Box# 31

Folder# 614
[Word's Fair:
Newsclippings]
1949- 1965
/
S e.ctlo n
2
NEWS FBA TURES
EDUCATION
AVIATION
./
ElGHT PAGES
Flushing Meadow, Up From Ashes
Moses Says Park Is Progressing, Over Half Is in Use
.-------------.1 remove some or the grip of that
By Robert Moses Park Commissioner Moses
sharpens his pen to impair crit-
ics who have been rash enough
to suggest ihat oae of his be-
loved 1Jarks-Flushi1!f1 Meadow,
site of the World's Fair--is in
a bad way.
extraordinary character. affection- i.
atelY known as Fishhooks Mc•
Carthy, head of the Brooklyn A'.h
Removal J:;ompany, at a price
which would not subject us to in-
dictment. We studied every possi-
ble means or acquiring the whole
T
HE tenth anniversary of the
opening of the world's Fair
of 1939 has recently been
cE-lebrated. This happens also to
be the tenth of Flush-
ing Meadow Park. Speakmg in a
sense as the residuary !ega tee of
the Fair, and assuming that the
true perspective is arrived at !rom
sevet"al angles. I am glarl to tell
the story from the point or those
who from the very beginning
planned to substitute a great park
for the mosquito-ridden swamp
and hideous ash and garbage
dump which blocked all the ave-
nues from eastern Long Island
rising smoke and finally with a meadow. ultimately if not imme-
transcendent' effort, of dlat.ely, but the whole thing seemed
1
too b1g for the vtswn and m
men who move dimly and already I . eans
through thr powdery ,
0
r the uty in the face of com-
into the city. ·
n11r lnherltnnrp frnm the World's
Fair was no accident. It I maY
say so with becoming modesty, or.
behalf of the little group of park
enthusiasts who made it possible,
this was quite an achievement in
advance planning. Back in 1938
I wrote a pre-Fair piece for ''The
Saturday E:vening Post'' entitled
"From Dump to Glory." By waY
of introduction to this piece I
quoted the description or the
Corona dump in F. Scott Fitz-
gerald's famous short story "The
Great Gatsby.'' It r,m like this:
"About halfway between West
Egg and New York the motor road
joins the ra1lroad and runs
beside It for a quarter of a mile.
so as to shrink away from a cer-
ta!n"desolate area of land. This is
a valley of ashes-a fantastic farm
where ashes grow llke wheat into
ridges and hills and grotesque
gardens; where ashes take the
forms of houses and chimneys and
. lpet1t10n of so many u t d
air. Occasionally a llne of gray worth n . . ' rgen an
cars crawls along an invisible 1 Y e tel pnses.
track, gives out a ghastly creak : Then the miracle happened-
and comes to rest, and immediately lthe idea of thl' World's Fair. It
the ash-graY men swarm up with was not, as the public seems to
leaden spades and stlr up an im- believe, a conception of those who
penetrable cloud, which scrrens ,have taken most o! the credit for
their obscure operations from your 1it. It was merely a gleam In the
t n•r , :L ., _:.: ....... : . .:_ .!
''The vallev or ashes Is bounded [comparatively unlnfluential gen•
. · . tlemrn who met casunllv In a
on one s1de by a small foul nver, !tavern in K G d ·
and. when the drawbndge is up !whose idPas \'eewt· atretons, andd
1
: · e pu m wor s
to let barges through, t 1e pas-
1
by a young girl in high school, tho
sengers on waltmg trams can stare :daughter of one of them. one of
at the d1smal,scene for as long as
1
these men was Mr. Joseph Shad•
half an hour.
1
gen, a Belgian engineer, whose
T
HE new Orand Central Park- ',young daughter acted as a sort of
way had to run through this !interpreter and publlc relations
. a((cnt for h1m. The second was
waste land, with huge ash heap \Colonel Ed11·ard R It 1 1 . . . . • . ooseve , re at ve
mf wffhlch were burled tturtY [of the other Roosevelts, who had
o o scourmgs, tm cans, cast-o lived for a long time in France
baby carnages and umbrellas of and had worked in many of
the Borough of Brooklyn. There the world. These two men and the
was no other place for 1t to go, little Shadgen girl, between and
and 1t seemed as 1f the. best we among thrm, hashed up the idea.
could do would be to o'Jtam a rea- of a World's Fair at Flu hln
sonably right of way, fillmg Meadow. and they sold this
m part of the meadow and cuttmg George McAneny, who, in tum,
through the middle of tne,dump, sold it to me to sell to Mayor La.
leavmg two great mountains of Guardia. I told Mr. McAneny that
ashes and which we fondly I would stop at nothing to help
hoped to cover w1th a thm layer him if the Fair were actually to
of topsoil and plant, If we could be in Flushing Meadow, and if
.•
,,·, ...
": ·.,"*_. .• ,,1.

