Box# 31

Folder# 617
Word's Fair:
Newsletters (3)
Mar ,1964- Apr ,1964
3/64-Rl
,' .l U N I S PH E R E 0 ,,,.,
11
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
FLUSHING 52, N.Y. • TELEPHONE· AREA CODE 212·WF 4-1964 • CABLE ADDRESS "WORLDSFAIR"
PEACE THAOUOH
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NEWS:
REFER INQUIRIES TO:
Peter McDonnell WF 4-6531
Jerome Edelberg - WF 4-6541
Joyce Martin - WF 4-6543
FOR RELEASE: AFTERNOON, MONDAY, MARCH 2, 1264
ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT
March 2, 1964
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR, March 2 --- The following statement
was released today (Monday) by Robert Moses, president of the New
York World's Fair 1964-1965 Corporation:
On October 9, 1962, the executives of the Fair announced an
advance package sale of entrance tickets, beginning May 1, 1963 and
ending February 29, 1964, The purposes were to advertise attractions,
facilitate early family plans by visitors and obtain cash to reduce
borrowing. The target at that time was 10,000
1
000 tickets involving
$12,000,000 in cash,
We are happy to announce that the exact number of tickets
purchased and the total in cash as of the close of business February
29, 1964 was 28,034,987 tickets and cash, almost three
times the figures aimed at, This is a larger advance sale than any
previously achieved by any comparable enterprise anywhere. It gives
evidence of the popularity of the Fair and indicates that the pre-
dicted total of 70
1
000
1
000 vtsitors will probably be considerably
exceeded,
FROM: Wm. J. Donoghue Corporation
10 Columbus Circle, N.Y.C.
(more)
3/64-Rl
- 2.-
This sale was directed by Thomas J, Chairman ot
the Executive Committee, and supported by the Finance Committee and
many other friends.
As a result of the excess of cash receipts from tioket sales
over the estimates, the Fair Corporation has repaid today the
$3 million in bank loans made at the latter part of November.,
1963, which were to mature on August 1, 1964. It is anticipated
that the $30 million 6% Notes outstanding, maturing on August 1, 1966,
will be paid off before the end ot 1964.
ROBERT MOSES
President
(Attached is copy of' a letter of' congratulations from Mayl)r Robert F.
Wagner to Mr. Robert Moses and Mr, Thomas J. Deegan, Jr.)
- 3 ..
(SEAL)
City of New York
Office of the Mayor
New York 7, N. 2·.
3/64 ... Rl
February 28, 1964
Hon. Robert Moses. President
Mr. Thomas J. Deegan, Jr.
Chairman of the Executive Committee
New York World's Fair 1964 .. 1965 Corp.
World's Fair. New York 11380
Dear Bob and Tom:
Your report on the enormous advance sale of tickets
to the Worldls Fair, adding up to more than double the volume
we expected, demonstrates widespread interest and support of
the Fair. It is the best evidence of public confidence, here,
all over the country and abroad, in the ability or the City of
New York to produce outstanding organizers, financiers and
builders.
I am sure that we are opening the greatest cultural,
educational, industrial, governmental and enjoyable exposition
of' all time. I congratulate all the Fatr executives, staff',
exhibitors and workmen on the Fair's progresse
Cordially and sincerely,
/S/ Bob Wagner
Robert F. Wagner
Mayor
3/64-R5
UN I SPHERE 01861
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
FLUSHING 52, N.Y. • TELEPHONE· AREA CODE 212·WF 4·1964 • CABLE ADDRESS "WORLDSFAIR"
PEACE THAOUOH
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REFER INQUIRIES TO:
Peter McDonnell
Jerome Edelberg
Joyce Martin
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
- 4-6531
\iF 4-6541
- WF 4-6543
ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT
March 4
6
1964
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR
1
March 5 --- Tbe Women's Adytsory Council ot
<... .
the New York 1964-1965 World's Fair today extended to women's organiza•
tiona all over the an invitation to participate in its program
of activities to be held at the Official Women's Hospitality Center at
the Fair.
At a luncheon meeting, held at the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel
(Waldorfkeller - 12 noon), the Council unveiled its plans for special
Honor Days at which the Fair, in joint sponsorship with women's groups,
will pay tribute to women who have made significant contributions in
various fields of endeavor,
The Honorable Esther Peterson
1
Special Assistant to the President
for Consumer Affairs, Assistant Secretary of Labor and Director of the
Women's Bureau, was the key speaker. Addressing the gathering of
....
women's organization representatives and Fair officials
1
she projected
the role the Advisory Council and its corps of volunteer hostesses
could play in interpreting for foreign visitors the status of women in
this country
1
presenting a true picture of their progress and achieve•
menta.
Mrs. Peterson herself will be one of the prominent women who will
be honored on the "Women tn Politics and Government Day" at the Fair.
Other special Honor Days will recognize women's contributions in
Fashion. Arts. Medicine and Science, Home and Community and Education,
FROM: Wm. J. Donoghue Corporation
10 Columbus Circle, N.Y.C.
(more)
3/64-RS
- 2 -
Participating also in the luncheon program were William A. B e r n s ~
Fair vice president in charge or Communications and Public Relation,
presiding, Mrs, Dexter Otis Arnold, President of the General Federation
of Women's Clubs, Mrs. Mary Jane McCaffree, the Fair's director of
Women's Activities and Alan c. Stoneman, president and chief executive
or Purex Corporation, Ltd, whose firm is sponsoring the hospitality
lounge.
The official World's Fair Women's Hospitality Center, headquarters
or all women's activities, will also serve as an informal, social
meeting point where women will be able to relax in elegant country club
atmosphere designed and furnished by Colonial Williamsburg. Its pent-
house location in the Better Living Center will offer a panoramic vtew
or the Fair for up to 225 guests with an additional capacity of 300 on
the terrace patio.
Also located on the penthouse floor will be the Hilton Cafe Inter-
national, which will serve unusual dishes or all the countries in which
the hotel chain operates with a staff of foreign chefs supervising the
preparation or their specialties. It is anticipated that both the
restaurant and club and the adjacent World's Fair branch of the Marco
Polo Club will be patronized by visitors to the Official World's Fair
Women's Headquarters.
The Hospitality Center is expected to be used by more than 265
women•s organizations, representing 30 million women here and abroad,
during the two Fair seasons. The calendar of receptions and meetings
already scheduled for the first six months indicate widespread interest
and the schedule of hospitality hostesses, furnished by women's organiza-
tions, is filled for the first exposition season.
Coordinating all the activities of the Women's Hospitality Center
is Mrs. Oswald B, Lord, chairman of the Women's Advisory Council, who
will be assisted by a Board of Advisors and an Executive Committee
comprised of women prominent in civic affairs, bus1ness
1
social and
professional groups.
# # #
3/64-R4
UNISPHERE
0 Ul61 ~
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
FLUSHING 52, N.Y. • TELEPHONE· AREA CODE 212·WF 4·1964 • CABLE ADORESS "WORLDSFAIR"
rtE.AC£ THROUGH
UNDERSTANDING
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REFER INQUIRIES TO:
Peter McDonnell
Jerome Edelberg
Joyce Martin
- WF 4-6531
- WF 4-6541
- WF 4-6543
F'OR RELEASE: SUNDAY I MARCH 8 I 1964
ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT
March 4, 1964
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR, March 8 --- More than 2
1
000 of the nation's
top athletes ~ 1 1 1 compete in fifteen or the scheduled nineteen Olympic
tryouts to be held at the New York 1964-1965 World's Fair and the near-
by metropolitan area this spring and summer, it was announced today by
Robert Moses, President of the International Exhibition. William s.
Adams, Jr., is Fair Sports Program Director.
The City of New York and the Fair will serve as co-hosts during
the 59 "Olympic Days" to be held in conjunction with the World's Fair.
The basketball tryouts will inaugurate the World's Fair Olympic
program, April 2-4, and the canoeing trials will conclude the compre-
hensive schedule, Sept. 12-13. The New York World's Fair will open on
April 22 and continue through Oct. 18. The XVIII Olympic Games are
alated for Oct. 10-24, 1964, in Tokyo, Japan.
Sports history also is being established as this marks the first
time in u. s. Olympic annals that so many events have been assigned to
a single region. In the words of Kenneth L. Wilson, president or the
u. s. Olympic Committee:
"The New York Fair and its unprecedented facilities tor handling
huge crowds will make it possible for a greater number of people than
ever before to witness the tryouts for the XVIII Olympiad."
Besides the Olympic tryouts, the World's Fair will also be the
scene of National A,A.u. championships 1n judo, wetghtltfting (junior)
and wrestling (Greco Roman and Free Style). Winners of the national
FROM: Wm. J. Donoghue Corporation
10 Columbus Circle, N.Y.C.
(more)
- 2 -
gymnastic titles
1
to be decided at nearby u. s. Merchant Marine
Academy, Kings Point, L. I., May 7-9, will be officially presented
their medals on May 10, at the Fair's Pavilion. There will also be
gymnastic eXhibitions at that time.
Olympic tryouts in boxing and wrestling will take place at the
Fatr•s Singer Bowl, which has a seating capacity of 18,000. Fencing
and weightlift1ng will be contested in the Fair's 2,100-seat Assembly
Pavilion and judo at the Singer Bowl.
Menfs and women's track and field trials, sure to attract
capacity crowds, will be held at Downing Stadium on Randalls Island,
N. Y. Swimming, diving and water polo events will be staged at the
Astoria Pool, Queens.
The new Olympic 6-lane water course at Pelham Bay Lagoon, Bronx,
to be completed by March 14, will be the scene of the rowing and
canoeing tryouts. st. John's University and Purdue are scheduled to
open the crew season on that date. The renovated course will be the
locale for many collegiate, club, sectional, national and international
races before the Olympic trials take place. The permanent layout will
be the scene of many major races hereafter.
The Olympia cycling speed testa will take place at Kissena Park•s
new track, and cycling road races in Central Park. Volleyball tryouts
wtll be at Queens College, Flushing.
The Stadium at Randalls Island is presently undergoing a complete
refurbishing in seating, track conditioning, etc. The resurfaced
quarter-mile track should be conducive to many record-breaking ach1eve-
mentsa A crowd of 22,000 can be accommodated at the Stadium.
Nothing is being left undone by the City and World's Fair
authorities in seeing that the razor-sharp and talent-loaded a t h l e t e s ~
men and women from all parts of the country, compete under the beat
conditions possible in earning the right to represent Uncle Sam in
the Olympics.
More than $1,000,000 is being spent in capital improvements to
make the holding of the Olympic tryouts tn the metropolitan area the
greatest ever.
(more}
3/64•R4
- 3 -
Visitors from every state in the country and from nations through-
out the world will view the exciting athletic competitions as well as
see the World's Fair expositions of culture, science and
industry.
Following the Olympic tryouts, the qualifying some 307
men and 79 women, will assemble in Los Angeles early in September. By
Sept. 20, the entire Olympic contingent will go through processing
and outfitting prior to their departure to Tokyo via jet airliner the
last week in the month,
The move to bring the important Olympic tryouts to New York and
the Fair was initiated more than two years ago by Mayor Robert F.
Wagner and Fair President Robert Moses. Their bid for the staging of
this unprecedented number of Olympic tryouts in this region was
strongly backed by the Mayor and Mr. Moses who offered the u. So
Olympic Committee $350,000 for expenses connected with the staging or
the tryouts in New York, The City is contributing $250,000, the Fair
the remainder.
Said the Mayor and Mr. Moses in a joint statement: "The avail•
ability or Flushing Meadow Park, site of the Fair, for some of these
events, together with the many other first-class facilities in the
New York area, makes the city by far the most approprtate location
for th"e tryouts."
After six months of deliberation on the bid, the u. s. Olympic
Committee accepted the offer, On June 20, 1962, the Committee sent
Mayor Wagner and Mr. Moses the following message:
"Your invitation accepted by unanimous vote of the Committee."
u. s. Olympic Committee President Wilson also announced to the
press that "these tryouts are major sports events in themselves. The
opportunity to compete before record crowds will stimulate our greatest
amateur athletes to top performances. This will, again, stimulate
America•s interest in our athletes and their standing in the fields or
international competition."
Both the Mayor and Mr. Moses characterized the Olympic Games as
"one of mankind r s great efforts to forward the understanding between
nations." They also expressed gratification in having the tryouts
(more)
. j
3/64-R4
- 4 -
"Join with us in our own Olympics of Progress at the New York World's
Fair to emphasize and reinforce our parallel purposes of peace through
understanding.
Not since the 1933 Chicago Exposition, when the first Major League
All-Star Baseball Game, featuring the immortal Babe Ruth, took place,
has there been a major sports event at the World's Fair.
Following is a chronological list of the Olympic summer tryouts,
and National A.A.u. Championships:
DATES
APRIL 2,3,4
MAY 18,19,20
JUNE 12,13
JULY 3,4
JULY 8,9,10,11
JULY 12,13,14
AUG. 7,8
AUG. 21,22
AUG. 24,25,26,27,28
AUG. 25,26,27,28,29
AUG. 26,27,28,29
AUG. 26,27,28,29
AUG. 29,30,31 and
SEPT. 1, 2,3
SE,PT. 2.,3,4
SEPT. 3,4,5
SEPT. 4,5,6,7
SEPT. 5,6
SEPT. 12,13
THE SCHEDULES
1964 u. s. OLYMPIC TRYOUTS
SPORT LOCATION
BASKETBALL St. John's U. (Jamaica)
BOXING World's Fair Singer Bowl
JUDO World •a Fair Singer Bowl
TRACK AND FIELD (Men) Randalls Island
ROWING (Single & Eights} Orchard Beach, Bronx
FENCING
World's Fair Pavilion
TRACK AND FIELD (Women) Randalls Island
WEIGHTLIFTING World's Fair Pavilion
WRESTLING (Greco-Roman
& Free Style) World's Fair Singer Bowl
WATER POLO Astoria Pool, Queens
ROWING (Small Boats) Orchard Beach, Bronx
GYMNASTICS (Men & t-V omen) U.S. Merchant Marine
Kings
SWIMMING (Men & Women) Astoria Pool, Queens
CYCLING (Speed Races) Kissena Park Velodrome,
Queens
VOLLEYBALL Queens College, Flushing
SWIMMING-DIVING
(Men & Women) Astoria Pool, Queens
CYCLING (Road Races) Central Park, N.Y.C.
CANOEING {Men & Women) Orchard Beach, Bronx
{more)
..
.. 3/64-R4
- 5 -
*OLYMPIC TRYOUTS SCHEDULED ELSEWHERE
DATES
MAY 19-23
JUNE 23 -JULY 3
JULY 5-11
JULY 7-9
JULY 13-20
JULY {Exact date
not set yet)
AUG. 3·7
AUQ. 22-30
AUG. (Exact date
not set yet)
SEPT. 12-16
MAY 1,2,3
MAY 4
MAY 7,8,9
MAY 10
MAY 23,24
MAY 24
JUNE 22,23,24,25,26
JUNE 26
SPORT
EQUESTRIAN (Jumping)
YACHTING (5.5 Meters)
YACHTING (Flying
Dutchmen)
EQUESTRIAN (Dressage,
Jumping{ Cross
Country}
YACHTING (Dragons)
SHOOTING
YACHTING (Stars)
YACHTING (Finn Mono•
types)
EQUESTRIAN (Dressage)
PENTATHLON
LOCATION
Gladstone, N. J.
Newport, R. I.
Atlantic Highlands
1
N. J.
Gladstone, N. J.
Long Beach, California
Fort Benning, Georgia
Chicago, Illinois
Long Beach, California
Site Not Selected
Fort Sam Houston, Texas
NATIONAL A.A.U. CHAMPIONSHIPS
JUDO Singer Bowl, World's Fair
JUDO AWARDS Singer Bowl, World
1
s Fair
GYMNASTICS u.s. Merchant Marine
Academy, Kings Point, L. L
GYMNASTICS ( Exhibi tiona-
Awards) World's Fair Pavilion
JR. HEIGHTLIFTING World's Fair Pavilion
JR. WEIGHTLIFTING
(Awards) World's Fair Pavilion
WRESTLING Singer Bowl, World r s Fair
WRESTLING (Awards) Singer Bowl, World's Fair
*U.s. Field Hockey Team eliminated from Olympics, losing to Canada in
qualifying round early last October in Lyons, France.
*U.S. Soccer Team plays in Olympic Round-Robin at Mexico City, March
15-22.
# # #
3/64-R6
U N I S P H E R E 0 "'61
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
FLUSHING 52, N.Y. • TELEPHONE· AREA CODE 212-WF 4-1964 • CABLE ADDRESS "WORLDSFAIR"
PE.ACE THROUGH
UNDI:RSTAHDINO
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NEWS:
REFER INQUIRIES TO:
Peter McDonnell - WF 4-6531
Jerome Edelberg - WF 4-6541
Joyce Martin - WF 4-6543
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT
March 5, 1964
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR, Mar. 5 --- The smallest and greenest or
all pavilions· at the New York 1964-1965 World's Fair will be the
distinction belonging to Julimar Farm Corporation according to word
received by Fair otticials. Conceived by Mrs. J. Phelps Revson or
Weston, Conn., the firm's line will consist of newly established
gourmet roods, "packaged gardens" and "bread 'n' butter gifts".
Edward Durell Stone, internationally known architect, designed
the 1,768-square root pavilion, the smallest he has ever done. Stone
also has designed the Christian Science Pavilion, the Billy Graham
Pavilion and House of Good Taste Building at the Fair.
In reality, the exhibit is a rather-and-son partnership. Edward
D. Stone, Jr., himself a noted landscape designer in Fort Lauderdale,
Fla., has designed the fairyland of gardens that will landscape the
Julimarta exhibit area.
Located in the industrial section between Pepsi-Cola and Better
Living sites, the pavilion will be surrounded by an elevated base,
giving the effect of floating in a bed Of glistening gravel, a White
airy structure of glass and shutters.
The vest-pocket pavilion occupies a small part of the 35,000
square feet of exhibit space, 95% or which is landscaped. Besides a
contemporary Southern Plantation style building, other structures on
the site include a penthouse garden, 3/4 scale farm, featuring a
matched pair of imported miniature horses standing 32 inches high,
and an authentic Japanese teahouse to be flown in sections from the
Orient to the World's Fair.
