Information in this document is embargoed until Sept. 24, 2012, at 11 a.m. EDT.

Contact: College Board Communications at 212-713-8052 or communications@collegeboard.org.

The Oregon SAT® Class of 2012
In Oregon, the most diverse group of graduating seniors in state history participated in the college-going process by ® taking the SAT . More than half of all graduates, 57 percent in the Oregon class of 2012, took the SAT at least once during high school. Among SAT takers in the Oregon class of 2012: o 89 percent reported attending public school. o 86 percent reported taking the PSAT/NMSQT . Those students scored 153 points higher, on average, on the SAT. o 76 percent reported completing a core curriculum. Those students scored 116 points higher, on average, on the SAT. o 18 percent took the SAT for free via the College Board’s SAT Fee-Waiver Service.
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How High School Course Work Impacts College Readiness
Completing a core curriculum and pursuing rigorous course work are two critical components of college and career readiness. Students who complete a core curriculum do better on the SAT than those students who do not complete a core curriculum. Taking steps to increase the number of high school students completing a core curriculum will have a positive effect on mean SAT scores and college and career readiness.

SAT Performance by Core Curriculum Completion Oregon Class of 2012
All Schools % Core Curriculum Noncore Difference Combined Difference 76 24 CR 533 495 +38 M 534 497 +37 +116
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W 511 470 +41

What is a core curriculum? A core curriculum is defined as four or more years of English, three or more years of mathematics, three or more years of natural science, and three or more years of social science and history.

The College Board’s Advanced Placement Program (AP ) enables willing and academically prepared students to pursue college-level studies — with the opportunity to earn college credit, advanced placement or both — while still in high school. Through AP courses in 34 subjects, each culminating in a rigorous exam, students learn to think critically, construct solid arguments and see many sides of an issue — skills that prepare them for college and careers. Research indicates that students who succeed on an AP Exam during high school typically experience greater academic success in college, experience lower college costs and are more likely to earn a college degree than their peers. Students who participate in AP or honors courses during high school also tend to perform substantially better on the SAT than their peers. In Oregon, students in the class of 2012 who took ® English AP or honors courses scored 125 points higher on the SAT than the average for all Oregon SAT takers, while Oregon students taking math honors or AP courses had a 174-point advantage compared to the average SAT score for the state. Similarly, Oregon students who took natural sciences, social sciences and history honors or AP courses also scored significantly higher on each section of the SAT than the average for all Oregon SAT takers.

Mean SAT Scores by AP or Honors Participation Oregon Class of 2012 – All Schools
CR English and Language Arts AP/Honors Mathematics AP/Honors Natural Sciences AP/Honors Social Sciences and History AP/Honors Mean Scores for All Test-Takers 566 572 577 575 521 M 558 593 584 571 523 W 543 551 555 552 498

SAT Highlights – Oregon Class of 2012

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Information in this document is embargoed until Sept. 24, 2012, at 11 a.m. EDT.
Contact: College Board Communications at 212-713-8052 or communications@collegeboard.org.

PSAT/NMSQT® Prepares Students for SAT; Identifies Students with AP Potential
In addition to completing a core curriculum and pursuing rigorous course work, the Preliminary SAT/National Merit ® Scholarship Qualifying Test (PSAT/NMSQT ) represents another important step on the path to college and career readiness. The PSAT/NMSQT — which is administered nationally each October — can identify students with potential to succeed in AP courses and exams, and provides valuable academic feedback that can help students prepare for the SAT and education opportunities beyond high school. The PSAT/NMSQT is the most widely-used 10th- and 11thgrade pre-college readiness assessment in the United States. The vast majority (86 percent) of SAT takers in the class of 2012 reported taking the PSAT/NMSQT.

Mean SAT Scores by PSAT/NMSQT Participation Oregon Class of 2012
All Schools PSAT/NMSQT Participation (86 Percent) CR PSAT/NMSQT Takers Non-PSAT/NMSQT Takers Difference Combined Difference 530 478 +52 M 531 483 +48 +153 W 507 454 +53

The PSAT/NMSQT measures the same skills as the SAT, and students who take the PSAT/NMSQT generally perform better on the SAT than those who do not take the PSAT/NMSQT.

