Box# 31

Folder# 607
Word's Fair: Hall of
Science
1963- 1965
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r (} e.e. n:r w DDuJL.t 1J 9 ·
·"sTATEMENT BY,,CULTURAL EXECUTIVEe CITY OF
NEW YORK, THE OFFI E OF,
>CULTURALAFFAIRS . I.' I
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THERE :;AS BEEN
THE EDUCATIONAL AND CULTURAL LIFE
Of OUR CITY IN THAT WE HITHERTO HAVE NOT
HAD A WUSEUN OF SCIENCE.
IT IS THAT THE FREE WORLD'S
GREATEST CAPITAL CITY OF THE ARTS AND
. SCIENCES HAS SO LONG B.EEN· DEN lED THIS FACET
SO IMPORTANT IN OUR ·
PERHAPS WE .SOME CONSOLATION
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THAT, UP tq MlfEUM
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HAS NOT BEEN PROVIDEif:#.· .. ·
FOR THE REASON THAt''jtlf1'·waD BEEN,
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IT SU'RELY HAVE 'BEEN·;INADEQUA'rE ( ... ·
TO HAVE HOUSED THE GREAT LEAP FORWARD
IN SPACE SCIEHCE.
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1.-i,\GN I r I CENT ART MUSEUMS AND AN OUTSTANDING
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MUSEUM Of NATURAL HISTORY.AND
90TANICAL GARDENS OF GREAT BEAUTY,
AND IT WOULD BE :·A PITY WERE WE ..
TO HAVE Now· A SECOND-CLASS MUSEUM OF SCIENCE.
TODAY SCIENCE EXHIBlTS WILL VARY
FROM THE EXPLOIATIONS .O.F UNSEEABLE,
UNWE I GHABLE AND • NCONCE j VABLE MINIINESS
PHOTOGRAPHIC tuGtiiFICUIOffS OF
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PARTICLES 81,000 D ,.. . ...
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IN THE ARE :·
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THE COMPUTERS, AUTOMAT.fC T'EACHING EQUIPMENT
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fOR HIGHER SPHERES or ARTitiCIAL
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AND OTHER SUCH WONDERS •
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BEYOND. THESE, OUTDOOR EXHIBITS OF
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THIRTY-FIVE STORY
TALL GANTRIES. LAUNCHING PADS
AND SILOS OF GREAT SIZE IN PROPORTION
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TO THE VAST PRAIRIES ·OF THE WEST,
AUGMENTED BY EL£CTRONIC TELESCOPES,
TRACKING STATIONS FOR SATELLITES
AND SCIENC£ EARS COCKED AND LISTENING
TO WESSAGES FROM THE STARS.
SUCH 61ANTS CREATED BY THE MIND OF
WILL NOT FIT WELL ·r1tillHE·ARCHITECTURAL
SURROUNDINGS OF RESt0EJn:IAl AREAS
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NOR BUSINESS · ,,
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A MODERN SCIENCE'MUSEUM NUST BE 8UILT
WHERE THERE IS OPEN PARK SPACE
OF A VERY SIZE,
80TH BECAUSE OF ;TH£ OUTDOOR EXHIB.ITS
AVA I LA8LE INNED lATELY,·
AND TO· PROVIDE ROOM. FOR THE
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FUTURE EXPANSION OF J;H.E MAIN BUILDING,
TOGETHER WITH lNG SPACE
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FOR SCHOOL BUSES ANO fll fVUE CARS.
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Of ALMOST INCREDIBLE .. · ---_ IFICANCE AND · .... _
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IMPORTANCE VILL COME 'tO US f'RON WASHINGtON,
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AND r·ROM THE LA BoRA TOR I ES AND
CONSTRUCTION CENTERS OF. OUR ALLIES
AROUkO THE WORLD.
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APRIL .. tt;, "63
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ROBERT .• · DOWLING
CULTURAL· EXECUTIVE
CITY OF NEW YORK
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CITY PLlNNING COMMISSION
Cal. lfo. 22
Reoollllll8nded amendment of the Clapital Budget for 1963 and Firat
Half' 1964 to include 13,500,000.00 for the construction of s Museum of
Soienoe and Technology in Flushing Meadow Park, Queens, and to postpone
14,800,000,00 presently listed under Project S-146 for the reconstruction
of the 56th Street Incinerator, Manhattan.
CB-63-5
April 18, 1963
The Board of Eeti.Date of the City of New York, Honorable
ROBERT F. WAGNER, Chairlllt.na
The Council of the City of New York, Honorable PAUL R. SCBEVANE, Presidenta
Honorable WILLIAM F. SHEA, Director of the Budget
Honorable ABRAHAM D. BEAMS, Comptroller of the City of New York.
Gentlemen a
On March a, 1963, the Mayor transmitted a request to amend the
Capital Budpt for 1963 and First Half 1964 to inolude 13,500,000.00 for
the oonstruotion of a Museum of Soienoe and Technology in Flushing Meadow
Queens, and to postpone 14,eoo,ooo.oo presently listed under Project
8-146 for the reconstruction of the 56th Street Incinerator, Manhattan.
The eatablishllent of a top rank Museum of Science and Teohnol-
ogy in New York City is desirable. Its location in Flushing Meadow &.rk
is appropriate. That a substantial start can be made through the use of
the City's capital funds on a site made available by the New York Vorld•s
Fair 1964-65 Corporation and by the Department of Parks is fortunate.
Calendar Item No. 65 of the City Planning Collllllission's Publio
Bearing of April 17, 1963 is approved under the following conditiona
That within the terms of the New York Vorld
1
s Fair 1964-1965
reaA
&-O-a eoN. ,/I
Corporation's standard form of agreement for exhibitors, the
desisn of the structure, selection, arrangement and design of
its contents and management of the exhibit be under the direc-
tion of a Board similar to those which have over the years
operated the City's museums and cultural institutions.
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The City Commission further strongly recommends -·
1. That the structure be designed as the first stage of a
permanent building or series of buildinge and/or outdoor areas
for the diapllf of material of scientific and technological
interest and of fundamental educational value;
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2. That the ai te made available for this first stage be
adequate for this purpose and that the Department of Jilt.rk&
agree to reserve at an appropriate time sufficient oontigu-
ou.e l&nd for future ex}aneion of the institution.
In order that capite.l funds may be uade available tor the
JIU88UIIl without impairing the City's debt incurring power, it has been
determined that 84,800
9
000.00, presently provided in the C&pital Budpt
for the reoonatruotion of the 56th Street Incinerator in Manhattan, o&n
be postponed to the next budget period without delaying the advancement
of this project. Pinal plans for the incinerator cannot be completed in
time for the projeot to be undertaken during the 1963-64 budget period.
On Maroh 27, 1963, (cal. No. 70)
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the Commission fixed April 17,
1963 as the date for a public hearing on the proposed amendment of the
capital Bucl.pt for 1963 and First Half' 1964.
The 111t.tter was the subjeot of a publio hearing duly held by the
Oouaiaaion on April 17, 1963, (Cal. No. 65)9 There were appearauoes ia
opposition and in favor and the hearing was closed.
'l'he matter was considered further at a publio meeting of the
Cit7 Planning Commission held on April 18
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1963
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(cal. No. 22).
The Oollllliaaion approTed the amend1111nt and adopted the follow-
ing reoommendationss
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'lhat the Capital Budget for 196} and Firat Half' 1964 Ul'14er
the Dtpartaent of Bt.rka be amended b7 adding a new line to read u
tollona
Col .a
._ber Col.umn Headins Colwm Enta
1 Line lfumber :576&
2 Project lluaber
P-497
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Title
9
Brief Dlacriptionp Museu. of Soieue.
Location &Dd '"'leohnolo&r,
"Plushing Meadow
Bl.rk, Queeu,
Including Site.
4 Total Coat
17,000,000.00
5 Appropriations b7 Board of'
latilllate as of December ,1,1962 0
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C&J!it&l BudS!t for and
{
Firat Half 1964
:5 ,500,000.00P
7 Sources of Funds for C&pi tal
t 1:5,500,000.00A.
Budget
:5,500,000.00P
8 Required to Complete
0
9 Years of Probable Usefulnesa
{
'O(lle.)
and Eatiu.ted Addi tione.l
1298,550
Annual Debt Service
10 Bltimated Additional Annual
190,000
Maintenance and Operation
Pootuteaa
A - Additional Funds
P - Private Contributions
Coluan 9 - '!'he figure shown in parenthesis after the tera
ot fl&rs refers to the partioule.r pkr&Braph of
Section 11.00 of the Local Finance I&v appliii!d
in determining suoh term of years.
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That the Capital Budget for 1963 and First Half 1964 under
the Department of Sanitation be amended by changing Line 544 to read
ae follo118 t
Col wan
lfullber
1
2
Column Heading
Line lfumber
Project Number
Title
9
Brief Desoription
9
Looation
Total Estimated Cost
Col Ullll Entq
544
S-146
56th Street
Incinerator,
Manhattan,
Reconstruction
4
5
A.ppropriations b;y Board of
Estimate as of December 31 P 1962 $ 82 p500o00
_I 188
8
250,00
7
8
9
10
capital Budset for 1963 and
First Half 1964
Sources of Funds for Capital
Budget
Required to Complete
Years of Probable Usefulness
and Eet:t..ted Additional
Annual Debt Service
Estimated Additional Annual
Maintenance and Operation
{ $ 97 ,500oOOR
t 90t750oOOA
$ 5t350,000o00
~ 20(6)
tt66o, 100
Footnoteea
A -Additional Funds
R - Benewal of 1962 Capital Budget Adoptions
Column 9 - The figure shown in parenthesis after the term
of ;rears refers to the particular parasraph of
Section n.oo of the Local Finance law applied
in determining such ttrJ11 of years.
Francis J. Bloustein
Aoting Ohairmn
Cit;r Planning Commission
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EQ1L IMMEDIATE RELEASE - OCTOBER 4, 1963
STATEMENT BY ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT OF THE NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965
RELATING TO CI'l'Y COUNCIL RESOLUTION PROPOSING REDUCED
WORLD
1
S FAIR RATES FOR SCHOOL CHILDREN
10/63-R5
It is inconceivable that any member of so important a
body as the New York City Council could be so confused about basic
facts in connection with free or drastic cut-rate admissions for
school children, The facts have already been stated in our statement
of October 2nd, another copy of which is attached.
Queens Councilmen Seymour Boyers and Edward Sadowsky have
argued as a basis for their resolution that:
1, The City is spending about $120,000,000 to build and
improve "a network of express high\·lays and scenic parkways leading
to the site from all parts of the city.
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THE FACT: THE CITY IS NOT SPENDING ONE CENT ON THE
$120,000,000 "NETHORK" THESE COUNCILMEN TALK ABOUT, THE FEDERAL
GOVERNMENT IS PROVIDING 90 PERCENT OF THE $120,000,000 AND THE STATE
10 PERCENT, EXCEPT IN ONE INSTANCE WHERE IT IS 50 PERCENT FEDERAL
AND 50 PERCENT STATE.
2. The City is spending $24,000,000 for improvements
related to the Fair.
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10/63-R5
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THE FACT: THE CITY LOANED THE $24,000,000 FOR
PERMANENT IMPROVEMENTS UNDER CONDITIONS WHICH REQUIRE FULL REIMBURSE•
MENT. THE $24,000,000 IN PERMANENT IMPROVEMENTS IS A CONTRIBUTION
BY THE FAIR AND ITS EXHIBITORS TO THE CITY, NOT THE OTHER WAY AROUND,
DESPITE THIS, THE CITY vJILL BE REPAID THE $24,000,000 FROM FAIR
REVENUES IF THEY ARE EARNED.
3. The $3,000
1
000 Hall of Science that the City is build-
ing on the Fairgrounds is for the Fair,
THE FACT: THE HALL OF SCIENCE IS PERMANENT AND IS
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A PART OF THE POST-FAIR CITY PARK, IT IS DESIRABLE BUT NOT ESSENTIAL
TO THE SUCCESS OF THE FAIR, ALL OF THE EXHIBITS ARE FURNISHED BY THE
UNITED STATES SPACE AGENCY AND PRIVATE CORPORATIONS, NONE BY THE CITY,
4, The City has provided funds for "the promotion and
development of the World's Fair."
THE FACT: THE WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
AND ITS EXHIBITORS AND SUPPORTERS HAVE PROVIDED ALL FUNDS FOR THE
PROMOTION AND DEVELOPMENT OF THE \vORLD' S FAIR,
For the information of all the Councilmen, and the
candidates for public office who are seeking headlines wherever they
can get them, the City of New York will receive a much greater benefit
from the Fair than from those paying moderate admission charges, The
Fair is an important revenue source for the City. Comptroller
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10/63-R5
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Abraham Beame has estimated that the City will receive around
$100
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000,000 a year in revenue. It will also have a magnificent
permanent pArk after 1965 if the Fair is prudently managed.
Any free admission or drastic reduction in entrance
charges for children would have to apply to parochial as well as
public schools, to high schools, to all schools in the suburbs and
in other states and to scores of associations and groups who want
to get in free or for next to nothing.
It might be well for members of the Council to speak to
the City's hotel associations and the restaurant groups, the City
merchants and a host of other taxpayers, and find out what they will
get from the Fair. The City's economic welfare is closely tied to
the Fair. If the Fair's present sound fiscal policies, pledged to
those who have financed it, are continued, all of New York will
benefit economically.
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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE - OCTOBER 2, 1963
REMARKS OF ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT OF THE NEW YORK WORLD
1
S FAIR 1964-1965
ON FREE ADMISSION OF CHILDREN
I note that a City Education officer, two candidates for
the City Council and other assorted Santa Clauses have attempted to
make an issue of free or drastically reduced rate admissions to the
Fair for Ne