FROM: Wm. J. Donoghue Corporation
10 Columbus Circle, N.Y.C.
(more)
3/64•R6
.. 2 -
The Julimar exhibit will have a series of six separate gardens in
the general scheme, including a "touch and scent" garden for the blind,
The pavilion proper is also surrounded by redwood platform or
deck, which permits Fairgoers to view all the gardens and decide where
to begin the trip through the gardens,
The Herb Garden, featuring a Georgetown motif, is designed so
that the blind may touch and scent such fine herbs and spices as thyme,
sage, garlic, basil and parsley.
The oval English Garden has a broad expanse of lawn and is sur-
rounded by perennials, shrubs and trees, It features a pool and an
exotic aviary,
The Renaissance Garden highlights a clipped evergreen hedge and
formally laid out garden paths and pools, fountains and topiaries with
beds of marble chips edged with boxwood,
A gladstone path leads to the Penthouse and a landscaped terrace,
Beyond is a 3/4 scale farm with barn, yard and a pair of matched, live
32-inch high miniature horses.
A crystal stream flows throughout the entire Julimar exhibit. At
one point it leads to a Japanese teahouse wtth Japanese sculpture,
bonsai and flowering shrubs set among boulders, as well as a Japanese
formal garden of stones,
At one point, in the Polynesian area of the Julimar Farm exhibit,
the stream becomes a waterfall where flowering plants and large
tropical trees are featured,
More than 100 trees will grow in the exhibit.
Mrs, Revson chose the name of her Weston, Conn. home, Jultmar
Farm, to represent all products she will be marketing for the first
time,
The exhibit will emphasize uniqueness, grace, quiet beauty in
contrast to the gargantuan buildings and mechanical splendors of the
giants of industry in the World's Fair Industrial Section •.
General contractor for the pavilion is Theodore L. Rubsamen,
Floral Parle, L. I. Landscape contractors are Rosedale Nurseries, Inc.,
Hawthorne, N. Y.
# # #
3/64-R7
U N I S P H £ R E 0 !lUll
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
FLUSHING 52, N.Y. • TELEPHONE· AREA CODE 212-WF 4-1964 • CABLE ADDRESS "WORLDSFAIR"
PtAC£ THJtOUOH
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...
NEWS:
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Peter McDonnell
Jerome Edelberg
Joyce Martin
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT

5,
1964
- WF 4-6531
- WF 4-6541
- WF 4·6543
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR, Mar. 5 ---A scientifically selected cross-
section or visitors to the New York 1964-1965 World
1
s Fair wtll be
interviewed periodically by the Market Research of America __ _
....
and Needham and Grohmann, it was announced by Fair officials.
The interviews will enable the Fair management and exhibitors to
make any adjustments in exhibits or services along the lines of the
wishes and suggestions of Fair visitors.
Conducted by MRCA, the continuing survey wtll ask or visitors
their opinions of transportation services to and around the Fair site,
convenience or the rest and service areas, restaurants, parking facili-
ties and various other matters which contribute to an enjoyable visit
to the City and to the Fair.
Needham and Grohmann will relate the survey information to other
statistics concerning the impact of the Fair on New York's business
community and make periodic reports to the Fair management.
FROM: Wm. J. Donoghue Corporation
10 Columbus Circle, N.Y.C.
# # #
3/64·Rl2
UNISPHERE
01061
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
FLUSHING 52, N.Y. • TELEPHONE· AREA CODE 212-WF 4-1964 • CABLE ADDRESS "WORLDSFAIR"
PEAC£ THROUGH
UNDERSTANDING
--· @) ..............
NEWS:
REFER INQUIRIES TO:
Peter McDonnell
Jerome Edelberg
Joyce Martin
POR ~ D I A T E RELEASE:
- WF 4-6531
WF 4-6541
- WF 4-6543
ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT
March 10, 1964
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR, Mar. 10 -·· The New York World's Fair
Commemorative stamp will be unveiled to the press at the dedication
or the Fair's Post Office, described as the "most modern in the world,"
on Wednesday, March 11, at 11:00 A.M.
Attending the ceremony at Flushing Meadow Park will be Postmaster
General John A. Gronouski, City officials, Fair President Robert Moses,
former Postmaster General James A. Farley, named by President Lyndon
B. Johnson as Honorary Postmaster for the Fair, members of Congress
and invited gaests.
Philatelists will have to wait until April 22, Opening Day of the
Fair, to buy the stamp. It will be sold in all of the nation's 35,000
post offices. Horizontal in shape, the stamp 1s green, measures
eight-tenths of an inch by 1-1/2 inches, and bears an imprint of the
Fair's Unisphere and Main Mall.
The Post Office, located in the northwest section of the Fair-
grounds, near Van Wyck Boulevard, is equipped with the latest electro-
mechanical devices. It will be able to process an estimated 250,000
pieces or mail a day.
Two such devices are a 77-foot long letter sorter and a cancelling
machine, called Mark II. The sorter, operated by 12 persons working
at typewriter-consoles, is capable of separating letters of 279
destinations at a speed of 36,000 per hour. Mark II can cancel and
stack ordinary size letter mail at speeds up to 30,000 per hour
regardless of the position of the stamp.
FROM: Wm. J. Donoghue Corporation
10 Columbus Circle, N.Y.C.
(more)
3/64-Rl2
- 2 -
Postmaster General Gronouski, hailing the Fair's Post Office as
the most modern in the world, called it a "working laboratory" for the
handling of bulk volume of mail. "Advanced mechanization is the only
means of keeping pace with the huge national mail volume expected to
reach or exceed a new high of 70 billion pieces this year," said Mr.
Gronouski.
The Post Office will be open every day of the Fair, including
Sundays, from 9:00A.M. to 10:00 P.M., the Fair's regular hours, and
will employ a staff of 60, not including collectors and deliverers.
A number will be multi-lingual to assist foreign visitors.
One unusual feature will be spectator galleries from which
visitors can view the entire processing of incoming and outgoing mail.
Numbered lights will direct a viewer's attention to the different
operations and recorded messages will describe them.
One exhibition will be selected philatelic displays from the
Post Office Department's extensive collection, ranging from the first
United States stamp issue of 1847 to the present. A lawn patio at
the entrance will display colorful and unusual mail deposit boxes sent
as gifts to the Government by foreign nations throughout the world.
Following the Fair, the boxes will be placed on permanent exhibition
on the lawn of the Post Office Department Building in Washington, D.C.
The interior of the Post Office will contain 10 working counters,
writing desks with pens, stamp vending machines, mail drops, more than
400 look boxes for exhibitors and concessionaires, and public tele-
phones.
The structure, occupying 17,752 square feet on a 45,000 square
foot plot, was built by the World's Fair Corporation at no cost to the
Federal Government.
Though the Post Office will not open officially until April 22,
its collection and delivery facilities will be made available to Fair
personnel, exhibitors and concessionaires starting March 16.
###
3/64-Rl7
U N I S PH E R E 0 oeeo
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
REFER INQUIRIES TO:
Peter McDonnell
Jerome Edelberg
Joyce Martin
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
- WF
- WF 4-6541
- WF 4-6543
YORK WORLD'S FAIR, Mar. 11 --- The Fair Corporation has
received inquiries from the press concerning the huge A & P sign
located some 300 feet from the northerly boundary of the World's Fair,
The sign, about 250 feet long, is on the roof of an A & P bakery,
It spells out, in 10-foot high neon letters, "JANE PARKER A & P BAKED
FOODS,"
Construction on the sign was started by A & P several years after
construction of the World's Fair began and was completed in February
1963. Although A & P has declined to exhibit at the Fair, the sign,
judging from its location and the time or its erection, is obviously
designed to attract the attention of Fair visitors, It has no other
purpose unless it is to be a conspicuous and obtrusive advertisement
overshadowing Flushing Meadow Park after the Fair.
The sign is clearly visible throughout a major portion of the
Fair, particularly at night. It is, in our opinion, a prime example
of the worst kind of advertising, utterly devoid of good taste.
We believe the sign is an affront to the exhibitors at the Fair
who are spending hundreds of millions of dollars to present the best
side of American life and to the 10,000,000 visitors who will come to
the Fair from all corners of the globe.
Among other things, the Fair has invested a large sum in a
fountain display with fireworks -- a spectacular use of colored jets
of water rising to unprecedented heights -- to be presented nightly,
constituting one of our moat attractive and colorful entertainment
FROM: Wm. J. Donoghue Corporation
10 Columbus Circle, N.Y.C.
(more)
.
.. A & P Sign
3/64-Rl7
features. Unless the offending A & P sign with its commercial neon
lighting is blocked out, it Will seriously interfere with the fountain
and fireworks displays and destroy their effects.
In view of complaints from exhibitors and others, the Fair, on a
number of occasions, asked A & P to remove the sign. A & P, through
its counsel, expt'essed a supposed "willingness to cooperate with the
Fait- in evet'y reasonable way" and a purported "interest in the Faii''s
success". However, it showed no disposition to take the sign down,
even during the Fair, apparently because "an investment of well over
$100,000
11
is involved. Correspondence with John T. Cahill, Counsel
f ~ r A & P, is attached.
The World's Fair legislation permits the Board of Estimate of the
City to limit signs within 500 feet of the Fair site. The legislation
was passed to insure the beauty of the Fair and to provide fot' the
safety, convenience and comfort of Fair visitors. While it might be
possible to control the sign through rules promulgated under such
legislation, counsel for A & P has warned that any attempt to do so
will "present serious legal questions." It appears, therefore, that
any effort to proceed against A & P legally will result in a lawsuit
which might not be decided until the Fait' is over.
Since A & P has not done anything about the sign, and has shown
no inclination to do anything, the Fair, in the interest of exhibitors
and the public, has been studying ways of screening the sign from view.
Our plans call for artificial sht'ubbery and decorative balloons call-
ing attention to the Jonee Beach State Park World's Fair 80 Days
Around the World Show, a show timed to run with the Fair seasons and
to serve as an important auxiliary attraction of the Fair.
* * *
A'rrACHMENTS: CORRESPONDENCE BETWEEN MR. MOSES AND A & P COUNSEL.
# # #
A & P Sign 3/64-Rl7
Att, No. 1
COPY NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
-
Exposition at Flushing Meadow Park
Flushing 52, N.Y.
John T, Cahill, Esq.
Cahill, Gordon, Reindel & Ohl
80 Pine Street
New York 5, N.Y.
Dear Johnny:
September 27, 1963
The A & P Company has a very large sign
11
Jane Parker
A & P Baked Foods
11
on top of' 1 ts building located some three
hundred feet north of the boundary of the World's Fair premises.
A number of complaints have been made to us to the general
effect that the sign will be most unsightly and inappropriate
during the Fair.
I understand that some question is presented as to
the legality of this sign under general law and that, in any
event, the Board of Estimate under our special World's Fair
legislation could direct its removal during the Fair. However,
I wonder 1f you would be good enough to use your good offices
to see whether the A & P, as a gesture of its good will toward
the Fair, would voluntarily take the sign down while the Fair
is in progress.
Cordially,
/s/ Robert Moses
President
A & P Sign
3/64-R17
Att. No. 2
9..Qll CAHILL, GORDON
1
REINDEL & OHL
Eighty Pine Street
New Yot•k 5, N. Y.
Telephone WHitehall 4-7400
October 14
1
1963
Dear Bob:
I have taken up with my client the matter of
the sign which you say is three hundred feet north of
the boundary of the World
1
s Fair premises.
I will advise you further when I hear from
them.
Honorable Robert Moses
New York World's Fair
Flushing 52, New York
Sincerely,
/s/ John
John T. Cahill
A & P Sign
·Att. No. 3
CAHILL, GORDON, REINDEL & OHL
Eighty Pine Street
New York 5, N. Y.
Telephone WHitehall 4-7400
3/64-Rl7
October 29, 1963
Dear Bob:
A & P has been considering the question raised by
your letter of ser.tember 27, 1963 concerning the "Jane Parker
A & P Baked Foods' sign, which you say may be within 500 feet
of the Fair's boundary, and wishes me to bring to your atten-
tion certain pertinent facts of which you may not be aware,
The negotiations for the purchase by A & P of the
property on which the A & P bakery is located were conducted
in 1958 and the contract was entered into in early 1959 well
before the possibility of the Fair appeared in public print.
That a large sign would be erected on the bakery roof • a
practice generally folloNed by A & P and, as you know, by
other commercial enterprises - was also under consideration
at that time, The structure of the bakery building was
designed to support the sign, Plans for the sign were filed
and the necessary permit obtained in 1961. Construction of
the sign itself was commenced in 1962, when the bakery building
was sufficiently far along, and completed in February, 1963,
The sign represents an investment of well over $100,000. Its
removal and later re-erection would be very costly.
You may also \'lish to know that the A & P bakery is
considered to be a show place of the bakery industry. It is
completely automated with the most modern equipment and is
probably the largest bakery plant of its type in the United
States, It is continually being toured by rood and drug
officials from many states. I am sure you will agree that
A & P is entitled to be proud of such a facility.
So far as I have been able to ascertain no action
has been taken by the Board of Estimate under Chapter 428 of
the Laws of 1960 to regulate signs within 500 feet of the
boundaries of the Fair premises. Any regulations now adopted
which purported to have a retroactive effect would present
serious legal questions if applied to the A & P sign.
A & P wishes me to express its willingness to co-
operate with the Fair in every reasonable way and ita interest
in the Fair's success,
Sincerely,
/s/ John
Honorable Robert Moses, President
New York World's Fair 1 9 6 L ~ - 1 9 6 5
Corporation
Flushing 52
1
N. Y,
JOHN T, CAHILL
A"& P Sign
Att. No. 4
COPY NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
-
International Exposition at Flushing Meadow Park
Flushing 52, N.Y.
John T. Cahill, Esq.
Cahill, Gordon, Reindel & Ohl
80 Pine Street
New York 5, N.Y.
Dear Johnny:
November 1, 1963
I have your letter of October 29th expressing A&P's
"willingness to cooperate with the Fair in e,,ery reasonable
way and its interest in the Fair's success," coupled with its
refusal to do anything about the sign, even during the Fair,
in view of the fact it has invested $100,000 in it.. I fail
to see the pertinency of the argument that this bakery is a
completely automated show place of the bakery industry.
Apparently, we shall have to pass on A&P's concept of
cooperation to the people who have been complaining about the
lack of good taste of displaying such a huge sign during the
Fair. Why not cut down the size as a matter of cooperation?
Cordially,
/s/ Robert Moses
President
\
I. 3/64 R-llf EX
UNISPHERE
Ol96t
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
FLUSHING 52, N.Y. • TELEPHONE· AREA CODE 212·WF 4·1964 • CABLE ADDRESS "WORLDSFAIR"
PIEAC£ THROUGH
UNOEASTANDINO
--·
....... .._ ...
NEWS:
FROM: Orar & Winter
33 Eaat 48th Street
New York 17
1
N. Y.
PLaza 2-8843
).
/
.
ROBERT MOSES
I
_....,.. PRESIDENT
. (,./ ·-
) ...
. k 'I
J/l /arch 11, 1964
.•
-·.J·
/ \
Zo/
NEW YORK--The daring, dash and defying antics of stunt
drivers guiding their cars through the air and out of high speed
spins will be staged daily at the 1964-65 New York World's Fair.
The Auto Thrill Show, featuring the Jack Kochman New York
World's Fair Hell Drivers, will be produced at a $2,500,000 site
where a high·banked, figure eight, asphalt track has been constructed.
For more than three years, engineers and designers have worked to
perfect the track·-the first one ever to be designed for auto thrill
shows.
Located in the Transportation Area of the World's Fair, the
181,000 sq. ft. site will offer Fairgoers an hour-long program four
times a day on weekdays and eight times daily on weekends and
holidays. The 5600 seat stadium was designed to give every fan a
good view of the action-packed program.
The World's Fair Hell Drivers are the direct successors to the
Jimmy Lynch Death Dodgers which performed in the 1939-40 New York
World's Fair. Rocky Fisher and Johnny RogersJ veteran stunt drivers
who drove in the World's Fair 25 years ago, will display their skills
at moat of the 1800 performances scheduled for the 1964-65 Fair
calendar.
The Hell Drivers will drive stock Dodge automobiles whose
only modification is a heavy-duty suspension system needed for the
exacting and punishing stunts, especially the 70 foot ramp-to-ramp
jump.
FROM: Wm. J. Donoghue Corporation
10 Columbus Circle, N.Y.C.
- more -
3 / 6 ~ R-14 EX
- 2 -
A team of 30 drivers and stunt men will combine for each
performance. Sixteen cars and trucks--standard Dodge vehicles driven
on the highway--will be used for such events as the hi-ski (a car
riding on two wheels) reverse spin (car speeding down the track in
reverse is put into forward motion through split-second change of
gears) and the world famous ramp-to-ramp leap.
At one point, a clown stands impassively in the center of a
ramp while four vehicles zoom down on him and come within inches of
his tattered garb, During the years with the Hell Drivers, clown
Billy Don Jones, of Wichita, Kansas, has suffered only one serious
mishap--a broken leg.
Because each driver risks his life during each performance,
he skillfUlly and dutifUlly checks-out his Dodge vehicle before pull-
ing onto the track. He takes nothing for granted. The check-out
list is a long one that includes tire pressure, front and alignment,
gas supply and the trusted seat belts that get a sharp tug.
The Hell Drivers' skill is reflected in destruction, too.
During the run of the Fair, the Hell Drivers will demolish 1800
vehicles--one a performance.
But for the most part, positive, split-second timing, team
effort and precision are evidenced as cars zig-zag and criss-cross
the asphalt, figure-eight track. At one point in the program, four
vehicles race around and around in a single line just inches from
one another at times even engaged in friendly bumping or bumpers
around the treacherous far turns.
The Kochman Hell Drivers have toured throughout Europe, Central
and South America and have four units touring the United States. More
than 2,000,000 persons saw the Hell Drivers in 1963.
When the World's Fair opens on April 22nd, the Hell Drivers
will be staging their 9,426th performance.