Oregon Enjoys Strong SAT Participation Among Traditionally Underserved Students
Since its formation in 1900, the College Board has been committed to expanding access to and equity in education. The SAT was created to democratize access to higher education for all students, and this is reflected in the increasing diversity among SAT takers across the United States and in Oregon.

Oregon Class of 2012 SAT Takers by Race/Ethnicity
All Schools # American Indian or Alaska Native Asian, Asian American, or Pacific Islander Black or African American Hispanic/Latino White Other No Response 295 1,756 486 1,818 13,597 435 426 PCT 2 9 3 10 72 2 2 Public Schools # 266 1,403 411 1,595 11,523 348 312 PCT 2 9 3 10 73 2 2

SAT Takers Reflect Oregon's Diversity
 The racial and ethnic diversity of Oregon SAT takers in the class of 2012 is the highest percentage of any class in history at 25 percent.  17 percent of all SAT takers (3,155 students) and 17 percent (2,643) of public school SAT takers in Oregon report that English is not exclusively their first language.

 36 percent of all SAT takers (6,118 students) and 38 percent (5,500) of public school SAT takers in Oregon report their parents’ highest level of education as a high school diploma or less.

Expanding Access Through SAT Fee-Waiver Service
For more than 40 years, the College Board has provided SAT fee waivers to low-income students for whom exam fees would present an unnecessary barrier in the college-going process. With the assistance of high school counselors throughout the country, the SAT Fee-Waiver Service is reaching more students than ever before. More than 370,000 students in the graduating class of 2012 benefitted from SAT fee waivers. The College Board provided more than $44 million in SAT services to fee-waiver recipients during the 2011-12 academic year. 

Benefits of the SAT Fee-Waiver Service Students who qualify for the SAT Fee-Waiver Service can take two (2) SAT exams and up TM to six (6) SAT Subject Tests during high school. Students who participate in the SAT Fee-Waiver Service can also qualify for college application fee waivers at hundreds of colleges and universities throughout the United States.

18 percent (3,377) of SAT takers in the Oregon class of 2012 utilized SAT fee waivers.

Note about the use of SAT score data: It is inappropriate to rank states, districts or schools on the basis of SAT scores alone. The SAT is a strong indicator of trends in the college-bound population, but it should never be used as the sole criterion for comparisons because academic intensity and nonschool factors such as demographics can vary widely across states, districts and schools. Always keep in mind that mean SAT scores tend to decline as SAT participation increases. States, districts and schools in which a majority of students take the SAT will generally have lower mean scores than those in which only a small percentage of students take the SAT.

SAT Highlights – Oregon Class of 2012

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Information in this document is embargoed until Sept. 24, 2012, at 11 a.m. EDT.
Contact: College Board Communications at 212-713-8052 or communications@collegeboard.org.

SAT Participation and Performance
 18,813 students in the Oregon class of 2012 took the SAT, which represents 57 percent of the state’s high school graduates. The 15,858 public school SAT takers in the Oregon class of 2012 represent 51 percent of the state’s public high school graduates. Math scores of Oregon SAT takers increased 2 points from 2011, and critical reading scores increased 2 points for public school students.

Oregon SAT Participation and Performance by School Type
School Type Public Religiously Affiliated Independent Other or Unknown Number 15,858 1,803 205 947 PCT 89 10 1 CR 518 547 594 498 M 521 549 576 483 W 494 533 574 470

Five-Year Trend in Overall Mean SAT Scores
SAT Takers — All Schools # 2008 2011 2012 18,939 18,754 18,813 CR 521 520 521 M 525 521 523 W 500 499 498 SAT Takers — Public Schools* # 15,540 15,763 15,858 CR 517 516 518 M 523 520 521 W 496 494 494

College Plans of Oregon's SAT Takers
 Among the SAT takers in Oregon's class of 2012 who responded to optional questions about their college plans: o o 34 percent of students indicated plans to attain a bachelor’s degree. 46 percent indicated plans to attain a more advanced (master’s or doctoral) degree. 81 percent indicated that they planned to apply for financial aid.

