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Monday, September 24, 2012
DELPHOS HERALD
The
50¢ daily Delphos, Ohio
Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869
OSU president spends $7.7M on
entertainment, p3A

Wildcats lose first on gridiron,
p6A
Upfront
Sports
Forecast
Obituaries 2A
State/Local 3A
Politics 4A
Community 5A
Sports 6-8A
Announcements 9-10A
Classifieds 2B
TV 3B
Index
Mostly cloudy
Tuesday with
a 50 per-
cent chance
of showers.
Highs around
70, lows in the upper
50s. See page 2A.
www.delphosherald.com
Ottoville chamber
hosts candidates
The Ottoville Area
Chamber of Commerce
will host a political can-
didate forum at 7:30 p.m.
Oct. 1 in the Ottoville
Municipal Center at 150
Park Dr. of State Route
224 West in Ottoville.
All Putnam County can-
didates and district office
seekers have been invited.
The event is open
to the public.
The building is
handicap-accessible.
Roads to close for
bridge inspections
Allen County Engineer
Tim Piper has announced
road closures for bridge
inspections this week.
Collett Street and Central
Avenue will be closed
at the Ottawa River and
South Dixie Highway will
be closed over Northfolk
Southern Railroad for two
hours on Wednesday.
Metcalf Street over the
Norfolk Southern Railroad
at the refinery will be closed
for bridge inspection from
8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on
Thursday and Friday.
Cub Scouts to
hold frst meeting
Delphos Cub Scout Pack
42 will hold its first meet-
ing from 6-8 p.m. on Sunday
at St. John’s Annex.
Boys in grades 1-5 who
wish to join should attend
with a parent or guardian.
Contact John Radler
419-692-2764 for
more information.
German dinner
tickets on sale
The Delphos Canal
Commission will serve
their annual carry-out
German dinner of brats
and kraut on Oct. 7.
Tickets are by pre-sale
only and may be purchased
for $7 by calling 419-
692-4496 before Oct. 3.
Pick-up will be behind
the Canal Museum in
the parking lot.
St. John’s, Jefferson sell-
ing tix for road games
Both St. John’s and
Jefferson are selling tick-
ets for road FB games
(7:30 p.m.) this week: the
Jays at Marion Local, the
Wildcats at Crestview.
St. John’s will sell during
normal high school office
hours (7:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.)
Tuesday-Thursday and until
noon Friday for $6 each for
adults (as well as all tickets at
the gates) and $4 for students.
Jefferson’s tickets are
on sale at all four school
district buildings and the
Administrative Building for
$5 for adults, $4 for students.
All tickets at the gates are $6.
Skip the lines,
maybe the
debates, too
BY CONNIE CASS
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON — Now
it’s for real. Every time Mitt
Romney or Barack Obama
hits a rhetorical high note
or commits another blunder,
millions of voters watch-
ing and listening out there
have the power to sit down at
home, fill out a ballot, drop it
in the mail and be done with
the 2012 presidential race.
At least a third of American
voters probably will lock in
their choices before Election
Day arrives on Nov. 6.
The old democratic rit-
ual of a single Tuesday in
November when citizens
commune in lines at schools
and libraries and churches is
fading across much of the
United States. Why not just
mail it in?
Although the two candi-
dates have yet to meet for
their first debate, voting by
mail is under way in two
dozen states, with more to
follow. In three — Idaho,
South Dakota and Vermont
— voters already can show
up in person.
Wyoming begins its in-
person voting on Thursday
and so does Iowa, one of a
handful of states considered
up for grabs in the neck-and-
neck presidential race.
In some of the other hotly
contested states — Colorado,
Nevada, North Carolina and
Florida — more than half the
ballots are expected to come
in early this year.
Stretching voting out
over six weeks makes the
high-wire act of presidential
campaigning that much more
complicated. It presents risks
but also rewards for the can-
didates, as Obama proved in
2008 through an aggressive
early mobilizing strategy that
overpowered Republican
challenger John McCain.
This year looks differ-
ent: The Romney campaign
is pouring manpower and
money into its own push to
sew up early votes.
An early voting primer:
WHERE EARLY
VOTERS RULE
Oregon’s elections are
entirely by mail these days.
Washington state also has
eliminated traditional polling
places in favor of mailed bal-
lots, but residents determined
to vote in person on Nov. 6
can go to a county election
office.
The rest of the states still
offer traditional Election Day
voting as well as some early
option. Colorado, one of the
presidential battlegrounds,
has the most early birds. In
2008, nearly 80 percent of
its votes were cast early and
that’s expected to increase
this time.
In 34 states and the District
of Columbia, people can vote
early without giving any rea-
son, in contrast to traditional
absentee balloting, which
was designed for those who
will be away from home on
Election Day, such as military
members or college students,
or are physically unable to go
to a voting booth.
Some states that ask for
an excuse are so loose almost
any reason will do, while oth-
ers have kept strict rules lim-
iting who can vote absentee.
New England and Southern
states are less likely to encour-
age early voting. It’s most
Vote early
See EARLY VOTE, page 3A
See SCIENCE, page 3A
Postal museum honors
Wolery for contributions
Dr. Walter W. Wolery, right, and his children, from left, Dr. Janet Wolery, Dr. Laura Wolery,
Dr. Scott Wolery and Dr. Tom Wolery, stand near an exhibit of Dr. Walt Wolery’s contributions
to the Delphos Museum of Postal History. Daughter Suzanne Belanger was absent.
Nancy Spencer photos
Delphos Museum of Postal History Director Gary
Levitt, right, talks of Dr. Walter W. Wolery’s gifts of
stamps and other postal-related items to the museum.
On the floor in between the two gentlemen is a paver, at
right, noting Wolery’s support.
BY NANCY SPENCER
nspencer@delphosherald.com
DELPHOS — Dr. Walter W.
Wolery, 81, was honored Sunday
with a paver in the entryway to
the Delphos Museum of Postal
History.
Dr. Wolery has donated loose
stamps, collections and books to
the museum for all to enjoy.
“Giving those items to the
musuem was a good thing to do.
It’s beneficial to the community
and it was beneficial to me. It
gave me more room in the house
for other stuff,” Wolery joked.
“I’m just glad someone is enjoying
them as much as I do.”
Levitt said Wolery was honored
for his many contributions, not only
to the museum but his dedication
to the art of philately.
“Dr. Wolery’s donation
encourages individuals to begin
their own collections,” Levitt
said.
Vets celebrate 25 years with pet adoptions, donations
Local fire and rescue departments were the recipients of pet oxygen mask kits Saturday during
the celebration. The kits consist of three pet oxygen masks of varying sizes, tubing, a transport bag
and decals for vehicles and stations that say “Pet Oxygen Masks On Board.” A DVD accompanies
the kit to train fire professionals that covers recognizing animal distress, administering the masks
and care and cleaning of the masks. Participating in the donation were, front from left, Dr. Sara
Smith, DVM; Dr. John Jones, DVM; Lima Police Department K-9 officer Nick Hart; Delphos Fire
and Rescue Firefighter/EMT Paul Carder, EMT/Intermediate Chris Wisher and Dr. Bonnie Jones,
DVM; and back, American Township Fire Department Platoon Chief Brian Helmig; and Spencerville
Fire Department Chief Dave Evans.
Nancy Spencer photos
Delphos Animal Hospital celebrated
25 years with a pet adopt-a-thon and
demonstrations at their East Fifth Street
location Saturday. Visitors could have their
pets’ toenails trimmed, watch a canine herd
sheep, watch K-9 demonstrations from the
Lima Police Department and get up close
and personal with dogs and cats available
for adoption through area agencies. Above:
Jamie Moreo gives a Lab/Beagle mix from
the Allen County Dog Warden’s booth a
snuggle. Nine pets were adopted.
Bill Nye warns: Creation views threaten US science
By DYLAN LOVAN
The Associated Press
LOUISVILLE, Ky. — The
man known to a generation of
Americans as “The Science
Guy” is condemning efforts
by some Christian groups to
cast doubts on evolution and
lawmakers who want to bring
the Bible into science class-
rooms.
Bill Nye, a mechanical
engineer and star of the pop-
ular 1990s TV show “Bill
Nye The Science Guy,” has
waded into the evolution
debate with an online video
that urges parents not to pass
their religious-based doubts
about evolution on to their
children.
Christians who view the
stories of the Old Testament
as historical fact have come to
be known as creationists, and
many argue that the world
was created by God just a
few thousand years ago.
“The Earth is not 6,000
or 10,000 years old,” Nye
said in an interview with The
Associated Press. “It’s not.
And if that conflicts with
your beliefs, I strongly feel
you should question your
beliefs.”
Millions of Americans do
hold those beliefs, accord-
ing to a June Gallup poll
that found 46 percent of
Americans believe God cre-
ated humans in their present
form about 10,000 years ago.
Nye, 56, also decried
efforts in recent years by law-
makers and school boards in
some states to present Bible
stories as an alternative to
evolution in public schools.
Tennessee passed a law ear-
lier this year that protects
teachers who let students crit-
icize evolution and other sci-
entific theories. That echoes a
Louisiana law passed in 2008
that allows teachers to intro-
duce supplemental teaching
materials in science classes.
“If we raise a generation
of students who don’t believe
in the process of science, who
think everything that we’ve
come to know about nature
and the universe can be dis-
missed by a few sentences
translated into English from
some ancient text, you’re not
going to continue to inno-
vate,” Nye said in a wide-
ranging telephone interview.
The brief online video was
not Nye’s first foray into the
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2A – The Herald Monday, September 24, 2012
For The Record
www.delphosherald.com
OBITUARIES
BIRTHS
LOTTERY
LOCAL PRICES
WEATHER
TODAY IN HISTORY
POLICE REPORT
The Delphos
Herald
Vol. 142 No.74
Nancy Spencer, editor
Ray Geary, general manager,
Delphos Herald Inc.
Don Hemple, advertising manager
Tiffany Brantley,
circulation manager
The Daily Herald (USPS 1525
8000) is published daily
except Sundays, Tuesdays and
Holidays.
By carrier in Delphos and
area towns, or by rural motor
route where available $1.48 per
week. By mail in Allen, Van
Wert, or Putnam County, $97
per year. Outside these counties
$110 per year.
Entered in the post office
in Delphos, Ohio 45833 as
Periodicals, postage paid at
Delphos, Ohio.
No mail subscriptions will be
accepted in towns or villages
where The Daily Herald paper
carriers or motor routes provide
daily home delivery for $1.48
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Delphos, Ohio 45833
Richard O. Brown
Gerald L. Seibert
Ralph Eugene
“Gene” Purdy
Delphos weather
Delphos man
arrested on traf-
fcking warrant
Police probe
rash of thefts
from vehicles
Ronald D. Keeling
Jan. 2, 1930
Sept. 19, 2012
Richard O. Brown age
82, of Cloverdale died 10:30
p.m. Wednesday at Van Wert
Inpatient Hospice.
He was born Jan. 2, 1930,
in Lima to Robert Oliver and
Martha Jane Bollinger Brown,
who preceded him in death.
He married Janet Wieging
June 19, 1981. She also
preceded him in death in
November 2005.
Survivors include three
sons, Michael (Brenda)
Ricker of Delphos, Mark
(Becky) Ricker of Ottoville
and Gary Brown of Urbana;
11 daughters, Julia (Keith)
Kleman of Venedocia, Kathy
(Wayne) Risner and Laura
(Philip) Johnson of Grover
Hill, Margaret (Michael)
Pavel of Van Wert, Deanna
(Chris Vonderau) Jewell
of Convoy, Elaine (Chuck)
Metcalfe and Amy (David)
Zalar of Delphos, Malinda
Ricker of Van Wert, Linda
(David) Neth of Lima,
Robin (Jeff) McGinnis
of Westminster and Kelly
(David) Butler of Lima, two
brothers, Fred Brown and
Jim (Marlene) Brown; a sis-
ter, Karen (Larry) Henchen;
and many grandchildren and
great-grandchildren.