1 York City school children. They did not make the
slightest effort to get at the facts and have been content to distort
what little they knew,
The reasons why the Fair can not give away free tickets
have been fully stated. Reduced advance sale rates have already
produced over a million dollars in needed revenues to avoid further
borrm11ing.
These are the indisputable facts:
1. The Fair is a non-profit private enterprise on public
land which will be improved and turned back to the City as a magnifi-
cent park.
2. The Fair is a business enterprise which must meet its
obligations. These include first of all, repayment in full to note-
holders. The 1939-1940 Fair, which was good-natured about favors
and economies, paid its bondholders only 32 cents on a dollar. This
record was our greatest handicap in financing the 1964-1965 Fair.
Our second obligation is to return $24,000,000 advanced by the City
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2. (Continued)
for permanent improvements. Our third obligation is to restore
surface areas, at a cost of $6
1
000,000, and our fourth to earn about
$11,000,000 to finish Flushing Meadow Park for the permanent enjoy-
ment of all ages. The last Fair left Flushing Meadow largely a
barren waste,
3. We have had, as might be expected, all sorts of pres-
sures for handouts, favors and special privileges. Among the many
reasons why we could not join the so-called Bureau of International
Expositions were that they insisted that foreign nations pay no rent
and that the Fair run only one year. This would have meant a bankrupt
Fair. In fact, it could not have been financed at all.
4. The matter o ~ admission charges was determined, not
by the President of the Fair, but by its Executive, Finance and other
Committees. The Directors were informed. Every official of the Fair
knew all about it. The advance sale reduced rates were the subject
or the fullest discussion.
5. Further reductions for children would involve all
children in all grade and high schools, parochial schools, etc., not
only in New York City but from every other community. The Fair is a
World's Fair. It is nationwide. It is not heavily subsidized by
the City. The City is largely on the receiving, not on the giving
end. The City is the beneficiary and residuary legatee. It has no
more right to free or reduced rates for its children than has any
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5. (Continued)
other community. Actually the United States Government has put more
non-returnable money into the Fair, notably for roads, marina, etc.
than has the City. The State of New York has put in as much.
6. Assuming several visits by school children, and it
is to be borne in mind that the Fair can not possibly be seen in a
day, the Fair would lose some $9,000,000 in entrance fees if all
children were admitted free, and could not meet its obligations.
The advance ticket charges for children are very low - below those
for any remotely comparable educational exhibits and entertainments.
7. Admission to most of the exhibits in the Fair is
free, but there are some, including various international, state and
amusement features which could only have been financed by low addi-
tional charges. If entrance admissions for children are to be free
or at greatly reduced rates, charges for some of the admission rates
within the Fair would have to be lowered. This could not be done
under our contracts and agreements. Moreover, there would be an
immediate demand for free or reduced transportation to and within
the Fair.
B. If exceptions were made for school children, many
other influential and persuasive groups would demand lower rates.
We have already heard from them.
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9. The Fair will present extraordinary advantages to
New York. They are worth a little sacrifice.
We pledged at the Fair prudent, honest, courageous and
non-political management, free from patronage, and that is what the
people of the City as hosts and ultimate beneficiaries will get.
MBK>RANDUM FROM
2/14/64
JEROME M. KAY
Counsel to the President
To: PRESIDENT SCREVANE
Attached is memorandum prepared by the World's
Fair attorneys and myself.
TilE POST f.' A I PI J\N:
STATUS OF HALL OF ')(:
Chapter 794 of the Laws of 1963 authorized an agreement
bE!tween the Commissioner of Parks of The City of New York:,
New York World's Fair 1964-1965 Corporation, and a. nonwpro.fit
cor:poration "organized or to be organized" for the construction,
occ.:upat:i.on, operation and maintenance by such corporation of
"a. hall of vti tb in Fll.whing Meadow Park. The statute
Ht;\te5 th.:"'t cuntract pHwide, a1aong other things,
tol' on the board of of the Hall of Sciente
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of t'he M."\yor, Commissioner of Parks and the President of the
Bor. :)u9h c.•f ()1,;-.eens. Upon the uking of such a contract, the
City :i.s .:;u tho:r iLcd annually, in its discretion, to appropriate
a s-;.Jm .fo-;. the maintenance and support of the Hall.
Sci•mc:_e Dl;lring Fair
There is no !;pecial col"' tract concerning the Hall of
Science during the Fair. TI"le Agreement of Lease bE!tween the
<:h;y and the Fair Corporation, dated :.toy 27, 1960, autoaatically
the Ha J.l ot Science t·1 the Fair Corporation as the
City construct5 it. l af defines the
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the: Purt New York Authority as its agent for: the
Area of the Fair. The Hall o'L Science during
tlut Fair will continue to be adlllinistered by the Fair Corpora-
tion through the Port Authority.
!'l!la t be Done
(1) 1-f..a l1 of Science must be incorporated as a
membership corporation with a name such a.s "Hall
o:f. Sci<Emce o:f the City of NflW York, Inc." This is done by
t'ilil'lg a te of incorpm: ation &ubscr ibed by five
incorporatorso Th!Q of the directors is to be stated
in the but it aay he done in an indefinite !ora,
«'Ach ar.
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'not les& than five and not more than twenty." The
', names of the directors until the first annual aeeting aus t
alao be &h.tltd. be at least three directors.
1'her11t is no legal PJaXism numbex.,
'(2) Onc:e o·cqa.nized the Hall of Seience corporation •
into the vri th the City for the
npen:. ti•:m Alld of' the Hall n1' in the post-
Fr.ir years.
(3) Th;a Hall of coxporation should adopt
bv··lMt!i obt-:-d.11 appropri . .ato:: ex•JIS!t>tion rulin9s.
!<:..) Nn fu.r theox spoci.:-.1 leg.ts.la,tion ::s necessary for
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(2) The lEigislation trhich contemplates the Mayor,
the Park Cora1.ui5.tsif.a.'\er, and the President of the Borotigh of
il\te!olns ,;;.s t•:r;;r.;hers of the Fa-i.r
1
s Board M is perrais-
the leqislation does strongly
t:J;;t 5 ts intent is to have these officials as 11eabers
attorneys Jor the Fa::.r also feel that these
nfficia.Jr; :;hould be lll"Jombe·rs of the Boa1d. This beinq the
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NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
!12. N.Y. • TUtPHONt · A"tA Coot Z12 · WF' 4·1SU5• • CA•Lt Aoo .. us"WORLOSF'AIR"
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URGENr
Augut 1, 19M
MEMORANDUM TO OEN. W. E. POTTER · .
FROM ROBERT MOSES
MOS E:S

You can readily <Jrasp trom Ule air reports and a look
at lh1a morninQ'• papers that tht moon exploration has become top
news. Therefore, we must be very sure of our plans and announce-
ments for the MartJn tv1a.r1etta openlnQ at the Ha.ll of Science on
September 8th.
Confu21on w1Ulin the Fair baa been bad enou\ih and has re-
centty been worse. There has to be an end ot this and soon. Cur
sta.!f heads must work toQelher a.nd stop tryin9 to function
ly and unlla.terally, and of course with the exhtbltors, architects,
builders, etc. This could be a hell of a fiop U 1t ls not handl.;..'Ci
We at the Fa.lr would be holding the ball. The fellow who conceived
Martin Marietta desl<;n is a real but a wUd one somethinq like
Norman Eel Geddes. The arra.n<Jemants for compleUon of construction
and installaUon are not clean cut. Tho scheme for accommodnt1ng
visitors 1• by no mea.na impressive. I have asked repeatedly for more
moeUnga the top people toQether. Pleue call them th1s wee*.·
c::: i.\lul
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/.S/ ROBERT MOSES
Fres1dc.t
r rcc.Jon1 Cl'lrk
W. Harrison
Go1. ::-:. l<·lntll.

Gen. S. 1-'vttcr
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8/64-R61
UNISPHERE
01061

NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
FLUSHING 52, N.Y. • TELEPHONE- AREA CODE 212-WF 4-1964 • CABLE ADDRESS "WORLOSFAIR"
REFER INQUIRIES TO:
Peter McDonnell
Jerome Edelberg
Joyce Martin
FOR Ir-'JMEDIATE RELEASE
ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT
August 13, 1964
- WF 4-6531
- WF
- WF
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR, Aug. 13 -- Academy Award win er
Gregory Peck will visit the American Cancer Society exhibit
at the Fair's Hall of Science on Saturday, August 15, at
10:30 A.M., where he will view "Time for Life," a film, in
which he stars, made for the Society.
Peck will enter the Fairgrounds at New Amsterdam Gate
(No. 2) and go directly to the Hall of Science. After the
film showing, he will go to the Pavilion of Spain (11:15 A.M.)
where he will view the Salvador Dali "Art In Jewels" exhibit,
which benefits the American Cancer Society, the American Heart
Association and the Institute of Physical Medicine and
Rehabilitation.
Following his visit to the Dali exhibit, he will visit
the Johnson's Wax Pavilion.
FROM: Wm. J. Donoghue Corporation
10 Columbus Circle, N.Y.C.
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EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT
NATIONAL AERONAUTICS and SPACE COUNCIL
WASHINGTON
September 11, 1964
Dear Mr. Screvane:
I appreciated the invitation to be present at the ceremonies of
dedication of New York City's permanent Hall of Science at the
World's Fair. I enjoyed the entire ceremony, with particular
interest in your thoughtful and well expressed remarks.
I believe the Hall of Science will be a credit and an inspiration
to the people of the City of New York •
Honorable Paul R. Screvane
President, The City Council
New York, New York
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NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
FLUSH INO 52, N Y. • TELEPHONE· AREA CODE 212- WF 4-1964 • CABLE ADDRESs"WORLDSFAIR"
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December 9, 1964
ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT
MEMORANDUM TO GUY TOZZOU
FROM ROBERT MOSES
Will you please talk to Mr. MacMaster of the
Chicaqo Science Museum and find out on what basis he would
make sugqestions for the proqra.m. of our Hall of ScS.nce -
that 1s offer some baste 1deas and alternatives for post-Fair
operation and expansion. I would suqqest that you ask h1m
to cooperate with you and Blll Laurence on a memo which
could be considered informally at the first meeting of the
new trustees. Please d1scuas this with Paul Screvane and
Charlie Pre11Bse. I think the Fair can find the funds to pay
Mr. MacMaster a reasonable sum for his advlce 1n the next
few months.
/s/ ROBERT MOSES
President
Rl'v1:vr
OA':"S TO OPENING ClO.Y
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THROUGH
UNOERSTA.NOINQ
Y...RGENI
MEl'viORANDUUl TO MORRAY DAVIS
FROM ROBERT MOSES
ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT
Col. 0 'Nelli's report to me on science uhiblta
1n other pavUlona avaUable to the Hall of Science after the
Fair la beinq diatrlbuted at tomorrow's Science Eoard.
meetlnq.
There are also some copies avaUable to the
press, but I wouldn't spread them around.
There wlll be enouqh left to distribute to the
Executive Committee on Tuesday.
RM:MR
CC: Guy TozzoU
Wallace Harrison
Erneattna Ha.1q
Peter Reidy
T. J. De8QBJ1, 1 r.
Stuart Constable
Col. John O'NeUl
/s/ ROBERT' MOSES
President
Debs Myers
Charles Preusae
William Laurence
Bradford Clark
Gen. WUU.a.m Potter
Gllmore Clarke
DAYS TO OPENING DAY
Martin Stone
John Tbornton
Paul Screvane
Blll Bema
George Spargo
Gen. 8. Potter
I
HENRY UTI'AL --
JOIIPH
s•THH.
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NEW YORK 17. NEW YORK A
LAW OFFICE OF
UTTAL, MILLER AND DUBIN
1521 FIFTH AVENUE
MUAIIAY HII.L 2-11622
Mayor Robert F. Wagner
City Hall
New York, New York
(<'' I)
t rch sr' 1965
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Re: Hall of Science l \ \
Dear Mayor Wagner:
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This morning t s mail brought Mr. s of
a further postponement of the s6,Cond of the Board
of Trustees of the Hall of J ;
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Perhaps I should be only in fact., I am very
disturbed. · . '<z/
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I cannot help but involved with
the development of r· /science 'for over three years,
that nothing of any real has occurred since before
the City agreed to of the Hall. That
expenditure of seven ,itillion dollars, i-y itself,
particularf· n--the eobtext· of the WorldS s Fair 1 cannot be
equated wrr· purpe.se of developing the kind of in-
stitution ich you in your speech dedicating
the Hall I\
It has noV\peen two years since your administration
first beccinle.., iny9lyed in constructing the Hall and almost
six months you invited the Board members to serve.
Until now nothing has been asked of most of the Board
members and, so far as I can tell, the envisioned institution
is no nearer reality.
Perhaps something worthwhile can yet develop if you believe
the project is urgent and demand immediate action. Other-
wise., I think we should give up the semblance of a Board
of Trustees of a projected science museum. Those of us
who remain devoted to the goal can then proceed without
the apparent assistance of the City and the Fair Corporation.
Sincerely yours,
SETH H. DUBIN
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HALL OF SCIENCE OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK
Minutes of Special Meeting
-of-
BOARD OF TRUSTEES
A Special Meeting of the Board of Trustees of the
Hall of Science of The City of Nei'l York was held on April 1,
1965, at the Terrace Club, New York vlorld Is Fair, Flushing
Meadow Park, Flushing, New York at 11:00 A.M.
Present:
Dr. Leona Baumgartner
Hon. r1ario J. Cariello
Seth H. Dubin, Esq.
Charles E. Eble
Halter A. Giles (Representing Clifton vl. Phalen)
Daniel Gilmartin
Dr. William L. Laurence
Joseph A. Martino
Commissioner Newbold Morris
Charles F. Preusse, Esq.
Robert W. Sarnoff
Hon. Paul R. Screvane
Absent:
Dr. Detlev 'vl. Bronk
Joseph E. Davis
Dr. John R. Dunning
Dr. Grayson Kirk
Hon. Robert Moses
Frank Pace, Jr.
Clifton W. Phalen
Dr. Isidor Isaac Rabi
Mrs. Marietta Tree
Mayor Robert F. Hagner
Guests were Edward A. Pierce, Jr., Director of Special
Activities of NASA, Russell E. Chappell of NASA and Guy F.
Tozzoli, Director of World Trade of the Port of New York
Authority •.
In the absence of Mayor vlagner, President of the
Corporation, it was the sense of the meeting that the Hon.
Paul R. Screvane, President of the City Council, should act
as Chairman of the meeting.
Mr. Screvane pointed out that it had been necessary
to cancel two tentative meetings of the Board because of the
difficulty involved in assembling a quorum in view of the
many outstanding civic leaders comprising the Board. Mr. Eble
led a discussion regarding future meetings of the Board and
suggested that a schedule for future meetings be prepared in
order that the Trustees might avoid conflicts with other com-
mitments. It was the sense of the meeting that, when nominated
and elected, the Executive Committee should prepare such a
schedule; that the next meeting of the Board be held at the
World's Fair, at an earlier hour of the morning if possible,
in order that the Board might personally inspect the Hall of
Science and its existing exhibits; and, that the Executive
Committee give consideration to the convening of meetings there-
after in the Borough of Manhattan in the late afternoon.
On motion duly made and seconded, the minutes of
the Special Meeting held on January 25, 1965, (copies of
which had previously been sent to the Trustees) were approved.
At the request of Mr. Screvane, Dr. William L. Laurence
then reviewed recent discussions he had had with the National
Aeronautics and Space Administration and with the Defense De-
partment with a view to obtaining the assistance of these
agencies for the organization and maintenance of the permanent
Hall of Science. Dr. Laurence stated that NASA had agreed
to provide $70,000 for the refurbishment of the 94 panels of
the Space Park, but that an additional $50,000 was required
to complete this work.
Dr. Laurence then introduced Mr. Edward A. Pierce,
Jr., Director of Special Activities at NASA headquarters in
Washington, who stated that he had requested funds from NASA
in excess of the $70,000 already set aside, but had been ad-
vised that, even though the appearance of the Space Park was
a matter of considerable concern to his agency, no further
funds were available at this time for the park. He emphasized
the importance of refurbishing on a peimanent basis.
Mr. Screvane stated that he had been kept advised
of the financial problem by Dr. Laurence, and stated that,
while the City of New York would be responsible for the opera-
tion and maintenance of The H ~ : . l l of Science after the closing
of the World's Fair, it did not appear that the Board of Esti-
mate of the City was in a position, at this time at least, to
appropriate the amount indicated by Dr. Laurence. Commissioner
Morris then stated that he would be happy to discuss with Mr.
Screvane in the very near future possible methods for obtaining
the required funds. In this connection, Mr. Sarnoff suggested
the possibility that the NASA might be agreeable to an advance
of the funds on a temporary basis.
Dr. Baumgartner expressed her hope that the Board
might be able to interest one or more foundations in making
substantial contributions to the permanent Hall of Science.
She expressed her view that the Hall of Science would be of
such interest and scientific value as to attract both individuals
and institutions with available funds.
In answer to a question by Mr. Screvane, Mr. Pierce
replied that it was his understanding that the Defense Department
was undertaking the refurbishment of the space vehicles in the
Space Park.
At the request of Mr. Screvane, r>1r. Tozzoli spoke
briefly on possible modifications in the Space Park for the
1965 season of the World's Fair. Mr. Tozzoli stated that one
new exhibit was planned and that preparations had been made
to provide two entrances, rather than one as in 1964, in order
that the ingress of visitors might be expedited.
A discussion then ensued as to the amount of space
which might be made available after the closing of the World's
Fair for the permanent Hall of Science. In this connectionJ
Mr. Cariello advised the Trustees that the City of New York
owned a substantial piece of land contiguous to the World's
Fair site. He further stated that he proposed to make every
possible effort to bring about the reservation of this acreage
for the permanent Hall of Science.
In answer to a question by Dr. Baumgartner, Dr.
Laurence agreed that approximately two-thirds of the exhibits
now comprising the Hall of Science building would be u s e ~ u l
and instructive, if not on a permanent basisJ for some time
in the future. He added that certain other exhibitors at the
Fair possessed significant scientific exhibits appropriate
for incorporation into the permanent Hall of Science which
the exhibitors might be agreeable to contributing to the Hall.
Mr. Straus then asked whether the Federal Building,
which, he noted, is a very spacious pavilion, might be avail-
able for additional space for the permanent H a l l ~ Mr. Preusse
stated that it was his understanding that the New York City
Board of Education had tentative plans for the use of a portion,
at least, of the Federal Building. A discussion ensued as to
the importance for the City of New York to construct a permanent
Hall of Science which would be worthy of the City's great
traditions. Although it was suggested that a motion be made
to request that the Federal Building be reserved for the use
of the permanent Hall of Science, Mr. Preusse observed that
such a motion might be premature, and Dr. Baumgartner stated
that she could not see any incompatibility in the joint use
of the Federal Building by the Hall of Science and the Board
of Education if such an arrangement were feasible. Mr. Cariello
then stressed the importance of obtaining cost figures for the
City's Board of Estimate before the Trustees should make any
definitive recommendation on the matter. At the suggestion
of Mr. Eble, it was the sense of the meeting that the timing
of any recommendation along these lines should be a matter for
review and a report by the Scope and Planning Committee of
the Board.
Mr. Martino, Chairman of the Nominating Committee,
then addressed the meeting. He stated that the matter of ob-
taining nominees from such an outstanding number of Trustees
had not been an easy assignment, especially in view of the
busy calendars of the Trustees, and that serious consideration
had been given both to the unique talents of the nominees for
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the positions to be filled ·and to the availability of possible
nominees for the positions. He then named the various nominees
which had been agreed upon by the Committee, as follows:
President: Dr. John R. Dunning
Executive
Committee: Dr. John R. Dunning
Scope &
Planning
Committee:
Dr. Leona Baumgartner
Dr. Detlev W. Bronk
Hon. Mario J. Cariello
Charles E. Eble
Joseph A. Martino
Clifton W. Phalen
Charles F. Preusse, Esq.
Hon. Paul R. Screvane
Dr. Detlev W. Bronk
William L. Laurence
Dr. Leona Baumgartner
On motion duly made by Mr. Gilmartin and duly seconded,
the following Trustees were elected by voice vote (no "nays"
recorded) to hold office until the selection and qualifications
or their successors:
President: Dr. John R. Dunning
Executive
Committee: Dr. John R. Dunning
Dr. Leona Baumgartner
Dr. Detlev W. Bronk
Hon. Mario J. Cariello
Charles E. Eble
Joseph A. Martino
Clifton W. Phalen
Charles F. Preusse, Esq.
Hon. Paul R. Screvane
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Scope &
Planning
Committee: Dr. Detlev W. Bronk
William L. Laurence
Dr. Leona Baumgartner
Mr. Eble then made a request, in which Mr. Cariello
joined, that there be spread upon the minutes of the meeting
the gratitude of the Board of Trustees to Mr. Martino and the
other members of the Nominating Committee for their work and
powers of persuasion in obtaining a slate of officials of such
unusual abilities, together with the Board's gratitude to these
officials for the acceptance of their offices. In this connec-
tion, he stated that the Board was especially fortunate in ob-
taining the services of Dr. Dunning to act as permanent Presi-
dent, in view of Dr. Dunning's outstanding accomplishments in
the field of science and his many local and national commitments.
In reply to a request by Mr. Dubin as to the amount
or funds which might be available for the Hall of Science
until the closing of the World's Fair, Mr. Sarnoff suggested
that this might be a matter to which the Executive Committee
should give its prompt attention.
There being no further business to come before the
meeting, it was, upon motion duly made, seconded and unanimously
approved, adjourned.
Secretary
HALL OF SCIENCE OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK
ADMINISTRATION BUILDING
WORLD'S FAIR, N.Y. 11380 ~ ~
/ .
Hon. Paul R. Screvane
President
City Council
City Hall
New York 7, New York
Dear Mr. Screvane:
Aprll 9, 1965
Enclosed is a copy of the minutes of the Special
Meeting of the Board of Trustees held on April 1, 1965, to-
gether with a complete list of the names and addresses of
the Trustees which includes officers elected thus far and
the members or the Executive Committee and of the Scope and
Planning Committee.
Also enclosed for your purposes, as a member of
the Executive Committee, is a copy of the Ey-Laws of the Hall
of Science. Your attention is invited to the second paragraph
of the section entitled "Executive Committee" which provides,
in pertinent part, that the "Executive Committee shall hold
at least one meeting each month of the year."
I look forward to seeing you again at the next
meeting of the Board.
Sincerely,
Enclosures
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FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION NEW YORK WORLD'S
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
AREA CooE 212- WF 4-1965 CABLe; WORLOSFAIR
May 26, 1965
MEMORANDUM TO C
FROM ROBERT MOSES
SUBJECT: HALL OF SCIENCE FUTURE
Will you have a talk with Paul Screvane and arrange an
early meeting with him, Col. O'Neill, Brad Clark and Guy Tozzoli about
the Hall of Science future. The picture looks something like this to me at
the moment:
1. Present Harrison pavilion really not suited to purpose-
too much form, too little function. Structure impossible to alter satis-
factorily and therefore big Marietta exhibit must stay. Basement space
inadequate.
2. Retaining part of Ford temporarily for storage and
exhibits for many reasons.not desirable.
3. New simple structure required tied into present pavilion
100,000 feet. Cost about $2, 500, 000. Plans 4% -$100,000 required in next
City capital budget. Question whether to retain Wally Harrison. I think
someone less busy would be better.
4. Col. O'Neill to check Bill Laurence's report on science
exhibits which might be left over from the Fair and donated by exhibitors.
5. Full time director needed - not necessarily a scientist.
Should be, if possible, man who knows New York and its government. Should
work with Counsel.
late in June.
6. Meeting to discuss above and other items should be held

/ President
'
JAMES B. KELLI!Y
DBFUTT CITY ADWIN'IITI.ATO ..
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1
THE CITY OF NEW YORK
~ ~ ~ ~ ~ v · OFFICE OF THE MAYOR
A OPrlCI! OF ADMINISTRATION
\/
Y May 26, 1965
Hon. Paul R. Screvane
President of the City Council
City Hall
New York 10007, New York
Dear Paul:
210 BROADWAY
NEW YORK, N. Y. 10007
TEL. 166-6767
I thought you might be interested in what
happened with my TV program on WNYC-TV,
Channel 31. I mentioned this to you some time ago.
We started the series at the World's Fair
last Friday, and it is called "Science at the Fair.
11
In the Fall, it will become "Science in New York"
and it will deal primarily with the use of modern
science and technology in the City government; such
as electronic traffic control , police identification
techniques, etc. I am the moderator and the show
is taped on Fridays for showing Friday at 2:30,
Saturday at 4:30 and Wednesday at 2:00. It is a
half hour show.
I should very much like to have you
and Dr. Dunning as my guests on one of these
telecasts. Will you please let me know when it
would be convenient for you to participate. Thank you.
Best,
UNISPHI!:AEO
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
FAIR, N.Y. 11360
AREA CODE 212- WF 4-1964 WORLDSFAIR
PEACE THROUGH
UNDERSTANDING
ROBERT MO ES
PR IDENT
Honorable Paul R. Screvane
President, City Council
City Hall
New York 7, N. Y.
Dear Paul:
June 22, 1965
for an addition to the Science Center. I think it has real substantial
merit. The first step, of course, when a decision has been reached,
would be to have the City appropriate $250,000 in the City capital budget
for 1966. This would provide working drawings.
I have asked Col. 0 'Neill to talk to you about this in connec-
tion with the agenda for the next meeting of the Science trustees.
7
Attachment
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Related Interests


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INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
PUCE THROUGH
UNDERSTANDING
WORLD'S rAIR, N.Y. 11380
ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT
AREA CODE 212-Wr 4-1964
July 23, 1965
Miss Edith Clavie
Office of Hqn. Paul Screvane
President City Counc!il
City Hall
New York 7, N.Y.
Dear Miss Clavie:
CABLE WORLDSF"AIR
.JOHN T. O'NEILL
DIRECTOR ENGINEERING
TEL.: WF 4-8!30
Pursuant to your request on the telephone just a
few moments ago I am enclosing another copy of the
attachment we previously sent you along witn a letter to
Honorable Paul Screvane dated June 22, 1965 relating to
the Hall of Science.
Very truly yours,
/J

