1,621 3,587 Percent 23% 2% 23% 7% 45% 100%

ETHNIC BACKGROUND White 2,937 90 African American Asian 19 65 Native American Pacific Islander 16 Multiple Ethnicity 460 3,587 TOTAL

83.0% 2.0% 0.5% 1.0% 0.5% 13.0% 100.0%

65 1,709 765 999 49 3,587

2% 48% 21% 28% 1% 100%

ECONOMIC IMPACT After Rehabilitation Services
HUNDRED THOUSANDS

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

BEFORE REHABILITATION

435% Increase in
Weekly Earnings of the 3,587 Individuals Rehabilitated

$243,684

AFTER REHABILITATION

$1,303,685

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USOR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT

VOCATI ONAL REHABILITATION PROGRAM

IMPACT of the Vocational Rehabilitation Program
CACHE BOX ELDER RICH

542 82

1,170 190 460
DAVIS WEBER

6 0 22

Total Served:

28,515 3,587

3,572 1

Total Employed

:

MORGAN

TOOELE

2,362 282 336 30 10,668 1,277
SALT LAKE

SUMMIT

DAGGET T

6 0

107 14
WASATCH

DUCHESNE

UINTAH

UTAH

4,662 540 119 18
SANPETE

132 21
CARBON

169 22

520 49

JUAB

919
EMERY

84
GRAND

MILL ARD

259 30 201 29
SE VIER

164 9

255 27
SAN JUAN

372 42
PIUTE WAYNE

BEAVER

60
IRON

5

12 0
GARFIELD

9

3

819 103
WASHINGTON KANE

22 2

317 55

1,866
11/124/2011

186

77

9

USOR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT

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VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION PROGRAM

MAJOR DISABLING CONDITIONS
of the 3,587 Individuals Rehabilitated
DISABLING CONDITION
OTHER DISABILITIES TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY BLIND/VISUALLY IMPAIRED ALCOHOLISM DEAF/HARD OF HEARING DRUG ADDICTION ORTHOPEDIC AMPUTATION COGNITIVE DISABILITIES MENTAL ILLNESS 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 900

33 (1%) 54 (2%) 64 (2%) 135 (4%) 175 (5%) 322 (9%) 496 (14%) 849 (22%) 1,459 (41%)
1,000 1,100 1,200 1,300 1,400

OCCUPATIONS of the 3,587 Individuals Rehabilitated
OCCUPATION
INDUSTRIAL SALES/CLERICAL PROFESSIONAL SERVICE OCCUPATIONS HOMEMAKER/ UNPAID FAMILY WORKER FARM/FISHING/ FORESTRY SELF-EMPLOYED

1,015 (28%) 820 (23%) 763 (21%) 753 (21%) 141 (4%) 62 (2%) 33 (1%) 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 Number Employed 800 900 1,000 1,100

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USOR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT

DIVISION OF REHABILITATION SERVICES

COLLABORATIVE

PARTNERSHIPS
TRANSITION COORDINATION WITH SCHOOL DISTRICTS
The Division of Rehabilitation Services has cooperative agreement partnerships with each of Utah’s forty school districts, with a rehabilitation counselor assigned to each Utah high school. In addition, there are jointly funded transition coordinators in some districts, and plans for additional transition coordinators in other districts. As a result of these partnerships, the Division can connect at the earliest point possible with students with disabilities who need vocational rehabilitation services as they transition from school to post-secondary life.

THE DIVISION OF REHABILITATION SERVICES
places heavy emphasis on collaborative partnerships to benefit those individuals with disabilities whom the Vocational Rehabilitation program serves in achieving independence and meaningful employment outcomes. While some collaborative efforts are mandated by law, this division views all collaborative activity as being much more than meeting a requirement; rather, it is through the establishment of true partnerships that a higher standard of service is provided to our clientele. Partnerships with various agencies and other entities enable us to provide a higher-level, more comprehensive service delivery system. This, in turn, leads to ever-improving and more substantial services to individuals with disabilities in their efforts to become more informed, make meaningful decisions, and achieve productive results in their lives. Some partnerships are listed below.

CHOOSE TO WORK
Choose to Work is a cooperative service provided through a partnership between the State Office of Rehabilitation and the Department of Workforce Services. Choose to Work provides individualized specialty job development and job placement for individuals with more significant disabilities. Within the 2009 performance year, this cooperative program was expanded to include a specialized focus for on-the-job training for people with disabilities, given current economic conditions.

WORKABILITY: OPENING DOORS TO WORK
Created through a partnership between the agencies of Education, Health, Rehabilitation and Workforce Services, WorkAbility establishes links and services to help Utahns with disabilities make informed choices and move toward attaining meaningful employment. Addressing such areas as benefits planning for public assistance recipients in their efforts to return to work, effective transition of students with disabilities from school to work, educating employers on the benefits of hiring people with disabilities, and the establishment of an employer network to provide qualified workers with disabilities to meet employer needs, the WorkAbility partnership is making a significant difference in Utah’s work market.

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DIVISION OF REHABILITATION SERVICES

SUCCESSFUL PEOPLE
Throughout his young life, Corby loved doing back flips, which he taught himself through progressively more difficult practice. While attending college, where he was taking 14 credit hours and working 35 hours per week, Corby regularly commuted 45 minutes away from home. With that demanding schedule, Corby had a lot of pent-up stress and energy. One day while waiting for the bus, he decided to release some of that energy by doing a series of back flips against a wall. In the process, he slipped and hit the back of his neck, breaking his neck in two places. This resulted in him becoming a quadriplegic. Corby came to Vocational Rehabilitation in 2005. VR was able to assist Corby with guidance and counseling. They also helped him to modify his van and continue his education. Without the worries of financing his education, Corby was able to concentrate on his schoolwork and on making himself better after his accident. Corby graduated with his BA in Computer Science in December 2010. On February 1, 2011, Corby started working as a software developer. With hard work, determination, and resources like VR, Corby is living life to the fullest.