Robert Conto, general manager of the Hell Drivers, said that
the organization has used Dodge vehicles for the past 23 years.
The Auto Thrill Show is the largest concessionaire at the
1964-65 New York World's Fair. It is situated near the spectacular
exhibits of the Big Three auto companies.
Transportation Productions Inc., of Brooklyn, New York, are
the producers of the Auto Thrill Show.
######
3/64 R-15 EX
UNISPHERE o u ~ e t
ll
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
FLUSHING 52, N.Y. • TELEPHONE· AREA CODE 212-WF 4-1964 • CABLE ADDRESS "WORLDSFAIR"
PEACE TUROUOH
UNOEIISTANDINO
--..
@) .............
NEWS:
From: CITIES SERVICE COMPANY
6o Wall st.
New York,. N.Y.
HAnover 2 -1600
RELEASE DATE: A.M., Tuesday, March 10, 1964
ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT
"The Cities Service World's Fair Band of America" will bring
music to an estimated audience of over 70 million at the New York
World's Fair during 1964 and 1965.
Arrangements have been completed for Cities Service to
sponsor the official band of the Fair by Burl s. Watson, Chairman of
the Board of Cities Service Company, and Robert Moses, President of
the New York World's Fair 1964-1965 Corporation.
Noted bandmaster Paul Lavalle, who has directed the famous
Cities Service band on radio and television since 1944, will wield
the baton at the World's Fair.
Using the original Cities Service broadcast format, the band
will perform a minimum of six concerts at officially designed facili-
ties at the Fair each day. The band will also be featured at various
special and official events at the Fair. In addition, each week a
state or a country will receive a musical salute from the band during
its concerts.
Cities Service has been bringing outstanding music to the
American public since 1927.
FROM: Wm. J. Donoghue Corporation
10 Columbus Circle, N.Y.C.
####
UN I SPHERE
01..-&1
3/64-RlS
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
FLUSHING 52, N.Y. • TELEPHONE- AREA CODE 212-WF 4-1964 • CABLE ADDRESS "WORLDSFAIR"
P(.ACit THAOUOH
UNDI:iltSTAHDINO
--·
~ - - ...
NEWS:
REFER INQUIRIES TO:
Peter MCDonnell - WF 4-6531
Jerome Edelberg - WF 4-6541
Joyce Martin - WF 4-6543
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT
March 12
1
1964
STATEMENT OF ROBERT MOSES IN ANSWER TO A LETTER
RELEASED BY COMPTROLLER BEAME
I have read Comptroller Beame•s statement regarding the
Post-Fair Flushing Meadow and related park improvements. I donrt
want to quibble. But the Comptroller begins by making an inaccurate
analysis of surplus funds. The facts are perfectly simple. Under
the present agreement bank loans must be repaid first. We have
just made such a repayment far in advance o ~ any expectation. Next
come our obligations to our noteholders. Then comes restoration.
Then comes the $241 000
1
000 advanced by the City for construction.
Then comes the balance for the completion o ~ the park, and finally
education.
The legislation proposed is merely permissive. It would
enable the Fair, if there is sufficient surplus, to combine demo•
lition, salvage, cutting and filling and many other engineering
objectives with park completion. I ~ these objectives are not
pursued together, an enormous amount of confusion will result.
In fact it would be almost impossible to pursue this work econom-
ically and in a reasonable time otherwise than under the auspices
of those who built the Fair and are in close touch with the ex-
hibitors, foreign and domestic. I speak in this instance as a
City Park Commissioner who prepared the grounds and had charge ot
the basic improvements for the 1939-1940 World's Fair and then
FROM: Wm. J. Donoghue Corporatien
10 Columbus Circle, N.Y.C.
{more)
3/64·Rl8
• 2 -
inherited the Fair grounds afterward. There was never enough money
left to complete the park and the result was that we left an area
which was a reproach to the City and or little use £or recreation
purposes.
The Comptroller says that it is proposed to give the World's
Fair Corporation a blank check. There is not a nickel of surplus
beyond the obligations above-mentioned which could be used by the
Fair excepting with the full approval of the appropriate City
authorities.
The Comptroller's statement that this legislation implies that
parks are more important than schools is sheer nonsense. What he
proposes is to use as much of the surplus as he can get for current
expense budget school needs. This is a one•shot operation. Once
spent the money is gone, and it is good for only a year.
The Comptroller says responsibility for park development is
being given the executives of a non-profit corporation. The fact
is that there is no other conceivable way of getting the work done,
and the executives in question are all people of reputation upon
whom the Comptroller seems to depend to earn the surplus which will
not exist unless they earn it. When he speaks of a costly duplica-
tion of administrative effort he is again talking nonsense. The
purpose of this arrangement is to avoid duplication. The
Comptroller's statement that parks would be developed without the
supervision of the City Park Department is false. Not one nickel
beyond restoration could be spent without the approval or the
governing body of the City and the City Park Department, City
Planning Commission, etc. The Comptroller refers to the letting
of contracts without public bidding, not mentioning the fact that
the money will be earned by the World's Fair and is not City money.
He says there would be no audit by the City Comptrollerrs
office. The simplest thing in the world is to require audit as
part of the agreement between the Fair and the City and to write
this into the agreement. There would be no objection to this.
The Comptroller's implication that there would be other funds
(more)
. .
3/64-Rl8
- 3 -
available to finish Flushing Meadow Park is sheer nonsense. This
is not the tact. That was the story in 1940 and nothing came or it.
The Comptroller does not mention the fact that the City will
not only receive enormous benefits from those attending the Fair
and from the Fair itself and the goodwill or visitors, but will
also receive a v e ~ large and unexpected sum in taxes, notably in
the case or the sales tax. It has been estimated that the City
will receive close to $200,000
1
000 additional money through sales
tax collections due to purchases by visitors to the Fair.
What intrigues me the most is the Comptroller's avoidance or
the one.thing which I would think he would be glad as a matter or
simple justice to mention - namely, that this Fair, which he and
a number or others in the financial world prophesied would never
get orr the ground, has already made advance sales or tickets
aggregating over $35,000,000, that no such record has ever been
made in the case or any other Fair or any other similar show or
entertainment and that the only way or earning a huge surplus is
by the most prudent and able management. I think it would be
smart tor the Comptroller to give some attention to these factors
rather than to spend time dividing up surpluses which do not as
yet exist.
I would hardly go so tar as to expect Comptroller Beame to
devote very much time to congratulating the Fair on the progress
which has been made or to express gratitude on this score, but I
think he might retrain from attacking the Fair as though it were
some alien, unofficial promotion incapable or serving the best
interests or the City.
ROBERT MOSES
# # #
..
3/64-Rl9
• U N I S P H E R E 0 ,.,,.,
N EW y 0 R K w 0 R L DIs FA I R 1 9 6 4-19 6 5 c 0 R p 0 RAT I 0 N
.. , ...
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
FLUSHING 52, N.Y. • TELEPHONE· AREA CODE 212-WF 4·1964 • CABLE ADDRESS "WORLDSFAIR"
PlACE THitOUOH
UNOEASTAttOINO
ROBERT MOSES
--..
®---
NEWS:
REFER INQUIRIES TO:
Pete McDonnell - WF 4-6531
Jerome Ede1berg - WF 4-6541
FOR RELEASE: TUESDAY, MARCH 17
1
1964
March 13, 1964
FOLLOWING IS TEXT OF CABLEGRAM FROM ROBERT MOSES,
PRESIDENT OF THE NEW YORK WORLDIS FAIR 1964-1965
CORPORATION, TO THE HON. SEAN MOORE, LORD MAYOR
OF DUBLIN:
THE HONORABLE SEAN MOORE
LORD MAYOR OF DUBLIN
DUBLIN, EIRE
PRESIDENT
ON THIS ST. PATRICK'S DAY
1
THE NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR EXTENDS
WARM GREETINGS TO THE PEOPLE OF IRELAND. EVERYONE IN NEW YORK
WEARS A BIT OF GREEN ON MARCH 17 AND, SHARING THE WARMTH AND
WIT OF THEIR GAELIC NEIGHBORS, ALL NEW YORKERS ARE TRANSFORMED
THIS DAY INTO IRISHMEN.
WE AT THE WORLD'S FAIR ARE PROUD TO HAVE THE PAVILION OF IRELAND
IN OUR MIDST. IT IS SURE TO BE ONE OF THE MAJOR ATTRACTIONS AT
THE OPENING ON APRIL 22. AT YOUR EXHIBIT, MILLIONS OF PERSONS
FROM THE UNITED STATES AND FROM ALL PARTS OF THE WORLD WILL
FIND GRAPHIC EVIDENCE OF THE INDUSTRY, CULTURE, FAITH, POETRY
AND MUSIC WHICH COMBINES TO FORM THE IRRESISTIBLE CHARM AND
APPEAL OF IRELAND.
FROM: Wm. J. Donoghue Corporation
10 Columbus Circle, N.Y.C.
Robert Moses
President
New York World's Fair
1964-1965 Corporation
/
' .
3/64•R21
UNISPHERE 0"""
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
FLUSHING 52, N.Y. • TELEPHONE· AREA CODE 212-WF 4-1964 • CABLE ADDRESS "WORLDSFAIR"
Pt:.AC! tHROUGH
REJ.?ER INQUIRIES TO:
Peter McDonnell
Jerome Edelberg
Joyce Martin
• \!IF 4-6531
- UF 4-6541
- 4-6543
Ji'OR RELEASE MONDAY
1
MARCH, 16,
STATEMENT BY THE
ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT
March 14, 1964
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
The position of A & P, as stated in legal papers served on
the Fair, is, in essence, "The public be damned."
A & P says bluntly that its baleful neon eye must beam
throughout the Fair -- must shine undimmed on the edifices of the
Fair, its fountains and shows.
Among other things, the Fair has invested over $2,500,000
in a fountain display with fireworks -- a spectacular use of
colored jets of water rising to unprecendented heights -- to be
presented nightly, constituting one of our moat attractive and
colorful entertainment features, Unless the A & P sign is blocked
out, it will seriously interfere with enjoyment of the fountain and
fireworks displays and destroy their effects,
to A & P, the Fair can take no steps, even on our
own property, to protect our exhibits and displays and millions of
visitors from having this football field length sign intrude upon
the beauty or the Fair. All the visitors to the Fatr must day and
night observe this unblinking and omnipresent Big Brother.
FROM: Wm. J. Donoghue Corporation
10 Columbus Circle, N.Y.C.
(more)
. '
l
3/64•R21
We believe the many magnificent pavilions within the Fair
are entitled to be viewed without interference by A & P. Those
who scan the Dead Seas scrolls should not have to read also A & Pfs
sign. Those who glory in Michelangelo's P1eta should not have to
gain inspiration from the poetic message or JANE PARKER'S BAKED
l'OODS. Those who seek a quiet moment in our Garden of Meditation
should not be compelled to reflect on this strident advertising
slogan.
A & P proudly tells us the sign was built to summon the
attention of all and sundry for miles around, to "be visible across
Flushing Meadow Park to traffic approximately one mile distant
moving on Grand Central Parkway," "from the Long Island Expressway
approximately a mile and a quarter distant," "to passengers on the
Long Island Railroad and on the elevated lines operated by the New
York City Transit Authority," and to "pedestrians, travelers and
inhabitants of the surrounding area." All must look.
Onets home is still one's castle. The world's Fair grounds
are our home. What we propose to do is to protect our home so we
and 70,000,000 or more guests dontt have to look at the offensive
antics of this neighbor any longer. We cantt believe there is any
legal doctrine that will compel us to use the Fair to glorify Jane
Parker• s rolls.
The plan to screen the A & P sign will have as its basic
element the use or artificial shrubbery located entirely on World's
Fair property west of the van Wyck Expressway. Details will be
announced when planning is completed.
# ~ .II
INFORMA'l'IO!{ gQ£X.
3/64-R20
UN I SPHERE 01861
NEW Yo'R.K WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
FLUSHING 52, N.Y. • TELEPHONE· AREA 'COOE 212-WF 4-l964 • CABLE ADDRESS "WORLOSFAIR"
PUC£ THROUGH
UNOitASTANOING
...............
@l---
NEWS:
REFER INQUIRIES TO:
Peter McDonnell
Jerome Edelberg
Joyce Martin
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT
1964
- WF 4-6531
- WF 4-6541
- WF 4-6543
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR, Mar, 13 --- The agreement between
Comarg Corporation, sponsors or the Argentine Pavilion, and the
New York World's Fair 1 9 6 4 ~ 1 9 6 5 Corporation has been terminated
because of contractual defaults on the part or Comarg, it was
announced today by former Governor Charles Poletti, Fair vice
president in charge of International Affairs and Exhibits.
The Argentine Pavilion is being taken over by Taylor &
Gaskin International, Inc,, 6440 Mack Avenue, Detroit 7, Michigan,
general contractors for the building, acting through the newly
created Tagasint Fair Corporation of New York City.
The building is substantially completed and will be ready
in time for the Fair's opening, The new sponsors or the Pavilion
will undertake to make arrangements for the exhibits in that
building.
# # #
FROM: Wm. J. Donoghue Corporation
· 10 Columbus Circle, N.Y.C.
FAIR
OFFICIAL
UNISPHERE®
- ..
e 1f61 Nt. Y01. Wo.W't foi4- lf6C.I96! Corpotvtioft
NE\VS
TICKH
PAVIUON OF JORDAN TO DISPLAY on Monday, March
2
nd, _a PLANS READIED FOR SPECTACULAR
HISTORY AND CULTURE OF HOLY LAND press was held m the Fau s OPENING PARADE AND CEREMONIES
Press Bu1ldmg, where Robert Moses, pres·
His Majesty King
Hussein I of the Ha-
shemite Kingdom of
Jordan will visit the
Fair in late April, ac·
cording to word re-
ceived by Mr. Mosc.:s
and Governor Poletti.
His Majesty The monarch is ex-
King Hussein
1
peered to tour the
grounds and inspett, especially, his coun·
try's pavilion.
The Pavilion of the Hashemite King-
dom of Jordan is a unique architectural
undertaking which was designed to depict
the ancient Land of Jordan - the cradle
of all Western civilization. In Jordan, a
country rich in religious background, arc
found the great shrines of Jerusalem, Beth-
lehem and Jericho, and the storied River
Jordan and Dead Sea.
Through the centuries, the art of Chris-
tian man has continually strived to repre-
sent the glory and the suffering of Christ
as He approached Calvary. The stained
glass windows of the Jordan Pavilion at-
tc.:mpt to convey The Holy Spirit which
emanates from the 14 Stations of the Way
of the Cross in the Holy City of Jerusalem.
The Pavilion's skylights of multicolored
many-faceted glass reflect the spirit of light
ever present in the Holy Land- the light
from above which brings inspir.ttion and
direction to man below.
On exhibition in the pavilion will he ,1
collection of Dead Sea Scrolls which were
discovered during 194 7 in caVL·s on the
banks of the Dead Sea. These Scrolls com-
prise the euliest known manusmpts of
the Old Testament. An .mciem culurnn
brought from the old Jordanian city of
Jerash will stand ne.u the pavilion. This
column is a gift from His 1\l.ijesty K111g
Hussein to the World's Fair and the City
of New York, and will remain in Flushing
Meadow Park after the conduswn of the
Fair.
© 196 .. New York World's Fair 1964-1965 Corporot•on
ident of the Fair Corporation, issued a
statement announcing the results of the
Fair's advance ticket sale program. The
pre-opening admissions sale was the largest
for any single event in history.
The thronged conference, attended by
every major metropolitan daily, in addition
to radio, television and magazine reporters,
revealed titat the advance sale had soared
ro 28,034,987 tickets as of February 29 for
a total of $35,219,602 in cash, almost three
times greater than the target figures.
Among important effects of the huge
sale were the ability of the Fair Corpora·
cion to repay $3 million in 5% bank loans,
not due until August 1st, 1964, thus saving
substantially in interest charges; and the
Fair's anticipation of paying off the $30
million 6% notes outstanding, before the
end of 1964, even though the notes will
not mature until August 1, 1966.
Thomas J. Deegan, Jr., chairman of the
executive committee, supplemented Mr.
Moses' statement with comparative statis-
tics, showing that the advance ticket sale
exceeds the entire attendance at the 1939
New York World's Fair.
(Continued on page 2, col. I)
.. \
When the first ticket holder enters the
Fairgrounds at 9:00 a.m. on Opening
Day, April 22nd, he will be greeted not
only by Fair officials but, undoubtedly, by
a barrage of reporters for newspapers,
magazines, radio and television outlets
around the world.
Promptly at 9:15 on the Fair's red letter
day, the American and World's Fair flags
will be raised with appropriate ceremonies
at the Court of the Universe. The national
anthem will be played by the World's Fair
Band.
At the conclusion of the flag cere-
monies, General William E. Potter as
Marshal, will lead the great parade accom-
panied by his staff and the Color Guard.
When the marchers reach the reviewing
stand in f rant of the Central Pool and
facing the Court of the Universe, General
Potter will enter the stand to review the
entire parade.
The hour-long, colorful parade will fea·
turc exhibitors' floats, numerous high
school and college bands, international
representatives in native costume and
prancing, decorated animals- all keyed
to gaiety and excitement.
After the conclusion of the parade at
l 0: 30, Guy Lombardo will entertain Fair
guests .md the press in the Singer Bowl
until the visiting dignitaries file into the
Bow I and take their places on the speakers'
platform.
.-\fter Richard Tucker sings the Star
Sp.mgled Banner, Thomas J. Deegan, Jr.
wd l start the official ceremonies by intro·
ducing His Eminence Francis Cardinal
Spellman, who will deliver the invocation.
After bnef addresses by Mr. Moses, City,
State, and Government officials, Postmaster
Gcner.d John A. Gronouski will present
the first folders of World's Fair Commem·
or.tti\'e Stamps to the principals.
The ceremonies will be concluded by a
rendidon of Richard Rodger's official
World's Fair song, "Fair is Fair."