Top 10 Institutions Receiving Scores from Oregon SAT Takers
Institution OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY UNIVERSITY OF OREGON PORTLAND STATE UNIVERSITY WESTERN OREGON UNIVERSITY UNIVERSITY OF PORTLAND SOUTHERN OREGON UNIVERSITY UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON WILLAMETTE UNIVERSITY LINFIELD COLLEGE STANFORD UNIVERSITY State OR OR OR OR OR OR WA OR OR CA Type Public Public Public Public Private Public Public Private Private Private

o 

Students from the Oregon class of 2012 who took the SAT and/or SAT Subject Tests™ sent score reports to a total of 1,331 institutions.

Note about the use of SAT score data: It is inappropriate to rank states, districts or schools on the basis of SAT scores alone. The SAT is a strong indicator of trends in the college-bound population, but it should never be used as the sole criterion for comparisons because academic intensity and nonschool factors such as demographics can vary widely across states, districts and schools. Always keep in mind that mean SAT scores tend to decline as SAT participation increases. States, districts and schools in which a majority of students take the SAT will generally have lower mean scores than those in which only a small percentage of students take the SAT.

SAT Highlights – Oregon Class of 2012

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Information in this document is embargoed until Sept. 24, 2012, at 11 a.m. EDT.
Contact: College Board Communications at 212-713-8052 or communications@collegeboard.org.

The SAT ® Created by educators to democratize access to higher education, the SAT is a highly reliable and valid standardized measure of college readiness used in the admission process at nearly all four-year colleges and universities in the United States, including test-optional institutions. The content on the SAT reflects the reading, mathematics and writing curricula taught in high school classrooms. Uniquely the SAT also measures how well students can apply their knowledge, a factor that is critical to college and career success. The SAT is a fair and valid predictor of college success for students of all backgrounds, and SAT performance data illustrate that success on the SAT is linked to the type and rigor of course work completed during high school. Studies regularly demonstrate that the best predictor of college success is the combination of SAT scores and high school grades. Nearly three million students take the SAT each academic year via nearly 7,000 test centers in more than 170 countries. For further information, visit www.collegeboard.org/SATPress.

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About the College Board The College Board is a mission-driven not-for-profit organization that connects students to college success and opportunity. Founded in 1900, the College Board was created to expand access to higher education. Today, the membership association is made up of more than 6,000 of the world’s leading educational institutions and is dedicated to promoting excellence and equity in education. Each year, the College Board helps more than seven million students prepare for a successful transition ® to college through programs and services in college readiness and college success — including the SAT and the Advanced ® Placement Program . The organization also serves the education community through research and advocacy on behalf of students, educators and schools. For further information, visit www.collegeboard.org. -30Data Notes Type of High School: Unless otherwise noted, data reflect all students in Oregon who took the SAT at least once during high school. Data specific to public school SAT takers are marked as such.
*Note about public school participation and mean scores: A number of factors can contribute to yearly fluctuations in public school participation levels and mean scores, including a state’s efforts to foster a college-going culture, the academic preparedness of students taking the SAT®, and changes in student behavior when completing the SAT Questionnaire. Public school participation levels are calculated based on optional, self-reported data students provide when completing the SAT Questionnaire during registration. Unanticipated increases or decreases in the number of students providing their high school’s unique code can influence year-over-year differences in public school participation and influence mean scores. A decline in the number of students providing their high school’s unique code among the classes of 2008 – 2010 resulted in a decline in reported public school participation in many states for those years. The College Board carefully monitors changes in student data and has enhanced the registration process to encourage more students to report school affiliation. As a result, the percentage of students reported by school type in the class of 2011 and 2012 has increased. As with any data, fluctuations from year to year should be interpreted with appropriate consideration.

© 2012 The College Board. College Board, Advanced Placement Program, AP, SAT and the acorn logo are registered trademarks of the College Board. SAT Subject Tests is a trademark owned by the College Board. PSAT/NMSQT is a registered trademark of the College Board and National Merit Scholarship Corporation. All other products and services may be trademarks of their respective owners. Visit the College Board on the Web: www.collegeboard.org

Note about the use of SAT score data: It is inappropriate to rank states, districts or schools on the basis of SAT scores alone. The SAT is a strong indicator of trends in the college-bound population, but it should never be used as the sole criterion for comparisons because academic intensity and nonschool factors such as demographics can vary widely across states, districts and schools. Always keep in mind that mean SAT scores tend to decline as SAT participation increases. States, districts and schools in which a majority of students take the SAT will generally have lower mean scores than those in which only a small percentage of students take the SAT.