CORBY CAMPBELL

Wes had the desire to succeed—he just needed support and opportunity. After suffering from seizures, Wes came to VR for help to obtain and maintain a job. With the help of VR, he went back to school and received his certification. He has now been successfully employed for over 14 months. With his VR counselor to encourage him, Wes worked hard to complete his education. His alcohol dependency is in remission, and Wes is helping others in AA with their dependency. Wes has overcome many obstacles because of his determination and work ethic. He says his success was due to his counselor reassuring him and helping him believe in himself.

WESLEY KAURA

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DIVISION OF REHABILITATION SERVICES

SUCCESSFUL PEOPLE
Jeannie had struggled with school throughout her life. At the age of 16, she dropped out of high school. After a while Jeannie decided to get her GED and work toward a better job. However, the job she wanted was that of nurse, which requires difficult courses. She struggled with the demanding nursing classes, and many times she had teachers tell her that she was not going to make it. However, they didn’t know Jeannie. She was not going to give up. In her third quarter of nursing school she took a test that she did not pass. The teacher saw how determined Jeannie was and recognized something else was causing the problem. Jeannie was referred to Vocational Rehabilitation in 2010. After testing, it was discovered that Jeannie had dyslexia and severe depression. Her counselor helped her find a good therapist and provided medication to help with her disabilities. Her VR counselor never told Jeannie that she couldn’t become a nurse; instead she helped guide her and get her back on track. Jeannie graduated with her associate’s degree in December 2010 and passed her nursing exam in July 2011. Jeannie is now working full time and planning to go back to school and obtain her bachelor’s.

JEANNIE MANNING

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DIVISION OF REHABILITATION SERVICES

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USOR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT

DIVISION OF REHABILITATION SERVICES

INDEPENDENT LIVING PROGRAM
increase ties to bili el of integration in their communitie disa nce and lev s. h wit pende e als idu ir ind iv nd th e for i ities rtun po

e op provid To Mission:

The Division of Rehabilitation Services, in conjunction with the Independent Living Centers, the Division of Services for the Blind and Visually Impaired, and the Utah Statewide Independent Living Council, provides independent living services to eligible consumers.

INDEPENDENT LIVING PROGRAM
Coordination of services occurs through contractual arrangements and management structures supported by all entities involved in the program. All services are provided through the network of Independent Living Centers (the Utah Independent Living Center, Salt Lake City; Options for Independence, Logan; Active Re-Entry, Price; Red Rock Center for Independence, St. George; TriCounty Independent Living Center, Ogden; and Central Utah Independent Living Center, Provo). Eligibility for the program is based on the presence of a disability coupled with the ability to benefit from the provision of services. All services are based on individual need, as described in an individualized independent living plan. The listed services are time-limited and designed to assist consumers in increasing and maintaining their levels of independence and community participation.

PEER SUPPORT
Peer support is designed to assist individuals in increasing and maintaining their independence. The information needed to live with a disability can more easily be gained when support is provided by an individual with a disability.

INDEPENDENT LIVING SKILLS TRAINING
Skills training includes adaptive cooking, cleaning, budgeting, personal hygiene, transportation, and advocacy.

INDIVIDUAL AND SYSTEMS ADVOCACY
Advocacy programs are designed to increase both the consumer’s ability to advocate for himself or herself and the community’s capacity to meet the needs of individuals with disabilities. Systems advocacy is a process used to increase awareness and encourage the community to provide access for all citizens.

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DIVISION OF REHABILITATION SERVICES

InformatIon and referral
Information about other services and referrals to other programs are intended to increase the options available to individuals.

nursIng facIlIty dIversIon and communIty re-entry
this is a comprehensive program that provides nursing home diversion and community reentry services. It is designed to enable people with disabilities living in nursing homes or other institutions to move into alternative community living arrangements that promote personal choice, and also to keep individuals at risk of entering a nursing facility in the community.

assIstIve technology servIces
a comprehensive program of assistive technology services includes assessment, evaluation, shortterm loans, and equipment purchases for eligible consumers. assistive devices can provide significant opportunities for individuals to participate in school, home life, and the general community.

accomPlIshments
159 consumers became eligible for Independent living assistive technology Program services. 148 consumers received assistive technology devices. 5,612 individuals with disabilities were served. 51 consumers were relocated from nursing homes or institutions due to independent living services received. 161 consumers were prevented from entering nursing homes or institutions due to independent living services received.

recreatIon and communIty IntegratIon Programs
recreation and other community integration programs are often an individual’s first introduction to independent living services. activities have included river trips, adaptive skiing, swimming classes, weightlifting, movies, book clubs, golf, and many other community activities. often, successful experiences in these programs lead to increased self-esteem and sense of worth, which then lead to further participation and increased independence.

IndePendent lIvIng older BlInd servIces
In cooperation with the division of services for the Blind and visually Impaired, the Independent living centers provide services to individuals aged 55 or older who are blind or severely visually impaired. services are designed to increase and maintain seniors’ ability to remain active in their homes and communities. all services, including recreation, are integrated, allowing seniors to participate. the division provides other significant services to augment those of the centers, including intensive orientation and mobility services, low vision screening, and general adaptive living skills.