SUNDAY, MAY 22, 1949
·l"··
.llmlel aitt>lrme /n>u linkNillf{ tlrrir aa/1 in n t>nrkiug /it•/
mains here of the old Fatr but the Court or States stood durir
Interesting stainless steel the Fair era was too far awl
vane left to us by the Budd from the United Nations Assemb
pany, and the near-by vistas, to E'nable us to do anY of the ult
walks and landscaping. It hU been matP. landscaping and develo:
replaced by a well kept ment.
neighborhood recreation During the la.st decade we held<
and twenty football and to on Parade, and wi
!lel<Ls. the help of the Borough Preside
T
O THE south, across the Em- and interested citi7.ens gs
p!re state Bridge. the senate dws are bemg developed mto
Amphitheater area is permanent botamcal and hort1c1
and 1n active use. No doubt tural . crnter. The New Jer1
Rose will always feel that Btuldmg, constructed w1th stc
his Aquacade BillY was the cxcan1ted from the same qua·
est trader at the Fair. He out or which one of the Washu
bid for a noble historic pageant ton was once bu
the state Amphitheater and when now housrs t t1c pnl1re who prot
he had gayly eliminated the aca- the F!w,J\Jn>: Mradow arf'a, Th
demlc historlanswhowerehlsri.vals, man; mal pi&YJ<rounds along Or1
simply stripped the Muse of Central Parkway. one m Core
torY to her essentials, and put on a another ncar Horace Hard
girlie pool show with historical un- Boulevard and a th1rd m }
aertones. A temporary wart on the hR