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965
World'a Fair, N.Y. 11310 • 212-WF 4-1964
IOIIIT MOSES, l'realdont
QUOTE OF THE MONTH
FAIR OUTLOOK FINE-AD-
VANCE S/JLES of ttckt'/.1 to the
lY/orld'.! F,ur durmg tlw /,1.\t I() nwnthJ
total $3 5,21 C),602 111 C.IJJ, -·· /,ngcr.
report.r l?o/Jert 1\!oJt>.!, prewhllt of
the corpur,ttto/1, "th,m ,/ll)' prcz in111l1
I))' wmp,n.d;h enltr-
prise tlll)'ll'herc"
lfe .rh,tre thl' pride of Mr. ,\IIIH'I
u·hen he ,,ddJ, ll'ith toloLI.d lllldcr-
.rtatement. "u e ""IJ' h.n·e" .11/((e.\J "''
our h,auh."- EJ1ronal. New York
Journal-American, March ·1, 1
1
)(,1.
(Con11111ml from /'·'X" I. ,of. 2)
FAIR'S ADVANCE TICKET SALE
A letter from l\.l,tyor W.tgner .tdd rl'\>l'• I
w Mr. Moses .111d Mr. lkeg.tn w.ts ""
trtbuted to the press. In wngr.ttul.111ng the
F.11r exelllti\TS, st.llf. exh1h1tors .tnd work
men on the F.11r's progrrss. the ,\l.tror s.11d
th.l! the uwrmous .llh·.tllll' ,,de llf t1eku'
IS "tlu: best t:\'ldelll'l' nf publtL llllthdtncL·
here, .til mer the wumry .tnd .tbw.td 111 the
.tbtllt)' oi the C11y of New York w pro-
duce tHHst.tnd1ng orgJniZrr>. tin.llllll'fS .tncl
budders."

Tower of the Winds, port of Pepsi-Colo
hibit ot the Fair, is readied for Opening Doy,
April 22. Titled "It's A Small World,· the
exhibit will present a spectacular tour of the
globe designed ond built by Walt Disney. A
UNICEF pavilion ond garden operated by
U.S. Committee for UNICEF is also port of
the Pepsi-Cola project.
WOMEN'S ADVISORY COUNCIL
PLANS ANNOUNCED AT WALDORF
F.ur Pres1drnt Robrrt p.ud tr1h1Hl:
tu the Women's Hospn.tllt)' Cem<:r
.It .1 lunLheon hdd Jt the W.tldorl Aston.t,
.tt wlmh 1\trs. Lsthrr Peterson,
SeL ret.tr)' of Ltbor, w.ts the hunurcd guo!.
The luJHheon sponsorul by the
Womrn·s Adnsory Cuunul PI thr l'.ur.
PIJns fur >peu.tl Honor D.tp dunng the
F.ur·, ;e,t>ons were rr\eJic:d.
Mrs. Peter>on, who Spcu.tl
w the tor Comumrr Atf.urs .tnd
D1rnlllr of the Women's Bure.tu, wdl be
honored on the "\X'umen 111 Pol1t1es .111d
GmerrllllLIH D.ty" .tt the Lur.
\X'dl1.11n Berm, F.ur 'ILr prc"dem,
>en eel ,t> m.tstrr uf Len:monlt:S lor the
progr.tm wluLh rnLluded by
Adncn l'elktiL'f, eh.mm.tn ot the bo.trcl
of Purrx ( orpelr,ltlon, Ltd., !\Irs. Dexter
OliS Arnold, pn:srdmt of the <.;ener.tl h:d·
n.ll1on of \'\'omen's Clubs, .111J Dougl.ts
l..tph.un, \'IL r pres1elent of the Bettrr L1 ,. ·
mg Center. wl11ch wdl housr the \'X'omm\
Husprt.dny ( cnrer. wurt<:S\' oi Purcx
U.S. Space Park Slated for
Fair's Transportation Area
A [Inned Swes Sp.tLe P.Hk. d1spl.ty111g
the must unpressi\T .Hr.t\ of iull-scJit
Wlkrts .111d 'i'·l(t:lf.tft l \Tr ,\SSe!11bfed 0\lt-
Sidt: of C.tpe Kcnnccl)·. wdl h· J hrghl1ght
"f the l'.ur·s Tr.l!lsport.Hillll Arc.t, .ttcord·
lilt.: tn .1 i<liiH .rnnoumuncnt hr F.ur Prr'i·
dl:llt R,Jhert :\loSl'S Jnd c'l[\ Cnuncd
Prcsrdent P.tul R SL rc1 .tnc It IS, spnnsorrd
br the Dt:p.trrmenr nf Defense, the N.t·
uon.tl Annn.tlltiC.tl Sp.tu: A gem y .111d the
F.tir
r\ tulf·,t.tk HP.ltt.ul" 'tttiPil of rhe
S.uurn \' rntkcr. l'\f'<:dc<l till.Hfl Amcn
e.ln 111 the .\lo11n. 11dl he .1 fe.t·
rure uf the 11111'""11).! cxhd'lt The modt:l
't.1nds K'i fet:t t.dl .tnd mc.tsures '' icn 1n
c!l.lllll'tl'f
Tnllt;flll,l.! "'n rhc t\\o·.llfe P.1rk wdl he
.I Trt.lll II h""'ru. IIi> leer lllt.:h. 'r.tnclrnt.:
1 c rrrt.dll 11 1th rhc ( •l'lllllll 1111 r"l:'.
llht ·" tl " .. ul.l he "n rhc p.t.l .1r ( .q'e Kln·
f1L'Ih bl'!t!fC LtUflLh!llL: (\\(1 .P.(flJtl.illf\ 1[H11
l.lfthnrh1r '
Other e'hll'lh \\ill IT\< luck the 'f'.ilL
'r.tlt Aj'• .II ... l.urL1r I'' ur""n ,\f.,,Julc.
;\rf." .. \ftrcun .tncl Th"r-lklt.l l.lllmh"
h1cln . .1n X-I 'i • rc,t.trth
.11rcr.tfr .ln,f the 'l'.ill' IL'hli lc "I'J<L'
.tnd utlilt<l''> l11r
.trt ht:>n,t.: l'fli\IJcd .It 1111 < "'t t" the (;"'
crnmenr. Tht:re ''ill be 111,, h.trJ.'C t11r, 1c11
1111.! tht cxh:hrt'
PAYING THE WAY FOR OPENING DAY
-Crews working on day and night shifts
pave the huge complex of avenues which link
the hundreds of exhibits at the Fair. Most of
the paving is done at night when traffic on the
grounds is at a minimum. Because all curbing
was laid in advance, paving operation is sim-
ple and fast. Every artery will be spic-ond-
spon for Opening Doy, April 22.
10th Exhibitor PR
Meeting Tomorrow
The exhibitor public relations meet·
ing tomorrow is the tenth such working
session. William Berns, vice president
in charge of Communications and Pub·
lie Relations, will mark the occasion
by expressing the grateful apprecia·
tion of his staff and consultants for
the fine cooperation and outstanding
contributions of the exhibitor public
relations representatives to the suc·
cess of the Fair.
Giant Sat_urn V rocket arrives to become port
of the Un1ted Stoles Space Pork exhibit in the
Fair's Transportation Area.
LINCOLN. CENTER FESTIVAL
EVENTS COMPLEMENT
FAIR ATTRACTIONS
In accordance with its "Memo of Under-
standing," Lincoln Center for the Per-
forming Arts and the New York World's
Fair are co-sponsoring the Lincoln Center
World's Fair Festival, which began on
March 15 and will continue through the
fall of 1965. The Festival will present out-
standing international performing artists
in Philharmonic Hall and The New York
State Theater.
In announcing the Festival, Schuyler G.
Chapin, vice president of programming for
Lincoln Center said: "We arc looking for-
ward to the opportunity of not only
presenting these great performing arts
companies, but of playing host to new audi-
ences visiting Lincoln Center and the
World's Fair. We arc also particularly
pleased to introduce The New York State
Theater to our audiences during the Festi-
val."
Especially for Fair visitors, the Metro-
politan Opera Company will give a gala
two-week season of nine different works,
including "Falstaff," "Macbeth," and
"Otello," from April 27 through May 10.
The New York Pro Musica will dedicate
three concerts to Shakespeare on April 2 5,
May 2 and 9.
Among the many other outstanding
World's Fair Festival events will be the
Bayanihan Philippine Dance Company and
the Chilean National Ballet in the State
Theater, and the Sahm-Chun-Li Dancers
and Musicians in Philharmonic Hall. The
latter company, from Korea, will be on
their first tour of the U n iced States and
represent the first successful effort to bring
together in one company all the great
dancers of Korea.
FAIR POST OFFICE
DEDICATED
The New York World's Fair Commem-
orative Stamp was unveiled last week dur-
ing the dedication of the Fair's Post
Office, described as the "most modern in
the world." The stamp, of 5-cent denomi-
nation, will go on sale nationally on April
22, the Fair's Opening Day. It is horizontal,
green, measures eight-tenths of an inch hy
1J.t2 inches, and bears an imprint of the
Unisphere
8
and Main Mall.
Among the 350 persons attending the
ceremony were Postmaster General John
A.Gronouski, Mr. Moses and former Post-
master General James A. Farley, named hy
President Lyndon B. Johnson as Honorary
Postmaster for the Fair_
CODE - 11380
..::;.::-.•.- .: '
MOST OlYMPIC TRIALS
TO BE HELD ON OR NEAR
THE FAIRGROUNDS
The World's Fair and nearby metropoli-
tan area will host fifteen of the scheduled
nineteen Olympic tryouts this spring and
summer. William S. Adams, Jr., Fair
Sports Dirccror, who is coordinating this
record program, reports that more than
2,000 of the nation's foremost athktes will
vic for positions on the U.S. Olympic team
which will compete in the XVIII Olym-
piad in Tokyo, Oct. 10-24, 1964.
The City and the Fair will serve as co-
hosts of the 59 "Olympic Days," marking
the first time in U.S. Olympic annals that
so many events have been assigned to a
single region. Besides the Olympic tryouts,
the World's Fair will also be the scene of
numerous National A.A.U. champion·
ships.
Olympic tryours in hoxing, wrestling
and judo will take place at the Fair's Singer
Bowl, which has a seating capacity of \H,-
000. Fencing and weight-lifting will he
contested in the Fair's 2,100-seat Assem·
hly Pavilion.
Men's and women's track and field trials
arc bound to attract capaciry throngs to
Downing Stadium, Randalls Island, which
can accommodate 22,000. Swimming, div-
ing and water polo events will he staged at
the Astoria Pool, Queens.
In the words of Kenneth L. Wilson,
pres1dent of the U.S. Olympic Commit-
tee, "The New York Fair and its unprece-
dented facilities for handling huge crowds
will make it possible for a greater numher
of people than ever before to witness the
tryouts for the XVIII Olympiad."
Postmaster General John A. Gronouski !left),
Fair President Robert Moses and former Post-
master General James A. Farley hold up
enlarged facsimile of World's Fair Commemo-
rative Stamp at dedication of Fair's post-
office, described as "mosl modern in the
world." Stamps first will be sold in oil U.S.
Post Offices on Opening Day of Fair, April 22.
Mr. Farley was named by President Lyndon B.
Johnson as Honorary Postmaster for the Fair .
BOUNTY SLIPS IN- The Bounty, Metro-
Goldwyn-Mayer's World's Fair exhibit, is
shown at its slip at the World's Fair Marina as
it is opened to the public far the first time.
The Bounty, constructed in lunenburg, Nova
Scotia in 1960, is a detailed reproduction of
the 18th century H.M.S. Bounty on whose
decks the drama of a mutiny was once played.
DANISH AND SWEDISH PAVILIONS
HAVE VARIETY OF APPEAL
Both the Pavilions of Denmark and
Sweden will have many tempting features
to offer all Fair visitors.
In the Pavilion of Denmark, a miniature
Tivoli Gardens playground for children
created by eleven of Denmark's leading
artists, is complete with slide, sandbox,
playhouse, maze, pools, canals and a cafe.
The Restaurant of Denmark will serve
Danish breakfasts, luncheons featuring
dishes from the Danish provinces, dinners
from the world-famous menus of Copen-
hagen, and the popular Danish Koldt
Bord, a table laden with meats, fish,
cheese, hams and other foods in endless
variety.
Sidewalk cafes modeled after those in
Copenhagen, will be outside both the Den-
mark Restaurant and the Kattegat Inn,
where smorrebrod will be served.
A Butik will offer a thousand and one
different gifts from food parcels to fabrics,
silver to salad bowls, toys to trays, and
pins to porcelains.
The Pavilion of Sweden, dedicated to
the theme of "Creative Sweden," is a testi-
monial to that nation's private enterprise.
Sponsored by leading industries and busi-
nesses, it has three main sections: a large
"Hall of Industry" featuring exhibits of
Swedish technology and products; a minia-
ture branch of the Nordiska Kornpaniet in
Stockholm, Sweden's largest department
store, which will display and sell hundreds
of examples of Swedish craftsmanship in
CI)'Stalwarc, ceramics, metals, textiles and
other fields, and "Restaurant Sweden,"
specializing in authentic Swedish smorgas-
bord, which will serve a selection of up
to .j() d1shes daily. The Skal Bar will fea-
ture Swedish beers, aquavit and other
rh1rstquenchcrs.
ART COLLECTIONS OFFER VARIETY AID BEAUTY II FAIR'S PAVILIOIS
The art collections to be offered at the
Fair range from priceless antiquities to ab-
stract, non-representational paintings and
sculpture, promising a rewarding experi-
ence for all visitors.
The circular base of the Federal Pavilion
will have an outdoor display of sculpture
selected for it by the Museum of Modern
Art, and an outdoor sculpture exhibit will
be featured in the New Jersey Pavilion.
Florida will present a rotating art exhibit
displaying both old masters and examples
of contemporary art loaned by museums
and private collectors. A special feature
will be its large collection of pre-Colum-
bian an.
Montana's centennial train will house
Charles Russell originals depicting scenes
of the Old West, and within the New Eng-
land Pavilion a 150-foot segment from a
mural in the New Bedford Whaling Mu-
seum will tell the story of whaling.
Hawaii will exhibit replicas of Tikis in
its Bishop Museum, and the works of con-
temporary Texans will be on display in the
Texas Pavilion.
The New York State Council on the Ans
will sponsor the art exhibitions at the State
pavilion. "The River: People and Places"
will be a survey of 17th-19th century paint·
ings featuring the Hudson River country.
Exhibits from various museums and cul-
tural institutions in the Ciry will be dis-
played in the New York Ciry Pavilion.
Among the highlights will be the Metro-
politan's small sculpture collection, objects
from the Museum of Primitive Art, a mon-
tage of 20th century art prepared by the
Guggenheim Museum, and important
pieces from the Whitney Museum's perma-
nent collection.
A committee of distinguished museum
directors and curators has supervised the
selection of 40 paintings to comprise a
"Four Centuries of American Master-
pieces" exhibition in the Better Living
Center.
Bronzes, porcelains, jade, ancient callig-
raphy, and stone monsters from the
Shangera, representing 40 centuries of
oriental art, will be sent to the Fair by the
Republic of China. The U. A. R. Pavilion
will display the most extensive collection
of Egyptian treasures-including the King
Tutankhamen collection - ever sent to a
foreign country.
Old masters from the Prado - works of
El Greco, Goya, Velazquez, Zurbaran-
will be on display in the Spanish Pavilion.
Supplementing this collection will be con-
temporary paintings of Dali, Picasso and
Mira, and sculptures by Sanchez and Sec-
ran.
A rotating art show in the American-
Israel Pavilion will feature the works of
Rembrandt, Lieberman, Chagall, and others
who have interpreted Jewish life in their
paintings.
Diego Rivera murals and Orozcos will
be exhibited in Mexico's pavilion and in
the Pavilion of Venezuela will be the works
of Jesus Soto and "white" landscapes by
Armondo Reveron.
There will be primitive an in the Afri-
can Pavilion, colored sand portraits in the
Belgian Village, ancient an and sculpture
in India's Pavilion, an exhibit of ornate
weapons and other anifacts in the Pavilion
of Thailand, and in the Philippine Pavilion
the history of the Islands will be told in
paneled wood carvings.
A 50-foot abstract in stainless steel, ex-
ecuted by Bertoni, will be placed at the
entrance to Austria's Pavilion, and Greece
will show bronze sculptures by Capralos as
well as stone and marble statues by La-
meras.
The processes involved in block printing
will be demonstrated in the privately-span·
sored Japanese Pavilion, and Indonesian
artisans will teach the ancient process of
batik printing and dyeing.
The religious pavilions will incorporate
art works as an integral part of their ex-
hibits. The centuries-old, gem-encrusted
Holy leon of the Virgin of Kazan will be
shown by the Russian Onhodox-Greek
Catholic Church. The Protestant and Or-
thodox Center will be beautified by a series
of stained glass windows, while the Moe·
mon Church wiiJ have giant murals and a
replica of Berte! Thorvaldsen's "Christus"
executed in marble by Aldo Rebechi.
The Fair's most noted acquisition and
one of the greatest of all works of art -
Michelangelo's Piela- will be exhibited
for the first time outside of St. Peter's in
the Fair's Vatican Pavilion.
Radio and Television Provide Saturation Coverage of Fair
Changes occurring in the American way
of life since the 1939 New York World's
Fair will be dramatically reflected in the
major role which the radio and television
industry will play in the new World's Fair.
The first television programs ever seen
by the public originated from the 1939
Fair, with nearly 200 TV sets in the area
carrying President Roosevelt's opening day
speech to some 1,000 people.
At the 1964-1965 Fair, there will be 300
color television sets within the Fair-
grounds itself, programming closed-circuit
highlights of Fair events, originated by
RCA from 69 TV outlets around the
grounds.
The Fair's radio and television center
will be located in the Singer Bowl where
each of the national networks will have its
own office. Additional space will be avail-
able for other broadcasters reporting from
the Fair.
Coverage of Fair events to date has been
exccnsive, especially in the New York area.
WNYC-TV and Radio have carried weekly
programs for the past year featuring as
host William Berns, Fair vice president in
charge of Communications and Public Re-
lations.
Plans for covering the Fair once it is
open are being made by broadcasters from
all over the country and from abroad. Such
well-known attractions as the "Today"
Show and "Queen For A Day" will origi·
nate from Flushing Meadow numerous
times after Opening Day.