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USOR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT

DIVISION OF REHABILITATION SERVICES

SUCCESSFUL PEOPLE
44 and mother of three, was referred to the Active ReEntry satellite office in Moab by her brother who is an IL coordinator in Missouri. Malinda has diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, COPD, and coronary artery disease. She has had the big toe and second toe of her right foot amputated, as well as a section of the foot under those toes, creating a chronic non-healing wound in that foot. She has also lost the middle toe of her left foot and may still lose the big toe on that foot. Her doctor wanted her to have diabetic shoes to help her keep from having any further amputations, and to increase her mobility. Due to her other disabilities, Malinda has great difficulty keeping her balance and uses a cane for some of her mobility needs. She is also unable to shower without assistance. Active ReEntry was able to provide her with a shower chair from their loan bank that helped a great deal, but the IL coordinator still needed to assist Malinda to get the diabetic shoes. The IL coordinator contacted her executive director, who suggested that she contact the Diabetes Association. She did so and was given four organizations to contact. She then did some Internet research to find out the average cost of diabetic shoes so that she could try to find the needed funds. USOR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT 23

MALINDA M. FORD, age

Her research showed that the average cost of a pair of diabetic shoes for a woman is about $125. A worker from her building suggested the Salvation Army. She immediately called them and they brought her a check for $125 the same day, but they wanted to remain anonymous to the consumer. She contacted Malinda to let her know about the donation and asked her to meet at the only pharmacy in Moab that sells the shoes and to bring her prescription. When they arrived they found that the shoes with needed accessories would be over $800. The IL Coordinator explained the consumer’s situation to the pharmacy. They called in their manager, who decided that they could give a $300 discount for the shoes and accessories. Medicaid was also applied to and gave approval for a partial foot orthotic. That brought the balance down to $50, which Active Re-Entry could cover through other funds. Malinda came to Active ReEntry on August 2, 2011, and walked out of the pharmacy on September 7, 2011 wearing the new shoes. The IL coordinator was diligent in advocating for and assisting this consumer in obtaining the funding needed to achieve her mobility goals.

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USOR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT

DIVISION OF SERVICES FOR THE

blindand VISUALLY IMPAIRED
DIVISION OF SERVICES FOR THE BLIND AND VISUALLY IMPAIRED

William G. Gibson Division Director

TRAINING AND ADJUSTMENT PROGRAM

BUSINESS ENTERPRISE PROGRAM

VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION PROGRAM

William G. Gibson
Division Director

Deaf-Blind Program

Low Vision Services

Orientation and Training Programs

USOR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT

25

UTAH STATE OFFICE OF REHABILITATION ANNUAL REPORT

26

USOR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT

DIVISION OF SERVICES FOR THE

blindand VISUALLY IMPAIRED
M ission

: To assist indiv

i d ua

ls w

ho a

re b li

nd or

v i s ua l l y i m

d paire

in a

vin chie

xim g ma

um levels of independ

enc

ea

nd,

whenever possible, in developing goals toward competitive employment.

The Division of Services for the Blind and Visually Impaired (DSBVI) provides services designed to increase independence, community integration and productivity for individuals who are blind or visually impaired. These services are provided to eligible individuals under the State Office of Rehabilitation through programs located at the DSBVI. Services include: VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION (VR) provides services to assist individuals with visual impairments to prepare for, obtain and maintain employment. TRAINING AND ADJUSTMENT SERVICES (TAS)
includes outreach training services, counseling by a staff social worker, and a complete center-based orientation and training program. obtaining skills and learning alternative techniques in cooking, cleaning, personal hygiene and organization.

3 Orientation and Mobility (O&M) instruction
is provided to help individuals travel in their own environment, move about independently and safely, and utilize public transportation. “Adjustment to Blindness” classes teach selfesteem, self-confidence and self-advocacy skills.

1 The Orientation and Training Program (OTP) is a series of classes that gives the student
an opportunity to learn alternative techniques for everything from basic personal care to cooking, woodworking, crafts, braille, and computer skills and programs.

LOW VISION SERVICES (LVS) assists individuals
living in Utah who have a significant vision problem. There are many devices, resources and services available to help individuals learn to use their remaining vision effectively and to utilize alternative techniques.

2 Activities of Daily Living (ADL) provides
teachers who work with clients to facilitate

USOR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT

27

DIVISION OF SERVICES FOR THE BLIND AND VISUALLY IMPAIRED

BUSINESS ENTERPRISE PROGRAM (BEP) is a
unique opportunity designed to train and license blind and visually impaired individuals to operate their own businesses, including food service and vending routes in government facilities.

school, either poor vision or risk factors that could interfere with normal visual development. With vision screening, many children avoid permanently losing their vision as a result of various treatable diseases.

DEAF-BLIND (DB) SERVICES are offered for blind
and visually impaired individuals who also have a hearing loss. Services may include training in alternative communication skills and instruction concerning the use of adaptive equipment. The DeafBlind Support Services Provider (SSP) program assists individuals in the community or home with visual and auditory tasks.

THE OLDER BLIND PROGRAM provides independent living services to people who are age 55 or above and are blind or visually impaired. Staff at DSBVI and the Independent Living Centers throughout Utah work together to help increase the independence of these individuals. Objectives include offering community-based independent living services to maximize their independence, increasing program participation through outreach activities, and providing training and support regarding individual and systems advocacy. Services and activities may include orientation and mobility, low vision services, and housing and transportation. Individuals served through the training and rehabilitation programs continue to receive ADAPTIVE TECHNOLOGY ASSISTANCE. A rehabilitation technology specialist assists clients with evaluation and training, as well as setup of adaptive technology. Through this assistance, individuals are able to gain and maintain competitive employment. A computer teacher in the training program is also available to provide instruction in basic computer skills. Individuals served in the OLDER BLIND PROGRAM also receive assistance in acquiring evaluation and set-up of adaptive technology. Through this service, these clients have gained access to and have been able to increase their independence and participate in their communities. Under the VR Program, the Division is continually searching for methods that will better serve clients in acquiring skills to increase independence or to obtain gainful employment. A job readiness class has been developed, which has helped clients learn skills in resume writing, completing applications, interviewing and other job-seeking techniques. This class has assisted many clients to gain and maintain competitive employment.