Related Interests

e brrn romplcted,
Amphitheater nose housed the are open to public t:se.
state exhibits during the Fair and South of the boat basin
eventually followed other out- Flushing Bay and the park'
houses. extensions and butler's Sl stem we have a huge pari
pantries into the wreckers' Val- flrld where a stadium and athl
halla. center have been designed.
Those who recall the Parachute doubt part of this plan will
Jump, Terrace Club, Jungleland earned out. IL seems ltkely, 11
and Great White Way will always ever. that some of the area
see in their mind's eye the amuse- be devoted permanently to a
ment area where they had ao mob1le parking accessible to
much fun In 1939 and 1940. Never railway. North of Ro
I shall I forget the agricultural In- • ...... Bu, .. u u• ·n
! In which lovely lassies in portat1on yards are being exp1
1
brief bras and G strings, bowed ed and. Mme park land will :
I by thr weight of centuries, as the to be g1ven up for this purpo
poet satd. leaned on their hoes and EAST of Flush!ng Meado'
1 gazed pensively upon our synthetic are makmg a
'topsotl. Grover's minions· In- d!tion to the park o)·stem In
sJstf'd that this was a perfectly
trrnftc p1rce o! symbolism and aevelopment of tne so-called
scouted the idea that the appeal sena Corridor, a swampy v,
was deliberately aimed below the le&dlni from Flush!DS Mel
Adam's apple. Park through Klssena. Parl
YORK
arnbuut
who recall the Parachute
Jump. Terrace Club, Junaleland
and Great White Way wlll alw&Jt
aee In their mlnd'a eye the amuae·
ment area where they had 10
much fun In 1939 and 1940. Never
ahll1 I foqet the aarlcultural In·
rl011U1'8 In which lovely lasaies In
brief bras and 0 atrlngs, bowed
by the weliht of centuries, aa the
poet aald, leaned on their hoea and
1ued penstvelJ upon our IYDtheUc
topsoil. Grover's mlnicma• In·
alated that thla was a perfectly
terrlftc piece of QmboUim and
scouted the idea that the appeal
waa dellber&telJ aimed below the
Adam'& 4Pple·
E
AST or Flushlng Meadow we
are making a. ad-
d1Uon to the park &yst.em in the
Gevelopment of the so-called Kla·
lena COrridor. a awampy valley
trom ll'lush1DI Meadow
KlsleD& Park to
HISTORY IN THE MAKING
EDITORIALS
SCIENCE
Section
2
Orchard Street
Cries Its Magic
Word: Bargain
EIGHT PAGES
Senators Ask if
Truman Ignores
By Robert J, Donovan
WASHINGTON.
amusement and lake areH,
we believe that the enormous
in surrounding popula-
will before long force !Inane-
of this work. Even now the
north OYH l"'IIRillnl( M"adow
Borough President Burke's
In the new Borough Hall Is
of the finest ln the entire
city.
In the center of Flushing Mea-
dow, Constitution Mall has been
reconstructed, but our program
for the aegment where the Lagoor.
of Nations, Great Fountain, Court
of Peace, !orel!rn buildings and
to acqUire this cor-
aroae through the construe-
of a rreat storm water sewer.
We uaea sanitation material for
ftll. The trunk aewer 11 now at-
moat completed. Many play 1leldl,
walks, bUlc pathS and other recn-
atJon facWties will be lnatailed
ln4 P'lu.ahinl Meadow Jn thla wu
will become part of a contlDuoua
P&rlt and parkway belt extendlnR'
Ilona tb.e entlre north aide of
Queens to Alley Park. Grand Cen-
tral Parkway itself, which was
temporarily paved between Horace
Harding. Boaicnud Rnd the Kew
a-nt....,. is. ;o be v.·Jdllnoo-1
and the roadway system In the
loop will be revised as an exten-
&ion of the Van· Wyck Expressway
and a contempora
gram. Many year
th11 entire park 'W
In fact, it 111 not 1l
Patience, 1117 1l
tlence I Keep your
Yoll were 1
we leveled
IIZid rats
aaddlel, wltll
" root lODI, IIU
the bulldOiel'a a1
d18turbed thetr 1
reign. The Patr ,
utravapma. Th
great part wheJI
heraldect worlwl
from dump to l)oJ
Civil War Wrecking Greek Ec(
Faster Than U. S. Can Rebuil4
is possible except In convoy. on homu have beel
By Barrett McGurn coun- where m:
specified days each week, fifteen '
ATHENS. or twenty buses and trucks as-
N
0 TRAIN moves in Greece semble behind a band of mine- terlal, the loss lui
without pushing two or
three fiat cars in front of sweepers and set off to their des- (!orne, MarabaU
d d
·have to be apen
the locomotive to detonate un- tlnatlons un er m!Utary guar , Ioat b........ . w.wugl. .
detected mines. This miserable These conditions have played corcUnc to the a
necetsity is typical of the condl- havoc with the original Marshall civilians have '*
tlons which aJ;e keeping this little plan reconstruction schedule. Ac- the cuerrlllu,
A/,._...4 rruuainal plar1round iR Flu•hln1 Meadow Park near llorace Hartling Boulevard a• illooka now East-West border country from cording to Dowsley Clark, public THE combined
economic Independence despite the information officer !or the Mar- hlgblydestrucl
from the beginning the project LET me give a 1·ough idea of the IT was obvious to all of us that many hundreds of millions of dol- shall plan mission In Greece, it Greets to brlni 1
was planned so as to Insure a BTeat scope or this program. It began the final program for Flushing lara of aid the United States has has been necessary to use more TUrkey, the Unit
park In the geographical and PDP· with leveling or the great ash Meadow Park and the parkway given. men as guards than as workers Britain and otbeJ
ulatlon center of the city. llump, filhng of a considerable system would take a long time to So far In the course of Greece's on some of the American-financed
carry out, and that after all the ·-
part of the meadow. creation of temporary buildings of the Fair three-yer war between Commu- rebuilding enterprises. Soldier that the money
11
THE Plan blossomed, received two lakes north of the filled land, had been removed it would take nlsts and anti-Communists, eightY protection for American-paid road with Marahall
1
offtclal, PUblic and financial ap- of new approaches, years to finish Flushing Meadow trains have been derailed. Three repair crews has been the rule prosperous, aelf·l
proval, and the project got under ooundary and intersecting traffic Park. The war intervened and for hundred railroad cars have been rather than the exception. At Ia to be reconstr1
way with a complicated program arteries: reclamation of the south a time stopped work. Then came damaged. In addition 450 auto- night soldiers have had to be used other .commodltJ
of basic improvements, financed shore of Flushing Bay, elimination th" Unitrn
111
"
1
;M, th" nri''"'- mobiles have been blown up bY to 'defend the expensive recon- tor{oUilr wideapn
with cl ... , state and Fair e•h1bltors' of •ewage pollution in the "'hole tunity to convert a substantial t In ,..it'leteera offer A o " mines on the highways. Mines s ruction mach ery Despite all ..,
money and d!r te part of Flushing Meadow Into the ·• . for American d
• ec d by a commit• bay by the construction of disposal World Capitol. A distinguished even have been sUpped at night these money-consummg safe- banks pay, The
tee of distlncuished city and state plants with trunks IPaclin!l' . tn committee offered this into wheat ready for morn· gUards. at least $300,000 worth of plain that much
engineers. We drove what ap. them: bulkheeding and nprappmg but !twas finally rejected In favor ing's threshing. Legs have been reconstruction machinery has been still try1nc to j
peared to be a tough bargain with of the bay front.: r.onstruction of
11
of the site in midtown Manhattan blown off farmers as a result. In destroyed, severn! dozens of the throuah the pure:
on division of ultl-