Administrative Ass't to CoL O·Ne1u
Post-Fair Expansion
Hall of Science of the City of New Yor
A Preliminary Report
Prepared for the Board of Trustees of the Hall of Science
By William L. Laurence
Science Consultant, New York World's Fair
Member of the Board's Scope and Planning Committee
Flushing Meadow, New York City
August 9, 1965
"The Hall of Science will be much more than a museum .••
It will add immeasurably to our cultural as well as practical
treasures and will offer to visitors another proof of the
indomitable, restless, inquiring spirit of our city, the
world's capital."
Robert Moses, President
New York World's Fair
"The present Hall of Science is but a nucleus of what
will, in time, grow into a magnificent Science Center, to
take its place with Lincoln Center, The Metropolitan Museum of
Art, the American Museum of Natural History, and our other
institutions of learning, as part of a great cultural complex
unmatched anywhere in the world.
11
Paul R. Screvane, President of the
Council of the City of New York
It must be recognized at the outset that the development of
a Center of Science and Technology worthy of the world's greatest
city will take many years and many millions of dollars. This makes
it all the more important to start out with a long-range plan that
will serve as the Grand Design for the orderly development of a
dynamic institution, of which the individual parts, as they
gradually emerge, will fit harmoniously into the prpjected whole.
This means that from the very beginning we should set our sights
very migh. While realizing that great institutions, like 'living
things, require years in which to grow and mature, we must also
realize that the world's greatest city, the outstanding p r o ~ u c t
of science and technology, cannot afford second best. In other
words, the Grand Design for the Hall of Science at Flushing Meadow
calls for the finest institution of its kind anywhere in the world.
It should also aim to become, over the course of years, one of
the wonders of the modern world, representative of the spirit of
America and commensurate with its greatness as the leader of
the free world.
However, this does not mean that we must wait for the full
realization of this Grand Design. A number of exhibits in the
Hall of Science, as well as several significant exhibits in
other pavilions, could be retained as permanent exhibits in the
Post Fair Hall of Science, while a number of other exhibits may
be stored in some suitable place for future use as space becomes
available.
-2-
To allow for variety, it ~ y be found desirable to replace from
time to time some of the exhibits in the science hall with others
from storage. It also should be borne in mind that some of the
retained exhibits may serve as parts of larger, more comprehensive
exhibits at a later date.
One of the major Post Fair projects should be the construction
of the Great Hall, in which all the major developments in science
and invention would be demonstrated by means of colored motion
pictures, many of which are already available, and other modern
techniques of presentation. The building should be divided into
two major sections. One, named the Hall of Discovery, would be
devoted to the pure sciences astronomy, mathematics, physics,
chemistry and biology. This section should have two theaters, one
for the physical sciences, the other for the life sciences.
The second section, named the Hall of Inventions, would be devoted
to the applied sciences, in which will be told the story of the
great inventions from the beginning to the present. This section
would also have two theaters, one for the story of inventions in
the physical sciences, the other for those in the life sciences.
The theater for inventions in the physical sciences would
demonstrate, through dramatic motion pictures, all major techno-
logical developments in the fields of engineering, transportation
and communication, as well as developments in the space s c i e n c e s ~
rockets, missiles and satellites. The theater fer inventions in

the life sciences would similarly provide dramatic demonstrations
of developments in medicine. immunology, bacteriology, behavioral
sciences, nutrition and public healtho
The Post Fair Hall of Science should take advantage of all
modern techniques of presentation in addition to motion pictures,
including open and closed circuit television, dioramas, revolving
stages, etc. Motion pictures in color could present in highly
dramatic form the story of the major discoveries of the fundamental
laws of nature, and of the inventions that resulted from these
discoveries. Actors playing the parts of great scientists and
inventors --such as Newton and Edison and Testa--demon-
strating each major discovery or invention made by them, would
make such presentations not only highly instructive, but highly
dramatic and entertaining as wello
The Post Fair Hall of Science should aim to provide a history
of ideas, showing how the inquisitive mind of man. over the
millenia, and particularly since the advent of free institutions,
succeeded in making nature yield some of her most important secrets,
and how these triumphs of man's free mind in turn, made it
possible for all free and particularly the American people,
to harness the forces of nature to build a better life for themselves
in an environment more suitable for man's needs, material as well
as spiritual.
-4-
The institution at Flushing Meadow must not be a museum of
static displays, but a living dynamic institution, a great cultural
center, designed to instruct, to enrich and to inspire all those
who visit it, young and old, university graduates and those with
no more than an elementary school education. It should instruct
and at the same time entertain. This great Center of Science and
Technology--as it should be known-- should be the equivalent of
a great National Theatre, in which the leading actor is the human
mind, seeking through the ages .. to gain understanding of the world
around it and to make man at home in a more orderly universe.
The exhibits at the Center should set it as their main
objective to give the average person an outline of man's knowledge
of the universe, the infinite and the infinitesimal, the living
and the non-living, and how this knowledge was acquired. The
motion pictures should provide the background for actual demon-
strations showing the minds of the Newtons and Edisons in action.
These demonstrations should be associated with personal do-it-
yourself participation, visitors being taught to perform some of
the crucial experiments that represent landmarks in the history of
ideas. The visitor could be taught to weigh the earth; to determine
the distance of the moon and the sun; to measure the velocity of
light traveling at 186,000 miles per second. He could discover
helium in the sun and determine what other elements it contains.
-s-
He could repeat Faraday's simple experiment of electromagnetic
induction that ushered in the Age of Electricity, of radio, television
and radar. He could be made to discover the electron, which led
to the Age of Electronics, computers and automation. These are
only a few examples in which the average person could be \Pitiated
into the fellowship of the great discoverers through the ages.
Rather than presenting a maze of detail, the Science Center
as a whole should stress the unity of nature and the fundamental
laws that govern it. It could be built around several great central
exhibits, all interrelated. One of these should give the visitor,
largely through available motion pictures, a comprehensive view
of the cosmos at large, the universe of stars, galaxies and super-
galaxies. Another should present the story of the solar system and
of the earth. A third should present the story of matter and
energy, from primitive concepts of matter to the atom and its
nucleus, from the early uses of fire to nuclear energy. Other
great exhibits should tell the story of communication from the
beginning to Telstar, and of transportation, from the wheel and
the oxcart to the supersonic plane and the rocket.
One outstanding exhibit could show the eight great figures in
the history of science whom George Bernard Shaw named as the
''Makers of the Aristotle, Ptolemy, Copernicus,
Galileo, Kepler, Newton, and Einstein. These all-time greats
could be represented in Walt Disney-type animated figures, similar
to that of Abraham Lincoln in the Illinois Pavilion at the World's Fair.
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Each figure would tell the story of the universe he "made", its
meaning and its significance. The figures could be combined with
actual exhibits demonstrating their achievements. An alternative
possibility is a series of eight motion pictures in color, with
prominent actOrS playing the partS Of the eight "universe builderS • II
Another great general exhibit, in color motion pictures and
other modern techniques, should tell the story of the evolution
of life on earth and the possibility of its existence elsewhere
in the universe. The nature of life and how it functions, with.
emphasis on human development and physiology, should be the subject
of another animated Walt Disney type demonstration.
An exhibit showing how a humble Austrian monk, Gregor Mendel,
cultivating peas in his garden, discovered the laws of heredity
operating throughout the entire realm of life, from the lowest
bacteria to the higher animals and man, should serve as the starting
point for the story of genetics and the recent spectacular discoveries
of the chemicals within living cells (named DNA and RNA) through
which heredity is transmitted from generation to generation.
This great story should be brought up to date with the decipherment
of the Code of Life, which may open the way to man's control of his
own evolution, described as a potentiality more dangerous than
the atom or hydrogen bomb.
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The Hall of Science exhibits should, of course, also tell
the story of America's contribution to science and technology,
from colonial times to the present. It should show how, building
on the discoveries of the past, the American creative mind trans-
formed a virgin continent into a New World which offered the greatest
opportunities for the individual to grow in freedom and to attain
the highest standard of living in history in an environment in
which he could realize to the fullest extent his intellectual
and spiritual endowment.
The exhibit should provide a great pageant of all the great
names in American science and invention--Franklin, Eli Whitney,
Joseph Henry, Fulton, Morse, Bell, Willard Gibbs, Michelson,
Edison, Tesla, de Forest, Goddard, to mention but a few. It
should show America's great contributions in the invention and
development of the telephone and the telegraph, the automobile,
radio, television and radar; the airplane, helicopter, jet plane
and rocket; its contributions to the science of medicine, surgery
and nutrition; to agriculture and transportation; to the harnessing
of great rivers, such as the Niagara and the St. Lawrence, with
scale models of these giant dams.
Two of the major exhibits of American technology should, of
course, show our country's outstanding contributions to the
Atomic Age and the Age of Space.

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The atomic exhibit should show the highlights of the great
secret wartime developments that brought the Atomic Age into being.
It should show, among others, a model of the first nuclear reactor
in the squash court at the University of Chicago, in which the
first atomic fire on earth was lighted., It should be climaxed
with an actual experimental swimming pool type nuclear reactor,
which is absolutely safe and highly spectacular. The exhibit
should also illustrate the great promise of atomic energy as a
vast new source of energy for industrial power
9
and as a most
important tool in agriculture, biology and medicine, in the
conquest of disease and the postponement of aging.
The exhibit on the Space Age should, first of all, provide
a clear explanation of the fundamental principles that make it
possible to launch and to maintain a satellite in orbit. It
should display models of the various types of American satellites
placed in orbit, their instrumentation and function. It should
include equipment for tuning in on Telstar, Relay or other types
of communications satellites currently in orbit.
The Hall of Science should also offer glimpses of potential
discoveries and inventions in the immediate and more distant
future. It should show how atomic energy promises to give mankind
everywhere an abundant source of energy for an abundant life, and
how that will serve as a vital factor in bringing peace to the w. rl.'i.,
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It should show that mankind is entering an era in which most
major diseases will be brought under control and the average
lifespan will be increased by some decades.
It should also show that within the next two decades or so,
scientists hope to solve the problem of harnessing the fusion
energy of the hydrogen bomb into a limitless source of industrial
power, with the oceans of the world providing enough fuel to last
more than a billion years.
The Hall of Science should offer a glimpse of what further
explorations of outer space will bring in the future. Such a
glimpse should make the onlooker aware that we stand on the threshold
of awesome discoveries, that will open vast new horizons for mankind.
As stated, motion pictures in which well-known performers would
re-enact moments of great discoveries would be not only highly
instructive but entertaining as well. There is no<greater thrill
than that of the naked mind of man, with or without simple tools,
challenging nature to yield up some of her important secrets and
coming out triumphant after overcoming some apparently insuperable
obstacles. The intellectual and spiritual exaltation, the profound
religious awe, that must have overcome Newton when he discovered
the Law of Gravitation; the ecstasy experienced by Einstein when
he discovered the principle of Relativity (he was so overcome that
he actually took to bed for two weeks); the joy of Pierre and M a r i ~
Curie the night they first saw the eerie light of radium in the
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abandoned cadaver shed, after four years of back-breaking labor,
to take but a few examples, could be made to live again in the minds
and hearts of spectators at the Hall of Science.
The Hall of Science should be commensurate with the greatness
of the greatest city in America, and indeed, of America itself, not
only as the country in which free men attained the highest techno-
logical development and the highest standard of living of any nation
in history, but also as the country where science has made possible
the evolution of a free society in which every man may achieve the
highest dignity and stature as an individual with the greatest
opportunity ever for the full development of his physical, spiritual
and creative potential.
Not only has science made possible in the United States the
highest form of a free society, but now science is playing the central
role in the all-important task of defending the free world, against
the greatest threat in its history, The Hall of Science must make
it clear to the world that in the great war of ideas in which we are
now engaged, our greatest defensive weapons are not atomic and
hydrogen bombs but the mind of man functioning in an environment
of intellectual and spiritual freedom.
The Hall of Science should therefore dramatically demonstrate
the following fundamental points:
1. All modern technology has its origin in fundamental
discoveries made by inquisitive minds seeking knowledge
of nature.
~ ·
2.
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While pure science seeks only knowledge, without
any thought of practical application, every scientific
discovery eventually leads to far-reaching techno-
logical developments for the improvement of man's lot
on earth. In its turn, technology gives science new
tools that make possible further fundamental discoveries.
The exhibits would make it clear that most of the fundamental
scientific discoveries, upon which our great technological achieve-
ments are based, have largely been made by scientists of the free
western democracies. Our modern industrial civilization began with
the steam engine, invented by James Watt, a Scotchman, who made use
of basic laws of mechanics discovered by Galileo, an Italian, and
Newton, an. Englishman. Galileo's and Newton's fundamental discoveries
have, in fact, laid the foundation of all the great contrivances of
the Machine Age. The principle of electromagnetic induction, which
made possible the dynamo and ushered in the Age of Electricity, was
discovered by Michael Faraday, an Englishman. Sir J. J. Thomson
discovered the electron, the basis of all the marvels of electronics--
radio, television, radar, automation, computers, rocketry, satellites,
etc. Roentgen, a German, discovered the X-ray, one of the most
powerful tools to penetrate the mysteries of matter, as well as powerful
weapon in the diagnosis and treatment of disease. Henri Becquerel,
a Frenchman, discovered radioactivity, which opened the door to the
Atomic Age. Ernest Rutherford, a New Zealander, discovered the
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nucleus of the atom, citadel of the material universe, and James
Chadwick, an Englishman, discovered the neutron, which opened the
way to nuclear fission, discovered by Otto Hahn, a German.
Pasteur, a Frenchman, discovered the bacterial origin of infectious
disease and laid the foundation of modern immunology, which revo-
lutionized medicine and public health. Alexander Fleming, a Scot,
discovered penicillin, which opened the way for the antibiotics
that have so far saved more lives than were lost in both world wars.
The Hall of Science as a whole, must, however, avoid giving
the impression that science and technology are purely materialistic.
Science is the outgrowth of the spirit of man, of his desire to know,
to seek the truth. Its technological fruits serve to make man free
from exhausting physical labor, to enable him to cultivate his
spiritual and creative powers, in short, to make him free. An
understanding of science should therefore stimulate faith in the
future, for science, by fostering the free mind, gives the greatest
assurance against any threat to freedom.
"And ye shall know the truth and the truth shall make you free!"
REMARKS OF
MAYOR ROBERT F, WAGNER
AT
DEDICATION OF
CITY'S PERMANENT HALL OF SCIENCE
AT WORLD
1
S FAIR
SEPTEMBER 9, 1964
I feel great pride and satisfaction in being with you today
to dedicate this Hall of Science, temporarily a part of the World's
Fair, but destined to be a permanent and major feature of the
Borough of Queens and an important addition to the cultural and
educational facilities of the City of New York.
It is the hope and expectation of many of us assembled here
that what we are dedicating here this morning will progressively
became a world center of display and communication for that entire
complex of classified knowledge, thought and research that we call
science.
Millions of people from all over the world will visit this
Hall of Science in the months and the year ahead. I am sure it will
come to be one of the most talked of features of this great World's
Fair. But, as I said, this is only a grove of what we hope will
become a great forest. This Hall of Science is designed to provide
the overlook ..• the over-all view and panorama of the great leaps
science has taken for, with and through the mind of man.
It is well that in dedicating this Hall of Science we recall
that science was an obscure and heretical approach only 300 years
ago. In 1610, when the great Galileo undertook to prove by logic
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and experimentation the theory that the Earth revolved around the
sun, rather than vice-versa, he was taking his life in his hands.
Galileo barely managed to escape being burned at stake. He was
accused of threatening the foundations of both religion and
society. Scientific experimentation, itself, was judged to be
heretical. Science was attacked as being sacriligious.
Yet today--and more so every day-- science and the scientific method
dominate almost all our concepts.
Indeed, the consequences of the scientific methods dominate
our imagination and command our resources; finally science challenges
the very existence of mankind.
This is so very true that we must now ask ourselves: Does
mankind control the consequences of scientific knowledge, or do
these consequences control and dominate mankind?
This is the background against which this Hall of Science rises.
This ~ d i f i c e can help pose this central question of our age. Surely
this must be more than a showcase of modern gadgetry and a carnival
of scientific magic. It must instruct, inspire and enrich-- and
it must do more. It must dramatize the unity of the world and its
place in the universe.
The incredible marvel of the human brain is that it integrates
learning and experience. At the same time, however, a major effect
of the continuing scientific advance has been to make the integration
of knowledge increasingly difficult. Science divides knowledge--
and the world--into an increasing number of components, just as