THE DEAF-BLIND SUPPORT SERVICE PROGRAM (SSP) continues to expand. Individuals
who are deaf and blind receive assistance from support service providers in activities such as reading their mail and newspaper, grocery shopping, getting to and from appointments, and attending recreational activities. These services have enabled individuals to become more involved in their communities and enjoy greater independence. The number of individuals participating in this program continues to increase, and individuals living in the rural areas of Utah are now participating. The number of individuals served by the LOW VISION PROGRAM continues to increase. This past year, 7,020 individuals have been served in the Low Vision Program. Following a referral from an ophthalmologist or optometrist, individuals with usable residual vision are evaluated in Low Vision clinics. Clinics are conducted throughout the State of Utah and in several rural communities by our Certified Low Vision Specialists. Low Vision devices such as special magnified glasses, illuminated lamps, magnifiers and other items are provided. Low Vision Services carries a wide range of items such as Braille devices, adaptive devices with speech and large print items.

THE DIVISION’S VISION SCREENING PROGRAM
is an important service provided to children in Utah. The goal is to detect, prior to a child’s entering 28 USOR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT

DIVISION OF SERVICES FOR THE BLIND AND VISUALLY IMPAIRED

ACCOMPLISHMENTS
Vocational Rehabilitation Services were provided to 661 blind or visually impaired individuals.  A total of 66 individuals were placed into employment.  Of those who received services, 91 percent were considered severely or most severely disabled.  Training and adjustment classes to facilitate adjustment to vision loss were attended by 1,720 individuals.  Low vision services were provided to 7,020 individuals, 384 of whom were served for the first time.  Over 56,597 preschool and kindergarten children were screened for amblyopia and other vision problems; Davis District and Granite Preschool did not report on vision screening. Over 3,402 children were referred for professional eye examinations and treatment. Follow-up care was received by 1,415 children.  This year 46 children were diagnosed with pathological conditions: 1 preschool-aged child suffered a stroke. 1 child received a prosthetic eye. 1 child was diagnosed with Duane Syndrome. 1 child has glaucoma. 1 child has ocular albinism. 2 children have cataracts. 3 children have optic nerve hypoplasia. 3 children were diagnosed with Cordial Vision Impairment. 4 children were diagnosed as legally blind.  Children were diagnosed with various vision problems, including optic nerve hyperplasia, cataracts, retinopathy, glaucoma, retina pimentos, retina detachment, nerve damage to the eye, etc. 43 children were told to return to the doctor within six to 12 months.

62 children were confirmed as already under a doctor’s care for vision conditions. 126 children were diagnosed with amblyopia. 296 children tested within normal limits. 543 children were found to need glasses. Over 165 children moved and were not able to be located. Over 100 parents refused the screening and/ or follow-up and stated it was mostly due to financial reasons.  The BEP currently operates 103 locations consisting of vending, cafeterias and snack bars. They service a total of 557 vending machines, and also have 23 highway rest area locations.  A total of 123 individuals who are deaf-blind were served in the Support Service Provider (SSP) Program.

USOR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT

29

DIVISION OF SERVICES FOR THE BLIND AND VISUALLY IMPAIRED

SUCCESSFUL PEOPLE

GLEN PEEL
Glen lost his sight in a chemical accident in Idaho over twenty years ago. He attended classes in Idaho on cane travel and braille and relocated to Mt. Pleasant, Utah, in 1990. There Glen became a Business Enterprise Program (BEP) manager in Provo. In 1994 Glen was given the opportunity to open a hardware store. He received additional training through the Vocational Rehabilitation Program and the Division of Services for the Blind and Visually Impaired (DSBVI). At the Center, he was provided with a computer and software training, enabling him to transition into a new career in the hardware business. In 1995 Glen opened the store with his wife, Detina. Today Glen owns and operates Horseshoe Mountain Hardware in Mount Pleasant, Utah. He opened a new, 26,000-square-foot store in 2002 and now has 20 employees. Glen states that he is very grateful to have received services, and that without the help of DSBVI and the Vocational Rehabilitation Program, he doesn’t know if he would be successful today. According to Glen, “Attitude is what it is all about, and to keep trying is so important.” Glen believes that the agency gave him the attitude and self-confidence to accomplish what he has, and all the success he has achieved is due to DSBVI and the VR Program.

30

USOR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT

DIVISION OF SERVICES TO THE

dEAFand HARD OF HEARING
DIVISION OF SERVICES TO THE DEAF AND HARD OF HEARING

Marilyn Call Division Director

Robert G. Sanderson COMMUNITY CENTER of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Programs

SOUTHERN UTAH PROGRAM

UTAH INTERPRETER PROGRAM

Division Director

Marilyn Call

Interpreter Certification and Training

Outreach and Assistive Technology Program

Deaf Programs

Hard of Hearing Programs Individualized Services Community Education Services

USOR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT

31

32

USOR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT

DIVISION OF SERVICES TO THE

dEAFand HARD OF HEARING
M is
The Division of Services to the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (DSDHH) provides services designed to increase productivity, independence and community integration for individuals who are deal or hard of hearing. The Division is also responsible to certify all ASL interpreters for Utah. Program services are provided through the Robert G. Sanderson Community Center of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing in Taylorsville and a satellite office in St. George.