On Opening Day, April 22, at 7:30p.m.
EST, NBC Television Network will bring
viewers to the Fair via a special hour-and-
a-half program in color sponsored by
United States Steel. Under producer Robert
Bendick, a staff eventually to number 2 50
persons has been at work on the grounds
creating a show to capture and commem-
orate the Fair's excitement and color.
Henry Fonda will act as program host and
among his area hosts will be Fred Mac·
Murray, Carol Channing and Lorne Greene.
UNISPHERI:e CIQifll
II
'
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
'
.
Hon. Paul R. Screvane
President of City Council
City Hall
New York 7, N. Y.
Dear Sir:
AREA CODE 212-WF 4-1964 CABLE WORLOSFAIR
March 16, 1964
In accordance with the procedure discussed at the joint annual
meeting of members and directors held on January 22, 1964, the
Executive Committee of the Fair Corporation considered, at its meet-
ing of March 6, 1964, the matter of car identification emblems and
procedure for admission to the F'air of members and directors.
The Executive Committee determined that permanent passes
will be issued to all members and directors.
It was also determined to issue to any member C!r uircdor who
desires to have one, an automobile medallion, which will identify the
owner of the car as a member or director. It will not, however, be
possible to provide any special parking privileges.
Your pass will be sent to you by the Comptroller of the Fair
Corporation in due course. If you desire a medallion, please write to
Miss Ernestine Haig, Secretary of the Corporation, requesting one.
Cordially yours,
~ 3 ~
Stuart Constable
Vice President-Opt-orations
-"-.. @--....
37DAYS TO OPENING DAY
.... . .
UNISPHI:AI:
8
•••••
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964·1965 CORPORATION
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
FLUSHING 52. N.Y. • TUtPHONE ·AREA CODE 212 • WF 4·1964 • CABLE ADDRESS •wORLDSF'AIR"
PIACI fHitOUOH
UNDIERITANDINO
March 23, 1964
The Honorable Leonard Farbsteln
Concp·ess of the United States
House of Representatives
Washington, D. c.
Dear Congressman:
As indicated before, no purpose would be
served by the discussion you propose.
Cordially,
/s/ Robert Moses
President
RM:fh
ROBERT MOSES
I'AIItDENr
.-..-..-.. @--""' 30 DAYS TO OPENING DAY
J.EONAJ;tp FARBSTEIN
... 1tno NOEW YoRK
COMMITTUo
POREION AFFAIRS
ctongrtss of tbt llniteb &tates
J{loust of
D. «;.
March 17, 1964
Robert Moses, President
N. Y. World's Fair 1964-1965 Corp.
World's Fair, New York, 11380
My dear President:
I would appreciate very much if you would give
an appointment to the undersigned, with a small com-
mittee of about two or three people, for the purpose
of discussing with you the establishment of a "Senior
Citizens' Day or Week,
11
sometime in the Fall and also
the admission at reduced rates for groups of elderly
people during the off season.
With warm regards,
LF:jt
S1n;erely, ;··
/) ·-
/LEONARD FARBSTEIN, , J
Member of Congress
NEW YORK O,.P'ICIIz
171F'I"HAVIHU&
0RIGON 1•5077
WAIHINOTOH CW,ICI:
NHO•
CAPITOL 4·J I Z I, EXT. M35
/
••
••
RENEWAL & DEVELOPMENT COMPANY 0 4 WEST 58 STREET
NEW YORK, N.Y. 10019 0 ELDORADO 5-4100 0 CABLE: RENADEV, N.Y.
March 25, 1964
Mr. Paul Screvane
City Hall
New York, New York
Dear Mr. Screvane:
your capacity as a member of the Board of
the request made by the
Senior 1zens Golden Ring Council for the establishment of a
special week sometime in September during which senior citizens
would be allowed reduced price admissions to the World's Fair.
It seems to me that this is a most reasonable as well as a modest
request. Many elderly people who would like to visit the Fair
would not be able to cover the many exhibits in one day. In
addition, the admission price of $2.00 or even the special rate of
$1. 35 plus expenses of carfare, food and special exhibits admiss-
ion prices would make the cost of a visit to the World's Fair
prohibitive.
The request for a 25¢ admission in September takes cognizance of
the fact that the World
1
s Fair Corporation might be reluctant to
offer any special prices during the peak spring and summer visiting
periods.
I know that a 25¢ admission for the week in September V\0 uld be
welcomed by many elderly people with whom I have spoken in the
Bronx. I am sure they reflect the feelings of elderly people through-
out the city.
I hope you will use your influence as a member of the World's Fair
Corporation to see that this request is granted.

I
;:mes H. Scheuer
JHS:mwk
\INIIIPHEREe 018111
PEACE THROUGH
UNOER9TANOINO
URGENT
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
FLUSHING 52, N.Y. • TELEPHONE ·AREA CODE 212 • WF 4·1964 • CABLE ADDRESS uWORLOSFAIR"
ROBERT MOSES
PREll I DENT
MEMORANDUM TO MURRAY DAVIS
FROM ROBERT MOSES
The. April 22nd Fair opening program must be settled,
printed and ready for distribution on a certain day, and many other
complex arrangements must be determined finally at that time.
What day? What is the deadline? Before that the presence or ab-
sence of the President must be settled.
The latest scuttlebutt is
1. He will attend
2. He won't
3. He will send a message to be read by Mayor Wagner.
I am getting more and more inquiries on this subj ectt and
it will surely break out in undesirable press speculation and public
discussion very shortly if we don't make a simple final announcement.
Incidentally, it is essential that you have the messages
from Mr. Hoover, Mr. Truman and General Eisenhower very shortly.
RM:MR
_.,_., @---
Where is my April 22nd program dummy?
/
/ ~ ~ ~ ~
~ ? ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
...... President
DAYS TO OPENING DAY
B·lo-IOM-701376(63) ~ 114
. . ( \\ /
..... ~ / Aj
.. SEYMOUR M A ~ K S
,TO THE COMPTROLLER
FOR RELEASE:

NEWS
10 A.M., THURS., April2, 1964
THE CITY OF NEW YORK
OFFICE OF THE COMPTROLLER
MUNICIPAL BUILDING
NEW YORK, N. Y. 10007
ABRAHAM D. BEAME
COMPTROLLER
64-36
Comptroller Abraham D. Beame has sent the following letter to
Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller:
RE: Assembly Introductory 5229
Print 6151
"I strongly urge your veto of the above listed bill to amend the laws
covering New York City's agreement with the World's Fair Corporation.
"The present law specifically states any surplus remaining, after payment
of all obligations, shall be turned over to the City. It shall be used to pay for the
restoration and improvement of Flushing Meadow Park, and the balance must be used
for educational purposes.
"The proposed amendments, contained in the above bill, would permit
the City to grant a two-year extension to the World's Fair Corporation, and further
extensions if deemed advisable. They would permit the City to contract with the
World's Fair Corporation to improve Flushing Meadow Park, as well as a chain of
other parks, before any of the surplus can be used for education.
"I base my objections upon the following:
"1 - This legislation carries the clear implication that we consider parks
more important than our urgent school needs. This is unrealistic at a time when our
schools are the focal point of the greatest social unrest in the history of our City,
State and Nation. Under the bill now before you, practically all the funds could be used
for parks. As a matter of fact, the plan and program, as prepared by the World's
Fair Corporation, estimates a surplus of $25, 725, 000 and allocates $23 million to
park improvements. Thus, only $2, 725,000, or about 1o:fo, would be available for
education. Under the bill before you, even this sum need not be made available for
education, if the cost of the parks exceeded the $23 million estimated.
(more)
Beame -2-
64-36
"2 - The surplus remaining after the World's Fair debts and obligations
are paid off, can be used by the City for either operating expenses or capital
improvements. On the other hand, City capital funds (bond money) can be used only
for public improvements or for certain specified purposes, permitted under the Local
Finance Law. The City could, if it so desired, make the park improvements out of
capital funds, as it normally would, and leave the bulk of the surplus available for
educational operating expenses.
"The proponents of this amendment have stated that these funds are a
'one-shot operation' and, therefore, less useful to our schools. That is a specious
argument. I need only point out a few of the critically-needed 'one-shot' expenditures
which could be applied to schools, with results which will be appreciated for many years
by our children, their teachers, and their parents.
"Such 'one-shot' money could be used to repair a leaky roof, and make it
weather-tight for many years. It could be used for replacing old and worn-out textbooks,
and for purchasing sorely needed new books, helping many classes for many years. It
could be used for many other items which will help improve the comfort, health, safety
and education of our children.
"Furthermore, the argument that a 'one-shot' income is not a good income
is fallacious. It falls before the fact that all the increased tax revenues which the City
expects as a result of the World's Fair are, in essence, 'one-shot' revenues. After
the Fair, we will have them no longer. Certainly, this is no reason for not using the
revenues from the World's Fair, for vital City services.
"3 - Even though this legislation is permissive, it should not be considered
at all because it is contrary to sound and proper government operation. It would permit
the City to transfer the responsibility for Park development from municipal officials,
who must answer to the people for their actions, to the executives of a non-public
corporation. There is no valid reason for this transfer, nor for the fact that it would
create a costly duplication of administrative effort.
Beame -3- 64-36
"4 - The World's Fair Corporation would be given the authority to
develop Parks without the control and supervision we now exercise over our own Park
Department. The only approval which would be required, under this bill, would be
the City's approval of plans before the program starts. After it gets under way,
there would be no City control. This seems to be a strange way of bypassing our
Park Commissioner and turning over the proposed to a sort of Super Park
Department, or a quasi- Authority.
"5 - Under this amended bill, contracts would be awarded, without public
letting, by the World's Fair Corporation, without approval by the City, and without
a public -hearing, as now required. It, thus, circumvents the approval by elected
officials who are directly responsible to the people.
"6 - There is no rEquirement that the Corporation be subject to audit.
"For all of the foregoing reasons, I urge your disapproval of this bill. "
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4/64·R3 EX
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
FLUSHING 52, N.Y. • TELEPHONE· AREA CODE 212-WF 4-1964 • CABLE ADDRESS "WORLOSFAIR"
llttAC:I: 1'HR0UOH
UNOEA8TANOINQ
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NEWS:
For Purther Information contact:
JAPANESE EXHIBITORS
1
ASSOCIATION
11 West 42nd Street, Suite 1142
New York, New York 10036
Telephone: OX 5-0466
FOR ±MMEDIATE RELEASE:
ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT
April 2, 1964
Japanese-American relations received another boost recently when
170 personable young Japanese men and women, who will staff the Japan
Pavilion at the New York World's Fair, spent three days and two nights
at Camp Zama, Headquarters of the United States Army in Japan. The
group visited the installation in a move designed to acquaint them
with the American way of life and to facilitate their forthcoming
Fair assignments. They will arrive here on April 8.
The results of the visit were gratifying on both sides. ·
"Brimming with charm and cordiality, they left no doubt about the
fast friendships they are capable of cultivating," said an Army
spokesman for the 132 women and 38 men, who were selected from an
original 2
1
000 applicants as being most highly qualified to represent
their country in the u. s.
"Living in Camp Zama is the closest thing to living in the
United States without leaving Japan," said Katsuei Aogagi, 21, a
junior at Meiji University in Tokyo. Only 10 of the group have ever
visited the u. s. before.
The Camp Zama experiment represented one of the final steps in
a indoctrination program which has been geared toward the
day the group will arrive in New York, and it included a comprehensive
schedule of classes, tours, and social events.
FROM: Wm. J. Donoghue Corporation
10 Columbus Circle, N.Y.C.
(more)
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- 2 -
4/64·R3 EX
At Camp Zama, the group was introduced to the American phenomenon
or cafeteria-style dining. A new experience for most of them, they
moved along the serving line holding trays tor helpings of French
onion soup, hamburgers and cheeseburgers, French fried potatoes,
buttered green salad, assorted relishes, buns and butter,
toe cream, milk and coffee.
Their first real chance to converse in English and to learn
about the u. s. firsthand came when they gathered at the Open Door
with some 50 Zama American High School students for a casual two-hour
get-together.
of the women in the group are slated for hostess and
waitress duties in the House or Japan, the Pavilion building given
over to restaurants and the presentation of theatrical entertainments.
The list of qualifications for the young women was impressive.
Good looks, of course, was a primary requisite, with intelligence a
close second. A completed high school education was another
requisite. Sixty-five percent of them are University graduates.
Proficiency in time-honored Japanese arts ranked high: skill at
playing a musical instrument, the ability to dance, to perform the
tea to arrange flowers -- all were basic considerations.
# # #
4/64-R6
01061
...•.. ~ . · · · ·
' ,.
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
FLUSHING 52, N.Y. • TELEPHONE· AREA CODE 212-WF 4·1964 • CABLE ADDRESS "WORLDSFAIR"
' . '
I'IAC:C THROUGH
UNOCJt.T"NOINO
--·
@---
NEWS:
REFER INQUIRIES TO:
Peter McDonnell
Jerome Edelberg
Joyce Martin
- WF 4-6531
- WF 4-6541
- WF 4-6543
FOR RELEASE; MONDAY, APRIL 6, 1964
r
ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT
April 3, 1964
,··'''
New York World's Fair, Apr. 6 --The Montana Centennial Train, a
25-oar modern day iron horae ladened with $1,000,000 worth of gold
nuggets and priceless memorabilia of the old west, chugged out of
Billings, Montana yesterday (Sunday) on the first leg of a 17-day
journey that will take it as part of Montana's exhibit to the New York
World's Fair at Flushing Meadow, N. Y.
Aboard the train are cowboys, Indians, 75 horses and tack, a
stagecoach, ranchers, wild life exhibits, famous guns of the frontier
days, typical saloon of the time, general George Custer's gold watch
and a number of state officials headed by Governor Tim Babcock.
Enroute to the World's Fair, where it is scheduled to arrive on
the morning of Opening Day, April 22, the train will make stops at
Omaha, Kansas City, St, Louis, Louisville, Cincinnati, Charleston,
Washington, D.C., Baltimore and Philadelphia. Wild West parades will
be staged in each city and the public will be permitted to inspect
the train,
The train will remain at the Fair, on the grounds of the Montana
Pavilion, for three days, then resume its tour through an additional
six cities, with stops at Pittsburgh, Cleveland, Chicago, Milwaukee,
Moline and Minneapolis.
Upon the train's return to Billings, seven of its 25 cars will
make a second run to New York and go on permanent display at the Montana
exhibit at the Fair.
FROM: Wm. J. Donoghue Corporation
10 Columbus Circle, N.Y.C.
(more)
4/64-R6
- 2 ..
The cars are painted golden yellow, orange, and blue, and
on their sides huge murals depicting Montana's history, from the year
1864 when it became a territory to the present. The murals, ranging
from 7 to a feet high and 8 to 16 feet long, number 150 and were
painted by L,.man Rice and Bud Wert of Billings.
Parpose of the nationwide tour 1s not only to celebrate the lOOth
birthday or Montana as a territory (it was admitted to statehood 75
years ago, in 1889), but to encourage tourism in the Big Sky
as Montanans like to call their state. The reference is appropriate:
with a population of less than 700,000 Montana covers more than 147,000
square miles, ranking 4th in size in the nation.
At the Fe1r, the cars will be on display from 10 A.M. to 10 P.M.,
and in the words of Michael s. Kennedy, director ot the Montana
H1atorical Society which planned the exhibit, "viewers will be treated
to the really authentic and exciting sturr or history".
Even the million dollar gold collection will be truly historical.
One of the nuggets was mined by Granville Stuart six years before
Montana Terri tory was created.
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REMARKS OF
ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT OF
THE NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR
1964-1965 CORPORATION
AT THE
OPENING OF THE
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR
1964-1965
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22, 1964
AT NOON
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0 1964 New York World's Foir 1964·1965 Corporation
Let me express first our sorrow that the Chief
Executive who inaugurated this Fair is not here
to give it his blessing. Let me offer also our testi-
mony to the universal respect and affection in
which his memory is held, and our prayer that
Almighty God may protect and strengthen his
successor, who is our chief guest here today.
The staff of the Fair expresses today deepest
thanks to all who have come here to open the
big show. We have done our best by ingenuity
and hard work to implement ambitious slogans
and colorful promises.
We particularly welcome those who have had
faith in us through early trying days. We invite
visitors from every state and land, solicit their
friendship and devoutly hope that in presenting
here this Olympics of Progress we shall draw
them closer together on our shrinking globe,
and thus in the end promote peace.
Dedicated to the Industrial Promotion
and Trade Growth of New York
"All New York Is A World's Fai
.\, :\layor ol :'l:ew York City, and in the name of its light million rL·sil
visitors to the World\ Fair. \\'1· olin vou the IH>.,pitalitv of our hott'l.,, 0111
n1ltural and L'lllertainmellt larilitin .
. \ho\'e all. \\'l' oHer you our lril'ndship- to all ol 1011 mn1ing lron1 all 1orners of the globe. \Vhatcvcr
your rare, 01 rrced, or nalionality. you will lind volll' rou111erpa1" in om rity, our freedoms
and opportunities.
Alter vou hal'e .,cen and l'lljoyed the .ltlranions ol the \\'mid\ Fair, spe!HI a kw mon: days here with us,
seeing the beautiful and excitin!{ wonders that are a permanent part ol our rlly.
For in a 111anner ol speaking, all :'l:e11· York is a World\ Fair.
N Y C F
. G 1 President To Address
. • . Irms e Labor Force of
Annual AP Luncheon
$12,700.,000 In President Johnson will address the an 8.,000 Constructed
nual Associated Press luncheon scheduled
Federal Awards on r\pril 20 in thl' \\'aldori-Astoria llotel. 1964 World's Fair
in conjunction with the 78th annual con
United Stall'S Gol'l'rnment contracts
totaling S i2.700.000 have heen awarded to
New York C'i11· husinl'SS firms and
from the ol Feb. 17 to :\larch 16,
it was disclosed this month hi' a surn·1· of
wntract awards whi(:h was ;nade h" . the
:'\e11' York Department ol Comnll'fl'l'
and Industrial lkl'elopnwnt.