He was preceded in death
by two sons, David and
Timothy Ricker.
Mr. Brown had been a
member of V. F. W. Post
3740, Ottoville, and American
Legion Post 888, Fort
Jennings, having served in the
U. S. Army during Korea. He
was also a member of Eagles
Lodge Arie 471 of Delphos,
U. A. W. Local 1331, Van
Wert, and the Putnam County
Historical Society.
Per his request no public
services will be held.
Memorial contributions
may be given to Community
Health Services Hospice of
Delphos.
Arrangements by Bayliff
& Son Funeral Home,
Cridersville and condo-
lences may be shared at
BayliffAndSon.com.
Gerald L. Seibert, 83,
of Lima and formerly of
Spencerville, died at 8:07 p.m.
Sunday at St. Rita’s Medical
Center.
Arrangements are incom-
plete at Thomas E. Bayliff
Funeral Home.
Ralph Eugene “Gene”
Purdy, 82, of Spencerville,
died at 9:15 p.m. Friday at St.
Rita’s Medical Center.
Arrangements are incom-
plete at Thomas E. Bayliff
Funeral Home, Spencerville.
High temperature Sunday
in Delphos was 62 degrees,
low was 39. Weekend rainfall
was recorded at .92 inch. High
a year ago today was 68, low
was 50. Record high for today
is 92, set in 2007. Record low
is 32, set in 1942.
By The Associated Press
Today is Monday, Sept. 24,
the 268th day of 2012. There
are 98 days left in the year.
Today’s Highlight in
History:
On Sept. 24, 1890, the
president of the Church of
Jesus Christ of Latter-Day
Saints, Wilford Woodruff,
wrote a manifesto renouncing
the practice of polygamy, or
plural marriage (the manifesto
was formally accepted by the
Mormon Church the follow-
ing month).
At 3:01 p.m. on Friday,
Delphos Police went to a resi-
dence in the 500 block of
West Sixth
Street to
serve an
arrest war-
rant for a
subject in
that area.
U p o n
of f i cer s’
a r r i v a l ,
they locat-
ed Daniel
My r i c k ,
22, of Delphos, at which time
they arrested Myrick on the
warrant issued out of Van
Wert Common Pleas Court
on the charge of trafficking
in marijuana which is a fifth
degree felony.
Myrick was transported to
the Delphos Police Department
and was later turned over to
deputies from the Van Wert
County Sheriff’s Department.
Delphos Police are inves-
tigating a rash of thefts from
vehicles.
AT 9:04 a.m. on Friday,
police were called to the 400
block of South Canal Street
in reference to a theft com-
plaint at a residence in that
area.
Upon officers speak-
ing with the victim, it was
found someone, in the over-
night hours, had gained entry
into the victim’s vehicle and
removed items from inside.
At 12:16 p.m. on Friday,
police were called to the 400
block of Grant Street in refer-
ence to a theft complaint at a
residence in that area.
The victim stated some-
time in the overnight hours,
someone gained entry into
two unlocked vehicle at the
residence and had taken items
from inside.
At 9:06 a.m. On Saturday,
police were contacted by a
resident of the 600 block of
South Main Street in reference
to a theft complaint.
The victim stated that some-
time in the overnight hours
of Thursday night, someone
gained entry into an unlocked
vehicle that was parked at the
residence.
Delphos Police Chief Kyle
Fittro reminds residents that
removing valuables from
vehicles and locking vehicles
is a good deterrent to crimi-
nals seeking a quick boost of
items from vehicles.
ST. RITA’S
A boy was born Sept. 19 to
Marina Gable and Joel Finn of
Spencerville.
A girl was born Sept. 21 to
Heather and Garrett Thompson
of Elida.
A girl was born Sept. 22 to
Ashley and Shane Harter of
Delphos.
Twin girls were born Sept.
23 to Holly and Roger Kemper
of Cloverdale.
Corn $7.64
Wheat $8.72
Soybeans $16.15
CLEVELAND (AP) —
These Ohio lotteries were
drawn Sunday:
Mega Millions
Estimated jackpot: $14 M
Pick 3 Evening
0-1-1
Pick 3 Midday
7-2-4
Pick 4 Evening
5-0-5-1
Pick 4 Midday
8-5-5-5
Pick 5 Evening
1-1-0-1-2
Pick 5 Midday
3-2-8-8-7
Powerball
Estimated jackpot: $200 M
Rolling Cash 5
05-18-29-34-36
Estimated jackpot:
$100,000
WEATHER FORECAST
Tri-county
The Associated Press
TONIGHT: Clear in
the evening then becoming
partly cloudy. Not as Cool.
Lows in the upper 40s. South
winds 5 to 10 mph.
TUESDAY: Mostly
cloudy with a 50 percent
chance of showers. Highs
around 70. Southwest winds
5 to 15 mph.
TUESDAY NIGHT:
Mostly cloudy with a chance
of showers and isolated
thunderstorms. Lows in the
upper 50s. Southwest winds
around 10 mph. Chance of
measurable precipitation 50
percent.
EXTENDED FORECAST
WEDNESDAY: Partly
cloudy with a 50 percent
chance of rain. Highs in the
lower 70s. Northwest winds
around 10 mph.
WEDNESDAY NIGHT
AND THURSDAY: Mostly
clear. Lows in the upper 40s.
Highs in the upper 60s.
THURSDAY NIGHT
AND FRIDAY: Partly
cloudy. Lows in the upper
40s. Highs in the upper 60s.
FRIDAY NIGHT
THROUGH SATURDAY
NIGHT: Mostly clear. Lows
around 50. Highs in the
upper 60s.
SUNDAY: Partly cloudy.
Highs in the mid 60s.
May 4, 1958-Sept. 23, 2012
Ronald D. Keeling, 54,
of Delphos, died at 1 p.m.
Sunday at Vancrest Healthcare
Center.
He was born May 4, 1958,
in Lima to Robert and Ruth
(Feathers) Keeling, who pre-
ceded him in death.
Survivors include three
brothers, Kenneth Keeling,
Robert (Rena) Keeling Jr.
and Kevin (Karen) Keeling
of Delphos; and three sis-
ters, Connie Truesdale, Susan
(Joseph) Osenga and Carla
(Tim) Grothouse of Delphos.
Mr. Keeling loved garden-
ing and fishing.
Funeral services will begin
at 1:30 p.m. Wednesday at
Harter and Schier Funeral
Home, the Rev. Tom Shobe
officiating. Burial will be in
Walnut Grove Cemetery.
Friends may call from 2-4
p.m. and 6-8 p.m. Tuesday at
the funeral home.
Preferred memorials are to
the family.
Nov. 14, 1919-Sept. 23, 2012
Ann A. Bonifas, 92, of
Ottoville, died at 8:44 a.m.
Sunday at Putnam County
Ambulatory Care Center,
Glandorf.
She was born Nov. 14,
1919, in Monterey Township,
Putnam County to Andrew
and Rosa (Weber) Hoehn,
who preceded her in death.
On Aug. 30, 1950, she
married Jerome Bonifas, who
died Sept. 15, 1980.
Surviving are nine chil-
dren, Jane (David) Kahle
and Paul (Joyce) Bonifas
of Kalida, Martha (James)
Miller of Landeck, Thomas
(Judith) Bonifas of Kalida,
Patricia (Virgil) Schroeder
of Glandorf, Robert Bonifas
of Ottoville, Doris (Joseph)
Bockey of Delphos, Sharon
(Carl) Mesker of Spring
Lake, Mich., and Donald
(Kathleen) Bonifas of Fort
Jennings; 27 grandchildren;
32 great-grandchildren; a
brother, Walter (Toni) Hoehn
of Lima; four brothers-in-law,
Arthur (Alice) Bonifas of
Delphos and Richard (Jane)
Bonifas and Albert (Eileen)
Bonifas Jr. of Landeck
and John (Lori) Bonifas of
Alpena Mich.; a sister-in-law,
Dorothy (Elmer) Hoffman of
Delphos.
She was also preceded in
death by a great-granddaugh-
ter, Alexis Mack; two broth-
ers, John (Alberta) Hoehn
and Lawrence Hoehn; a sis-
ter, Hilda (Wilbert) Menker;
three sisters-in-law, Agnes
Hoehn, Rosie Hoehn and
Betty Hoehn; and her father-
in-law and mother-in-law,
Albert and Mary Catherine
Bonifas Sr.
Mrs. Bonifas retired
from Schnipke Engraving in
Ottoville and was a home-
maker. She was a member
of Immaculate Conception
Catholic Church, Ottoville,
and its Altar Rosary Society.
She was a 1937 graduate of
Ottoville High School and vol-
unteered at Paradise Oaks and
Meadows of Kalida Nursing
Homes. She was strong in
her faith, devoted to God and
taught her family to love one
another. She was a wonder-
ful role model and proud of
her large family. She enjoyed
working on the family farm,
having her family together
and playing cards and bingo.
Her sharp memory was with
her to the end. She was truly
loved and will be missed by
all those she touched.
Mass of Christian Burial
will begin at 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday at Immaculate
Conception Catholic Church,
the Rev. John Stites officiat-
ing. Burial will follow in St.
Mary’s Cemetery, Ottoville.
Visitation will be from
6-8 p.m. today and 2-8 p.m.
Tuesday at Love-Heitmeyer
Funeral Home, Jackson
Township (on the corner of
St. Rt. 224 & 634).
Memorials may be made
to Immaculate Conception
Church Repair or St. Mary’s
Cemetery.
Condolences may be
expressed at lovefuneral-
home.com.
Ann Bonifas
Myrick
New breast cancer
clues found in
gene analysis
By The Associated Press
NEW YORK — Scientists
reported Sunday that they
have completed a major anal-
ysis of the genetics of breast
cancer, finding four major
classes of the disease. They
hope their work will lead
to more effective treatments,
perhaps with some drugs
already in use.
The new finding offers
hints that one type of breast
cancer might be vulnerable
to drugs that already work
against ovarian cancer.
The study, published
online Sunday by the journal
Nature, is the latest example
of research into the biological
details of tumors, rather than
focusing primarily on where
cancer arises in the body.
The hope is that such
research can reveal cancer’s
genetic weaknesses for better
drug targeting.
“With this study, we’re
one giant step closer to
understanding the genetic
origins of the four major
subtypes of breast can-
cer,” Dr. Matthew Ellis of
the Washington University
School of Medicine said in a
statement. He is a co-leader
of the research.
“Now we can investigate
which drugs work best for
patients based on the genetic
profiles of their tumors,” he
said.
The researchers analyzed
DNA of breast cancer tumors
from 825 patients, looking
for abnormalities. Altogether,
they reported, breast cancers
appear to fall into four main
classes when viewed in this
way.
One class showed simi-
larities to ovarian cancers,
suggesting it may be driven
by similar biological devel-
opments.
“It’s clear they are geneti-
cally more similar to ovar-
ian tumors than to other
breast cancers,” Ellis said.
“Whether they can be treated
the same way is an intriguing
possibility that needs to be
explored.”
The report is the latest
from the Cancer Genome
Atlas, a federally funded proj-
ect that has produced similar
analyses for brain, colorectal,
lung, and ovarian cancers.