THESE SERVICES INCLUDE:
Information and referral. Educational classes. Counseling/c ase management. Assistive technology/demonstration and loaner programs. Consultation services for assistive technology. Interpreter mentoring, certification testing and interpreting services for DSDHH and USOR staff. Library services. Activity programs for senior citizens, youth, families, and deaf-multidisabled individuals to decrease isolation. Adjustment training. Benefits planning.

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n mi , fa ities a nt deaf or ha ortun to en rd of hearing with opp yme hanc plo e or m eir em aintain sk h ills necessary to fully participate in t

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ACCOMPLISHMENTS
INTERPRETER PROGRAM
This program is responsible for evaluating, training and certifying interpreters for the deaf for the State of Utah, as well as providing interpreter services for the Utah State Office of Rehabilitation. Over the past year, the following certification tests were administered: 137 written 89 novice level 88 professional level 42 temporary permits The center has an interpreter lab where individuals practice their interpreter skills for a total of 870 hours. Sixty-five hours of interpreter workshops were provided to assist individuals to improve their skills in order to maintain current certification USOR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT 33

DIVISION OF SERVICES TO THE DEAF AND HARD OF HEARING

or prepare for their next level of certification. The Interpreter Certification Advancement Network (ICAN) program provided mentoring and training to 15 individuals. Of those, 8 advanced to the next level. Over 1,848 hours of interpreting were provided by staff interpreters.. Information/referral regarding interpreting in Utah was provided to 621 individuals

performing community services, and attending community events. 257 deaf children participated in programs such as family support activities, the holiday party, annual surprise egg hunt, and other seasonal activities. 203 deaf or hard of hearing individuals attended job fairs held at the Sanderson Center. Liaison activities occurred at least monthly with the Utah School of the Deaf, Utah Association for the Deaf, Association for Late-Deafened Adults, Hearing Loss Association of America, Legislative Coalition for People with Disabilities, Utah Developmental Disabilities Council, Utah Transit Authority, Division of Workforce Services, senior citizen centers, and Independent Living Centers. Information and awareness programs were provided to 176 individuals.

OUTREACH AND ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY REPORT
The Outreach Specialist has the responsibility of collaborating with representatives from other agencies and organizations to present specialized information. The Outreach Specialist focuses on the needs of the deaf and hard of hearing. The following represents the number of organizations and individuals reached during the last year. 62 presentations were provided for consumer agencies and businesses. 927 people attended presentations. 1,479 consumers were provided with information and referrals. 153 home visits were made by the assistive technology specialist. 389 individuals who were deaf were provided assistive technology. 957 Facebook views 172 Tweets on Twitter

HARD OF HEARING PROGRAM
In the northern half of the state, information and referral awareness services were provided to 1,756 hard of hearing individuals. One-on-one consultation, adjustment training, and support services were provided to 958 individuals. Twenty-seven sixweek series of classes on coping skills, lipreading, or conceptually accurate sign English were provided to 481 hard of hearing people. One thousand seven hundred fourteen individuals participated at the Division’s information booth at various fairs. Help with assistive technology through the Sanderson Center demonstration lab and loaner program was provided to 552 individuals.

DEAF PROGRAMS
Fifty-five volunteers assisted with a variety of programs with the Sanderson Center. An average of 71 senior citizens participated in senior programs each week. Examples of activities include social activities, Medicare and Medicaid workshops, health clinics, and community tours. Monthly social support and training activities were attended by 45 individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing and have additional disabilities. Activities included training on technology use, 34 USOR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT

MENTAL HEALTH COUNSELING/CASE MANAGEMENT
Mental health and case management services were provided to 389 clients who are deaf or hard of hearing. Nine hundred five hours of therapy were provided. Case management staff members provided 2,872 service hours, including counseling, referrals, creating treatment plans, and coordinating services. An additional 724 hours were spent

DIVISION OF SERVICES TO THE DEAF AND HARD OF HEARING

providing outreach education, developing materials, and creating more resources in the community, and staff members responded to 2,092 requests for information. Benefits planning services were provided to 34 individuals. Independent living training was provided to 32 individuals through a peer counselor housed at the center. Training included such things as writing skills, how to ride public transportation, cooking, and using technology such as e-mail. Legal, HEAT, and VITA clinics organized by the individualized service staff provided information/services to 218 individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing.

SOUTHERN UTAH PROGRAM
The Division opened a satellite office to provide services to the growing southern Utah population. This program provides community education, classes, case management, information and referral, adjustment training for hard of hearing adults and as assistive technology demonstration program. Services provided this pas year included the following:

129 classes and/or workshops were given. 2,039 individuals received presentations at
senior centers and booths at senior fairs.

377 clients were served by the hard of hearing
specialist.

129 classes and/or workshops were given. 2,039 individuals received presentations at
senior centers and booths at senior fairs.

PERSONAL ADJUSTMENT SERVICES
Socialization and adjustment activities benefitted 26,058 (duplicated count) participants at the Sanderson Community Center.

474 clients were served by the hard of hearing
specialist.

ADULT EDUCATION CLASSES
Thirteen adult education classes and workshops were attended by 2,982 individuals in northern Utah. Classes included American Sign Language and conceptually accurate signed English, financial planning, computer skills, speechreading, parenting and legal rights of employees who are deaf and hard of hearing. In southern Utah, a variety of educational classes were attended by 1,453 participants.

95 home visits were made. 605 individuals received on-site services from
this office.