on the East River. all650 clvllians have lost their lives reconstruction workers have been market dollars •
.l."att was. iq· :?,ushfou ll<feado'¥ and temporary utilities !or the Fair, Those connected with the Flush- to mtnes. killed and several score have been Pew new fact
0 r .. .:elve "' ot throughout the entire area: manu- ing Meadow committee, however, 'I'h 1 kid oo M t t h 1 1 bu.llt to
*
4

0
00,000. Thill proved to be facture of topsoil out of earth. went on. The architects and en- e osses have despite nap · os
0
t e v ct ms World War li u
wooden money, because there was p<'at moss and mulch, planting glneers became identified with have been Greeks. One American clvU war Par1
a deftcit Instead of a balance, and of large trees, grass and shrubs the new site and its approaches, r------------... reconstruction worker was wound- Greek aPorta t1
in
and mu h f th llmin k Mr. McGurn, Herald Tribune ed but not fatally, Several AIDer· pee'•'" •A co ..... '
OUI' rna source of future develop· on the basis of the final land· c
0
e pre ary wor Rome correspondent. begins a 81 ;;' .':' .... ....
ment funds thus simply evapor- scape design and an endless num- which was done to attract the series of three articles survey- Ieana were captured but all have e ....... aoo,oa
ated, . ber of other basic improvements, United Nations to Flushing Mea- ing the situation in Greece 0 " been releued. the country 11 ex:
not to speak of permanent build- dow proved in the end to be valu- the basis of a recent tour. The It haa proved neceuar:v to aus- The UDltecl Btl
The relations of the Fair and ings, such as the City Building, able at the location which was second and third. articles will pend half the original Ma.rab&l will have to be
Park gangs ln this fantastic enter• planned for ice 11nd roller skating finally decided upon. At the same appear Mondav and. Tuesday. plan reconatructlon proJectl. whll llf
prise were at times strained, but after the Fair; the State Amphi- time, it was agreed that thr City 1'------------' The Marshall plan schedule and ... e e
this was very superficial. Both theater, planned for swimming, Bulldln& at Flushing Meadow an enormous expenditure of man- the rail and highway travelen :s & P
George McAneny and Grover concerts and .shows when the Fair would be converted into an Assem- hours in the hunt for mines. Every n
0
neot _ beetennthtthhe
8
oGnlyreekiSUtferulaera. butotot
0
1!
Whalen had been public omcials, ended, and othe1· structures. bly Hall for annual meetlnis of "'UUJ _ pop ... •
f
the United
until the new morning many miles of Greek tion have fled or been evacuated- even ......... _ to
were genuinely Interested in the The. total cost o these perma- ...., --...
future park and along with th nent 1mprovements reached the capitol was completed, and this roads are "swept" for mines. from homes in guerrilla-threat- to another. The
th di
• e staggering of $5
9
.ooo.ooo. gave us an opportunity to carry }N THEMSELVES the losses have ened villales. They have crowded AtheDa from 2 1
o er rectors, were concerned Without them the Fair could not out a substantial part of the park been great for a country of only Into cities lllte Athens and Balo- In llll&lla' comm1
with what the Fair would leave the have been held at all. Other program In the vicinity of the 8,000,000 population, but the effect nika where there has been little borde.!
city when the pageant faded. Moat great permanent public impro1·e- City Building once dominated by of the terror warfare has been or no work and a dole of less than the
of the big exhibitors knew they ments some distance from Flush- the TrYlon and Perisphere, and much more far-reaching and a pound of bread and the equlva- C1le tul1:v
would get their money's worth out lng Meadows were m a vuy real surrounded by the Communica- crippling. In large parts of Greece, Ien'l'ht .,of
1
ann
5
ceounntlceda duof. hold!Dc
of advertising, and even the bank· sense by-products of the _Fair-the tiorus and Power groups. h th 1 ··- 'l'h .....