1
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Monday, September 24, 2012 The Herald – A3
STATE/LOCAL
www.delphosherald.com
BRIEFS
Information submitted
LIMA — President and
CEO St. Rita’s Health Partners
Brian Smith, announced
Friday the elimination of 60
positions, effective immedi-
ately.
The majority of the posi-
tions eliminated were in man-
agement and support areas.
Technology changes such as
the successful implementation
of the CarePATH electronic
medical record system elimi-
nates the need for some medi-
cal transcription positions.
As the health care envi-
ronment changes, St. Rita’s
must change to keep pace and
maintain the ability to pro-
vide health care services in
the future.
“We will always act in
a way that honors our com-
mitment to our mission and
balances that commitment
with good stewardship of our
resources,” explained Smith.
“Our primary focus remains
providing a safe, quality envi-
ronment for our patients. Just
like other organizations, St.
Rita’s has adopted lean man-
agement techniques from the
manufacturing sector which
have helped make the deliv-
ery of care more efficient.
One positive result from these
efforts is an overall reduction
in most patients’ stay in the
hospital.”
Industry analysts con-
firm that hospitals across the
country are having to make
the same difficult choices.
Industry observers predict
there will be a decline in
demand for inpatient services
over the next 10 years as more
and more procedures move
to outpatient settings. Finally,
the uncertainty of health care
reform and impending reim-
bursement changes is creating
tremendous pressure on the
industry.
“The senior leadership
team has been working for
months to achieve better effi-
ciencies through attrition,
retirements, retraining for new
positions and implementing
more cost effective practices,”
Smith said. “But we could not
make all the changes needed.
Position eliminations were
our last step.”
St. Rita’s
lays off 60
Allen County and Lima
elected and appointed officials
will hold the 104th dialogue at
noon on Wednesday at Allen
Economic Development Group,
144 South Main Street, Suite
100.
As always, county, town-
ship, village, and city officials
are invited to chat and share
a light meal. A $5 donation is
requested to cover the cost of
lunch.
Dialogues are an agenda-
free, informal opportunity to get
to know each other, exchange
ideas and build relationships,
according to David Adams, a
member of the group’s steer-
ing committee. More than 180
officials have participated since
April 2003. Total attendance
is 1,476.
Members of the Planning
Committee are David Adams
(formerly, Lima City Council),
Syl Essick, Roy Hollenbacher
(Bath Township Trustee), Millie
Hughes (Lima Area League of
Women Voters), Mitch Kingsley
(Bluffton Village Council),
Frank Lamar (formerly, Perry
Township Trustee), Jed Metzger
(Lima/Allen County Chamber
of Commerce), Greg Sneary
(County Commissioners),
and Marcel Wagner (Allen
Economic Development
Group).
For more information, call
Allen Economic Development
Group at 419-222-7706.
Public offcials
104th dialog set
for Wednesday
Ohio State head spends
$7.7M to travel, entertain
Science
Early vote
COLUMBUS (AP) — Ohio
State University President E.
Gordon Gee has spent $7.7
million on top of his record-
setting compensation to trav-
el, entertain, and maintain his
9,600-square-foot mansion, an
Ohio newspaper’s investigation
has found.
The review by The Dayton
Daily News detailed spending by
the 68-year-old Gee that comes
on top of $8.6 million in salary
and benefits he’s collected since
returning to Columbus to lead the
university in October 2007.
Records obtained by the
newspaper through records
requests showed Gee travels the
globe often on private jets stay-
ing in luxury hotels sometimes
reached by limousine, dines at
country clubs and fancy res-
taurants, and throws dozens
of expensive parties a year for
thousands of guests.
In a statement, the univer-
sity said endowments and pri-
vate donations — not tuition
or tax dollars — are used to
fund Gee’s travel and use of
the residence. He did not grant
the newspaper an interview for
the story.
Spokesman Jim Lynch said
since arriving at the university,
Gee’s efforts have generated
$1.6 billion from donors. Steps
taken by Gee over the past two
years have yielded another $1
billion in investments, returns
on business deals, and savings,
Lynch said.
“The University has rigor-
ous standards and processes in
planning the president’s budget
and reviewing his expenses,”
the university statement said. It
added, “A significant propor-
tion of President Gee’s time,
travel, and use of the University
Residence is devoted to
resource-generation to support
the work of our students and
faculty. “
To come up with its expense
tally, the Daily News reviewed
records documenting Gee’s
work day, housing, American
Express statements, travel
expenses, and discretionary
spending reports.
The investigation found
the university spent more than
$895,000 for gatherings at
Gee’s mansion in the Columbus
suburb of Bexley, the Pizzuti
House, between April 2008 and
June 2011.
University records showed
Gee hosted 16,000 guests at
275 events over the last five
years, up from 5,757 guests at
138 events hosted by his pre-
decessor Karen Holbrook, the
newspaper reported.
Gee’s parties are considered
an essential part of the presi-
dent’s outreach to the commu-
nity and donors. They feature
specially designed and printed
invitations, shuttle buses and
parking valets, musicians and
photographers, decorations and
fresh flowers.
Guests to Gee’s recep-
tions included cyclist Lance
Armstrong, actor Sidney Poitier,
the president of Bangladesh and
CNN correspondents Sanjay
Gupta and David Gergen, stu-
dents, neighbors, journalists and
politicians.
The review found the uni-
versity spent more than $64,000
since 2007 branding Gee around
his signature bow tie with ties,
bow tie cookies and O-H and
bow tie pins.
Lynch said, “It’s a nice ice-
breaker. The freshmen show up
on campus and President Gee
hands them a cookie. They love
it. The students love it.”
The university also picks up
the tab for thousands of dollars
for flowers Gee sends to politi-
cians and staff members, annual
airline club memberships, and
concert, basketball and football
tickets to be used at Gee’s dis-
cretion. He’s also provided with
a financial planning and tax
preparation stipend, a car, and
housing at the president’s fully-
staffed residence.
Records showed the house was
remodeled for $1.3 million and
stocked with $673,000 in artwork,
Persian rugs, European antiques
and a $532 shower curtain.
University policy says the
president “is expected to stay
in accommodations similar to
those used by executives of
businesses and not-for-profit
institutions; however, luxury
hotels should be avoided.”
The investigation found
Gee often stays at modest
hotels such as Courtyard and
Holiday Inn Express when
traveling inside Ohio, but uses
more upscale accommodations
exceeding $400 a night when
traveling out-of-state. Those
have included Le Meridien
Bristol in Warsaw, The Taj
Mahal Hotel in Mumbai, Loews
Hotel Vogue in Montreal, Hotel
George and the Four Seasons
in Washington, D.C., and the
Warwick in New York.
Gee has built a strong nation-
al reputation in higher educa-
tion, but has been previously
criticized for lavish spending.
When he was president at
Brown University, the univer-
sity spent $3 million renovat-
ing a home for Gee, includ-
ing $400,000 for a conserva-
tory built in Great Britain and
shipped to Providence. At
Vanderbilt University, where
he served as chancellor, he
oversaw $6 million in renova-
tions and ran a $700,000 annual
tab for parties, the Wall Street
Journal found.
Gee’s current stint as presi-
dent of Ohio State has included
a much-publicized football
memorabilia scandal that led to
the resignation of head football
coach Jim Tressel.
According to the Daily News,
Gee’s travel and entertainment
spending appears to outpace
presidents at similarly situat-
ed universities, the University
of Texas at Austin and the
University of Michigan.
Between 2007 and 2011,
UT-Austin President Bill
Powers spent $310,560 on
travel and entertainment com-
pared to Gee’s $1.1 million,
records showed. University of
Michigan President Mary Sue
Coleman’s travel and enter-
tainment expenses from 2007
through 2010 totaled $410,235.
Maintaining her university-
owned house ran an additional
$100,000 a year.
(Continued from page 1)
combustible debate, but “it’s
the first time it’s gotten to be
such a big deal.”
“I can see where one gets
so caught up in this (debate)
that you say something that
will galvanize people in a bad
way, that will make them hate
you forever,” he said. “But I
emphasize that I’m not ques-
tioning someone’s religion —
much of that is how you were
brought up.”
In the video he tells adults
they can dismiss evolution,
“but don’t make your kids do
it. Because we need them.”
Posted by Big Think, an
online knowledge forum, the
clip went viral and has 4.6
million views on YouTube.
It has garnered 182,000 com-
ments from critics and sup-
porters.
It drew the ire of the cre-
ationism group Answers in
Genesis, which built a bibli-
cally based Creation Museum
in Kentucky that teaches the
stories of the Old Testament
and has attracted headlines
for its assertion that dinosaurs
roamed alongside Adam and
Eve.
The group produced a
response video featuring
two scientists who say the
Bible has the true account
of Earth’s origins, and that
“children should be exposed
to both ideas concerning our
past.”
Nye, who is prone to inject
dry humor into scientific dis-
cussions, said Earth is about
4.5 billion years old.
“What I find troubling,
when you listen to these peo-
ple ... once in a while I get the
impression that they’re not
kidding,” Nye said.
Ken Ham, a co-founder of
Answers in Genesis, said dat-
ing methods used by scien-
tists to measure the age of the
earth are contradictory and
many don’t point to millions
or billions of years of time.
“We say the only dating
method that is absolute is the
Word of God,” Ham said.
“Time is the crucial factor for
Bill Nye. Without the time of
millions of years, you can’t
postulate evolution change.”
America is home to the
world’s biggest creationist
following, Ham said, and the
$27 million Creation Museum
has averaged about 330,000
visitors a year since it opened
just south of Cincinnati in
2007.
Nye can’t talk for long
about science without men-
tioning his current passion:
speaking out against proposed
government cuts to NASA’s
planetary sciences division.
Nye is CEO of The Planetary
Society, an organization in
Pasadena, Calif., that pro-
motes space exploration.
NASA’s landing of the
Curiosity rover on Mars last
month is the kind of tech-
nological achievement that
get kids interested in science,
Nye said, but funding cuts
would endanger future mis-
sions.
He said if Curiosity is able
to find evidence of life on
Mars — perhaps in the form
of fossilized microorgan-
isms — it would “change the
world.”
“It would change the way
everybody feels about his or
her place in space,” he said.
“And we do that for $300
million a year, which is not
even a buck a person. We
don’t want to cut that.”
(Continued from page 1)
popular in the West, where
the trend got started in the
1990s.
DOES EARLY VOTING
INCREASE TURNOUT?
Not necessarily. Giving
people more time seems like
an easy way to get more citi-
zens to vote. But it’s not so
simple.
Some studies have found a
small increase in total presi-
dential turnout when it’s easy
to vote early. Others found
turnout actually dropped.
Maybe some voters just pro-
crastinate and end up missing
the deadline. And potential
Election Day voters might
stay home if early voting
drains excitement from the
finale.
For state and local elec-
tions, mailing ballots to all
registered voters does bring
an increase in participation,
perhaps by reminding people
about more forgettable elec-
tions.
Presidential races are hard
to overlook, so voting options
don’t seem to make such a
large difference.
“Early voting is not some-
thing that suddenly brings out
hoards of new voters who
would not otherwise have
voted,” said Barry Burden,
a University of Wisconsin
political science professor
who studies voting patterns.
“It’s a convenience for peo-
ple who likely would have
voted anyway.
VOTES IN THE VAULT
Once cast, an early vote is
the bank. It can’t slip away
because of a candidate’s mis-
step or an “October surprise” or
a nasty new attack ad. Neither
rain nor snow nor traffic jam
can touch it come Nov. 6.
A candidate holding back
dirt on his opponent can’t
afford to be coy much lon-
ger. By mid-October, signifi-
cant numbers of voters will be
locking in.