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it has taught us how to divide matter itself into smaller and
smaller units. Perhaps in this Hall of Science knowledge can be
put back together again, in as much one piece as possible.
In this Hall of Science, the advances of science will be
reflected and the history of science will be dramatizedo Here there
will be demonstrated the great ladder which leads from the firm
footing of tested facts upwards, upwards, toward the moon--toward
our sister planets--outward into boundless space.
This Hall of Science and the exhibits contained in it, and
the additions we hope to see erected after the Fair is over, are de-
signed to be cooperative ventures between government and the
scientific community, as represented both by the great corporate
laboratories and by the great university laboratories.
It is to be borne in mind that what we plan and hope for here is
and undertaking not just by the City of New York or by any
particular person or group, but by the world of science, as rep-
resented in America and particularly in New York.
All of the scientific world must feel that this is to be their
center for the public display of scientific achievements, for
communication to the lay world and for graphic teaching to the youngo
This is what I hope to see rise here. This is what I hope the
scientific world will come to expect to see here and to participate
in creating.


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This is our purpose, and I certainly hope that it finds a
corresponding measure in our capacity. I believe that these hopes
will be realized, and I expect that many of those present, and many
of those who are not present, will assist us in bringing this
design to fruition.
Of course, all that we laymen can do is to provide the shell.
We can arrange that there should be put together the bricks and
mortar and steel and glass. We can put the name of the Hall of Science
up in lights and make sure that it is seen by all who enter the gates
of our city. But what is presented inside this Hall of Science
later to become the Museum of Science and Technology--is up to the
scientific community. They can make it become, in fact, a great
center of communication with the lay world. Or they can let it
become just another building in New York City.
We are aware that the scientific world, too, has been frag-
mented. The body of scientific knowledge has become so vast that
no scientist today can hope to become expert in more than one or
two subjects. Scientists, even in adjacent fields, find that they
speak different languages. They find it difficult to communicate
even with each other, not to speak of with laymen. Yet communications
is essential not only between the different branches of science,
but above all between the men of science and the work-a-day world •..
the world of government and of everyday thought and action. Just ~ s
no man is an island by himself, so no science, nor even the whole of
science, is an island by itself. Science is part of the continent
of knowledge and part of the world of mankind.
. , ~ •
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The basic idea of democracy is that all men, thinking and
acting together, should direct the future of each nation and hence
of the world, and that their decisions should be based on all
available knowledge ••• including scientific knowledge.
Of course, it is impossible today, with scientific knowledge
exploding like an atom bomb, to provide each citizen with precise
information of what is going on in the sub-worlds of science.
Probably the most that we can manage is to convey to the general
public the changing contours of the scientific scene. But the need
to do this much is vital. Yet the need for this kind of communication
is only beginning to be met.
I belive that this Hall of Science may be an important contri-
bution to the efforts that must be made in this direction. It can
serve the adult world. It can serve the world of youth. It can
serve the elementary and intermediate schools. It can serve the
universities. That is what I mean when I say I hope it will become
a major center for scientific display and communication with the
lay world.
I do not think of a science and technology museum for the
City of New York as a teaching museum to replace our schools and
our colleges. I think of the museum as a complement to education,
as a supplement and a reinforcement for the scientific education
of all of our citizens. Primarily, however, I think of it as a
center of new ideas, of imaginative presentations, as a place where
-6-
each of us may be thrilled by the achievements of the past and challenged
by the dreams of the future. For we have learned that the dreams of
fifty years ago in science are the realities which influece our lives
today. Our science museum must be dynamic; it must grow with new
concepts and new ideas; it must suit the lives of the citizens whom
it will serve.
Our Museum of Science and Technology must be a community museum,
not only in its planning and execution, but also in its serve. Thus,
as it grows, it could send out mobile units to other areas of the city.
The possibilities for such a museum are infinite. New York City's
Museum of Science and Technology could become a world center for the
encouragement of scientific curiosity among youth and non-scientific
adults.
Yes, this museum can serve many . I hope it will.
I know that the extension and expansion of this exhibit Hall of Science
into a great scientific center can be realized.
There remains that central question. Does science belong to
mankind, or is mankind now powerless, at the mercy of science?
Is mankind to be like Gulliver, tied down by the Lilliputians of
science, or is mankind still the master of its own fate?
This problem can be strikingly dramatized in this center of science.
Perhaps by dramatizing it, the form and shape of the final answer
can be affected.
In the name of New York City and also in the name of
I am happy to join in dedicating this Hall of Science.
# # # #
':t
TO:
·FROM:
SUBJECT:
MEMORANDUM
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
(A.k .
JOHN T.
ATE:
August 18, 1965
Hall of Science
I have talked with Charlie Preusse, Guy Tozzoli,
Stuart Constable, Bill Laurence and Fran Miller and
we are getting the data together upon which to determine
' . .
the cost of running the Hall of Science and the Space Park
until July 1, 1966. ;
We are meeting with the NASA people on Fridey,
August 20th, after which we should be able to determine
the requirements for the Space Park.
JTO:ros
cc: Charles Preusse
Guy Tozzoli
Stuart Constable
William Laurence
File
JTO -2
-- .. ____
, I