USOR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT

35

DIVISION OF SERVICES TO THE DEAF AND HARD OF HEARING

SPOTLIGHT

SUMMER KIDS’ CAMP
Someone once asked Helen Keller whether, if she could choose just one of her disabilities, she would rather be deaf or blind. She responded that she would rather be blind. “Blindness cuts you off from things,” she replied, “but deafness cuts you off from people.” In line with our mission to decrease isolation for people who are deaf, DSDHH provides a one-week summer day camp each year. Summers are long for deaf children and their families. Deaf children are most often the only ones who sign in their neighborhoods, so they are involved in neighborhood play only on a very superficial level, if at all. Deaf children from ages six through 12 are invited to the day camp as are children of deaf adults who hear, but use sign language as their primary language in the home. Since

36

USOR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT

DIVISION OF SERVICES TO THE DEAF AND HARD OF HEARING

deafness is a low-incidence disability—even including hearing children who sign—this day camp program helps expand the social circles of deaf children. Each year the camp has a theme, and educational experiences are planned to support the theme. Last summer the campers learned to enjoy and respect the animals of our earth. Field trips included going

to Cabela’s and participating in a sea life program at an aquarium. DSDHH provides staff, volunteers, and interpreters for the camp. Children’s families pay for entrance fees and food costs. The day camp program is one small way in which DSDHH helps to mitigate the social pain of deaf children and their families.

USOR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT

37

DIVISION OF SERVICES TO THE DEAF AND HARD OF HEARING

SUCCESSFUL PEOPLE
WILLIS MORTON is a successful person in every way. Willis was born into circumstances that could have led to a disastrous life experience. However, his inner light and likeable personality, along with great adult services to support him, allowed Willis to get and keep a good job. He worked as a janitor for the State of Utah for 30 years, and has been surrounded by good friends and co-workers.
Willis’ original parents abandoned him when he was five years old and left him in a closet to die. Someone heard his weak cries and got him to the hospital in time to save his life. When his health was stabilized and no parents could be found, he was placed in an institution for people with mental retardation in Arizona. After three years at the institution, someone noticed that Willis was bright and thought to check to see if he was deaf, not mentally retarded. These observations were right. Willis was profoundly deaf! He was transferred to the School for the Deaf in Tucson, Arizona. There he learned sign language, and when he was matched with good deaf foster parents, and life became much better for Willis. After getting his education, Willis was brought to Utah by his foster parents because Utah was known to have a good Vocational Rehabilitation program for deaf people. In those days there were only two rehabilitation counselors for the deaf, and they provided an eclectic array of services for adult deaf. Because Willis has such a happy, charismatic personality, he was well liked, and Utah Deaf Rehabilitation providers became his new family. Because of his childhood deprivation and the late diagnosis of his deafness, Willis had some challenging behaviors, holes in his field of knowledge, and a need for much training in job skills, social skills, and independent living. His determination and patience, as well as the never-give-up attitude of his rehabilitation counselors, paid off. Willis got his own apartment, a good job, a driver license, and a brand new car. Now Willis is a retired state employee. He has time for fun and keeps engaged socially by coming several times a week to the Sanderson Community Center. While there, he benefits from socializing with others and participating in programs such as counseling, case management, certified Deaf Interpreters, Senior Citizens Club, and independent living skills training. Willis continues to be a fun and energetic friend to many in the Deaf community. His friendly smile and interest in everyone’s well being makes Willis’ friendship a highlight in many people’s lives.

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USOR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT

DIVISION OF

DISABILITY DETERMINATION SERVICES
CHIEF CONSULTANT

SYSTEMS UNIT

DIVISION OF DISABILITY DETERMINATION SERVICES

Medical Relations Consultative Exam Unit Medical Consultants Office Management Examiner Unit 1 Examiner Unit 2 Examiner Unit 3

ASSISTANT ADMINISTRATOR MANAGEMENT

Gary Nakao Division Director ASSISTANT ADMINISTRATOR ADJUDICATION

HEARING UNIT

TECHNICIANS UNIT

Division Director

Gary Nakao

USOR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT

39

40

USOR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT

DIVISION OF

DISABILITY DETERMINATION SERVICES
n: ssio Mi
a To m
ke

te a cura ac

nd timely decisions o nw h
eth

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ilit req isab yd uire ments for social securit

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t

ACCOMPLISHMENTS
Last year, the Utah DDS reported an increase in receipts which began in January 2009 because of the impact of the national economic crisis. Receipt of claims increased from 17,428 in Federal Fiscal Year 2008 to 19,475 in FFY 2009 and leveled at 18,974 in FFY 2010. In FFY 2011, however, there was an increase in initial receipts but also an increase in Continuing Disability Reviews (CDRs) which was the result of Congressional action. The Social Security Administration’s (SSA) goal for our Utah DDS was 21,659 cleared claims in FFY 2011. With the hiring and training of additional examiners in FFY 2009 and FFY 2010, the Utah DDS was able to clear 22,251 claims which is an all-time high. Additionally, the Social Security Administration has a measure of productivity called the Production Per Work Year or PPWY. The Utah DDS was never able to come very close to the national PPWY goal from SSA because of examiner turnover of about 28 percent a year. Since FFY 2007, however, with the Executive Director’s approval of a new Examiner Pay Plan, the examiner turnover has been dramatically improved to the point where in FFY 2011, the Utah DDS came within five points of the national goal. It is projected that the Utah DDS will hit the national PPWY goal in one to two years and hopefully begin exceeding it. The challenge currently and in FFY 2012, however, is that there has been a hiring freeze since FFY 2011 and projected for FFY 2012 and with normal attrition, the Utah DDS may be down at least ten examiners by the end of FFY 2012. With the projected increase in approximately 650 more Continuing Disability Reviews in FFY 2012 than last year, an increasing backlog is certain to develop. ANOTHER POSITIVE EVENT THIS PAST YEAR for Utah was being selected by the Social Security Administration Office of the Inspector General to start up a Cooperative Disability Investigation (CDI) Unit. The CDI Program is a joint effort among Federal and State agencies to effectively pool resources for the purpose of preventing fraud in SSA’s Title II and Title XVI disability programs and related federal and state programs. In Utah, the participating agencies include the Social Security Administration Office of the Inspector General, the Utah State Office of the Attorney General, the Social Security Administration and the Utah DDS. The Utah DDS provides an examiner to the CDI Unit. Having USOR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT 41