“If you wait until the
weekend prior to the election
to release your stink bomb,
you’ve lost Coloradans,” said
George Mason University
associate professor Michael
McDonald, an expert in elec-
tion statistics. “If you’ve got
the game-changer, you’ve got
to do that soon.”
Offsetting that, however:
Early voters tend to be die-
hard partisans, whose faith in
their candidate is less apt to be
shaken, political researchers
say. Independents and unde-
cided voters are more likely to
vote on Election Day or just
before.
WHO ARE EARLY
VOTERS?
Despite what you might
have heard, early voters tradi-
tionally are more likely to be
Republican.
Barack Obama’s success-
ful push for early votes in
2008 created the impression
of a Democratic phenomenon,
and that idea’s been reinforced
by court fights this year over
changes to early voting rules
in Democratic-leaning areas in
Florida and Ohio.
But 2008 was an aberra-
tion, McDonald said. Obama’s
beefed-up early mobilizing
effort benefited from infec-
tious enthusiasm among young
people and black voters for his
campaign.
Across the years, early birds
tend to be older and better-
educated and are more likely
to be white than Election Day
voters, he said, and they skew
toward the GOP. About a third
of voters cast their ballots
early in 2008, and Romney’s
efforts are likely to bump that
up this year.
F A R E W E L L ,
ELECTION DAY?
Someday the notion of
an Election Day may seem
as quaint as giving a cam-
paign speech from atop a tree
stump. Maybe it’ll be Election
Month or the six-week Voting
Season.
McDonald thinks that
would be OK.
“Voters like it. They like
the convenience of it,” he said
of early voting.
But Burden worries that
something is being lost. States
with tight limits on absentee
voting have higher turnout
rates than states with pro-
longed, wide-open voting sea-
sons, he said.

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2
“The easiest way to get a reputation is go outside the fold, shout around for a few
years as a violent atheist or a dangerous radical, and then crawl back to the shelter.”
— F. Scott Fitzgerald (born this date in 1896, died 1940).
IT WAS NEWS THEN
4A — The Herald Monday, September 24, 2012
POLITICS
www.delphosherald.com
By DONNA CASSATA
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON — A
frustrated Congress quit
Washington on Saturday with
at least one hope — that the
stark choice in the election
ahead will give lawmakers
clarity about what Americans
want from their government.
They desperately need some
direction.
Lawmakers will return in
about seven weeks and face a
crowded list of must-do items,
topped by avoiding what’s
become known as the fiscal
cliff: the combination of expir-
ing George W. Bush-era tax
cuts and automatic spending
cuts that could drive the coun-
try back into recession.
Two years of rancor and
a divided government resulted
in one of the least produc-
tive Congresses in history.
President Barack Obama piled
on in his weekly radio address.
“Without much fan-
fare, members of the House
of Representatives banged a
gavel, turned out the lights, and
rushed home, declaring their
work finished for now,” Obama
told Americans, while failing
to mention the Democratic-
controlled Senate. “If that frus-
trates you, it should — because
their work isn’t finished.”
In the early morning hours
Saturday, the Senate cleared
and sent Obama a bill to keep
the government running for
another six months. The tem-
porary measure is a reflection
of lawmakers’ failure to com-
plete any of the 12 spending
bills by the Oct. 1 start of the
fiscal year.
The nation will have to
wait until after the election for
Congress to deal with taxes,
spending cuts, the farm bill
and the cash-strapped Postal
Service. It comes as no surprise
to lawmakers that their pub-
lic approval has plummeted to
about 12 percent.
“I literally get on a plane
with a baseball hat and hope
to God nobody knows who I
am because they’re just going
to yell at me,” two-term Rep.
Tom Rooney, R-Fla., said
Friday as lawmakers prepared
to flee the Capitol.
Members of Congress are
counting on the voters, faced
with a straightforward choice
in the election, to decide a way
forward.
The candidates and parties
present two competing philos-
ophies. Obama and Democrats
envision a government with
enough resources to help lift
up the less fortunate. Mitt
Romney and Republicans see a
government that gets out of the
way, allowing people to make
the most in an opportunistic
society.
The difficulty for lawmak-
ers is the presidential election
of 2008 and the congressional
contests of 2010 contradicted
each other.
“The electorate has sent us,
has sent the country two very
different messages over the last
two elections,” said freshman
Rep. Mick Mulvaney, R-S.C.
“They elected the most lib-
eral president in a long time
and then the most conserva-
tive group to the House of
Representatives two years
later. That is the conflicting
message.”
The upcoming election —
“You sort of look at this as the
tiebreaker. I have no difficulty
with the big issues of the day
being solved at the ballot box,”
Mulvaney said.
Voters on Nov. 6 will chose
a president and decide con-
trol of the House and Senate.
Republicans say a Romney
victory, an increase in their
House majority and a major-
ity in the Senate would be a
mandate to begin making the
changes embodied by the bud-
get of Romney’s running mate,
Wisconsin Rep. Paul Ryan, in
their postelection session.
Ryan’s spending blueprint
remakes Medicare, reduces
personal and corporate taxes,
targets spending on safety-
net programs for the poor and
drives down the deficit to a
manageable level. Republicans
insist it is the only way to get
a country deep in debt back on
track.
The election choice, says
freshman Rep. Allen West,
R-Fla., is a “huge philosophi-
cal difference. It is based upon
will America be a constitu-
tional republic or will it be a
socialist, egalitarian, welfare
nanny state. I think the choice
is pretty simple.”
If the election restores
the status quo — an Obama
win, a Democratic Senate
and a Republican House —
Democrats are optimistic that
the GOP would be more will-
ing to compromise, with estab-
lishment Republicans prevail-
ing over the wishes of their tea
party brethren.
One Year Ago
• Thursday was the Elida FFA’s annual Apple Butter Day,
an outdoor exhibit for students to learn about farm safety, natu-
ral resources and of course, apple butter. “This is our 35th year
doing this here at Elida,” said FFA advisor Dennis Pohlman.
Although making and selling apple butter is a beloved tradition
of Apple Butter Day, Pohlman said the main point is to educate
students about safety on the farm and respect for nature.
25 Years Ago — 1987
• A former Delphos resident is taking part in Harvard
University’s Senior Executive Fellows program. Michael E.
Wilson is comptroller of the Defense Construction Supply
Center in Columbus. He is the son of Mrs. Burgen Wilson,
now of Delphos, and a 1962 graduate of St. John’s High
School.
• The grand marshal and honoree of Elida High School’s
third annual homecoming parade and festivities is Roland
(Rollie) Swank. Swank began the football program in Elida in
1931 while serving as a history and physical education teacher
in the school system. Five members of Swank’s first team came
to Elida to do some reminiscing. They were Tom Long, Kenny
Patton, Clarence Swanney, Ray John and Everett Baxter.
• The Delphos Bass Club held its last tournament of the
year at Coldwater, Mich. The winners were Arnold Osting first
place with 37 points, Ron Beair second place with 27 points,
third place Denny Claypool with 25 points and big bass of one
pound nine ounces.
50 Years Ago — 1962
• A group of business men from Fort Jennings and Buckeye
Sugars Inc., Ottawa, have purchased the grand champion steer
of the 1962 Putnam County Fair at Ottawa, paying 50 cents
per pound for the 950-pound animal. The steer was owned by
Jack Ricker, Fort Jennings. Richard Ricker, Jack’s father, had
the grand champion steer in 1944 when the animal sold for 20
cents per pound.
• Mrs. Thomas Osting was hostess to the members of the
Jay-C-Dels Thursday evening in her home at 2, Cleveland
Court. Attendance prizes went to Mrs. James Mesker and
Mrs. James Irey. At the conclusion of the meeting a luncheon
was served by Mrs. Osting and Mrs. Donald Schram, co-
hostesses.
• Six young women from this area will be among the 22
students to be graduated from the Lima School of Practical
Nursing Thursday evening this week. They are: Betty J. Allen,
Joyce A. Darbyshire, Eunice L. Sneary and Darilyn K. Vance,
all of Columbus Grove and Barbara A. Lauth and Alberta L.
Starr of Spencerville.
75 Years Ago — 1937
• The Jefferson High School Band will start preparations
within a few days to participate in the annual Van Wert
Harvest Festival which will be held October 15 at the county
seat city. Only Van Wert County musical organizations will
participate in the parade. The procession will disband in the
Van Wert High School stadium and the bands will join in an
All-County mass band concert.
• Janice Becker was chosen as president of the Queen of the
Rose court, a W.B.A. Junior organization, at a regular meeting
conducted Wednesday afternoon in the lodge rooms. Other
officers are Betty Knepper, vice president; Helen Schmersal,
secretary and Betty Schmersal, treasurer.
• More than 7500 men, who served with the First and
Second Officers Training camp at Fort Sheridan, during 1917,
will gather for the annual reunion next month at Hotel Sheridan
at Chicago, the beginning of the annual series of reunions and
gatherings of these men noted in the business, financial and
industrial circles will have the first chance of reuniting and
fighting the World War again. C. W. Bellis, formerly of this
city, was registered at the camp.
LETTER TO THE EDITOR
DEAR EDITOR:
When it comes to these “Protect Religious Freedom” signs
in the front yards of so many people, my sign definitely serves
for more purpose than just the rights of women. Christians
are being persecuted all over the world. We should not be
surprised by this, the Bible tells us it’s going to happen. That
doesn’t mean we, as Christians, should be doormats.
It is now and has been coming to America for a while. As a
Christian, I am very concerned. Have you not heard of the man
down in the southern states who was jailed because he held a
Bible study in his own home?
The Ten Commandments are being attacked seemingly
“everywhere.” Somehow, if one person complains about
something being religious, the majority has to succumb to the
one. Since when does the majority not win? Since “they” are
attacking Christians, that’s when.
Somehow it is OK for Hollywood to attack Christians. It’s
OK for them to make Christians look dumb or awkward.
If you don’t believe Christians are being attacked, you had
better wake up because it’s going to be in our own backyards
before you know it.
As far as the signs being in protest of the Affordable Care
Act health care law and taxpayers paying for coverage of
women; being female, I do not believe my government owes
me good health. It’s NOT an entitlement. My tax dollars should
never go toward contraceptives and abortions. As a woman or
a man, as an adult, that’s my responsibility.
You are right, Mr. Larry Donaldson, women do have the
“right” to make decisions concerning their own health. Quite
frankly, it should start with asking our Lord for wisdom to
make the right decisions concerning our bodies, eating right,
exercise, good mental health and keeping unmarried legs
together.
Kathy Stewart,
Delphos
Congress seeks clarity
from election for agenda
By TOM RAUM
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON — Mitt
Romney has given Democrats
plenty of support for their
claim he manipulated his
deductions to keep his overall
2011 federal income tax rate
above a certain threshold for
political purposes.
The Republican presiden-
tial nominee, whose wealth
is estimated as high as $250
million, seems hemmed in
by a comment to reporters in
August that he had never paid
less than 13 percent in taxes
in any single year over the
past 10. Had he taken the full
charitable deduction last year,
it would have pushed his tax
liability below 13 percent.
The former Massachusetts
governor and his wife, Ann,
could have claimed more
in deductions, the trustee of
Romney’s blind trust said
when the candidate’s 2011
tax returns were released.
But, Brad Malt acknowl-
edged, the couple “limited
their deductions of charitable
contributions to conform to
the governor’s statement in
August, based on the January
estimate of income, that he
paid at least 13 percent in
income taxes in each of the
last 10 years.”