ers who took over in 1940 did not Bronx Whitestone Bndge, the West of the City Buildlni a.nd sue as e ong stretch between Ol·eece•a 20,300 <Greek ArmY • esec:utlcm
M"dto TL I d th I f th G d c tral Pa k and the famous Pass of Thermopylae timate> Communist-led guerrWu cuaed of oomm
take too dim a view of the ,....rma- 1 wn mnr an e rcmova 0 e ran en r way, and the "Olympian Heigl1ts," rail- h•• been to "sow ruJn .......... •"'e Communlats ·-
,.... or the Riker's Island ash dump to acr0111 the Bridges of Wheels and - """""" .... _ ..
nent improvements. Therefore.: build La Guardia Airport, an Wings, In the area wbere the road service has been ctiscnntinued. 1!nea of the enemy." CoiiBidere.ble :n tllla :rear 2
as¥te from a Jot of good-natured achievE'ment which started Bill transportation exhibits, Courts of There is no longer any mil con- succeu In that pronam has been w
joshing and rather primitive prac• Somerville on the meteonc rise Railways and Wheels, were located, nection between Greece's two main achieved. Many scores of thou- r:o .;e
tical joking and occasional &lUi• from lieutenant colonel to four- most of the ultimate park pr011tam cities, Athens and Salonlka. In :;:a there have been
ging, we got along fsmoullly. star general. has been carried out and little re- great areas no automobile t1·avel to Oreek ArmY tlons. Another
' ' Jall aentencea bl
•. Vii War Wrecking Greek Economy
FasJer Than U. S. Can Rebuild It
is poasible except in convoy. On
specified daya each week, 1\fteen
or W.rent¥ buses and trucks as-
E
A.CH of tbele qents-thele
were seven of Ulem, IDcllldiDI
a woman-baa teatuled tbl1 at-
tended party IChOoll where almolt
dallY Communla' te&cherl drWid
into them and others the Dltlll for
violent llftrtbro'W of th& , O v e r n ~
ment.
SUNDAY NEWS
April 21, 1963
1
MarinaDredgingCuts,
WaterGatetot:we fair
The boatman's gateway to the upcoming World's Fair
-the Flushing Marina-has come ofr the drawing boards
with the removal of the first bucketful of aUt from the bot-
tom of Flushing Bay. ·
The $!.11 million dredrinr pro- etate and city government., Ill
Jeet I• the flnt ltep in the eon- addition to the marina operatora.
atructloll of the marilla, whleh The commereial development
will eventually provide mooring alone Fluahlng Creek will al110
apaee and berth for 2,000 1mall be promoted by provldlnr water
eraft. ·. depth to aeeommodate bulk mo•e·
The ftnt of more than 2 million ment of construction material,
;rard1 of mud was brought petroleum produeta and other
up In a 12-eublc yard bueket. Ma· blrce haulage. .
-----...,-r::i:':":':":::-::::""1 The eontr1d le under the au-
pemslon of Col. Kilton 11. MI.
letieh, distrlet engineer for the
· · ./,:C Army· Corp• of Engineen. Park•
Commieaioner ·Newbold Morria
'· <.: ;·· will be in of 1uperrisioa
·,/>
; floatinr element for the marina .
. ' • It fs expected that more . than
Map ahowa where OP•
eralion will provide ehannel for
boatmen uainr the Fluahin1
Marina.
terial will be towed In barges for
disposal In deep areas of Lonr
I11!and Sound off Eatons Neck.
The dredging operation will
pi'OYide a 300-foot wide ehartnel,
16 feet deep, at low water alld an
anehorare area of about '10 ,acrea
with depths ranalnr from •lx to
10 feet
M MIll loft Jolt
The overall development cost .
will be more than S8 million and
will be divided amonc Federal,
four million persona will tn'f'll
to thfl fair by boat.
NEW YORK
Mttalb m'rlbunt
17
Hot Debate, Fair's Prices Stay
By Fred Ferretti
0/ Tho Tribune Sla/1
WORLD'S FAIR.
The statement was short.
Only 24 words.
"The executive committee
took no action on the matter
of admission prices at the
of May 27. 1965. The
matter was fully discussed."
That was all that was
publicly.
But behind closed doors at
the Administration Building
at the World's Fair yesterdaY.
the words were much more
impassioned-and the state-
ments much lengthier.
For one hour and • 15
minutes Fair president Robert
Moses defended his no-ad-
mission-cut policies - and
City Council President Paul
SCrevane challenged them.
In the end, there was no
decision. Another executive
committee meeting was
scheduled for July 9, but the
questiQn of prices wasn't e