1
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·I
SCIENCE OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK
Minutes of Regular Meeting
-of-
BOARD OF TRUSTEES
A Regular Meeting of the Board of Trustees of the
Hall of Science of The City of New York was held on September
21, 1965, at the Terrace Club, New York World's Fair, Flushing
Meadow Park, Flushing, New York at 12:30 P.M.
Present:
Honorable Robert F. Wagner
Honorable Newbold Morris
Dr. Leona Baumgartner
Seth H. Dubin, Esq.
Dr. John R. Dunning
Mr. Daniel Gilmartin
Dr, William L. Laurence
Mr. Joseph A. Martino
Honorable Robert Moses
Charles F. Preusse, Esq.
Mr. Robert W. Sarnoff
Mr. Ralph I. Straus
Absent:
Dr, Detlev W. Bronk
Honorable Mario J. Cariello
Mr, Joseph E. Davis
Mr. Charles E. Eble
Dr, Grayson Kirk
Mr. Frank Pace, Jr.
Mr. Clifton W. Phalen
Dr. Isidore Isaac Rabi
Honorable Paul Screvane
Mrs. Marietta Tree
Guests:
William T. Farley, Esq.
Mr. Robert A. Harper
Mr. Francis D. Miller
Mr. GuyF. Tozzoli
Dr. John R. Dunning, President of the Corporation,
acted as Chairman of the meeting, and Dr. William L. Laurence,
Secretary, acted as Secretary for the meeting.
The Chairman stated that Dr. Laurence had caused
Notice of this meeting to be mailed to each Trustee on September
11, 1965 and directed that Dr. Laurence file with the minutes
of the meeting his affidavit to that effect.
The Chairman pointed out that the first item for con-
sideration, in accordance with the Notice of meeting, was approval
of the minutes of the Executive Committee meeting held on August
31, 1965. In this connection, he stated that a copy of the
minutes of said meeting had been sent to each Trustee, together
with the Notice of the meeting.
it was
Upon motion duly made, seconded and unanimously carried,
RESOLVED, that the minutes of the Executive
Committee of this Corporation held on August 31,
1965 be, and they hereby are, ratified, confirmed
and approved. '
The Chairman then stated that, in accordance with the
action taken at the Executive Committee meeting held on August
31, 1965 and the Notice of this meeting dated September 11, 1965,
the next item on the agenda related to the election of elective
Trustees to hold office for the ensuing year. He then called upon
Mr. Joseph A. Martino, as Chairman of the Nominating Committee, for
-2-
a brief ·report on the results of his conferences with Mr. Charles
E. Eble and Dr. Detlev W. Bronk, the other members of that
Committee. Mr. Martino stated that it was the conclusion of
the Nominating Committee that the existing elective Trustees
should continue to hold office for the coming year, and that
his Committee would continue to give consideration to the possible
nomination of three additional Trustees, as permitted under the
Education Law, in order that additional representative members
of the community might be called upon to serve the Corporation
as Trustees •
it was
Upon motion duly made, seconded and unanimously carried,
RESOLVED, that the following persons are
hereby elected to serve as Trustees of this
Corporation until the third Tuesday in September,
1966 or until their successors shall be elected
and shall qualify:
Dr. Leona Bamngartner
Mr. Detlev W. Bronk
Mr. Joseph E. Davis
Seth H. Dubin, Esq.
Dr. John R. Dunning
Mr. Charles E. Eble
Mr. Daniel Gilmartin
Dr. Grayson Kirk
Dr. William L. Laurence
Mr. Joseph A. Martino
Hon, Robert Moses
Hon. Frank Pace, Jr.
Mr. Clifton W. Phalen
Charles F. Preusse, Esq.
Dr. Isidor Isaac Rabi
Mr. Robert W. Sarnoff
Mr. Ralph I. Straus
Mrs. Marietta Tree
-3-
Mr. Martino further stated that his Committee had
further concluded that Dr. Dunning should be nominated as
President of the Corporation for the coming year, and that
the Executive Committee of the Board of Trustees, as presently
constituted, should continue to act as such during the same
period.
it was
Upon motion duly made, seconded and unanimously carried,
RESOLVED, that Dr. John R. Dunning be,
and he hereby is, elected to serve as Presi-
dent of this Corporation until the third
Tuesday in September, 1966 or until his suc-
cessor shall be elected and shall qualify; and,
FURTHER RESOLVED, that the following
Trustees of this Corporation are hereby elected
members of the Executive Committee of the Board
of Trustees to serve until the third Tuesday
in September, 1966 or until their successors
shall be elected and shall qualify, with Dr.
John R. Dunning to act as Chairman of said
Executive Committee
Dr. John R. Dunning
Dr. Leona Baumgartner
Dr. Detlev W. Bronk
Hon. Mario J. Cariello
Mr. Charles E. Eble
Mr. Joseph A. Martino
Mr. Clifton W. Phalen
Charles F. Preusse, Esq.
Hon. Paul R. Screvane
The Chairman then stated that several of the Trustees
had mentioned the practical necessity of electing a Vice-President
and a Treasurer for the Corporation in view of the enlarged
scope of the activities of the Corporation expected after the
-4-
close of the World's Fair on October 17, 1965. He further
stated that he had been advised by Charles F. Preusse, Esq.
that provision for these two additional officers would require
an amendment to the By-Laws of the Corporation, but that the
By-Laws made provision for their own amendment "upon the vote
of a majority of the Board of Trustees at any regular meeting
of the Board ***,"
Upon motion duly made, seconded and unanimously
carried, it was
RESOLVED, that the Paragraph of the By-Laws
entitled "Executive Officers" be, and the same
hereby is, amended to read as follows:
' ~ h e executive officers of the Corporation
shall be the President, the Vice-President,
the Treasurer and the Secretary, who shall be
elected by the Board of Trustees from among
their number to hold office until the election
and qualification of their successors. The
Board of Trustees may elect such other officers
as they may deem proper."
The Chairman then requested Mr. Martino, as Chairman
of the Nominating Committee, to confer with the other members
of that Committee and report back to the Board at a subsequent
meeting the names of possible nominees for the positions of
Vice-President and Treasurer of the Corporation,
A discussion then ensued as to the use of the amount
of $250,000 which the Executive Committee, by letter to Mayor
Wagner dated August 31, 1965, had asked be appropriated from
·5-
New York City funds from presently available sources for pre•
liminary planning by the Corporation. Dr. Dunning pointed out
that this amount had been requested for preliminary and final
planning for a new exhibit building, to be located adjacent
to and to implement the existing Hall of Science Building,
to contain approximately 100,000 square feet and to have an ulti-
mate cost of approximately $4,000,000. Certain Trustees inquired
as to the feasibility of using the planning fund, if and when
made available to the. Corporation, for studies as ·to the possible
conversion of the Federal Building into an exhibit building.
Commissioner Moses then explained that, from the outset, it was
understood that a specific 23 acre plot would be set aside for
use by the Hall of Science, and that the Federal Building did not
fall within this area. He further explained that use of the
Federal Building as a part of the Hall of Science complex would
require travel, by visitors to the institution, of a considerable
distance over the parkway, and could well discourage the a n t i c i ~
pated attendance at the science complex. When Mayor Wagner stated
that it was a matter of no moment to him how the planning fund
might be utilized by the Corporation, whether in planning for a
new building or in exploration of the possibility of use of the
Federal Building, Conmissioner Moses st.<t ted that the new building
located within the boundaries of the 23 acre plot, should properly
serve as a permanent tribute to the administration of Mayor Wagner
because of the Mayor's assistance in the initiation of and subse-
quent enthusiastic support to the Hall of Science.
-6-
The Chairman then asked for an informal vote of
the Trustees as to the use of the planning fund and it was
the sense of the meeting (7 Trustees in favor, 2 opposed and
3 abstaining) that the fund be used for preliminary plans for
the new exhibition building to be located adjacent to the pre-
sent Hall of Science Building.
A discussion then ensued as to the ultimate scope of
the science complex. Chairman Dunning expressed the hope that
the new building would be merely the beginnings of a science
educational center which would be second to none in the nation.
In this connection, he stated that he believed the Trustees
should be fully informed, by more frequent meetings, as to
possible sources of additional funds for the Corporation and as
to possible alternatives for the use of such funds, In this
connection, Dr. Baumgartner and Dr. Laurence indicated possible
sources for substantial private funds for the Corporation.
Mr. Sarnoff then inquired as to the status of the United
States Space Park located at the Fair and the government exhibits
contained in the Park. Dr. Dunning explained that he had written
Mayor Wagner on September 9, 1965, enclosing a copy of a letter
to him, dated August 25, 1965, from Major General LeBailly,
United States Air Force, and Julian Scheer, National Aeronautics
and Space Administration, agreeing to loan to the City of New
York, for use by the Hall of Science, their exhibits provided the
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City was agreeable to entering into a contract with the agencies
containing certain general conditions indicated in the letter
of August 25, 1965. Dr. Baumgartner then inquired as to the
procedure for obtaining City approval of the proposed contract,
and Mr. Preusse suggested that Mayor Wagner might use his
good offices to cause the letter of August 25, 1965 to be
delivered to the Board of Estimate with his recommendation that
the proposed loan of the exhibits receive the prompt approval
of the Board of Estimate. Mayor Wagner stated that he would
make every effort to expedite the matter.
Dr. Dunning stated that he had written to Mayor Wagner,
on behalf of the Corporation on September 2, 1965 requesting
New York City funds in an aggregate amount of $409,364 covering
winter maintenance and "shut down" expenses for the Hall of
Science building for the period October 18, 1965 until April 1,
1966, and operating expenses for the period April 1, 1966, (when,
it was anticipated, the building would be re-opened to the public)
until July 1, 1966. Mayor Wagner stated that he recognized
the need for these funds and that steps were under way in an
effort to make the money available to the Corporation for these
purposes as promptly as possible.
Dr. Dunning suggested that a meeting of the Board be
held at the earliest convenient date subsequent to the time when
-8-
the fund for planning with respect to the new building might
be made available to the Corporation.
There being no further business to come before the
meeting, it was, upon motion duly made, seconded and unanimously
carried, approved.
J --
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William L. Laurence, Secretary
/··,.. ..
HALL OF
ADMINISTRATION BUILDING
WORLD'S FAIR, N.Y. 11380
NOTICE OF REGULAR MEETING OF TRUSTEES
NOTICE IS I-mREBY GIVEN THA'l', a Regular Meeting of
the Board of Trustees of the HALL OF .SCIENCE OF THE CI'l'Y OF
NE111 YORK will be held at the York VJorld' s
Pair, Flushing Meadow, New York on day of September,
1965 at 12:30 for the follm-Ting purposes:
1. Approval of the minutes of the meeting of the
Executive Committee held on August 31, 1965.
2. Election of elective Trustees of the Corpora-
tion for the coming year.
3. Election of a President of the Corporation
for the coming year.
11, Consideration of a possible amendment of the
By-Laws of the Corporation so as to add to the
Officers of the Corporation a Vice-
President and a Treasurer.
5. Transaction of such other business as may pro-
perly come before the meeting.
Dated: September 11, 1065
PLEASE ADVISE IF YOU 'HILL NOT ATTEND THIS MEETING
II- T,uncheon ll!ill he nt J:->:00 noon.
HALL OF SCIENCE OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK
MINUTES OF MEETING
OF
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE
A Meeting of the Executive Committee o£ The Hall
of Science of The City of New York was held on August 31,
1965, at The Terrace Club, New York World's Fair, Flushing
Meadow Park, Flushing, New York at 12:30 P.M.
PRESENT:
Dr. John R. Dunning, President of the Board
of Trustees and Chairman of
the Executive Committee
Joseph A. Martino
Clifton w. Phalen
Charles F. Preusse, Esq.
GUESTS:
John Bagley (attending at the request of Hon.
Mario J. Cariello, member of the
Executive Committee)
William T. Farley, Esq. (attending at the re-
quest of Charles E. Eble, member
of the Executive Committee)
Robert Harper (Columbia University, School of
Engineering & Applied Science) .
Dr. William L. Laurence (Trustee of The Hall
of Science, and Science Consultant
of the New York World's Fair)
Francis Miller (Port of New York Authority)
Col. John T. O'Neill (Director of Engineering
of the New York World's Fair)
Dr. John R. Dunning, Chairman of the Executive
Committee, acted as Chairman of the Meeting. Dr. Dunning
pointed out that the first item on the Agenda, in accordance
with the Notice of Meeting dated August 24, 1965, related to
a proposed request by the Committee that Mayor Wagner make
available to The Hall of Science, from current City funds,
the sum of $250,000 for the purpose or conducting plans and
surveys ror a new exhibit building to complement the existing
Hall of Science Building. He then read to the Meeting a
. proposed letter to Mayor Wagner containing such request,
which also advised the Mayor that the building would contain
approximately 100,000 square feet (as compared with the 35,000
available square feet for exhibition purposes in the existing
Hall of Science Building) and was estimated to have an ulti-
mate cost of approximately $4,000,000. It was the unanimous
sense or the Meeting that the letter should be delivered to
Mayor Wagner rorthwith.
Mr. Preusse then asked that the Committee deviate
from the Agenda to give consideration to a personal request.
He recalled that he had acceded to the request of the Board
or Trustees to act as Secretary or The Hall of Science until
such time as the Board and Executive Committee were organized
and plans for the future of The Hall of Science were well under
way. He further stated that, in his opinion, that point had
now been reached, and asked that, in view of his many pro-
fessional commitments, the Executive Committee accept his
resignation as Secretary or the Board.
WHEREUPON, upon motion duly made, seconded and
unanimously adopted, it was resolved that:
The Executive Committee hereby aclmowledges with
much gratitude the exceptionally able and time-
consuming work of Charles F. Preusse, Esq. as
Secretary of The Hall of Science of The City of
New York; and,
The Executive Committee hereby accepts, with
considerable reluctance, the resignation of l.fr.
Preusse as Secretary or The Hall of Science of
The City of New York; and,
The Executive Committee hereby elects, to succeed
Mr. Preusse as Secretary of The Hall of Science
until January 1, 1966, Trustee Dr. William L.
Laurence and agrees to provide Dr. Laurence with
office space and a secretary for the discharge
of his duties as secretary.
Dr. Dunning then stated that the second item on
the Agenda related to a letter of intent, dated August 25,
1965, which he had received (signed jointly by E.B. LeBailly,
Major General and Director of Information of The United States
Air Force, and by Julian Scheer, Assistant Administrator of
the Office of Public Affairs of The National Aeronautics and
Space Administration). The letter confirmed the intention of
the U.S.A.F. and the N.A.S.A. to loan to the City of New York,
for use by The Hall of Science, exhibits now contained in the
u.s. Space Park of the World's Fair. The letter further stated
that theman was conditioned upon a definitive contractual
agreement with The City of New York which would set forth
certain conditions required by these governmental agencies
along the lines set forth in the letter of August 25, 1965.
Dr. Dunning caused copies of the letter to be distributed to
all those in attendance.
After full discussion, it was the unanimous sense
of the rileeting that the letter be approved in principle, that
acknowledgement of the letter (approving in principle the
conditions contained therein) be made to Major LeBailly and
Mr. Scheer and that a copy of the letter be forwarded to
Mayor Wagner for appropriate action. Dr. Laurence agreed to
prepare, for transmittal to the Mayor along with the copy of
that letter, a covering letter setting forth an inventory of
the exhibits contained in the u.s. Space Park of the vlorld's
Fair.
Dr. Dunning then asked Dr. Laurence to report to
the Meeting on the next item of business on the Agenda re-
garding the results of his conferences with representatives
of the Atomic Energy Commission. Dr. Laurence stated that
the two most popular exhibits in The Hall of Science Building
had been "Atomsville, U.S.A." and "Radiation and Man", and
that he had expressed the view that The Hall of Science would
be greatly interested in a loan to it of these exhibits as
a permanent feature of the lower exhibition pavilion of The
Hall of Science Buil((.:.ng. He further stated that he had been
advised that the Atomic Energy Commission already had commit-
ted itself to lending these exhibits to sites in Chicago and
Seattle for limited periods of time, but that the representa-
tives of the Commission had indicated to him that it appeared
likely that these two exhibits could be made available to the
Hall of Science Building by April 1, 1966, the contemplated
date for the re-opening of the building for public eYJlibition.
Dr. Dunning then stated that he had been in regular
communication with Dr. Laurence as to the feasibility of re-
questing the Atomic Energy Commission for additional Atomic
Enerr;:r exhibits suitable for public exhibition in the lower
pavilion of The Hall of Science Building, and, to this end,
he had arranged, subject to the approval of the Executive C o ~
mittee, for a conference to be held on Tuesday, September 7th
in Washington, D.C. between Dr. Glenn Seborg, Chairman of the
Atomic Energy Commission (and other representatives of the
Commission), and Dr. Laurence and himself for the purpose of
discussing the possibility of obtaining such additional exhibits.
Mr. Phalen then stated that, in his opinion, Dr. Dunning and
Dr. Laurence should confirm the appointment immediately with
f I
the hope that additional Atomic Energy exhibits might be
constructed by April 1, 1966, in addition, should take
any reasonable and appropriate steps required by the Commis-
sion in order to obtain the additional exhibits. Mr. Phalen's
suggestion was unanimously approved by the Committee.
At the request of Dr. Dunning, Colonel O'Neill
then distributed to those in attendance copies of estimates
he had caused to be made covering winter "shut down" and
maintenance expenses in the amount of $259,571 of The Hall
of Science Building from October 18, 1965 (at which time The
City of New York would become obligated to pay the expenses
of The Hall of Science Building) to April 1, 1966 (when it
was anticipated that the building would be opened to the
public), and covering operating expenses from April 1, 1966
to July 1, 1966 in the amount of $149,793. Mr. Martino then
suggested, and the members of the Executive Committee were
in unanimous agreement with his that an additional
letter be delivered immediately to Mayor Wagner asking that
New York City funds be made available as promptly as possible
in order that the possibility of serious deterioration to
the building, due to winter damage and ordinary "wear and
tear" from operations be avoided.
A discussion then ensued as to the need for the
retention, on a temporary basis after the closing of the Fair,
•• •
of such items as furniture, cleaning equipment and maintenance
equipment. Mr. Preusse suggested that an inventory of such
items required by The Hall or Science be made. It was the
unanimous sense of the Meeting that such an inventory be
prepared and that Colonel O'Neill transmit the i n v e n t o ~ to
Hon. Robert Moses, President of the Fair, together with a
request that the items be withheld from public auction tem-
porarily.
Mr. Francis Miller was then unanimously authorized
both to confer with United States Air Force officials as to
the possibility of borrowing exhibits for the Hall of Science
from the United States Air Force Museum located at the
Wright Patterson Base in Dayton, Ohio, and with the responsi-
ble officials of the companies involved with respect to the
possible retention of materials and equipment sufficient to
floodlight The Hall of Science Building subsequent to the
closing of the Fair.
Dr. Dunning then pointed out that, under the Cor-
poration's By-Laws, it was provided that a meeting be held
on the third Tuesday of September for the purpose of electing
Elective Trustees of The Hall of Science, each such Trustee
to hold office for the following year or until his successor
shall be elected and shall qualify. He pointed out that the
third Tuesday in 1965 would be September 21st, whereupon it
· ~ 1 •
was unanimously agreed .that the meeting on that date be
held at 12:30 P.rJ!. at The Terrace Club in the World's Fair.
WHEREUPON, upon motion duly made and seconded,
it was unanimously
RESOLVED, that Mr. Joseph A. Martino, Mr.
Charles E. Eble, and Dr. Detlev w. Bronk be, and
they hereby are, appointed as a Committee to
nominate Elective Trustees for The Hall or Science
or The City of New York to hold office until the
third Tuesday in September, 1966, to nominate a
President to hold office for the same term, and
to nominate an Executive Committee or the Board
of Trustees to hold office for the same term.
There being no further business to come before the
Meeting, it was, upon motion duly made, seconded and unani-
mously approved, adjourned.
it; AdO;) il., · ..
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UNISPHEA£
8
01Q61
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT F'LUSHING MEADOW PARK
WORLO'S rAIR, N.Y. 11380 AREA COOE 212 • WF 4·1965 CABI.E WORLDSFAIR
P!AC( THAOUVH
UNDI:ASTANOINO
ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT
October 23, 1965
FROM ROBERT MOSES
. " .