The tax returns had become
a distraction for his campaign,
with Democrats and even
some fellow Republicans
this summer urging Romney,
who earlier had released
2010 data and a preliminary
2011 return, to disclose more
than two years of informa-
tion. Senate Majority Leader
Harry Reid, D-Nev., had kept
the issue alive by making an
unsubstantiated and roundly
criticized claim that Romney
had not paid any taxes for 10
years. Romney’s statement
about the 13 percent level had
come in reaction to Reid’s
assertion.
Romney probably also
will be reminded by the
Democrats by something else
he said in August. Defending
his right to pay no more taxes
than he owed, he said, “I don’t
pay more than are legally
due, and frankly if I had paid
more than are legally due I
don’t think I’d be qualified to
become president.”
The decision of Romney’s
trustee to limit the use of
charitable deductions in 2011
in order to adhere to the
candidate’s claim raised the
eyebrows of several tax law
experts. They noted that the
trustee’s use of numerous tax
strategies gives Romney the
rare ability to loosen or limit
his tax payments at will.
The Romneys donated
roughly $4 million to charities
last year, but only claimed a
deduction of $2.25 million
on their tax return, filed with
the Internal Revenue Service
on Friday.
That information, Reid
said, “reveals that Mitt
Romney manipulated one of
the only two years of tax
returns he’s seen fit to show
the American people - and
then only to ‘conform’ with
his public statements. That
raises the question: What else
in those returns has Romney
manipulated?”
Romney made $13.7 mil-
lion last year and paid $1.94
million in federal income
taxes, giving him an effec-
tive tax rate of 14.1 percent.
That was a bit above the 13.9
percent rate paid on 2010
income.
Romney gives Dem support for tax deductions claim
By JOSH LEDERMAN
and STEVE PEOPLES
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON —
President Barack Obama,
defending his foreign poli-
cy record at a time of anti-
American rage in the Muslim
world, fired back at sugges-
tions from Republican Mitt
Romney that the president
has been weak with allies
and enemies alike.
In an interview airing the
night before Obama meets
with other world leaders at
the United Nations, the pres-
ident said, “If Gov. Romney
is suggesting that we should
start another war, he should
say so.”
It was Obama’s most
direct rebuttal yet to persis-
tent skepticism by his White
House rival on his handling
of an unraveling situation
in the Middle East. Romney
has charged the U.S. stance
has been marred by miscal-
culations, mixed messages
and appeasement.
The foreign policy argu-
ments come as both can-
didates sharpen their strat-
egy just six weeks ahead
of Election Day. Speaking
to reporters on a flight to
Colorado Sunday night,
Romney acknowledged he
was slipping behind Obama
in several swing states and
said he would spend more
time with voters in the com-
ing weeks.
“I think the fundraising
season is probably a little
quieter going forward,” he
said following a weekend
largely devoted to raising
money in California.
Facing Republican fears
that his campaign is mov-
ing in the wrong direction,
Romney huddled earlier in
the day with his top advisers,
preparing for next month’s
debates and crafting a more
aggressive strategy.
“I don’t pay a lot of atten-
tion to the day-to-day polls.
They change a great deal,”
Romney said. “And I know
that in the coming six weeks
they’re very unlikely to stay
where they are today.”
Obama Is launching a
new campaign offensive
today with his first televi-
sion advertisement target-
ing Romney’s comments
about Americans who don’t
pay income taxes. The ad,
which was to start running
in swing state Ohio, argues
that Romney should stop
attacking others on taxes and
“come clean” on his own.
The ad uses Romney’s
comments to wealthy donors
that 47 percent of Americans
don’t pay income taxes,
believe they are victims and
feel entitled to government
assistance. It shows Romney
saying, “My job is not to
worry about those people.”
The 30-second spot signals
that Obama will keep mak-
ing the wealthy Romney’s
taxes a campaign issue even
after the Republican released
a second year of information
about his personal finances
on Friday.
Romney and Obama both
discussed foreign policy in
interviews broadcast Sunday
on CBS’ “60 Minutes.”
Romney, who has criti-
cized Obama’s response
to unrest in Syria and anti-
American protests across
the Muslim world, broad-
ened his reproach to include
Israel. He said Obama’s fail-
ure to schedule a meeting
with Israeli Prime Minister
Benjamin Netanyahu during
the annual U.N. gathering
this week “sends a message
throughout the Middle East
that somehow we distance
ourselves from our friends.”
The White House has said
scheduling precluded a meet-
ing between the two lead-
ers, who won’t be in New
York at the same time. But
Obama pushed back on the
notion that he feels pressure
from Netanyahu, dismissing
as noise the Israeli leader’s
calls for the U.S. to lay out a
“red line” that Iran’s nucle-
ar program mustn’t cross
to avoid American military
intervention.
Obama responds to Romney’s tough talk on Mideast
WASHINGTON (AP)
— The world’s leaders are
gathering in New York, but
President Barack Obama has
no plans to meet privately
with any of them.
He will make time for
“The View,” a freewheeling
TV talk show more likely
to reach voters than Obama
would with the diplomacy
he is skipping at the United
Nations.
Just six weeks until the
election, the realities and
priorities of campaign poli-
tics hang prominently over
Obama’s final turn on the
world stage before facing
voters.
Unlike his predecessors,
he is skipping the face-to-
face meetings with coun-
terparts where much of the
U.N. works gets done, leav-
ing Secretary of State Hillary
Rodham Clinton to pick up
more of those sessions her-
self.
Obama’s itinerary today
and Tuesday is compressed
so that he can get back to
campaigning in some of the
most contested states such as
Ohio and Virginia.
Obama’s address to the
U.N. General Assembly,
while avoiding any referenc-
es to Republican rival Mitt
Romney, will be viewed in
more of an election context
by many observers. Those
include the more than 130
heads of state and govern-
ment who are keenly inter-
ested in who will be in the
White House next year.
Obama’s two worlds will
collide in his speech Tuesday.
He will have a chance to dis-
tinguish his world vision from
Romney’s at a time when
foreign crises have intruded
in an election focused pri-
marily on the economy.
Obama campaign offi-
cials privately welcome the
imagery of the president
commanding the U.N. stage
and making his case about a
stronger U.S. position in the
world. But the speech is less
anticipated this year, seem-
ing also to be squeezed into a
pursuit of a second term built
more on domestic concerns.
Obama is expected to
explain, explore and defend
U.S. engagement in the
world as anti-American rage
has run high in many nations,
fueled by anti-Muslim film
that was made in the United
States but unconnected to
and denounced by Obama’s
administration.
More than 40 people,
including the U.S. ambas-
sador to Libya, have been
killed in violence linked to
the protests over the film,
raising hard questions about
the transitions to democracy
in the Middle East and North
Africa.
The upheaval roiled the
presidential campaign when
Romney accused Obama’s
administration of sympathiz-
ing with those who attacked
U.S. interests.
At the U.N., Obama will
try to differentiate himself
from Romney by projecting
a less aggressive tone toward
the world, while also defend-
ing America and not seem-
ing like an apologist, said
Shibley Telhami, a Middle
East scholar and senior fellow
at the Brookings Institution.
“That’s a tough mix,” he
said.
Obama
tightens his
UN diplomacy
1
ARE YOU BUILDING, REMODELING, OR ADDING A ROOM??
ALLEN CO. FAIRGROUNDS
Sat., SEPTEMBER 29th @ 9AM
HOME IMPROVEMENT
AUCTION
www.pbauctions.com
KITCHEN & BATH: Kitchen cabinet sets by
Silver Creek, granite counters, sinks,
faucets, showers, vessel sinks, tubs, drop
in & pedestal sinks, top brand toilets &
sinks. FLOORING: Carpet rems in res, comm, berbers, plush,
carpet padding, ceramic, 2 ¼” to 5” hardwoods in oak, maple, cherry,
hickory, walnut, some w/15-25 yr. warranty! Travertine, marble medal-
lions, laminates. EXTERIOR DOORS: P/H entrys in oak, mahogany,
maple, & cherry, fibergls & steel, 1/2 & full view, leaded glass, 9 lts,
sliding & patio. INTERIOR DOORS: P/H, raised, 6 panel in oak & pine,
flush, bifolds, french. WINDOWS: Vinyl, new const & replace.
TRIM: Casing, baseboard, crown, chair rail,
spindles, handrails, newels, & stair parts in
oak, pine, & primed. NAME BRAND TOOLS:
Frame, finish, brad, & floor nailers, air
comps, drills & saw kits. SPECIAL INT:
Pavers & stone, light fixtures, lock sets,
lever door sets, entry locks, electrical.
2750 Harding Hwy (Rt. 309) • Lima, OH 45804
Directions: From Rt. 75 exit 125, east on St. Rt. 309 to auction site.
TERMS: Inventroy subject to change. Drivers license to register. Cash, check or cc.
7% buyers premium. Sale conducted by Paranzino Brothers Auctioneers, Inc.
YOU’VE GOT TO CHECK OUT OUR WEBSITE FOR TONS OF
INVENTORY AND PHOTOS FOR EACH DAY!!
ARE YOU BUILDING, REMODELING, OR ADDING A ROOM??
ALLEN CO. FAIRGROUNDS
Sat., SEPTEMBER 29th @ 9AM
HOME IMPROVEMENT
AUCTION
www.pbauctions.com
KITCHEN & BATH: Kitchen cabinet sets by
Silver Creek, granite counters, sinks,
faucets, showers, vessel sinks, tubs, drop
in & pedestal sinks, top brand toilets &
sinks. FLOORING: Carpet rems in res, comm, berbers, plush,
carpet padding, ceramic, 2 ¼” to 5” hardwoods in oak, maple, cherry,
hickory, walnut, some w/15-25 yr. warranty! Travertine, marble medal-
lions, laminates. EXTERIOR DOORS: P/H entrys in oak, mahogany,
maple, & cherry, fibergls & steel, 1/2 & full view, leaded glass, 9 lts,
sliding & patio. INTERIOR DOORS: P/H, raised, 6 panel in oak & pine,
flush, bifolds, french. WINDOWS: Vinyl, new const & replace.
TRIM: Casing, baseboard, crown, chair rail,
spindles, handrails, newels, & stair parts in
oak, pine, & primed. NAME BRAND TOOLS:
Frame, finish, brad, & floor nailers, air
comps, drills & saw kits. SPECIAL INT:
Pavers & stone, light fixtures, lock sets,
lever door sets, entry locks, electrical.
2750 Harding Hwy (Rt. 309) • Lima, OH 45804
Directions: From Rt. 75 exit 125, east on St. Rt. 309 to auction site.
TERMS: Inventroy subject to change. Drivers license to register. Cash, check or cc.
7% buyers premium. Sale conducted by Paranzino Brothers Auctioneers, Inc.
YOU’VE GOT TO CHECK OUT OUR WEBSITE FOR TONS OF
INVENTORY AND PHOTOS FOR EACH DAY!!
ARE YOU BUILDING, REMODELING, OR ADDING A ROOM??
ALLEN CO. FAIRGROUNDS
Sat., SEPTEMBER 29th @ 9AM
HOME IMPROVEMENT
AUCTION
www.pbauctions.com
KITCHEN & BATH: Kitchen cabinet sets by
Silver Creek, granite counters, sinks,
faucets, showers, vessel sinks, tubs, drop
in & pedestal sinks, top brand toilets &
sinks. FLOORING: Carpet rems in res, comm, berbers, plush,
carpet padding, ceramic, 2 ¼” to 5” hardwoods in oak, maple, cherry,
hickory, walnut, some w/15-25 yr. warranty! Travertine, marble medal-
lions, laminates. EXTERIOR DOORS: P/H entrys in oak, mahogany,
maple, & cherry, fibergls & steel, 1/2 & full view, leaded glass, 9 lts,
sliding & patio. INTERIOR DOORS: P/H, raised, 6 panel in oak & pine,
flush, bifolds, french. WINDOWS: Vinyl, new const & replace.