Related Interests

en
put on the agenda. However,
as Mr. Screvane noted. a
meeting of the policy-making
committee could be called at
any time.
The meeting of the execu-
tive committee had been long
awaited, and a great majority
of exhibitors had asked that
prices go down ln the light of
low nttendaljiCC. For a time
Mr. Moses reportedly was so
Inclined, but then he changed
his mind. To buttress his
forces on the reportedly
evenlY divided committee, he
was ready to add two new
members. ·
It happened as the first
order of business yesterday.
The Fah·'s acting controller,
Herbert Payne, who yesterday
became controller, and Mrs.
Marian Cahill Heffernan, were
named to the committee, In-
creasing Its number to 27.
<Mrs. Hofferman was one of
six of the members not pres-
ent yesterday.)
Then the question of ad-
missions came up on the
agenda at the closed
Deputy Mayor Edward F.
Cavanagh Jr. got the floor to
read a signed message from
l\{ayor Wagner to the Execu-
tive Committee.
"MY conviction," the mes-
sage read, "Is that the Fair
belonl!'ll to thP pPnplP nf N""'
Ynrl·." l1t' .... a11: • ,, f' F ,1·
<'l'P<Ht'd b:. ··!.\lt n11d
dl'd!cat!nn'' ol f'Xhihllors. con-
C!'sslonnaires, Hobrrt
and the Exrcullve Commit tcr.
and that all of these should
want to see It successful "I
do," the mrssagr snld. and
added that thr brst wav to cto
this was to make chai1.ges In
the price stmcture. The Mavor
made no recommim-
INSIDE 'I'HE l:0;:\llTTEE
tight-lipped, amid the general
good mood of the event.
Mr. Moses was also there,