/1/
As to the detailed City operation and maintenance
budget, I suggest Constable confer with the City budget people.
As to the curator staff, I suggest you talk to John
Dunning, Joe Martino, Paul Screvane and Guy Tozzoli about
Stuart Constable as Acting Director (loaned by the Fair part-time
until July 1, 1966) and the positions listed below:
Director
Assistant Director
Secretary
3 Stenographers
Exhibit expenses
Clerical Supplies
Travel, etc.
Miscellaneous
$30,000
18,000
15,000
18,000
25,000
15,000
15,000
14,000
$150,000
This amount, in my judgment, should be raised from foun-
dations, beg1nning February 1st if ossible, on a five-year basis.
·'
/J
'
. President
RM:MR
Mr.
President
New York World's Fair
1964-1965 Corporation
International Exposition
at Flushing Meadow Park
World's Fair, New York 11380
Dear Bob:
Thank you for your letters.
The preliminary hearing before the Board of Estimate does
look reasonably favorable for both the building and the operating
budget with exclusion of some sensitive items such as the directors'
salaries and some staff. After the October 28th meeting of the Board
of Estimate, we should have the situation finalized or at least clarified.
It is clear that we shall need immediate private fund support,
and the executive committee is meeting next week to implement plans
in this direction. I believe from the budget studies and the "disallowed"
items by the City, the amount required will be nearer $200, 000 for the
first year.
Your fine cooperation and your excellent suggestions are much
appreciated. I am calling attention to your interesting suggestion of
Mr. Constable.
Best regards,
~ n n i n g , President
for the Board of Trustees,
Hall of Science
.... , ,, '' . ) . ·' . ....
• - ,,. If .. •. .... eo . ·-· •• 'j l- ·--'. L-
• 01101
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
WORLD'S rAIR, N, Y. 11380
212-WF'4-1965
CABLI!: WORLOSFAIR
ROBERT MOSES
December 3, 1965
MEMORANDUM TO COLONEL JOHN O'NEILL
FROM ROBERT MOSES
·S
I want a sign- 12 feet by 6 feet- facing Grand Central Parkway
to read something like this:
"HALL OF SCIENCE
After removal of the Ford Pavilion, this space will be
occupied by an addition to the Hall of Science to
accommodate major atomic and other scientific exhibits.
11
See me.
President
RM:gls
cc: Mr. Stuart Constable
Mr. Chas. Preusse
Mr. Guy Tozzoli
.. (!)---
Mr. Murray Davis
Mr. Herbert Payne
Gov. Chas. Poletti -----
Hon. Paul Screvane /./"
rxEAo)
.COPY
- ···---·-··----- ""' ....-.---.- -·-·-- -----------r-'"""""'
. ....
HALL OF SCIENCE OF THE CITY OF NEW
ADMINISTRATION BUILDING
WORLD'S FAIR, N.Y. 11380
NOTICE IS HEREf;Y GIVEN THAT, pursuant to the Order of the
President, the Special Me:eting of the Board of Trustees, which had
been scheduled to be held on December 20, 1965, has been postponed
ur.;:il a to __
The President has asked that each Trustee be advised that
the postponement has resulted from the inability of the Secretary to
obtain a quorum necessary for the transaction of business, due,
apparently, to the Christmas season.
Dated: December 15, 1965
r
Number.
BY-LI\vlS
or
_ _Qf __ THE_ CI'I'Y
The property, affairs, business and concerns of the Cor-
poration shall be by a B::>ard of Trustees which shall con-
sist in not more than tl'Tenty-one elective Trustees, and not more
than four ex offici2_ Trustees (\oJho shall be the I1ayor of the City
of New Yorl< for the term of' that office, the President of the City
Council of the City of Ne

Related Interests

l YoPk for the term of that office, the
Corrunissioner of Parlm of the City of Nev1 York for the term of that
office, and the BorouGh President of the Borough of Queens of the
City of Ne

Related Interests

1 York fer the term of tint office).
The number of the elective Trustees may be decreased to not
less than five such elective Trustees, upon the vote of h10-thirds of.
all of the membern of the Board or Trustees at a meeting duly called
and held, by the off:tce of any Trustee \·Thich is vacant.
Election of Trusteen and Term.
Elective Trustees shall be elected on the third Tuesday
in September of each year. E2.'Jh such Trustee shall hold offi-ce
for the following year or until his successor shall be elected
and shall qualify. A.'1y elective Trustee whose term has expired
may, nevertheless, be re-elected.
Vacancies.
Any vacancy amonr; the elective Trustecn, ho

Related Interests

lever
arising, shall be filled by the Board of the
unexpired term.
If nny elect 1 vc Tru:Jtcc shall rail to attend three
consecutive mectingo or the Board of Trustees, without excuse
accepted as satisfactory by the Board or Trustees, he shall
be to have resiGned his office.
l

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leetinr;s.
Regular meetinr,s or the Board or Trustees shall be held
on tt1e third Tuesday in March and September of each ;rear.
Special Meetings or the Board of Trustees may be called
at any time hy the Secretary of the Corporation upon the order
of the Pres.Ldent, OP at the request of any thPee Trustees.
All meetings ::;hall be held at such place, or places, liithin
New Yorlc City :1:1 may be dc:>l·-:nated 1n the notice of meeting, by the
person or person:; ca.ll1ne; r.ucn meeting, The Secretary of the Cor-
poration shall mall notice ):· each regular or ::;peclal meeting to·
than ten days be:C'orc tr1e to the u:::u:1l of each
Trustee.
Quorun.
/\t all or the Poard of 'l'runte:e::J a ma,jorlty of
the ex:L:tlnc; 'i'ru:.:t.c0s ;;ho.ll cone t Ltutc a quorum, and concurrent
vote of ma.Jorltv or TrnrJt:ccs ctt an;r at ;.;hich
1nc the on:I o.::tlon i.n \·lh l ch .111 of cxlct:Lng
::;l1::1ll concur in uri.tlnc :::h1.ll be blncli.nr:; and valid although
3UCh act Lon ha:J not been o.uthorlzed or approv0cl any meetin:-o; of
the Board.
EY..ECU'r IVE COf'.'U'1ITTE3
'T't10 ::loJ.r-d or 'I'rustees ::;hall appoJnt an Executive Committee,
consls'vln-:-; ln not J.e::;c five ffi(mbcrs of Board, shall
have and exnrc oll 'c:lw ri.;-;ht:-; ancl pm·mrc of the Board of Trustees
vacancy Jn Comrnl ter: roha.ll iJe r hy thr: Board or
Trustees •
. E::F:cu:.i'.'C C8mi11lt1:ce ::;:nll dr.:tcrn:lnc the manner and
given of provl.ckcl, ho\-tcvcr, 'd1nt ::;ald Executlvc Committee
shall hol(1 one month of trw year. Any
action ln which all of the existing members of the ve
Conuni ttee shall concur in vJri tine; ohall be b:Lndin3 and valid
not authorized or approved at any cf the
Executive Committee,
OFFICERS
'l'he executl•Je officers of the Corporatlon ohall be the
President ancl the Secretary, wbo nhall be elected by th11 Board
of Trustees from among tt1eir number to holrl office until the
election and qua1if1catlon of thclr succc:J:;or. TM Board ar
Trusteeo may elect sJch other officers as they may deem proper.
The of the Corporation shall preside at all
meetings of the Board of Trustees and shall enforce the provi-
sions of these By-L3.v1s.
The Secretary of the Corporation chall cause notices
to be issued of all moetlngs of the Board of Trnsteer; and a
record made of the of the Board.
THE DIRECTOR
Tho noard of Trustees shall elect a Director •::ho shall
serve durin0 the plca::.;urr; of ::hr; BcKtl'd. The D:trector nhall be
the chief adm tn:Ls trat1 vc o.:.'flc:r-:- the Corporation sub,ject to
the control of the Bo;:tru of 1'.::-'•:stecs anrl the F..;wcutive Committee.
He shall his r>(: tlme to tl1c ai'.falrG of 'chc Corporation
and shall ve a salary to be [' _;_;,:ed hJ t11e Bo3.rd.
The Director shall attend all meetings of the Board of
Trustees and the Executive Committee. He shall make recommenda-
tions to the Board or the Executive Committee as to the appointment
and removal of employees, and shall be re S;Jonslblc for
the performance by all employees of their respective duties and
for the execution of all dlrecti ves of the Board and the Executive
Committee.
SEAL
The seal of the Corpora tlon shall be in form
and inscribed with the corporate name and the state and year of
incorporation.
AMENDMENT
These By-Laws may be amended, in or in part,
upon the vote of a majority of the Board of Trustees at any
regular meeting of the Board, or at any special meeting of the
Board called for th1c purpose.
HALL OF SCIENCE OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK
ADMINISTRATION BUILDING
WORLD'S PAIR, N. Y. II UO
Board or Trustees, including Officers and Committee Members
President - Dr. John R. Dunning
Secretary - Charles F. Preusse, Esq.
Executive Committee
Dr. Leona Baumgartner
Assistant Administrator
Agency for International Development
Washington, D.c. 21525
(56 Washington Mews
New York, N.Y. 10003)
Dr. Detlev w. Bronk
President
Rockefeller Institute
York Avenue and 67th Street
New York, New York
Hon. Mario J. Cariello
President
Borough of Queens
120-55 Queena Boulevard
Kew Gardens, New York
Dr. John R. Dunning
Dean of Engineering and Applied Soienoe
510 Seeley w. Mudd Building
Columbia University
New York, New York 10027
Mr. Charles E. Eble
President
Consolidated Edison Company of
New York, Inc.
4 Irving Place
New York, New York
NYC Telephone - OR 3·4519
Washington - DU 3-8008
NYC Telephone - LE 5-9000
NYC Telephone - BO 8-5000
NYC Telephone - UN 5-4000
NYC Telephone - 460-2211
Mr. Joseph A. Martino
President
National Lead Company
111 Broadway
New York, New York
Mr. Clifton w. Phalen
President
New York Telephone Company
140 west Street
New York, New York
Charles F. Preusse, Esq.
Whitman, Ransom & Coulson
522 Fifth Avenue
New York 36, New York
Hon. Paul R. Screvane
President
City Council
City Hall
New York 7, New York
Scope and Planning Committee
Dr. Detlev w. Bronk
Dr. Leona Baumgartner
Dr. William L, Laurence
Science Consultant
New York World's Fair 1964-1965
Corporation
Flushing Meadow Park
Flushing 52, New York
NYC Telephone - RE 2-9400
NYC Telephone - 394-4141
NYC Telephone - TN 7-1700
NYC Telephone - 566-5018
NYC Telephone - WF 4-5414
Mr. Joseph E. Davis NYC Telephone - TR 6-4747
President
Carver Federal Savings & Loan Association
75 West 125th Street
New York, New York
-2-
Seth H. Dubin, Esq.
Utall, Miller & Dubin
521 Fifth Avenue
New York, New York 10036
Mr. Daniel Gilmartin
President
Local 100 of Transport Workers Union
of America
210 West 50th Street
New York, New York
Dr. Grayson Kirk
President
Columbia University
116th Street and Broadway
New York, New York 10027
Hon. Newbold Morris
Commissioner of Parks
Department of Parks
Arsenal Building
64th Street and Fifth Avenue
New York, New York
Hon. Robert Moses
President
New York World's Fair 1964-1965
Corporation
Flushing Meadow Park
Flushing 52, New York
Mr. Frank Pace, Jr.
Suite 2311
1 Rockefeller Plaza
New York, New York
Dr. Isidor Isaac Rabi
University Professor
Department ot Physics
Columbia University
New York, New York 10027
-3-
NYC Telephone - MU 2-8622
NYC Telephone - JU 6-8000
NYC Telephone - UN 5-4000
NYC Telephone - RE 4-1000
NYC Telephone - WF 4-2301
NYC Telephone - CI 5-5031
NYC Telephone - UN 5-4000
Mr. Robert w. Sarnoff NYC Telephone - CI 7-8300
Chairman of the Board
National Broadcasting co., Inc.
30 Rockefeller Plaza
New York, New York 10020
Mr. Ralph I. Straus NYC Telephone - MU 7-6988
331 Madison Avenue
New York, New York 10017
Mrs. Marietta Tree NYC Telephone - YU 6-2424
United States Representative on the
Trusteeship Council of the United Nations
799 United Nations Plaza
New York 17, New York
Mayor Robert F. Wagner NYC Telephone - 566 5700
City Hall
New York 7, New York
- -- ---·
\
Permanent Hall of Science
Dedicated 1964
Ceremony Excerpts
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
. .
... J -
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. . ..