TRIM: Casing, baseboard, crown, chair rail,
spindles, handrails, newels, & stair parts in
oak, pine, & primed. NAME BRAND TOOLS:
Frame, finish, brad, & floor nailers, air
comps, drills & saw kits. SPECIAL INT:
Pavers & stone, light fixtures, lock sets,
lever door sets, entry locks, electrical.
2750 Harding Hwy (Rt. 309) • Lima, OH 45804
Directions: From Rt. 75 exit 125, east on St. Rt. 309 to auction site.
TERMS: Inventroy subject to change. Drivers license to register. Cash, check or cc.
7% buyers premium. Sale conducted by Paranzino Brothers Auctioneers, Inc.
YOU’VE GOT TO CHECK OUT OUR WEBSITE FOR TONS OF
INVENTORY AND PHOTOS FOR EACH DAY!!
ALLEN CO. FAIRGROUNDS • SAT., SEPT. 29TH @ 9 AM
2750 Harding Hwy (Rt. 309) • Lima, OH 45804
Directions: from Rt. 75 exit 125, east on St. Rt. 309 to auction site.
YOU’VE GOT TO CHECK OUT OUR WEBSITE FOR TONS OF INVENTORY AND PHOTOS FOR EACH DAY!
ANDY NORTH
Financial Advisor
1122 Elida Ave.
DELPHOS, OHIO 45833
Bus. (419) 695-0660
1-800-335-7799
Call or stop by today.
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& Putnam Counties since 1993!
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Living in the Now,
Preparing for the Future
For many of us, our goals in life remain constant: fnancial indepen-
dence and providing for family. Striking a balance between saving
for goals, such as education and retirement, and allocating
money for daily expenses can be challenging. But you can do it.
Learn how you can redefne your savings approach
toward education and retirement. Call or visit today.
www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC
Andy North
Financial Advisor
.
1122 Elida Avenue
Delphos, OH 45833
419-695-0660

Few things are as stressful as worrying about work. Because
it’s easy to feel like things are out of control, it’s essential to
consider any fnancial decision carefully. This is especially true
when it comes to your retirement savings.
Edward Jones can help. We’ll start by getting to know your
goals. Then we’ll sort through your current situation and work
with you face to face to develop a strategy that can help you
keep your retirement on track.
Keep Your Retirement
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Even If Things at Work Are
Up in the Air.
To make sense of your retirement savings alternatives,
call or visit today.
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Financial Advisor
.
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419-695-0660
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THE DELPHOS
HERALD
(419) 695-0015
Monday, September 24, 2012 The Herald – A5
COMMUNITY
LANDMARK
www.delphosherald.com
Happy Birthday
Delphos Fire Truck Display
SEPT. 25
Matt Wrasman
Lisa A. Cross
Ron Foppe
Steve Goodwin
Tanner Higbie
SEPT. 26
Steve Peters
Nikki Taylor
Linda Martin
Darren Edinger
Sonya Roeder
CALENDAR OF
EVENTS
TODAY
9 a.m. to 7 p.m. — Ottoville
Branch Library is open.
7 p.m. — Ottoville village
council meets at the municipal
building.
Marion Township Trustees
meet at the township house.
7:30 p.m. — Delphos Eagles
Aerie 471 meets at the Eagles
Lodge.
TUESDAY
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite at
Delphos Senior Citizen Center,
301 Suthoff Street.
7 p.m. — Delphos Area
Simply Quilters meets at the
Delphos Area Chamber of
Commerce, 306 N. Main St.
Al-Anon Meeting for Friends
and Families of Alcoholics at
St. Rita’s Medical Center, 730
West Market Street, Behavioral
Services Conference Room 5-G,
5th Floor
7:30 p.m. — Alcoholics
Anonymous, First Presbyterian
Church, 310 W. Second St.
8:30 p.m. — Elida village
council meets at the town hall.
WEDNESDAY
9 a.m. - noon — Putnam
County Museum is open, 202 E.
Main St. Kalida.
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite at
Delphos Senior Citizen Center,
301 Suthoff Street.
Noon — Rotary Club meets
at The Grind.
6 p.m. — Shepherds of Christ
Associates meet in the St. John’s
Chapel.
7 p.m. — Bingo at St. John’s
Little Theatre.
Allen museum offers
Techumseh book
presentation, signing
Techumseh
The Allen County Museum,
620 W. Market St., Lima, will
offer “Thus Fell Techumseh”
book presentation and book
signing by author Frank Kuron
at 2 p.m. Sept. 30.
“ Rumps e y- dumps e y,
Rumpsey-dumpsey, Colonel
Johnson killed Tecumseh!”
Did he really? Such was the
slogan craftily used by Richard
M. Johnson’s campaign strate-
gists to win him the vice-pres-
idency of the United States in
1836. Now compiled in one
place, the words of the men
who bore witness to this event
prove that this may not truly
be the case.
If you enjoy solving a
real mystery, the death of
Tecumseh is a classic in the
annals of American history.
How this great Shawnee Chief
fell at the Battle of the Thames
in 1813, and by whose hand
has been the subject of debate
for almost 200 years. Between
the covers of this book are
quotes from over 160 people
who had something to say
about this event. If their sto-
ries agreed with each other
there would be no mystery —
but they don’t!
Political interests, friend-
ships, family, honor, glory, and
even simple misinterpretations
have colored these accounts.
You are the one challenged
to separate fact from fiction.
Can you do it? The Northwest
Territory wasn’t secured for
the Americans until Tecumseh
fell along the Thames River.
Before you arrive at this
battleground to review his
demise, march along with
the participants, learn of the
hardships they faced and gain
insight into the preliminary
battles they had to fight — all
from their own words. In the
process you’ll acquire a new
appreciation for the character,
courage and determination of
all the men involved in acquir-
ing the frontier lands of 1813
for their respective nations; be
they British, Indian, American
or Canadian.
In his debut book, American
history enthusiast, researcher
and author Kuron of Toledo
has compiled all known testi-
monies of this confrontation
into a riveting who-dun-it
adventure. Kuron plays detec-
tive as he presents extensive
passages from over 200 let-
ters, newspaper accounts, and
diary entries of the people who
were involved in this history-
altering event. The reader sits
on the metaphorical jury and
weighs the evidence.
This year marks the begin-
ning of the bicentennial of the
War of 1812. This program
and book signing is free and
open to the public.
COLUMN
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Please use the coupon also to make changes,
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THE DELPHOS HERALD
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The Delphos Her-
ald ... Your No. 1
source for local
news.
Pirates knock off Lady
Wildcats on the pitch
FORT JENNINGS — The
Jefferson Lady Wildcats lost
their soccer match 5-1 against
Continental on Saturday at
Keith Hamel Memorial Field
in Ft. Jennings.
The match started badly for
the Wildcats when a cross by
the Pirates’ Vanessa
Koppenhofer trick-
led past senior
goalie Paige Miller
(12 saves versus 28
total shots) off the
foot of Jefferson’s
Jordan Radler for
an own-goal (Paige
Kindilien was the closest
Pirate) at 32:59 of the first
half.
The Lady ’Cats tied the
score at 1-1 at 30:16 when
sophomore Kylee Haehn used
her left foot to service the ball
into the box and onto the foot
of freshman Logan Hamilton
for a score past Continental
senior keeper Leva Weller
(3 saves, 4 Wildcat shots on-
goal).
The Lady Wildcats con-
tinued to keep pressure on
the Pirates.
“This was the best game
we have played all year. We
played as a team today and
we were able to move the
ball at times today with some
great passes and send it up
to our forwards and outside
mids at the right
time,” Jefferson
coach Josiah Stober
noted.
The Pirates
played hard and
fast, though, and
scored three more
goals by the end
of the half: at 20:14, when
Whitney Miller connected
with Sloane Zachrich; at 5:24,
when Paige Ordway assisted
McKenna Scott; and at 2:14,
when Scott found Zachrich.
At the start of the second
half, Scott assisted Taylor
Willliamson for the final tally
just 26 seconds into the 40
minutes.
However, Jefferson once
again found some intensity,
this time on the defensive
end. Midfielder Baily Miller
pressured the Pirate offen-
sive players and had several
timely interceptions. Outside
midfielder Adrie Miller was
aggressive and seemed to
frustrate the offense.
“We were fundamentally
sound today on defense. We
tried to tell the girls at the half
to break down, don’t stab and
keep the offense in
front of you,” Stober
added.
The Lady ’Cats
played well the sec-
ond half, allowing
just that one goal,
but could not find
the net themselves.
The Lady ’Cats travel to
Ft. Jennings High School this
Tuesday for a 5 p.m. start.
----
Lady Wildcats
win twice at Cory-
Rawson Invitational
MT. CORY — Jefferson
paid a visit to Mt. Cory
Saturday for the Cory-Rawson
Volleyball Invitational and
won two matches.
The Lady Wildcats wal-
loped Miller City 25-6, 25-19
— a team they had swept in
a 3-of-5 match earlier this
season — and then outlast-
ed Lima Temple Christian
25-20, 19-25, 25-22.
They will play at LTC
5:30 p.m. (junior varsity
start) tonight.
-----
Big Green,
’Riders
notch tie
ST. MARYS —
Visiting Ottoville
and host St. Marys
Memorial bat-
tled to a 2-2 title
Saturday afternoon
in boys soccer action at West
Elementary School.
Scoring for the Big Green
(6-3-1) was Anthony Eickholt
with both goals.
St. Marys (7-0-3) — who
outshot the visitors 6-4 — got
tallies from Nathan Wilker
and Zac Nelson.
Ottoville hosts Lima
Temple Christian 7 p.m.
tonight.
-----
FORT JENNINGS — The
second half became the down-
fall for the Fort Jennings boys
soccer team again Saturday
afternoon at the Fort Jennings
Outdoor Athletic Complex.
New Knoxville (7-2-1)
scored twice in the second
half to down the
Musketeers 3-1 in
non- conf er ence
action.
The Musketeers
(5-6-1) came out
strong, possessing
the ball and play-
ing wide well.
At the 20th minute, they
brought the ball back across
the “big D” from the right to
the left, Drew Stechschulte
slid a nice counter pass
from the middle back to the
right in the gap to find Alex
Berelsman, beating the flat-
back defense to score in the
left post net.
The next 15 minutes went
well for Jennings but with no
additional scoring.
On a counterattack, the
Rangers’ Andrew Mackie
dribbled down to the right-
side goalline just wider than
the 6-yard box and cut the
ball back, finding Goncalo
Branco, who shot far post
left to score, tying the match
at 1-1.
That score held to
halftime.
The battle contin-
ued for 20 minutes
in the second half.
The Musketeers were
not putting together
as many passes nor
changing the point of
attack as well.
More physical play was
occurring and a foul gave
the Rangers a free kick from
30 yards out on the right.
Mackie struck the kick onto a
running Branco, who beat his
defender and the keeper for
New Knoxville’s lead.
The fight raged on, yield-
ing few chances for the
Musketeers.