DIVISION OF DISABILITY DETERMINATION SERVICES

only been in full operation since May 2011, the Utah CDI Unit has already produced $2,072,875 in Social Security savings and $1,191,304 in non-SSA savings through August 2011.

IMPACT ON UTAH CITIZENS AND ECONOMY
As of June 2011, there were 55,553 Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) beneficiaries in Utah receiving a total of $49,798,000 a month. This represents an increase of 3,035 beneficiaries and $2,847,000 a month over last year. Also, as of June 2011, there were 28,286 Supplemental Security Income (SSI) beneficiaries in Utah receiving a total of $13,337,000 a month. This represents an increase of 3,648 beneficiaries and $1,510,760 a month over last year. As the data indicates, the disability program is having a large impact on Utah’s citizens and economy.

SOCIAL SECURITY RECOGNITION TO DDS STAFF MEMBER VAN LUND

For FFY 2011, Van Lund, Supervisor of the Utah DDS Technician Unit, received a Social Security Associate Commissioner Citation for his contributions to the Utah DDS and to the Social Security disability program. In addition to his normal management duties, Van is the Utah DDS representative to the Social Security planning and implementation process for the Disability Case Processing System (DCPS). This is a massive undertaking by the Social Security Administration and the state DDSs to implement one case processing system for all DDSs in the country. Currently, there are five different case processing systems used by DDSs. The conversion to DCPS is projected to be completed by FFY 2016. Van has been with the Utah DDS since 1994 and has been an Examiner Assistant Supervisor and is currently a Supervisor.

DDS ADVISORY COUNCIL
The nine-member DDS Advisory Council continues to provide valuable input and feedback on how DDS is serving the public. Additionally, each of the nine members and alternates provides a flow of accuracy and timely information regarding the SSA disability program to different segments of the public or agencies he/she represents. The Advisory Council was established in state statute in 1994 and is celebrating its seventeenth year. For two years now, the Advisory Council has been using the Tandberg system to allow Council members from outside the metropolitan area to participate in Council meetings through video-conferencing technology.

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USOR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT

UTAH STATE OFFICE OF REHABILITATION

OFFICE LOCATIONS

UTAH STATE OFFICE OF REHABILITATION
ADMINISTRATION OFFICE 250 East 500 South P.O. Box 144200 Salt Lake City, UT 84114-4200 (801) 538-7530 1-800-473-7530 Fax (801) 538-7522

GOVERNOR’S COMMITTEE ON EMPLOYMENT OF PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES 1595 West 500 South (801) 887-9392 Voice Salt Lake City, UT (801) 887-9500 TTY 84104-5238 Toll-free: (866) 454-8397

DIVISION OF REHABILITATION SERVICES
ADMINISTRATION OFFICE 250 East 500 South P.O. Box 144200 Salt Lake City, UT 84114-4200 INDEPENDENT LIVING REHABILITATION PROGRAM 250 East 500 South P.O. Box 144200 Salt Lake City, UT 84114-4200 NORTHERN UTAH DISTRICT 115 W. Golf Course Road, Suite D Logan, UT 84321-5984 BRIGHAM CITY OFFICE 275 West 1100 South Brigham City, UT 84302-3116 950 East 25th Street, #200 Ogden, UT 84401-2606 2984 North 400 West, Suite A Layton, UT 84041-1344 150 North Main, #103 Bountiful, UT 84010-6123 (801) 538-7530 (800) 473-7530

(801) 538-7530 (800) 473-7530 Voice/TTY

(435) 787-3480 (800) 560-9766 Voice/TTY (435) 734-9408 (800) 559-9408 Voice/TTY (801) 395-7020 Voice/TTY

OGDEN DISTRICT

DAVIS DISTRICT SOUTH DAVIS OFFICE

(801) 776-5951 Voice/TTY (801) 296-1293 Voice/TTY

USOR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT

43

OFFICE OF REHABILITATION LOCATIONS

SALT LAKE DOWNTOWN DISTRICT 50 West Broadway, #800 Salt Lake City, UT 84101-2034 VALLEY WEST DISTRICT TOOELE OFFICE 5522 South 3200 West Taylorsville, UT 84129 982 North Main Tooele, UT 84074-1616 926 West Baxter Drive (10600 So.) South Jordan, UT 84095-8687

(801) 238-4560 Voice/TTY

(801) 957-8200 Voice/TTY (435) 882-1086 (800) 734-1086 Voice/TTY (801) 446-2560 (800) 625-7519 Voice/TTY

SOUTH VALLEY DISTRICT

SANDERSON COMMUNITY CENTER OF THE DEAF AND HARD OF HEARING—VR PROGRAM 5709 South 1500 West (801) 263-4884 (VP/TTY) Salt Lake City, UT 84123-5217 (800) 860-4860 (VP/TTY) (801) 263-4893 (877) 860-4861 (Voice/VP) HEBER CITY OFFICE 175 North Main, Suite B3 Heber City, UT 84032-1668 150 East Center, Suite 3300 Provo, UT 84606-3157 (435) 657-0629 (800) 337-2142 Voice/TTY (801) 374-7724 (800) 662-6539 Voice/TTY (801) 772-0793 Voice/TTY