The Gmunml'nt suggests that cit1· firms
interested in work on thesl'
contracts in touch dirL·etly with the
firms listed helm1·:
Fuel Indicator Transmitter, $58,049,
Llquidmeter Corporation, 41-03 36th St.,
Long Island Cily.
Lucr Syringe, $28,502, Hypo Surgical
Supply Corporation, 11 Mercer St., Man-
hattan.
Dental Gold Alloy Casting, $110.ROO.
Julius AdL•rer, Inc., 21-25 44th Al'e .. Long
Island City.
Cable Assy, $9l,ll50, Tafft>t F.lectronics
Inc., 27-05 Brooklyn-Quet'ns Expressway
West, \Voodside.
Radio Test Sets, U 70.906, Capl'hRrt
Corporation, ll3-46 123rd St.. Rtchmond
Hill.
Chlorination Kits. $110.731, J<:mpirt'
Corporation, 10-3·1 44th Dril'l'.
Long Island City.
IContiou•d on Page b)
ITntion ol the American :'\ewspaper Puh·
iishL·rs •\ssol'i.1ti•m in the sallll' hotel.
The mlli'L'ntion, whiL'h will he attended
ill i.-!00 11l'\\'Spapc·r l'Xe<:utives. will run
April :n. ;\ number of p.ml'l dis·
<:ussions will he held on editori,d and fiscal
prnhll'lnS the imlustn.
Royal Crown Mo·ves
Offices ToN. Y. C.
Hol'al Cro\l'•t Bon Comp.1111, the '\o.
soft-drink c"n'·,·rn in the nation, will
mm t' ir- L'a'tl'rtl dil'i,ion headquarters from
:\ewark to :'\ew York <. 'ity on :\pril I 'i, it
"·" ll'arnl'd ill (.'0\1\IEHCE :'\E\\'S.
Thl' ,· .. mp.IDI h.td hel'n .1t 7 -H Broad
'-,tl'l't'!. '\,.,,·,Irk, hut will tr.1mfl'r to till'
11l'\\' B.mkvrs Trmt Build 2SO Park :\1 ,.
"\\',, .tl'L' thl' lo hl' lll'arcr
our .1nd our
.I l'llllll'·lll\' '""kl',Jll.ll1 't.l!l'd.
WEATHER? PHONE 999-1234
')Ill' \lunitil'·tl t lllllllllllli,.1ti"n lt·ntl'l
olin' to '\, \\' <.'it I ,.,.,id,·nh .md
1 1'itur' imnwdi.lll' tl'kphonl' inl,nn.lli"n llll
tr.tllic. lr.lll,it. "hod opl'llinc: .md ,tiH r
rt·l.ltnl pr,.h!l'lll' .. lr<>lllld till' ,j,"-k .. lfllltlld
thv ,,dl'nd.!r. The· numhl'l ;, 'I'I'J 12 q_
One of the world's most comprehcnsi\'l'
l'Xhihits of human accomplishment will be
umTiled \\'ednesday 9 o'clock,
;\pril 22. with thl' opening of the New
York 1964-1965 \\'cHid's Fair.
(. 'onn•in·d as an Olympics of Progress,
ib 160 pa1·ilions will offer soml•thing for
L'n'fyom·, whatever the visitor's hack-
..:round or intl'rest. Lo<:<tted on 646 acres of
Flushing \kadow Park-site of th(· 1939·
1940 \\'orld's Fair- and leased to the Fair
Corporation hy the City of Nell' York, the
Fair's first of two six-month periods will
umtinue Oct. 18, 1964. The ex·
position will reopen April 21. 1965 and
chse finalh on Cktoher 17, 1965.
\\'hat ki;1d of Fair has been huilt? It in·
1 ,In·' .111 l'\penditure from all sources ol
onl' hillion dollars. The toil of mon•
th.111 H.OOO pl'ople went into this L'rt·ation.
Llltim.ttl'h .t total of about people
11 ill he t·mplml'd .11 the site. ,\ small arnll'
"' huildin!,! 'P'''·i.dist' hare spent almost 22
million m.l!l·hours of wmk to express the
.1u lllltpli,hml'nh and "'pir.1tion' of nations.
'!.II<'' .111d indu,tn.
·1 o .til intL'nb .t.nd purpose,, entireh· new
in,t.dl.ttion' h.td to he laid under!.!round. It
t•w•k 111" \l',lf' to imt.tll 340 miles of eke·
(Continued on Page 4)
bY·

oti arttf
l!)eVetopm«mti
+l;g. U'adtson Ave.,
'tork· 1'001'1
:Pll. 9;.'7'7'10
Rollerr Wagner
Mayor
IW61tfo,
CC!ItlrttllihllltW
watt
Fl!lf CoftlrtllmOtltw
Sl\eaftan'
OfJh191f Cortlmiftl6ner
!(.tty,
C<sttlmlfit6nlfl'
•. Sf6dtmf1Uet'
l)lMfot,
o.wtottfllolllt •"" ftft)IIIOfiOll
Lou SIMIIIIM'i
fu\lllo Adv'-
C, lurstein
Eeonom&t

lt.-al'dh Affilhllt
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st.ttflfioflfl
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C6:-M4lrlrlf0t', eo-.Mefef
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['. Books I
J>E.CfSIONS IN SMALL
SUS1NtsS W. Hayne§. INVEST
MEN't Dt:ctSIONS IN SMALL BOSI·
Marlin R. Jr. llniver,ity
of Kentucky Prt·ss. I rxington, Ky. ...
'fhe first ithlumt• is n studv ol the pric iny,
rtreihods <A fiR It r<msidC'r;;
in clepth the tht·mks, procedures, ami
;,f tlwmh t•xecutivt•s u<;e to drtrrrnim·
prites. 1'ht· <;f.•umd volume dt·
tailed malh('fm!lical lormular drsignd Ill
ffl(Jf(' t•flicient mt·thods ol •:apit.rl
ioveslmt•nt.
GO (;lJIIlL!;. "Broadway ami Timt·s
Stjunrc"; "Ct•rllr>11 l'nrk"; "Wall l.;trn·t";
''Gternwkh Villngt•"; "t.;ratur of
"lloitNI Nntions." l:ditnl hy l,t·w lr.utk.
Porkt·l nm.ks H• ... 11 of pad •itnl
ittft>rtnation l'>tl'h drvotrd to 11
u·ult'r ol in thr city.
UNIJI'I\ST,\NIJIN(; IJICITAI COM
I'UTHlt.; llmwltl :\1. lknrrv. llavtlrn l'uh
l1<hing l 11.... l.ii111 l' many >HI'
lut/1' tlw llll'>lllitll! of thl' word
· It•! ul11tH' hnw tlu·sp intrkat•·
uotnplltittl! lnol' wnrk or how tht'l' n111 hl'lp
• • 1\h. llt·nrn·\
Ill' Ips I ill 11 rll'nl.
2
Department Store
Sales Rise
Here In February
0. P. Thomas has been eiectt>{l llresidcnr
nf 'iinclnir Oil Corporation, it was an·
,,omwed la't month in the annual com-
12'.?.,000 st<lckholders.
\.fr. Thomas sue·
c<?erls E. L '1reiniger,
head ol: the concern
since 1 961 , who was
nmnt•d bnnrd chair-
man. He is an 1 R-
w•ar veteran with Sin·
clair .mel has heen
ext>cuti\•e vice presi-
0. P. Thomas dent nf .tclminisrratinn
1:01' the past four years.
Other corporation ,md
rion presidents elected durin9; the pasr
month were:--·
C. G. Drescher, Sinclair Refining Co.
Oavid M. Baldwin. Charles F. Noyes Co.
Ralph E. ( .adue Jr., Jnhn David, Inc.
Grant Kul'hn, E.quitahle Life Assurance
YICiety of the United
Robert r\. W nlfe. Lionel T ny C:orpn·
ration.
Barry 'lmirh, Sutton Or>r.tni·/ation.
flarol<l X. Schreder. Group Securities.
Inc .. ancl r>istrihurors Ctoup, Inc.
Murray J. hrestone, :\.1. J. Firestont' and
('ompany.
l>-r. Otto Chemical
( orporatil>n.
II. C:han<llet· ·r nrner Jr .. Commerce and
I i\SSfJ(·iatir>n.
( :yrus S. ( :ollins, Argl'ntim· r\muican
( :haml){·r of ( ·ommnn·.
Moon Shot Bldg.
llesigned ln City
Till' Vt·rtital Building for the
tnt•m hnuntl i\pollo l'rojl'ct, which was
in Ncw York ( :ity hy a 200 man
architt•ttural and l'ngim·t·ring organit!ltion,
i' nuw in the prl'lirninary of ton·
strurtion at ( :ap•· Kl'nnl'dy.
·rill' "''" hy a corn
hint· ol four NPw York ( :itv lirrns, known
as llrhaltn Holll'rt,·SI'Piyl' ltl'atled
hr Max 0. llrhahn '" manal(ing partner.
at thl' 'llllll' timt• as tit('
Vntitali\"•·mhlr lluildin1: was the l.aum:h
( nntrol ( · .. ntn, hoth kt•\' of thl'
;\polio l'roit•tl. The prn\t'lt i' to
t.lkt• t\llll'rit,lll il'flllllilllh !II till' llliMIIl.
Thl' ""t'lllhlv will lw S24 fl'l'l
(,"/ t ket with- and 1 { ami will
nul"''' tlw l!fl'.lfl''' n>hllm' ol an\' known
huildinf,!, I \fi.!IIHI.IIO!I nthic kl't: 4'>
,,,.1\. """'' will "'' .tnotlwr rnurd.
Department smre during the fnur-
period ending Feb. 29 registered an
incl'('"'lse of I 3 per cent over the >arne
period last ''car. the Fodera! Bank
nf New York reported. The sales gains are
interpreted as indicating the confidence nf
New York consumers in the st:tbilitv of
their incomes.
There were increases in a numher of
economic indices rhe
parable months, pnintinl.\ ro a growth
rem in commerce and indusrrv in the dty.
These comparative • however,
still have to be evaluated against the back-
drop of the newspaper sttike a •uzo.
which depressed the over-all economic How
in the citv.
Electric power consumption rose ro
2,3H,900.000 kilowatts in the five·wt:ek
period I. compared with
kilowatts vear. Con-
solidated Edison reported. .
Intercity truck tonnage handled at truck
terminals in the York i\1etropolitan
r\rea showed increa.;es in three of the four
weeks of february, ro wit: 0-2 per cent
9;3in in rhe week Feb. 8, 3.6 pet'
cent the week ending Feb. I 5. H.3
per cent gain in the week ending Feb. 22
and a 2.1 per in the week ending
february 29.
Loans outstanding .. 1s recorded b1 the
Federal P.esen;c from reporting member
hanks in York City. totalled S22 bil·
linn on Feh. 26, showing an increase of
$2.1 hillion O\'Cf February 27,
On the revcrSt' side of the economic pic·
ture, 1,913 ocean \·cssc.·l arrivals and de-
partures at the Port of York were re·
ported this February. wmpared with 2.167
movements in February 1963. The differ·
cnce was attributed to the tugboat strike in
Fchruary this year.
C:omplet('d mnstrut·tion in New York
City totalled S35,522,·H 2 in February,
compared with 545.600,789 in the same
month la't \Tar, which i' explained by the
fal't that ltuildt·rs rm.hcd production last
year to get under the deadline of the new
wning
$530,000,000 MORE
1\ddit ional income acnuing to
rt·sidents of New York City as a result ol
the rt·n·nt Fcdl'ral tax cut amounts to
$5 year!,·. '"·cording to estimates
hast·d on Trl'asury Departm('nt reports.
Commerce News

FranKlin, Ill. · R\
tarv of the lill.S.. 1
will talk on: ''BU.
a Ptn:tru:rshl\1 fm
tlte !Long: Thlhmll
Conrerent.Le t)lll 1
Tup the lfafu
Fair. Flushing,.
program!
can llP pn
with wocl:dl-widlf
"GBoalllS 11
"'The \Vllolitl!:
Centurv"' wilL ll
the t964'
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ness b.
with the openi:
1\flTSICAL 1'1
A mt!Ska:l' I
as!'o.:iation witl
Nte oE the tn'
tiona\
Run:r1> conYen
Pa
at the Statlet-1
PACKAGIN4
With 50,0(
the
,\ssociation's :
position will
Ap
the conventio
Narion<ll Pad
York Hilton.
will be "Cm
DRUGGIS'l
"Cooperati'
;md manufac
the chit•f to]
conv('ntion o
chandisin!! l
modore fror
Arthur l. E
MINIATUJ
Pratt lnst
its firs
Competition
6-30, at
headquarter'
of four squ
white or co'
April,
tax ' 8Jnowits to
according tO.
.. :f.ePQrt$· .
Co---News
•• • • ' . ' :· - '. f ' • • • • . •
, ·Roosevelt Jr., Under Secre-
U.S. Department of Commeree,
· "Business and Government- -
fllttne:rSbiip for Profits and Growth" at
Industrial Modernization
, . . . on Thursday, April 16, at the
, of the .Fair Restaurant at the World's
. Flushing, L.I. The conference will
.... discuss. progtams on how local industries
' can', ,step up productivity and pace
with \\•orld-wide technological advances.
,, •.·
11
GROCERS IN 20th CENTURY"
.· ''The Wholesale Grocer in the Twentieth
Century" will be one of the highlights of
· . the 1964 United States Wholesale Grocers'
· ASS<ll!iation convention, scheduled April
at the Americana Hotel. The busi-
. ness sessions have been timed to coincide
with the opening of the World's Fair.
.·. A musical fashion show, produced in
association with Holiday Magazine, will be
'o11e of the interesting events at the Na-
otipnal As.o;ociation of Men's Sportswear
'··Buyers convention, to be held during Fall
·Sportswear Panorama Week, April 26-30,
· at the Statler-Hilton Hotel.
EXPOSITION
With 50,000 persons expected to view
the proceedings, the American Management
' AS50Ciation's 33rd National Packaging Ex-
. · will be held at the New York
April 20·23. Concurrently with
the A.M.A. stage its
•.National Packaging Conference at the New
· :.York Hilton, April 20-22, whose theme
, be "Creativity in Packaging Design."
· MERCHANDISING
'"Cooperative Advertising" for retailers
. manufacturers during 1964-65 will be
.· t!te. chief topic during the fourth annual
.I.Vnvention of the Wholesale Druggist Mer-
. cbandising Association at the Hotel Com-
. niodore from April 26-30, according to
· · Arthur L. Eirich, executive vice-president.
· Praulnstitute's Graphic Art Center will
· . uage its first International Miniature Print
CoMpetition and Exhibition, from April
the organization's New York City
831 Broadway. Original prints
· 'of(oor square inches or less, in black and
or color, will be on display.
April, 1964
Roanwell Corp. Expands Third Time
In Five-Year Period; Adds 100 Jobs
Roanwell Corporation, of 180 Varick
Street, designer, developer and manufac-
tmer of communications terminal equip-
ment for the voice communication field,
has expanded for the third time in five
years.
The company has added 20,000 square
feet to its space at the Varick Street address,
bringing its total space to 76,000 square
feet. The expansion means the addition of
100 jobs to the 400 positions now exist-
ing, J. R. Howell, President, stated.
The firm makes such products as ear-
phone elements, noise-canceling micro-
Chemical Co. Returns
After 9-Year Absence
Harshaw Chemical Company, one of the
largest manufacturers of industrial chem-
icals in the country, will reopen its New
York City sales office after an absence of
nine years from the city.
The firm moved its New York City
office to Hastings-on-the Hudson in 1955.
But early this month it returned to this
cily "to be nearer the center of our sales
urea."
It took space at 101 Park Avenue, with
Cushman & Wakefield acting as broker .
The company does an annual business
ol $70,000,000 and has sales offices and
manufacturing plants in all parts of the
country.
PHOTOGRAPHY FAIR
Color and black-and·white photographs
of the motion picture "The Carpetbaggers"
will be featured in the Third International
Photography Fair, April 8-12, at the New
York Coliseum.
phones, headsets and radio-telephone hand· , .
sets. It will use the 20,000 square feet of·
additional space to manufacture precision
piston trimmer capacitors.
Founded in 1948, Roanwell moved ln :
1959 from its Brooklyn loeation ·to .the·.
modem 17-story building in ··Manhattan,
now known as the Roanwdl Building;
This entailed an 'expansion from 28,0()() ·
square feet to 39,000 square ·feet. Dunng .
1961, this space was increased to 56,000 ·
square feet.
The company products are used widely
in naval, military and aero-space fields. ·
. , .
Queens C. of C Wins
Lighterage Case Stay
The Appelate Division of the Interstate ;
Commerce Commission . slispended · uirti}: ..
September 13 tariff mles proposed by. EaSt-- .· ·
ern railroads to impose an extra charge for ·.
lighterage service on lumber and forest: • '
products. The action follOwed an appealby
the Queens Chamber of Commerce. .
The Chambtr had protested against the
proposed extra lighterage · charge, charging
that it would he "unreasonable and ecq;
nomically burdersome for Brooklyn, Queens
and Long Island waterfront lumber dealers.''
Harold J. Powers, Chamber trailsporta.
tion chairman, filed its official . protest
against the extra tariff charges for $75 (Or
loose and $150 for baled and baride<l ..
lumber per carload. It was estimated that
these charges would add $200,000 annually
to the cost of lumber in the metropolitan·
area.
World's Fair to
To 35,000 Over
Give En1ployn1ent
T \VO-Year Period
\ Continuerl from Paqe I)
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Page 4
WOitLJl f',\JR HOl'SING
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t•IH 11! tilt l111t -..t ll,tfk" Ill t!Jt \\uJid.
African Pavilion presents international
:\lonorail, 50 feet up, to carry visitors a
1
Commerce News
April,
All New York Is
World's Fair; See
City Wonders, Too
\\'hl'n thl' throne:' ol 1·i,itors come troop-
ing in to ,,.,. the wondl'rs ol the :'\t'll'
Ymk \\'mid's Fair of 1%-lllll,'i, till'l' 11·ill
find mall\' pt·rmaiH'nt mmdl'rs to ,,.,. in
:'\l'll' York ( 'itl ihl'il.