At the 78th minute, Caleb
2
6A – The Herald Monday, September 24, 2012
SPORTS
www.delphosherald.com
LIMA CENTRAL CATHOLIC 42,
JEFFERSON 19
Jefferson 0 7 0 12 - 19
Lima CC 14 7 6 15 - 42
FIRST QUARTER
LC — Mykale Rogers 78 pass from Colin
Stolly (Stolly kick), 5:48
LC — Darius West 77 pass from Stolly
(Stolly kick), 2:58
SECOND QUARTER
DJ — Zavier Buzard 1 run (Austin
Jettinghoff kick), 8:42
LC — Sam Huffman 48 pass from Stolly
(Stolly kick), :00
THIRD QUARTER
LC — Stolly 4 run (kick failed), 5:48
FOURTH QUARTER
LC — Stolly 11 run (Rogers pass from
Stolly), 8:53
DJ — Ross Thompson 6 pass from
Jettinghoff (kick failed), 4:32
LC — Cory Stewart 11 pass from Stolly
(Stolly kick), :40
DJ — Quentin Wessell 1 run (pass failed),
:01
TEAM STATS
Jefferson Lima CC
First Downs 12 20
Total Yards 206 485
Rushes-Yards 44-102 41-260
Passing Yards 104 225
Comps.-Atts. 9-15 5-9
Intercepted by 2 2
Fumbles-Lost 3-1 2-1
Penalties-Yards 3-28 11-112
Punts-Aver. 1-51 1-20
INDIVIDUAL
JEFFERSON
RUSHING: Zavier Buzard 26-61,
Quentin Wessell 10-46, Jordan McCann
3-4, Austin Jettinghoff 5-(-)9.
PASSING: Jettinghoff 8-14-98-2-1,
Drew Kortorkax 1-1-6-0-0.
RECEIVING: Ross Thompson 6-63,
Buzard 2-8, Drew Kortokrax 1-33.
LIMA CENTRAL CATHOLIC
RUSHING: Jon Washington 16-96,
Colin Stolly 9-83, Mykale Rogers 6-45,
Kalito Lasenby 8-28, Sam Huffman 2-7.
PASSING: Stolly 5-9-225-2-4.
RECEIVING: Rogers 2-89, Darius
West 1-77, Huffman 1-48, Cory Stewart
1-11.
By JIM METCALFE
jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com
DELPHOS — The Kalida
volleyball team moved to 12-2
on the 2012 season on the
heels of a 25-21, 25-17, 25-15
Saturday afternoon at Robert
A. Arnzen Gymnasium.
Topping the victorious
LadyCats was a balanced
attack of senior Kayla Siefker
(11 kills, 18 digs), senior
Bailey Dangler (5 kills, 9
digs, 10 assists), senior Amy
Smith (5 kills, 9 digs), senior
Andrea Bellman (5 kills, 3
stuffs) and freshman Kylie
Osterhage (5 kills). Junior
Alexis Decker had 22 assists.
For the Lady Blue Jays
(4-10), senior Katrina Etzkorn
totaled 18 digs, along with
senior Christie Carder (9
digs, 8 assists), senior Emily
Horstman (9 digs, 3 kills),
senior Heather Vogt (5 kills,
5 stuffs), senior Lauren Utrup
(3 kills, 3 blocks) and senior
Bailie Hulihan (3 kills).
“Kalida is a good team;
they run a quick offense and
get you out of your rhythm
there and with the serve and
they have a lot of weapons,”
Jays coach Kellie Sterling
said. “At the same time, they
dig up everything; they are
such a scrappy defensive team
and we couldn’t get many hits
to drop.”
Kalida first-year coach
Sherry Luebrecht figures the
versatility of her team is key.
“We don’t necessarily do
it by design but the talent is
there. The girls know that if
one or two hitters are off, we
have others that pick up the
slack,” she asserted. “I can
trust my setters to go to the
girls with the hot hand. If they
are all on, we are very diffi-
cult to deal with. We haven’t
gotten to that point yet but
we’re working on it. We’re
getting better as a team.”
The LadyCats got off
quickly in set 1, taking advan-
tage of some early hitting
errors by the Jays (18 for
the match; 4 service errors, 4
aces) and a couple of kills to
lead 6-1 and force a Sterling
timeout. That seemed to do
the trick for the home team
as they began to get more and
more into the match. Behind
Vogt and Horstman, plus
some of Kalida’s own hitting
errors (18 for the match; 9
aces, 6 service errors), to take
the lead at 18-17 on an ace
by junior Kaylie Youngpeter,
forcing Luebrecht to call a
halt. That also did the trick,
breaking the hosts’ momen-
tum. From then on, it was a
sprint to the finish, with the
Maroon and White winning
that battle. A tip on a joust
over the net won by Smith on
set point gave the visitors a
1-0 edge.
The visitors got off quick-
ly again in the second set
and never looked back. With
either Decker or Dangler
using their myriad weapons
at the net and the Jays unable
to get consistent kills against
the LadyCat defense, Kalida
had leads of 5-1, 9-2 and 18-6
on a hitting error. The Jays
could not recover, though
they didn’t go away quietly.
The closest they could get
was 23-17 on a hit off the
block by sophomore Bekah
Fischer. However, a bomb-
kill by Osterhage and an ace
by Siefker put the guests in
the driver’s seat.
Once more in set 3, Kalida
got off quickly, building a
9-1 edge (despite a Sterling
timeout) on LadyCat hitting
and serving prowess. They
built that lead up to 18-7 at
one point on a kill by junior
Madison Burgei. Back came
the Jays with a 7-1 spurt to
get within 19-14 on an ace by
Hulihan and causing another
Luebrecht timeout. That was
as close as the Jays could get
as the visitors finished the
match with a 6-1 run, includ-
ing a hitting error on match
point, to end the sweep.
“I tell my girls to be
aggressive but to also keep
the ball in play, which is a
Catch-22. What I hope they
do is aggressively go for the
holes in the defense,” Sterling
added. “Right now, it’s a mat-
ter of confidence. We haven’t
had a lot of wins this year and
over the years and it’s hard
to maintain confidence when
you aren’t seeing the results
of your hard work. We talk
about maintaining a positive
attitude and concentrate on
what we’re doing well.”
Luebrecht has no such
issues.
“We’ve had a lot of suc-
cess over the years here and
we have six seniors. We have
six seniors; they have won
a lot of matches and helps
them be great leaders,” she
added. “We did and block
very well; that’s just a matter
of communicating well and
working hard, being quick to
the ball.”
In junior varsity action,
Kalida outlasted St. John’s
(6-4) 21-25, 25-21, 25-19.
St. John’s moved to 4-2 in
freshmen action with a 2-set
sweep.
St. John’s visits
Lincolnview 6 p.m. (JV start)
today, while Kalida visits
Miller City 6:30 p.m. Tuesday
(no JV match).
LadyCats sweep Blue Jays
By JIM METCALFE
jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com
LIMA — Before the
weather turned bad Friday
night, Lima Central Catholic
used its speed — which
Jefferson head gridiron coach
Bub Lindeman was most
concerned about coming into
the contest — to account for
three big passing touchdowns
to build a 21-7 lead over
Jefferson.
When the teams returned
to windy Lima Stadium
Saturday afternoon to
complete the Northwest
Conference clash of unbeat-
ens, the Thunderbirds turned
to the ground game to finish
off a 42-19 victory.
“LCC is just a good team.
We picked our poison com-
ing into the game,” Lindeman
explained. “We decided to
try and stop their run because
that is what they are known
for and take our chances
with the pass. However, their
speed showed on both sides
of the ball. They made a con-
certed effort to run the ball
the second half.”
LCC mentor Jerry Cooper
agreed.
“We threw the ball
extremely well Friday night.
However, we didn’t run the
ball like I wanted,” Cooper
explained. “We looked at
film between the halves and
decided to focus on the run-
ning game. We got back to
establishing the line of scrim-
mage the second half.”
LCC (5-0, 4-0 NWC) accu-
mulated 485 yards offense —
225 passing and 260 rushing,
179 the second half. Jefferson
(4-1, 3-1 NWC) had 206: 102
rushing and 104 passing.
As play resumed, a per-
sonal foul penalty on LCC
(11 penalties, 112 yards; 5
personal fouls/unsportsman-
like conduct flags for 56
yards) from the final play
of Friday’s first half allowed
Jefferson to kick off from the
Thunderbird 45. An onside
kick was then recovered by
Chris Truesdale, giving the
Red and White (4-1, 3-1
NWC) the ball at the 34.
They garnered one first down
but on 4th-and-11 from the
24, Austin Jettinghoff (8-of-
14 passing, 98 yards) com-
pleted an 8-yarder to Ross
Thompson (6 grabs, 65
yards), turning the ball over
on downs.
LCC had a fantastic
84-yard scoring run by Jon
Washington (16
rushes, 96 yards) nul-
lified on a penalty.
However, they used
a 7-play — all runs
— drive (including a
personal foul of the
visitors) to get back
on the board. At the
Delphos 4, Colin Stolly —
in the gun — faked running
backs into the line and swept
right end, getting to the pylon
for the score. His PAT was
wide right for a 27-7 edge
with 5:48 to go in the third.
A 51-yard punt by Drew
Kortokrax pinned the hosts at
the 6 (after a penalty), even-
tually forcing a punt.
Jefferson took over at the
LCC 48 but a play later, Kalito
Lasenby picked off a pass
and returned it 12 yards to
the Jefferson 47. From there,
it took eight running plays
— four different carriers —
to add to their lead. At the
11, Stolly again faked backs
into the line from the gun,
swept right end and found a
seam to paydirt. On the fake
extra point, Stolly, the holder,
found Mykale Rogers for the
2-pointer and a 35-7 margin
with 8:53 left.
The Wildcats, keyed by
a 17-yard Truesdale kickoff
return, retaliated with a 9-play,
60-yard scoring sequence.
Jettinghoff was 2-of-4 on the
drive for 39 yards, including
a 4th-and-6 from the LCC
6 where he rolled right and
found Thompson on an out
route and dove for the pylon.
Jettinghoff’s PAT was wide
for a 35-13 deficit with 4:32
remaining.
LCC — with Stephen
Saine recovering the onside
kick at the 48 — finished its
scoring with a 9-play drive
(including 2 Delphos flags
for 13 yards). On 4th-and-4 at
the visitor 11, Stolly dropped
quickly to the right and found
6-3 tight end Cory Stewart on
the left side at the goal line.
Stolly added the final point
for a 42-13 margin with 40
ticks left.
The Wildcats replied with
a quick 4-play
drive (including
2 15-yard penal-
ties against LCC)
to march 64 yards.
At the 1, senior
Quinten Wessell
(10 totes, 46
yards) bulled his
way inside right guard for the
six with one tick remaining.
The conversion pass fell short
of the goal line for the final
margin.
“The wind was swirling
today; it was tough to get
much going in the air. They
made it tough to run the ball
today, too,” Lindeman added.
“We told the kids to let this
sting for 48 yards — that is
a ‘rule’ we have — but at the
same time, we lost to a good
team. We don’t like losing
but if you do lose, you want
them to keep playing hard
to the end; that is what we
did. I expect us to come back
(today) and get back to work
at practice.”
Cooper knows his team
has some issues to address
but was overall pleased.
“We gave up a little bit
took much on the run Friday
night; we made a concerted
effort to defend the run bet-
ter today and we did so,”
Cooper added. “We had far
too many penalties and turn-
overs — that was true espe-
cially Friday night with the
rain — but those are things
we can and must correct.”
Friday night, LCC scored
on a 78-yard TD toss from
Stolly (5-of-9 passing, 225
yards, 4 TDS, 2 picks) to
Rogers (2 catches, 89 yards)
with 5:48 showing in the
first.
They went up 14-0 on a
77-yard aerial from Stolly to
Darius West at 2:58 of the
first.
Jefferson retaliated by
driving 13 plays and 69 yards
to a 1-yard touchdown dive
by Zavier Buzard (26 rushes,
61 yards) with 8:42 left in
the half.