Related Interests

rrY happy, and he said so,
Was he satisfied? , "Jf'e wrn to you, Mr. Prt>11hlrnt. for dirrdinn. hm nrr Ml)'ill{! tiff' 11iluatinn rlnrs not
luwe to be h tlrat rigl1t ?'' -City Council President Paul Screvane
"Oh, yes." .
Asked for comment on the
brief released statement, the .
F'a ir president said, ·.,
the whole thing, those 24

Related Interests

:ords." He called It "one of
the statements struck oft
juM ji11t>."
-Fair President Robert Moses
OUT ON THE 1<-.AIH GHOUNDS
lmildPrll om/ hm•P dorr1• a ,:om/ ,io/1 in \Ptr

Related Interests

tll'h, l111t 1111 snii•Mrren
ti•PY could learn a lot from n graduatP of 11 !ll'lwol.''
-Chrysler Pavilion Manager Thomas Ferguson
by the hand of man since the
barons at Runnymede and
th€' Constitutional fathers."
·He laughed. ·
he satisfied with at•
trndnncc? going up

\
..
Does he have any predlc·
tion on attendance? "I'm not
making any now." Until yes•
t.erday Mr. Moses had said
rrpcatrdly that the Fair
woulct dmw 37.5 million paid
vl,itors this season.
YPstcrday's attendance waa '
97,231, as compared with
fo1· May 27 last year.
This season's attendance is
trailing last year's by u;.
million.
Based on earlier reports of
the way the members of the
committee were leaning. In
their votes, a ballot seemed ·
to favor Mr. Moses in hl.s OP•
position to price cuts. · He .
would have been ahead 13 to '
11 with one person not vot·
ing and two on the fence.
Heactlons among the ex•
hibitors were anger, outrage,
and disbelief that the price
was not coming down.
.·\$..
PROUD LEADER of the 1965 Worhl's }'air, Robert Moses, aflel' >Iavin!( off a projrt·trd l'lll in the pri!'c of •
Chrysler Corp. manager
Thomas Ferguson, declaring
that the F'air Is worth $2.60
to some people but obvloualy
not to most, said that "bridge
bullders and engineers have
done a good job In New York,
but as salesmen theY. could
learn a lot from a graduate
of a business school."
datio11s. but left It to "your
judgment"
Mr. Screvane and Invest-
ment banker Frederic Brandl
then joined Mr. Cavanagh In
plendlng for some action to
bring l•P the badly lagging at-
tendance.
;

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[oses flatly refused to
consider tlw proposal, and he
was backed up by Charles
Poletti. Fair international
vier-president: William E.
Potter, rxrcutive rice-prrst-
dent. and Preusse.
Fair counsel.
Mr. Screvane then asked
whv the reduction in the price
· . r\n't brine
' J· :u,·.:o<'' '· The Fair
> clla'.11" Hll average of
barr!>· 1.000 per hour after 6
p 111.
Mr. l\loses n•plied that loW·
rrmg the prit'!'--from $2 50 to
$! 6 p. m would
t ly Hlcren:;e t hr cost of
mnmtl·nnnce and srcuntY
Th£•,-;e hare lwen cut to the
bone this srason.
Mr. Scrrvanc asked incredu-
lously If Mr. Moses was ad-
vocating that attendance be
kept down. and Mr. Moses
directed the question to Mr.
Preusse, who said t.he Fair's
desire was to balance the
budget.
The argument raged for
more than an hour nnd. ac-
cording to one member, "the
way it was it was going
to br another one of thosP
'

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