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. .. -l. .
• ·' VJ
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,,
1 .
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j
I'
George M. Bunker, President of the Martin Marietta Corp.,
speaks during dedication ceremonies. Listening from RIGHT to
LEFT are Queens Borough President Mario J. Cariello, Robert
Moses, President of the New York World's Fair 1964-1965
Corporation, Paul R. Screvane, President of the Council of the
City of New York, Mayor Robert F. Wagner and James E. Webb
Administrator of NASA. '
THE HONORABLE PAUL R. SCREVANE
President of the Cof/1/ci/ of the City of Neu• }'Ork
We are joining in more than a mere dedication of another
building at the Fair. What we arc doing today is
takmg _the first maJor step in the creation of an enduring
InStitUtiOn.
This magnificent building will be enjoyed by all the citi-
zens of our city and the millions of visitors during the Fair
and also for generations thereafter. Today we are in the
midst of a new .1ge and a new era, one in which the scientific
breakthroughs arc felt almost immediately
m our dady lives. The average citizen is affected by the de-
velopments in laboratories and in research centers as never
before in the history of man. Thus even the taste, as well
as the safety, of the water we drink and the food we eat
are immediately affected by scientific and technological re-
search. We and our children must learn more than we know
now about this vast body of knowledge, its methods, its
language and its history. None of us can afford to be illiterate
in the of science. Our schools and colleges and our
universities have the. task of instructing the young
m the ways and prmCiples of science. The schools have
accepted that responsibility.
___ .. , ...... I\,, .... _ .. , ____ 0-

But other instirutions, both public '
responsibilities to discharge. This Hal
the ways of meeting one of those resr
see here an institution of excellence, de
entire community and the country. N(
as a worldwide scientific and researc
center for many of the great industl
complexes of our nation. We are ve1
hope that this new establishment will
position of pre-eminence.
THE HONORABLE MARIO J. CA
Preside111 of the Borough of QueeJ
I welcome you today to the center c
has become symbolic as a world cenr1
Science, which with what we hope to
become the center of outer space. W
sunshiny day to give added impetus a1
derful project that we are about to
This is another pan of the resurget
the Borough of Queens, and it will
the greatest Eastern seaboard parks
we contemplate are completed.
SCREVANE
City of New l'Ork
a mere dedication of another
What we are doing today is
the creation of an enduring
be enjoyed by all the citi-
of visitors during the Fair
Today we are in the
one in which the scientific
are felt almost immediately
citizen is affected by the de-
in research centers as never
Thus even the taste, as well
drink and the food we eat
and technological re-
learn more than we know
knowledge, its methods, its
us can afford to be illiterate
schools and colleges and our
sk of instructing the young
science. The schools have
But other instirutions, both public and private, also have
responsibilities to discharge. This Hall of Science is one of
the ways of meeting one of those responsibilities. We fore·
see here an institution of excellence, dedicated to serving the
entire community and the country. New York City is noted
as a worldwide scientific and research center. It is also a
center for many of the great industrial and technological
complexes of our nation. We are very proud of this. We
hope that this new establishment will serve ro enhance that
position of pre-eminence.
THE HONORABLE MARIO J. CARIELLO
President of the Borough of Q11eem
I welcome you today to the center of our great city which
has become symbolic as a world center, and to the Hall of
Science, which with what we hope to achieve, will likewise
become the center of outer space. We're blessed with this
sunshiny day to give added impetus and success to this won·
derful project that we are about to unveil and dedicate.
This is another part of the resurgence that is going on in
the Boro!.!.zh of Queens, and it will be one part of one of
the greatest Eastern seaboard parks when all of the things
we contemplate are completed.
/
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THE HONORABLE JAMES E. WEBB
Administrator of the National Aeronautics and
Space Administration
As we move more deeply into the age of applied science,
public understanding is extremely important: it is impor-
tant to the nation in its national policies; it is important to
this city and your future in it. For science is an integral part
of the concepts and the hard work that maintain this nation.
In your New York universities, in your schools, in this build-
ing, the disciplines of science work with all other disciplines
in the American conviction that public knowledge is public
strength; that one of the hard facts of international life
today is that the technological balance of power is one of
the m o ~ ~ important elements in a nation's ability to influence
decisions on war or peace, life or death for millions, and the
means and the ends of national and international cooperation.
It is essential, I believe, in this belief, that the public realize
science's problems, become familiar with its tools, appreciate
its progress, recognize its relevance to technology, to engi-
neering and indeed to all aspects of modern living, and then
to share in its aspirations. So this building which we dedicate
today, beyond its magnificent structure, has a great sig-
nificance. It is a means of helping the thousands who will
visit here co understand a field of human endeavor which
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Opening of ceremoni.::s at the dedication of the permanent Holl
of Science on September 9, 1964, at the New York World's Fair.
has grown to new dimensions and new importance in our day.
It is a great credit I think to the wisdom of Robert Moses
and his associates that this permanent structure is designed
for retention after the Fair. And so today we dedicate a
building for which New York City and New Yorkers are
to be commended. We in NASA wish it every possible suc-
cess and appreciate the opportunity to work with the dis-
tinguished leaders of the Fair, the City and this Borough,
in making it possible.
MR. GEORGE M. BUNKER
Pre.rident of /he Corporation
Only a few years ago we were congratulating ourselves
because we had a part in launching a satellite that was the
size of a grapefruit. Today we put men into orbit and probe
the moon and Venus. What you will witness here this after-
noon may seem futuristic. But I assure you it is not. In less
than a decade you will think it commonplace. Perhaps the
most important function of a science center is to relate the
foreseeable future and to open people's eyes to its possibilities.
In this Hall of Science, with its comforting assurance of
permanency, we are hopeful of stirring the imaginations of
a younger generation. In this Hall, the Orville Wrights, the
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Robert Goddards, and
have their ambitions 611
the promise of the spac
lat·ly happy to have m:
Hall and to the new p
fore with great pride an
exhibit, "Rendezvous i
the City of New York.
THE HONORABLE 1
President of the Net
1964-1965 Corporal.
Science was old tw•
Willard Gibbs and ).
rather than elaborate
formulas of mathem:
Abdera, with no !abo:
them. The relation of l
sages of Athens. The
a word for it - psyd
Testament remarked, t
sun.
I remarked at the Jt
new importance in our day.
the wisdom of Robert Moses
,,.rmanPr>t structure is designed
And so today we dedicate a
City and New Yorkers are
wish it every possible sue-
to work with the dis-
the City and this Borough,
'M·"'"'"" Corpm·ation
were congratulating ourselves
• a satellite that was the
put men into orbit and probe
you will witness here this after-
1 assure you it is not. In less
it commonplace. Perhaps the
a science center is to relate the
eyes to its possibilities.
comforting assurance of
of stirring the imaginations of
Hall, the Orville Wrights, the
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Robert Goddards, and the John Glenns of the future may
have their ambitions fired and their energies directed toward
the promise of the space age. This is what makes us particu-
larly happy to have made a significant contribution to this
Hall and to the new permanent Science Center. It is there-
fore with great pride and pleasure that I turn over the Martin
exhibit, "Rendezvous in Space," to Mayor Wagner and to
the City of New York.
THE HONORABLE ROBERT MOSES
President of the New York 117orld's Ftlir
1964-1965 Corporatioll
Science was old two thousand five hundred years ago.
Willard Gibbs and Alben Einstein, working with logic
rather than elaborate laboratory equipment, gave us basic
formulas of mathematical physics, but Democritus of
Abdera, with no laboratory at all, was there long before
them. The relation of science to the humanities plagued the
sages of Athens. The Greeks anticipated Freud. They had
a word for it- psychiatry. As the Preacher in the Old
Testament remarked, there is really nothing new under the
sun.
I remarked at the June 15th opening of the Hall of Sci-
/
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ence that we at the Fair have been charged with favoring
business above culture, science above the arts and fun above
religion and the eternal verities, as though the sum total of
human knowledge, faith and endeavor can be exactly and
mathematically divided into exclusive, sealed, vacuum packed,
air tight compartments. This is nonsense. These objectives
overlap and run together. The subdivisions are for con-
venience only. There is contrast and emphasis, but not neces-
sarily conflict between science and the humanities. We
promised that our Hall of Science would in the broadest
sense include all the humanities. It will.
If the assertive, bright minds who chatter about form
and function were familiar with the classics they would know
that useful things are not necessarily beautiful, but that
beauty always has use. I believe Wallace Harrison has illus-
crated this maxim in this Hall. It is of course impossible to
explain architecture. I have admitted before that I don't
know what Wally Harrison had in mind, and perhaps he
doesn't know himself- the deft rock, convolution, whelk,
at once a fortress and a cathedral where some unseen organ
is to play without bells, bellows, pipes, keyboards or human
hands, literally a tour de force where a gigantic toy seeks to
elucidate science to the multitude.
As to the future, the campus we envision here in the
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Park after rhc Fair will be large enough to accommodate
whatever government research and private philanthropy can
be persuaded to provide. On this auspicious occasion, the
moon is one of our objectives. I like particularly the concept
of Frank Capra and his sponsors of a sort of second shift
or changing of the guard high above our small planet, a
strategic way station to the galaxies of outer space.
There is today extraordinary public interest in spare
exploration. Where man's mechanical forerunner has gone,
he is bound to follow. Meanwhile, an ingenious three·
dimensional show will serve to explain the fourth dimen·
sion. A man's reach, as Browning said, should exceed his
grasp, or what's a heaven for?
Millions will sec this counterfeit presentment. Our thanks
to the City, to the National Aeronautics and Space Agency,
to Martin-Marietta and to all the others who have been
engaged in producing this extraordinary spectacle.
THE HONORABLE ROBERT F. WAGNER
A!a;or of l h ~ Cil) of Nt:u· York
I feel great pride and sari sf action in being with you today
to dedicate this Hall of Science, temporarily a part of the
World's Fair, but destined to be a permanent and major fix·
\
mre and feature of the Borough of Queens and an important
addition to the culmral and educational facilities of the
City of New York.
Surely, this must be more than a showcase of modern
gadgetry and a carnival of scientific magic. It must instruct,
inspire and enrich and it must do more: it must dramatize
the unity of the world and its place in the universe. The
incredible marvel of the human brain is chat it integrates
learning and experience. At the same time, however, a major
effect of the continuing scientific advance has been to make
the integration of knowledge increasingly difficult. Science
divides knowledge and the world into an increasing number
of components, just as it has taught us how to divide matter
itself into smaller and smaller units. Perhaps in this Hall of
Science knowledge can be put back together again in as
much one piece as possible. In this Hall of Science, ,he
advances of science will be reflected and the history of science
will be dramatized. Here there will be demonstrated the great
ladder which leads from the firm footing of tested facts
upward, upward, coward the moon, toward our sister planets,
and outward into boundless space.
All of the scientific world must feel that this is to be
thm center for the public display of scientific achievements,
for communication to the lay world, and for graphic teaching
to the young. This
what I hope the scil
here and to parcicip:
Communication i!
branches of science I
and the workaday ~
every day thought :
by himself, so no s
an island by itself. S
edge and part of tl
democracy js chat all
direct the future of
chat their decisions
edge, including scit
and an imponant
facilities of the
a showcase of modem
magic. It must instruct,
more: it must dramatiae
in the universe. The
is that it integrates
time,bowever, a major
has been to make
difficult. Science
an increasing number
us how to divide matter
Perhaps in this Hall of
together again in as
is Hall of Science, .he
and the history of science
demonstrued the great
footing of tested facts
toward our sister planets,
feel that this is to be
scientific achievements,
and for graphic teaching
to the young. This is what I hope to see rise here. This is
what I hope the scientific world will come to expect co see
here and to panicipate in creating. This is our purpose.
Communication is essential, not only between the different
branches of science but above all between the men of science
and the workaday world, the world of government and of
every day thought and action. Just as no man is an island
by himself, so no science, nor even the whole of science is
an island by itself. Science is a part of the continent of knowl-
edge and pan of the world of mankind. The basic idea of
democracy is that all men thinking and acting together should
direct the future of each nation and hence of the world and
that their decisions should be based on all available knowl-
edge, including scientific knowledge.
. ·.
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James E. Webb, administrator of NASA, Mayor Robert F.
Wagner, Thomas J. Deegan, chairman of the World's Fair
Executive CommiHee, and Robert Moses, president of the Fair,
look off into "outer space," during dedication of the Hall of
Science.
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,, 1964 New York World's Fa1r 1964-1965 Corporation

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PROPOSED ADDITION TO SCIENCE CENTER
PHASE I - Construction
6/18/65
103, 000 sq. ft.
2, 400, 000 cu. ft
Estimate of cost
2, 400, 000 cu. ft. @ l. 50 $ 3, 600, 000.
($35/sq. ft)
Architect & Eng. costs 400, 000.
Pla.'1ning funds - $250, 000.
(Working drawings)
TOTAL $ 4, 000,000.
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