:'\l'll' York i' .1 •.core ol citi,·s rolk·d into
om·. It is thl'alrl's spla,hl'll with nt·on lil(hts:
it is thl' Jm·diel;d lll'alltl· of tiw Cloisters.
It is soarinc: sk"LTaJ><:rs and \'i,·tmian
hroll'lhl<llll'S. It is tlw hlarl' of nic:htcluhs:
it is the lll.Jjl'stl ol till' :\ll'lr<1f>olit.Jn \lu-
" lllll of :\rt.
\l'\1' York is .dso .1 titl· ol histllfl. It
11'.1> thl' first c.Jpit,d ol thl' llnitl'd SLJtt·s
undl'r 1 ht· ( onst it u t illn. On t hl' stt·ps of
till' h·dl'r.d I Ldl \.1tion;d :\h-1nori.d . .JLross
thl' stfl'l't I rom thl' \:, ,,. Ymk "itllt·k I''
changl' at Bro.1d ;md \\'all "itrl'l'ts. is .1
stalul' of \\',"hinc:ton m.u·kinl( til"
spot whl'rl' hl' took thl' oath ol olflc·t• as
first l'rl'sidl'nt in 17HLJ. \l'arill· is hauntTS
TaiL"fll, 11 hen· \\',"hington farl'll'l'li to
his olllu·rs ahl'r thl' smn·ssful com Ius ion
uf thl' \\'ar of thl' Hnolutiun.
T"da1. :'\l'll York .IS host to thl' llnitl'd
:'\at ions, is .1 11orld L' 1pital. Till' \!I.Jss-
facadl'd Buildinc: .md till' sll'l'L'p-
ing Ct·m·r;d .\ssl'mhh· Buildinc: with ih
l'OniL'X do:nt· 1 isitms from .dl cornns
of the world.
;\notiwr IIHJSI both for :\nit'rital" .md
foreignl'rs is thl' StaiUL' of Liberti.
\\'hl'n it l'l>lllL'S to p.1noramas. lew can
l'LJual that from thl' top of the Fmpin· "itat<'
Building. To thl' Ill'S! is the llud"m Hill'r.
to the north\\'L'St the P.disadt·s on thl' Ill'S!
hank ol thl' l lud,.on. Surroundinc: thl'
l'iL'II't·r i' ,J forl'st of sklxrap:rs: hl'I0\1', thl'
incrl'dihle 1 it'll' of \l'w York.
TimL'' Squ;JJ'l', ;Jt thl' intc·rst•ction ol
13ro.lll\\'al and Sl'l'l'nth .-\n·nut·. sums up
tiw sound .md lun of a great nwdl'rn cit1·.
Thl' tiwrouc:hLm< arl' linl'd 11 ith 1.11
appointl'd n1111 il' IH>liSL''· rt•st.Jurants. hotl'is.
nightclubs, souiL'Ilir shops .JIHI pt·nn\ ar
c,JdL''· On the LIL-.Jdt·, uf thl' buildinc:' .md
the r<H>Itops .Jrt' "spt·Ltand.lrs". :Jd-
1 l'rtising 'igns and di,pl.11 s lit J,l thousands
of l'andll'-poii'L'f th.Jt llldkl' this thl' Crl'at
\\'hill' \\',1\'
. \ short 11,1,. 1111rth ol ·1 iml'S Squ.lrl' is
Huckl'klll'r ( L'lltt·r .. 1 cit1 11 ithin .1 cit1.
Hockdcflt-r Cl'ntl'r is " gruup ol 'L'IL'Iltl't·n
building' coll·ring I 'i .ILTL'' Jouc:hJ, bl'
111 t'L'Il -IHth .md \\'t·st 'i2nd Strl'l't' .. 111d
I ilth :\IL'Tllll' .!lld thl' .ht·nut• ol till'
.-\ml'ritas.
\, 11· York i' thl' homl' ol ·\-I lllll"'llllls
oJTiuding rill' ( loistt'fs, thl' \ ktrnpolit.m
:\inl'tl· \L'ars ac:o a group of :\cw York
l.usint·,snll·n llll'l in ( ·,H>Jll'r Union to at·
t<·mpt to soh<· thl' sl'rious transporation
prohlcm, of tht times.
'I hey mganited under
thl' name of the
York ( 'htap Tramporta·
tion ;\ssol'i.Jtion-· a naml'
later dwnged to tlw "'''"'
York Board ot Tradl'.
Tmlav thl' :'l:ew York
Bo.ml ,;f Trade nmccrns
ir>elf not onl1· with trans·
Henry L. L•mberl port;Jtion m.attcrs, hut
with othl'r prohlt·m, inroh ing the business
Lllllllllllllitl and thl' l'ntirl' citl'.
·1 hl' llo.trd <on,ists of rt·presl'ntatin·s
lr11m mcn1hl'r in prac-
tit·.dh- L'll'rl of hminl'ss. It pinpoints
its ohil'ctin·s activities of its sei'L'n
SL'l'tiom- in.,urancL'. international. medical,
llll'rl'.IIHile. SL'Lllritil',, ll'\tilc and transpor-
tation.
lkc.IUSl' of thl' 1 it.d importancl' of world
tra<lc to "'" York Citv, the :'\ew York
ol ·I r.l(lc is dl'l'l'loping special promo-
tiom in 'liJ>J>IIrt of \\'orld Trade \\'t'l'k,
\la1 1·; to
I knn I.. I .nnlll'rt is now st•rving his
third tl'rtll as prl'sidl'nt. lie and his ft-llow
llll'llll)('rs <lfl' dr·tl'rlllinl'll to go all out to
initiate and support, through its puhlic
aiLJirs pro<.:r.un, d lorts dl'sigm·d to lx.·ndit
thl' l'l'lln<Hnit·. vtci.d :md political welfan•
ol .'\l'W York Cit1.
of .-\rt, thl' ,\merit-an .\luseum of
.\.Jtur.d I I iston .md the .\!meum of l\lod
nn .-\rt. It h.1s lour ""''· among tht·m the
l'l'ntral 1'.1rk z,., and the :'\ew York
/oologiL·.d park in thl' llrom, It is the !oGJ·
tion of Slll h lll'autiful plan·s of 1\'orship as
thl' ( .Jthl'dral ol St. John the Di1 im·. St.
1'.1trick\. ( .JthLtlral and Tt·mpk EmanuEl.
Till' llro.JdW.II tlll',Jtrt· is thl' lllL'l'l":l of
pl. I\ c:o,·rs I r111ll all o\'er the ll'orld .
.'\,II' Yo1 k is Filth ,\wmtL', with
'.!flat shot" llrrald Squ.m·. 11 ith it<o giant
dl'parttll<'nt ston•s and Union Square, where
it is .dl1.11·s har'.!:lin da1·. '\ew York is
llolll'mi.Jn ( ;fl'L'Illl ilh \'illage. it is grt·at
wlk'.!L's .md tlllill-rsitil's, it i' lx.·autiful
puhlic· g.mll'ns. it is the tl'eming waterfront,
hurn ing throni!' on the sidt'llalks.
Page 5
$12,700,000 Contracts Awarded
City Firms; Sub-contractors Invited
(Continued from Page I)
Hose and Air Duct Heaters, $80,700,
Pierpont Industries, 77-15 26th St., East
Elmhurst.
Contact Photographic Printing, $141,420,
Pax Electronics Company, Inc., 48-67
a8th St., Woodside.
Projection Photographic Printing,
$58,524, Simmons Brothers, Inc., 30-28
Starr Ave., Long Island City.
Components of Intercommunications
Sets, $207,942, Andrea Radio Corporation,
27-01 Bridge Plaza North, Long Island
City.
Investigation of Intermediary Metabo·
llsm and Energy Exchange, $100,000, Co-
lumbia University.
Electrolytic Oxygen Generator with
Special Fittings, $247,000, M. H. Tread-
well Company, 140 Cedar St., Manhattan.
Design Services for Study of Buoyancy
of Submarines, $36,129, M. Rosenblatt
and Sons 350 Broadway, Manhattan.
Bond Writing Paper, $581),785,
Wallter Gonlard Plehn Company. 109
Lafayette St., Manhattan.
X-Ray Film Processing Liquid Fixer,
$27,508. Pioneer Chemical Company.
36-41 Vernon Boulevard, Long Island
City.
Electrolytic Oxygen Generator Hepair
Parts, $26,511, Treadwell Corporation.
140 Cedar St., Manhattan.
Kit Bags, $29,412, United Luggage
Company, 2417 3rd Ave., the Bronx.
Annual Drydocking of U.S.N.S. Upshur,
$49,888, Todd Shipyards Corporation, foot
of Wright St., Brooklyn. .
Cont\nuatlon of Basic Research 11\
•rhermal and Aerodynamic Effects,
$98,845, Brooklyn Polytechnic. Institute.
Quantization of Field Theories, $46,000.
Yeshiva University.
Roasted ground coffee, 701,000 pounds,
$435,728, John A. · Vassllaros and Son ..
29-05 120th St., Flushing.
.. Roasted ground coffee, 142,000 pounds,
$89,t!18, Greenwich Mills Company, 383
3rd Ave., Brooklyn.
Dut·a-Stack Noise Suppression System.
$80,000, Industrial Acoustics Company,
380 Southern Boulevard, Bronx.
Performance Monitors, $487,000, Dyna-
mics Corporation, of America. 29-01
Borden Ave., Long Island City.
Desert Powder Prepared with Gelatin,
S58,032, Van Dutch Products, 2417 3rd
Ave., Bronx.
Fruit Jam Preserves $85,364, Fruit
Crest Corp., 103 S. 6th St., Brooklyn.
Gummed Paper Reinforced Tape. in-
definite quantity, Atlantic Gummed Paper
Corpcration, 1 Main St., Brooklyn.
Observation Gallery Improvements at
the York Post Office $46,000, K.
Construction Enterprises, 625 Parkslde
Ave.. Brooklyn.
Inshore Channel of Port New-
arlt, $172,998, Great Lakes Dredge and
Dock Co., 17 Battery Pl., Manhattan.
Hepair of Cargo Beam Catwalks at the
Brooklyn Army Terminal. $48,003, Paul
Bartoli, 1980 E. 34th St .. Brooklyn.
Page 6
Dredging and Rock RI\IIIoval of Area
16, Hudson River, Great Lakes Dredge
and Dock Co., 17 Battery Pl., Manhattan.
Shielded Enclosures, $68,217, Flltron
Company, 131-15 Fowler Ave., Flushing.
Inspection, Repair and Maintenance of
Aircraft, $6,990,701, Lockheed Aircraft
Service Company, Kennedy Airport.
Hawk 3-G-36 Trainer Repair Parts,
$47,818, Belock Instrument Company,
111-01 14th Ave., College Point, N.Y.
Conduct a Research Study into Cause
of Capacity Loss of Silver Zinc Battery
Systems, $49,227, Yardney Electric Cor-
poration, 40 Leonard St., Manhattan.
Review and Approval of Shop Draw-
ings and Instruction Manuals for Vertical
Assembly Building at Merritt Island, l<'la.,
$1,096,000, Urbahn-Roberts-Seelye-Moran,
462 5th Ave., Manhattan.
Transmitter. $46,196 S.M.S. Instru-
ments, Inc., Kennedy Airport.
Preparation of Ordalts and Fabrication
of Ordalt Kits for Fire Control Equip-
ment, $116,000, Belock Instrument Cor-
poration, 111-01 14th Ave., College Point.
Evaluation of Models of Munition Trail-
ers, $35,500, Henry Spen and Company,
1982 Pitkin Ave .. Brooklyn.
Fuel Oil, 700,000 gallons, Howard Fuel
Corporation, 6th St. and 2nd Ave., Broolt-
lyn.
Services to Print New York Naval
Shipyard Publication, $40,000, J. Miller
Printing and Lithographing Corpor·aion,
121 W. 19th St., Manhattan.
Two New York City architectt•ral firms
have been selected by the General Serv-
ices Administr·ation to design Federal
structures.
Relighting of areas at Albany, N.Y.
Post Office and lobby lighting, and In-
stallation and risers and panels at Utica,
N.Y. Post Office, $9:'1,000, Herbert Argln-
lar, New York, N.Y.
Remodeling of main entrances and
fluorescent lighting at 252 7th Ave.,
$245,000, Theodore Kauffeld, New York,
New York.
Furniture Items, $56,400, National Lock
Company, 21-24 44th Ave., Long Island
City.
Trictloroethylene, In 55-gallons drums.
$56,251, Trio Chemical Works, 338
Scholes St., Brooklyn.
Construction of Post Office Building,
Flint, Mich., Universal Equities, 750 3rd
Avenue, Manhattan.
Black Ground Pepper, $133,607, Hudson
Tea and Spice Co., 255 25th St., Brooklyn.
Black Ground Pepper, $33,792, Robbins
Sales Co., 377 Broadway, Manhattan.
Tile Vinyl Resin, $50,639, Kentile Com-
pany. 58 2nd Ave., Br·ooklyn.
Dredging in Chesapeake and Delaware
Canal, Mrl .. $9!l2,888, Atlantic Gulf and
Pacific Company. 260 Broadway.
Many opportunitil•s to hid on citv con·
tracts for a wide varil·ty of producis and
services arc available to New York Citv
businessmen and nwrchants. .
A partial list follows. \Vhcre a date is
nwntioncd, it is till' date ol' the opening of
the contral'l bids.
DEPARTMENT OF PURCHASE
April 29-Coal and coke, $1,800,000.
April 22-Anthracite coal for Hnrt'3
I:Jiand. $100,000.
May 6--Fuel oil and kerosene for up-
State, $50,000.
May 6--Anthracite coal for Seaview
Hospital, $300,000.
May 12--Bituminous coni, $250,000.
May 20---Fuel oil by tank wagon --
$4.000,000.
For Information, apply DeJmrtment of
i>ureha!>e, Room 191 I, Municipal Buihllng.
TRAN::liT AUTHORITY
April 17-Contract for modification of
sections of the Broadway-Jamaica
"L".
April 21-Contract for extension of
platforms of 10 stations on the Brighton
B.M.T. Line.
Jo'or information, to Transit Au-
thority, 810 Jay St., Brooklyn.
DEPARTMENT OF REAL ESTATE
April 8-Sale of 211 city properties at
auction, Statler-Hilton Hotel.
For information, apply to Dt•Jmrtment
ot· Ueal 2 Lafayt•ttt" St.
HOUSING AUTHORITY
Co!umbia Houses, Columbia, Stanton,
Delancey and Pitt Streets, foundations,
general corBtruction, plumbing, heating
and v:mtilati!lg and elevators. Postponed
from 17 to 11 datP early in May.
Molt Haven Houses, E. 140th St. and
Willis Ave., the Bronx, street and yard
improvements, lop soli and planting worlt.
Bids to te opt>ned in April.
For information to Uoom 911,
New 'l·or:t City Hom<lng Authority, 250
Broati\\Uy.
BOARD OF EDUCATION
Apr·il 9-Bronx Vocational High School,
addition and modernization, E. 151st St.
ond .Morris Ave.
Aplil treatment facilities at
J.H.S. 7, llighland· Boulevard and Hugue-
not Ave., Richmond.
April 14--J.H.S. 201. new building.
Pnrlt Ave. and 127th St.
April 20-Prospect Heights High School,
mo:lernization, 883 Classon Ave.
Spt•clficatlons for contracts may be
c•xamlned at Board of Estimate Estl-
mathl1 Room, 42·15 CrescPnt St., Long
IMiantl City.
Commerce News
t.
Photo shows 0
How St
Nestling sm
Lonns bv Ostwal
bands, putt
its production c;
Tlw story of
the stm v of hm
York dty with
111 n·r ran result
to labor and to
Established ir
. \dolph Ostwalll
a [artnry builc
:\lanhattan, till
building was 1
manut'ac:turcr a
obliged to vacat'
Tlwy purdta!
St reel, Staten 1'
rcnovawd the
tiona I cost of l
previously had
bland ami figu
for them to 1
ncar their hom
The firm pre
I !155 had outg
to arquirc adj
it wm
that time, the 1
Authority ann
1 he Richmond
opmcnt in thll'
plant
it stood faced c
Confronted
down
t h(' Ostll'alds
pmsibility of
T ('rscv or Pent
;1rtio;1. tlwv a
i ties. '
April, 1964
shows Ostwald Uniforms, Inc., alter expansion, snrounded by public housing development In Staten Island
Staten Islat1d Firm Grew-With City's Cooperation
. •· Nestling snugly inside a Staten Island public housing development, Uni.
· {QrtJlS by Ostwald Inc., t11e largest manufacturer of uniforms for high school
. .• is putting the finishing touches on an expansion program that doubled
. production capacity and increased by 100 the number of its employees.
story of Ostwald's growth is
· story of how cooperation of New
.City with a merchant.manufac.
. c.:an result in benefits to business,
·- l_abor and to tlle city as a whole.
·J;.!!&autn&n:u in 19113 by Ernest and
Ostwald, the firm operated in
building on 16th Street,
until 1946, -when the
was -purchased by another
·.manufacturer and the Ostwalds were
. 6bJiged to vacate. _ ·
- ·, :They purchased a garage on Jersey
· Staten Island, for $60,000 and
'.renovated the structure at an addi.
tiona! cost of $100,000. The brothers
..• lllre'II'Imistv had 'bought homes on the
and figured it would be easier
them to conduct their business
. their homes.
fi1·m progressed steadily and in
had outgrown its plant. Efforts
adjacent real estate were
it was not for sale. At about
the New York City Hmising
announced plans to erect
· Richmond Terrdce housing devel.
• nnrnf'llH in tllat area, and the existing
'Uf"""''" plant and the land on which
. stood faced 'condemnation.
Confronted with the problem of
"ah,,ttinn- down or moving elsewhere,
began investigating . the
of starting anew in New
or Pennsylvania. Before taking
they appealed to city author.
In a coordinated effort by officials
of the Richmond Borough President's
Office, the New York City Department
of Commerce and Industrial Develop.
mcnt, the New York City Housing
Authority and the City Planning Com.
mission, Uniforms Bv Ostwalcl was en.
ahlcd not only to s'tay and continue
operating, but to expand.