PROVO DISTRICT

AMERICAN FORK OFFICE 64 South 360 East American Fork, UT 84003-2590 CENTRAL UTAH DISTRICT DELTA OFFICE MANTI OFFICE RICHFIELD OFFICE 910 East 100 North, #215 Payson, UT 84651-1643 520 East Topaz Blvd., #109 Delta, UT 84624-4106 55 South Main, #2 Manti, UT 84642-1332 150 West 1500 South Richfield, UT 84701 320 North Aggie Blvd. #105 Vernal, UT 84078 475 West Price River Drive Price, UT 84501-2839 1100 East Lagoon Roosevelt, UT 84066-3099

(801) 465-8384 Voice/TTY (877) 509-8384 Voice/TTY (435) 864-2509 (800) 531-9914 Voice/TTY (435) 835-0750 (800) 531-9913 Voice/TTY (435) 896-1470 (800) 953-6479 Voice/TTY (435) 789-0273 (800) 286-0273 Voice/TTY (435) 636-2820 (800) 491-7734 Voice/TTY (435) 722-6969 Voice/TTY

EASTERN UTAH DISTRICT PRICE OFFICE ROOSEVELT OFFICE

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USOR 2011 ANNUAL REPORT

OFFICE OF REHABILITATION LOCATIONS

BLANDING OFFICE MOAB OFFICE

121 East 500 North Blanding, UT 84511-2720 125 West 200 South Moab, UT 84532-2534

(435) 678-1452 (800) 531-9912 Voice/TTY (435) 259-4635 Voice/TTY

SOUTHERN UTAH DISTRICT 965 East 700 South, #202 St. George, UT 84790-4085 CEDAR CITY OFFICE 925 South Main Cedar City, UT 84720-3726

(435) 673-5091 (800) 281-5091 Voice/TTY (435) 586-9995 (800) 281-9945 Voice/TTY

VOCATIONAL EVALUATION SERVICES 1595 West 500 South Salt Lake City, UT 84104-5238 OGDEN VOCATIONAL EVALUATION 950 East 25th Street, #200 Ogden, UT 84401-2606 PROVO VOCATIONAL EVALUATION 150 East Center, Suite 3300 Provo, UT 84606-3157 ST. GEORGE VOCATIONAL EVALUATION 1067 East Tabernacle, #9 St. George, UT 84770-3163 UTAH CENTER FOR ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY 1595 West 500 South Salt Lake City, UT 84104-5238 COMPUTER CENTER FOR CITIZENS WITH DISABILITIES 1595 West 500 South Salt Lake City, UT 84104-5238

(801) 887-9501 Voice (801) 887-9503 TTY (801) 395-7080 Voice/TTY

(801) 374-7724 (800) 662-6539 Voice/TTY (435) 673-3896 Voice/TTY

(801) 887-9539 (888) 866-5550 Voice (801) 887-9380 Voice

BENEFITS PLANNING, ASSISTANCE, AND OUTREACH PROGRAM (BPAO) 1595 West 500 South (801) 887-9530 Voice/TTY Salt Lake City, UT 84104-5238 (801) 887-9500 TTY

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DIVISION OF DISABILITY DETERMINATION SERVICES
ADMINISTRATION OFFICE P.O. Box 144032 Salt Lake City, UT 84114-4032 (801) 321-6500 Voice/TTY

DIVISION OF SERVICES TO THE DEAF AND HARD OF HEARING
SANDERSON COMMUNITY CENTER OF THE DEAF AND HARD OF HEARING 5709 South 1500 West (801) 263-4860 Voice Taylorsville, UT 84123-5217 (801) 263-4862 TTY (801) 657-5200 Voice/VP (800) 860-4860 Toll-Free UTAH INTERPRETER PROGRAM (801) 263-4860 Voice INDIVIDUALIZED SERVICES PROGRAM (801) 263-4860 (801) 263-4883 TTY OUTREACH AND TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM (801) 263-4860 (801) 657-5217 VP (801) 657-5212 VP (800) 860-4860 V/VP

(800) 860-4860 Voice

SOUTHERN UTAH SERVICES TO THE DEAF AND HARD OF HEARING 1067 E. Tabernacle, #10 (435) 673-8974 Voice St. George, UT 84770-3163 (866) 939-2975 VP

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SERVICES FOR THE BLIND AND VISUALLY IMPAIRED
ADMINISTRATION OFFICE 250 North 1950 West, Suite B Salt Lake City, UT 84116-7902 TRAINING AND ADJUSTMENT SERVICES LOW VISION SERVICES BUSINESS ENTERPRISE PROGRAM (801) 323-4343 (800) 284-1823 (801) 323-4395 TTY (801) 323-4348 (801) 323-4373 (801) 323-4386

VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION SERVICES FOR THE BLIND AND VISUALLY IMPAIRED 250 North 1950 West, Suite B (801) 323-4374 Salt Lake City, UT 84116-7902 PROVO VR SERVICES FOR THE BLIND AND VISUALLY IMPAIRED 150 East Center, Suite 3300 Provo, UT 84606-3157 OGDEN VR SERVICES FOR THE BLIND AND VISUALLY IMPAIRED 950 East 25th Street Ogden, UT 84401-2606 (801) 374-7705 (800) 662-6539 (801) 395-7060 (800) 950-8824

ST. GEORGE VR SERVICES FOR THE BLIND AND VISUALLY IMPAIRED 515 West 300 North, Suite B (435) 986-0055 St. George, UT 84770-4578

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