Other agencies joined in, includ.
ing the Board of Estimate, the
York City Department of Real
Estate, the New York City Department.
of Highways, the New York City De.
partment of Health, and the New York
State Division of Housing and Com.
munity Renewal.
The first step was a zoning variance
permitting a factory within a housing-
area. The variance was drafte<t h:y ·
Horough President Albert V;
mlco and approved by the Board of
Estimate. ·
The Housing Authority then revised
its building plans to encompass the.
factory in its development-and said to
Ostwald a strip of land to accommo.
date its expansion and to permit load.
ing of trucks and access to a main
highway.
In turn, Ostwald agreed to renovate
its existing building and construct its
proposed addition to conform to the
architectural design of the Housing
Authority's apartment buildings.
The company currently does about
::H million business annually. Its vol.
umc is reported to exceed the com.
bincd Yolume o£ its next four com.
petitors. It employ., from 400 to 450
persons.
"We are very happy with that ar.
rangemcnt," declared Adolph Ostwald,
president of the company. "Partic-
ularly, because of the close proximity
of our plant to its labor source. Some
of our employees live in the develop.
mcnt. Since we have seasonal peaks,
we also can call on seasonal labor from
the housing project."
Page 7
Major Industries Hold Rank; Some Small Groups Shift
(This third installment of a New York
City eccmmnic stlldy by Dr. A. C. Bursteitt,
department senior 11otes the
changing labor ratios of local mClnufact11r-
ing industries.)
In the five years between 1958 and
1962 most of the major of manu-
fal'turing industries have maintained their
relative positions in the hierarchy of New
York City's manufacturing complex.
Only some of the smaller groups, with
a total of five per cent of the city's manu-
facturing labor, have shifted rank. This
ncar-stability, however, applit•s only to
rank of the groups and not to their lll'r-
ccntagc shares of employment in the city's
::!unufncturin:; cstahlishmmt,.
All the major groups have experienced
shifts, either hy decreases or in
their shares of employment in manufactur
ing. These erosions and accretions aHectl'd
some 50,000 cmployel'S who moved, out of
and into, some major groups of manufactur-
ing industries between 195:-1 and 1962.
This chh and flow thus involved one of
every 18 manufacturing workers.
An estimated 15,000 other employees
mav have been involved in these shifts -
tho'Sl' whose places of work were brought
under coverage of the Unemployment ln-
suram·e Law between 1958 and 1962. This
estimated numher cannot he broken down
for allocation to the various major groups.
The printing and publishing group in·
creased its share of the manufacturin;.: labor
force from 13.06 to 13.77 per cent, a gain
of 0.71 per cent between 1958 and 1962.
This was the largest gain hy any group
during the peri<KI. Ten other major groups,
machinery and electrical equipment among
also made some gains.
Tlw apparel group, while retaining its
New York City
COMMERCE NEWS
415 Madison Avenue
New York, N.Y., 10017
Return Requuted
Page 8
MAJOR GROUPS' SHARES OF EMPLOYMENT IN MANUFACTURING
INDUSTRIES COVERED BY UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE in 1958 and 1962.
tIn percentages)
Major <lroup
Apparel and related products ............... .
Printing, publishing and aJiied industries
Food and kindred products
Miscellaneous manufacturing industries
Electrical equipment and supplies
Chemicals and allied products
Fabricated metal products
Textile mill products
Machinery, except electrical
Leather and leather products
'I<
1958
28.97
13.06
'I<,
1962
27.82
13.77
+or-
change
-1.15
+0.71
-0.52
+0.13
+0.39
-0.16
-0.01
Paper and allied products
Professional, scientific and controlling instruments
Furniture and fixtures .....
8.89
7.78
5.86
5.00
4.67
3.86
3.39
3.35
3.09
2.46
1.89
1.65
1.51
1.41
1.10
1.06
0.64
0.61
0.33
8.37
7.91
6.25
4.84
4.66
4.01
3.89
3.46
3.31
2.44
1.95
1.20
1.26
1.50
121
0.95
0.29
0.62
0.30
+0.15
+0.50
+0.11
+0.22
-0.02
+0.06
---0.45
Stone, clay, and glass products
·rransportation equipment
Primary metal industries
Rtthber and plastic products
Petroleum refining
Ordnance and accessories .. ..
Lumber, wood products, except fumiture
Tobacco manufactures ......... .
-0.25
-t-0.09
-1-0.11
-0.11
-0.35
t-0.01
-0.03
Based on employment data of the New York State
Depar·tment of Labor, Division of Employment.
primacy, sustaint-d the largest loss: its share
of manufacturing labor dropped from 28.97
to 27.82 per cent, a loss of 1.15 per cent.
Nine other groups suffered decreases in
their shares.
The redistrihution of manufat:turing
labor among industries in New York City
was widespread also witl!iu the major
groups. While specialization of capital
equipment and labor skills retards the
flow from one major group into another, it
has a less hampering effect on their move-
ments in industries bracketed within the
BRONX GROUP 70 YEARS OLD
Thursday, April will be a hig night
lor the Bronx Board of Trade, whit-h will
be n·lcbrating its 70th anni\'crsary. with
a dinner at the llotcl Concourse Plaza. i\
reception, preceding the dinnl'r, will start
:tt (,: P. \I accordinl! to ( 'hairrnan
Bernard E. ,\lpern.
Mr. Edward Feltelberg
'amt• major group. Some of the equipment
and skills can be switched from one to
another industry within the group.
Sewing machines and the skills of their
operative' can he used throughout the ap-
parel group, printing machinery can sim-
ilarly he employed by printers in various
in that group, and lathes and
thl'ir operators can perform machining jobs
in morl' than one industry in their major
group.
Shifts in population, combined with in-
ctcasin(! industrialization in other parts of
thl' country, and changes in technology
and taste which brought new and com-
peting products to the fore in the nation's
markets, have forced (and continue to do
so) adjustments in the mix of the city's
industries. Some of the ad·
justments within the major groups will be
discussl'll in a later article.
BULK RATE
U.S. POST AGE
PAID
New York, N.Y.
Permit No. 7539
Office of Pt·esUent of Counc11
City !Ia 11
New York 7. N. Y.
• .... 99
Commerce News
.JBROII M. ICAY
ccxasBL '1'0 TIB PRBSIDBRT
April
TO: PRESIDENT SCREVANE
Mr. Gorson called and asked if a ticket
for the opening of the World's Fair could
be sent to:
Mr. Stewart G. Tipton, President
Air Transport Association of America
1000 Connecticut Avenue, N.W.
Washington 6, D. c.
He is the official spokesman for all the
air lines.
-...·
This is the group I am working with concern-
ing special visa requirements for the World's
Fair. • ··;
...
.JOSEPH F. DELANEY
ONE FORTY ONE EAST TWENTY FIFTH STRf::ET
NEW YORK 10, N.Y.
DAVIS, DELANEY. INC.


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UNISPHERE
01961
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUS
4/64-Rl2
RPORATION
MEADOW PARK
FLUSHING 52, N.Y. • TELEPHONE· AREA CODE 212-WF 4-1964 • C LE ADDRESS "WORLDSFAIR"
THROUGH
UNDER&TANOINO __ .,
@---
ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT
NEWS:
April 9 1964
REFER INQUIRIES TO:
Peter McDonnell - WF 4-6531
Jerome Edelberg - WF 4-6541
Joyce Martin - WF 4-6543
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
BY ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT OF THE NEW YORK FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
As to threatened demonstrations at the Fair on Opening Day
1
with the cooperation of the City police, the rights, aooess
1
free
movement and comfort or our numerous Fair visitors from all parts
will be fully protected. The Fair will not become a stage for
irresponsible interference with visitors, secondary boycotts and
demonstrations not related to the proper conduct of the Fair.
There has been no claim of discrimination by the Fair.
FROM: Wm. J. Donoghue Corporation
10 Columbus Circle, N.Y.C.
/S/ Robert Moses
President
# # #
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U N I S P H E R E 0 11161
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-- .. ·l NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
_ INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
FLUSHING 52, N.Y. • TELEPHONE- AREA CODE 212-WF 4-1964 • CABLE ADDRESS "WORLDSFAIR"
\0
P!:ACE THROUGH
UNO£RSTAN01NG
__ .,
~ ~ ..... ..,
NEWS:
REFER INQUIRIES TO:
Peter McDonnell
Jerome Edelberg
Joyce Martin
I'OR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
• WF 4-6531
- WF 4-6541
• WF 4·6543
ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT
April 17
1
1964
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR, Apr. 17 -- TWenty-five official coat-of•
arms, representing the Nations of the Western Hemisphere and the
Organization of the American States, have been transferred from the
Avenue or the Americas in New York City to light poles on the Avenue
of the Americas at the New York 1964-1965 World's Fair.
Formerly located between 52nd and 59th Streets in the city, each
shield weighs 25 pounds.. The emblems are three feet in diameter and
are insured for $1000 each. They will be officially dedicated by the
Avenue of the Americas Association at the organization's "Day",
tentatively set for May 14, at the Fair. At that time, the Associa-
tion is to cite Fair President Robert Moses for his work as an
"outstanding public servant."
John H. Muller, president of the Avenue of the Americas Associa-
tion, yesterday said: "We're delighted at the special cooperation
received from officials of the Fair and New York City in helping to
place the coat-of-arms at the Fair and thus enable millions to observe
the unity and friendship of the nations of the Western Hemisphere."
The coat-of-arms, some of which contain as many as ten colors on
porcelain enamel, were made in 1960. The Avenue of the Americas at
the World's Fair starts at the Main Entrance, Gotham Plaza, {Gate
Noa 1), and ends at the Unisphere, symbol of the exposition.
# # #
~ FROM: Wm. J. Donoghue Corporation
10 Columbus Circle, N.Y.C.
I
• /sifl!'!!;:, mii a·<· ·" i "' 1 e.H ff :m• i a 1
WABC RADIO EDITORIAL 1133
niE WAY TO THE FAIR
There were threats against the city and promises of
punishment by the officials of the city. There were thouAands
of words written and spoken about it. There was lots of talk
and lots of noise. There was plenty of long-hidden hate that
all came to the surface. Some men talked madness about race
wars and about arming themselves. It all happened in this city
in the last few days, and it was all touched off by the ambitious
young people who called for a stall-in on the way to the Fair.
But there was no stall-in. There was no stall-in
because of the effectiveness of the city police who were turned
out by the hundreds to prevent it. ·There was no stall-in because
the city's administration had set up penalties that made
stalling-in an expensive and risky project. Most of all there
was no stall-in because most people who have supported civil
rights demonstrations, at their best and worst, could not support
lawlessness in any form.
Just like everyone else, WABC is relieved that there
was no stall-in. We're relieved that moderation and good sense
attracted more peovle than did irresponsibility, vio-
lence or hate. We re relieved that Wednesday in New York we
could see again that there is more to admire than to be ashamed
of in men.
But we can't forget either how wasteful this week had
been. And the counting is just starting---counting all waste--
wasted men, wasted hours, wasted words, wasted money, wasted fear
and anger and energy. And all the words that warned the stall-in
promoters they were hurting their own cause were not just pompous
words. Civil Rights progress was hurt. This can not be undone.
Demonstrations for Civil Rights that would have been accepted a
month ago were looked at with suspicion and annoyance at the
World's Fair opening.
(IDRE)
AN ABC OWNED RADIO STATION
50,000 ..-atts 770 "'c. Cl••·'' Channt•l N{•n 0ffl..:rr,on.lf .19 WfS 1 66th 1 REf. r, NEW YOifl'f. 2 J. N y Hf't NNA 7 5000
• 2 -
There was no stall-in. But all the threats and all
the intemperance have already done their damage. We hope the
rash young people from Brooklyn who took integration one step
backward in the last few weeks will now work again for all
society. After all, that's what integration means, doesn't it?
* * *
Broadcast April 23 and 24, 1964 by Walter A. Schwartz,
Vice President and General Manager of WABC
WABC regularly presents editorials on topics of vital interest
to its viewers. Clearly labeled as opinion, these radio
editorials are delivered by WABC Vice President and General
Manager Walter A. Schwartz. Your comments concerning the above
editorial will be greatly appreciated.
James A. Delay, Editorial Director
.......
i
REMARKS OF
ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT OF
THE NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR
1964-1965 CORPORATION
AT THE
OPENING OF THE
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR
1964-1965
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22, 1964
AT NOON



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0 1964 New Yori< World'• Foir 1964-1965 Corporation
Let me express first our sorrow that the Chief
Executive who inaugurated this Fair is not here
to give it his blessing. Let me offer also our testi-
m ~ n y to the universal respect and affection in
which his memory is held, and our prayer that
Almighty God may protect and strengthen his
successor, who is our chief guest here today.
The staff of the Fair expresses today deepest
thanks to all who have come here to open the
big show. We have done our best by ingenuity
and hard work to implement ambitious slogans
and colorful promises.
We particularly welcome those who have had
faith in us through early trying days. We invite
visitors from every state and land, solicit their
friendship and devoutly hope that in presenting
here this Olympics of Progress we shall draw
them closer together on our shrinking globe,
and thus in the end promote peace.
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Welcome to New York City. We hope
your visit here will be a pleasant one.
Twenty-six thousand policemen and police-
women stand ready to serve you.
Our police officers are well acquainted
with our city and will gladly give you
directions and help during your stay.
New York City police supply numerous
services in addition to general police func-
tions. Among these are:
• Emergency oxygen In the event of
heart attack or asphyxiation,
• Search for lost children and missing
persons.
• Obtaining ambulance service when
needed.
• Assistance in recovering lost property.
If emergency aid is needed any time of
day or night, call Police Headquarters by:
I. Dialing "0" for operator or
2. Using police street telephone
Give your nome
your location
the nature of the incident.
Help will be dispatched immediately through
the Police Department's two-way radio sys-
tem.
Cooperate with the police. Safeguard your
own property.
Use safe or safe deposit box in your hotel
to protect valuables.
Check your property in suitable check
parcel room, in railroad or bus terminal
lockers.
Carry as little cash as possible. Be mind-
ful of the cash you do have when in crowd-
ed areas.
Keep a list of your property. Be able to
describe it if stolen. Keep a record of serial
numbers and identifying marks on watches
and jewelry.
Safeguard Your Children
• Instruct your child to stay at your side.
If lost, the child should look for a
policeman.
• Don't allow children to accept rides
or gifts from anyone without your
approval.
• Small children should have written
Identification (name, address, telephone
number) in their clothing.
Female Visitors
Female visitors who may be reluctant to
report a sensitive matter to a male member
of the force may phone a complaint to the
Bureau of Policewomen-telephone SPring
7-3100, Extension 228 or 229.
A policewoman will receive the complaint
and take appropriate police action.
Protect Your Automobile
And Its Contents
• Lcx:k doors and windows.
• Remove Ignition keys, It Is a violation
of law to leave keys In Ignition.
• Keep clothes, luggage and other per-
t
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' sonaJ property out of sight if car Is
left unattended, Value of article should
not be a detenniniog factor. Even if
property Is of little value, it may en-
courage a thief to break in and there-
by damage your car.
• Don't transfer belongings into trunk at
same place car is parked-a thief may
be watching.
• llle fact that a street is weD-lighted or
heavily travelled does not always pro-
tect you from theft. The thief often
uses such an area in which to operate.
• Auto-theft insurance does not usually
cover theft of articles from car.
• It takes less than one minute to break
into a car. Even if you are just going
into a hotel to check in, don't leave
articles exposed.
• Don't leave your license, registration
certificate or other other identifying
in glove compartment.
• Responsibility is primarily with the
owner.
Traffic Safety
New York City's Traffic Regulations are
in many respects similar to the regulations
in your home town. Our maximum speed
on city streets is 25 miles per hour unless
posted signs specify otherwise. Parkway
speeds vary in accordance with posted signs.
For your own safety and convenience,
please comply with all signs concerning
speed limits and parking restrictions.
Don't pick up hitch-hikers. It is unsafe
and unlawful.
WHEN YOU NEED POLICE ASSIST-
ANCE. DO NOT HESITATE TO PHONE.
THE POLICE CAN BE MOST EFFEC-
TIVE WHEN THEY ARE NOTIFIED
PROMPTLY.
Public Information Bulletin No. 28
POLICE DEPARTMENT
CITY OF NEW YORK
ROBERT F. WAGNER MICHAEL J. MURPHY
Mayor Commissioner
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REMARKS OF
ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT OF
THE NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR
1964-1965 CORPORATION
AT THE
DEDICATION OF THE
NEW YORK STATE PAVILION
FLUSHING MEADOW
THURSDAY, APRIL 23, 1964
II A.M.
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0 1964 New York World's Fair 196-4·1965 Corporation
The New York State Pavilion is an outstand-
ing example of originality in design, structural
aud material experimentation and ingenuity in
the selection and display of exhibits. The Fair
has repeatedly said that it aims at variety and
freedom of expression, not at conformity and
adherence to any central, integrated, overall,
dogmatic super duper architectural plan. We did
not establish a style with fully integrated, cen-
trally conceived and controlled units. We want
no Greek or other revival dictated by pundits
of any school, classical, eclectic or avam-garde.
I believe that the originality, imagination and
dynamism of this pavilion will fully vindicate
this policy of freedom of design. I repeat what
I have said often. We have left it to the exhib-
itors and concessionaires to reflect the ambitions
of our time and to produce variety rather than
uniformity and family relationship. The inde-
pendent parts are, however, unified by the frame-
work and landscaping provided by the Fair.
The New York Pavilion will startle some and
strike others as conservative. We at the Fair
commend it because it represents vision. It will
rank high among state, industrial and foreign
pavilions and shows. When, after you have enter-
tained millions of visitors, you fold your tent
like the Arabs and silently steal away, I hope
that your towers may remain in the great future
Flushing Meadow Park as the highest vantage
point from which people in the future can re-
construct and visualize two World's Fairs and
imagine the metropolis of the future.
The Fair presents its thanks and congratula-
tions to Governor Rockefeller, to Lieutenant
Governor Wilson, to their co-workers and to the
Legislature for this splendid representation of
the Empire State.
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