Scoring closed as Stolly
connected with Sam Huffman
for a 48-yard screen pass with
no time left on the clock for
a 21-7 lead. A personal foul
was also called on LCC after
the kick; after the game was
delayed and then postponed
to Saturday, the flag would
be assessed then.
Both teams hit the road
for NWC contests Friday:
Jefferson at Crestview and
LCC at Spencerville.
Thunderbirds finish off Wildcats
Tom Morris photo
Continental’s aggressive style earned them 4 first-half
goals Saturday vs. Jefferson at Fort Jennings. Wildcat
senior goalie Paige Miller won this battle and a Pirate
player took the worst of the collision but the visitors won
the contest 5-1.
Tom Morris photo
St. John’s Heather Vogt and Kalida’s Andrea Bellmann
(10) and Kayla Siefker battle over the net Saturday
afternoon at Arnzen Gymnasium. The visiting LadyCats
got the sweep.
Kayser nabs
MAC POY
NEW BREMEN — St.
John’s senior golfer Nick
Kayser nabbed 2012 Midwest
Athletic Conference Player
of the Year honors with his
league-leading 151.5-point
total.
He shot a 78 to take run-
ner-up medalist honors dur-
ing Saturday’s MAC meet at
Arrowhead Golf Club.
Minster’s boys golf team
finished seven strokes ahead
of runner-up Versailles —
323-330 — in Saturday’s
Midwest Athletic Conference
meet at Arrowhead Golf
Club.
Jordan Bollenbacher of
Parkway was tournament
medalist with a 77, followed
by St. John’s senior Nick
Kayser, Minster’s Xavier
Francis, New Bremen’s
Darin Bergman and New
Knoxville’s Tyler Shreve, all
with 78s.
Brandon Groff and Tyler
Brees led the Tigers with
79s.
Craig Klausing shot an
85 for the Blue Jays (sixth
with a 356 team score), who
open tournament play 9 a.m.
Thursday at the Division III
sectional at Auglaize Country
Club.
The Wildcats also won the
final team standings (regular
MAC Golf Results
(See GOLF page 7A)
LOCAL ROUNDUP
(See ROUNDUP page 7A)
Rangers upend Musketeer boys
1
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Van Wert County
Invitational 2012
HIGH SCHOOL
BOYS
Small School Team Scores:
Minster 42, Columbus Grove
63, Lincolnview 107, Crestview
116, Pettisville 129, New Bremen
183, Ayersville 194, Stryker 254,
Antwerp 259, Mohawk
267, Edgerton 298,
Spencerville 318, East
Canton 330, Kalida 350,
Ottoville 423. No Team
Score: St. John’s.
Top 10 Individuals:
1. Jake Graham (CG)
16:24; 2. D. Slonkosky
(MI) 16:32; 3. Joel Genter
(CV) 16:40; 4. Dahlinghaus (MI)
16:40; 5. Alex Shafer (CG) 16:53;
6. Albers (MI) 16:59; 7. Williamson
(AN) 17:04; 8. Mycah Grandstaff
(CV) 17:08; 9. Frey (PE) 17:11; 10.
Colton Grothaus (CG) 17:13.
Other Local Finishers (178
Runners): 11. Bayley Tow (LV)
17:15; ... 14. Ben Bilimek (LV)
17:30; ... 16. Shelby Ripley (CV)
17:35; ... 19. Grant
Schroeder (CG) 17:36; ...
21. Aaron Hefner (SV)
17:42; 22. Jeff Jacomet (LV)
17:44; 23. Alex Rodriguez
(LV) 17:50; ... 28. Jerry
Kesselmeyer (CG) 18:00;
... 30. Nick Schmiesing (CG) 18:10;
31. Logan Douglas (CG) 18:11; ...
34. Copsey Bogle (CV) 18:15; ...
38. Skyler Whitaker (LV) 18:25;
... 42. Curtis Pohlman (SJ) 18:30;
... 53. Travis Lippi (LV) 18:38; ...
55. Grant Zeller (KA) 18:41; ...
61. Branden Clayton (CV) 18:57;
62. Tanner Skelton (CV) 18:59; 63.
Luke Schimmoeller (OV)
19:07; ... 65. Alex von-
derEmbse (KA) 19:09;
66. Troy Meyer (CG)
19:10; 67. Joe Wisher
(SV) 19:11; ... 69. Bryce
Richardson (CV) 19:15; ... 71. Cody
Reynolds (CG) 19:16; ... 76. Trevor
Neate (LV) 19:25; 77. Angelo
Katalenas (LV) 19:27; 78. Alex
Tabler (CG) 19:28; 79. Darrion Gant
(CG) 19:29; ... 81. Phillip Vance
(CG) 19:31; 82. Eric Warnecke
(KA) 19:32; 83. Jacob Schroeder
(CG) 19:33; 84. Zach Shafer (CG)
19:34; ... 88. Jacob Dunn
(KA) 19:41; ... 91. Elisha
Jones (CG) 19:50; ... 94.
Caleb Vogt (SV) 19:53;
... 99. Andy Burnett (CV)
20:01; ... 102. Adam
Saylor (CV) 20:09; 103.
Tyler Brant (LV) 20:14;
104. Isaac Simerman (CV) 20:14; ...
106. Cody Wischmeyer (CG) 20:23;
... 108. Jacob Cook (SV) 20:25; ...
110. Baily Clement (CG) 20:26;
111. Troy Thompson (LV) 20:27;
112. Ryan Kimmet (OV) 20:28;
113. Matthew Hurles (SV) 20:28; ...
119. Will Vorhees (CG)
20:32; ... 121. Ryan Price
(CG) 20:34; 122. Corey
Schroeder (CG) 20:35;
... 131. Corbin Schumm
(CV) 20:57; 132. Mark
Waldick (OV) 21:10; ...
136. Dalton Hines (LV) 21:27; 137.
John Landwehr (OV) 21:29; ... 139.
Aaron Hellman (SJ) 21:36; ... 143.
Anthony Hale (SJ) 21:49; ... 145.
Jared Long (CV) 21:56; 146. Trevor
Maag (KA) 22:06; 147. Austin
Sealscott (LV) 22:12; 148. Noah
Daugherty (CV) 22:18; 149. Jacob
Gibson (LV) 22:18; ...
151. Andy Horstman (OV)
22:27; 155. Mitchell Kerner
(KA) 22:44; 156. Trent
Gerding (KA) 22:48; 157.
Logan Roebke (KA) 22:55;
... 161. Carter Gorman (LV)
23:33; 162. Landon Goins
(CV) 23:33; 163. Jacob Germann
(CV) 23:41; 164. Brett Ripley (CV)
23:42; ... 168. Cody Klinker (CV)
24:14; ... 172. Kyle Sawmiller (SV)
25:36; ... 174. Austin Vorst (KA)
25:53; 175. Zach Keith (LV) 25:57;
176. Brandon Kimmet (OV) 26:58;
177. Micah Germann (LV) 27:07;
178. Zach Vannette (CG) 40:09.
Large School Team
Scores: Van Wert 55,
Coldwater 71, Wauseon
103, Bryan 118, Shawnee
119, Fairview 165, St.
Marys Memorial 194,
Ottawa-Glandorf 211,
Tinora 279, Lakota 284,
Parkway 289, Wayne Trace 299,
Allen East 390, Elida 410, Bluffton
410, Kenton 471.
Top 10 Individuals: 1. Jared
Fleming (VW) 16:20; 2. Kase
Schalois (VW) 16:35; 3. Wenning
(CO) 16:42; 4. Reiser (WA)
16:42; 5. Stoller (WT)
16:43; 6. Seas (CO) 16:44;
7. Kuess (CO) 16:45; 8.
Thomas (FV) 16:54; 9.
Trampe-Kindt (OG) 17:00;
10. Lehman (TI) 17:02.
Other Local Finishers (209
Runners): 14. Jordan Butler (VW)
17:12; ... 18. Connor Schaffer (VW)
17:33; ... 20. Nick Keber (VW)
17:37; ... 23. Cade Fleming (VW)
17:45; 24. Daniel Perry (VW) 17:48;
... 27. Spencer Prichard (VW) 17:53;
... 32. Eric Easley (VW) 18:07;
... 34. Ryan Rice (VW) 18:12; ...
42. Reed Baxter (VW) 18:31; 43.
Gaerid Littler (EL) 18:32; ... 85.
Bryce Beckner (VW) 19:40;
... 122. Josh Bull (EL) 20:38;
... 141. Eric Anthony (EL)
21:13; 142. Glenn McVey
(EL) 21:18; ... 158. Austin
Cunningham (EL) 21:53;
... 160. Jordan Coulter (EL)
22:01; ... 174. Alex Dukehart
(EL) 22:24; ... 182. Asa
Swihart (EL) 22:40; ... 189.
Logan Malone (EL) 23:09; ... 204.
Korbin Schalois (VW) 27:14.
GIRLS
Small School Team Scores:
Minster 17, Spencerville 105,
Edgerton 128, Kalida 136, St.
Wendelin 154, Columbus Grove
181, Ayersville 192, Crestview
195, Stryker 210, New Bremen
221, Mohawk 234, Pettisville
269, Antwerp 355. No
Team Scores: St. John’s,
Ottoville.
Top 10 Individuals: 1.
Slonkosky (MI) 19:42; 2.
Butler (MI) 19:56; 3. Barga
(MI) 19:57; 4. McKibben
(AY) 20:04; 5. Burke (MI) 20:14;
6. Niekamp (MI) 20:19; 7. Daniel
(MO) 20:29; 8. Jessica Doepker
(KA) 20:29; 9. Cierra Adams (SV)
20:32; 10. Barlage (MI) 20:36.
Other Local Finishers (127
Runners): 11. Jackie Gardner (KA)
20:43; ... 13. Katelyn Siebeneck (KA)
20:52; ... 18. Kacie Mulholland (SV)
21:05; ... 20. Alexis Ricker
(CG) 21:27; 21. Courtney
Perrott (CV) 21:35; ... 26.
Megan Joseph (SJ) 21:45;
27. Megan Langhals (CG)
21:45; ... 35. Tori Hardesty
(SV) 22:26; ... 38. Jennifer Burnett
(SV) 22:27; ... 41. Schylar Miller
(SV) 22:30; ... 52. Anna Mueller
(SJ) 23:20; ... 54. Chelsea Hancock
(CV) 23:24; 55. Kayla Parlette
(CG) 23:25; ... 59. Hali Finfrock
(CV) 23:52; 60. Katie Schmitz
(KA) 23:59; 61. Eden Allison
(CV) 24:02; 62. Taylor Miller (LV)
24:04; 63. Mackenzie Wurth
(CG) 24:17; 64. Janelle May
(CV) 24:20; 65. Tesa Horton
(SV) 24:27; ... 73. Elizabeth
Luersman (OV) 24:44;
... 75. Sienna Gerdeman
(CG) 24:45; 76. Becca
Brinkman (KA) 24:47; ...
81. Linnea Stephens (CG) 25:18;
... 83. Morgan Messer (CG) 25:21;
84. Lindsay Langhals (CG) 25:28;
... 87. Ashley Keiber (SV) 25:34;
88. Brooke Schnipke (CG) 25:36;
89. Teresa Pohlman (SJ) 25:38; ...
91. Melissa Amstutz (CG) 25:43;
... 95. Micah Stechshulte
(CG) 25:53; ... 101. Stacy
Hovest (CG) 26:14; ... 107.
Cora Finfrock (CV) 27:16;
108. Kara Hoersten (OV)
27:22; 109. Quincy Miller
(CG) 27:39; ... 114. Meghan
Sherman (CV) 28:40; 115. Erica
Honigfort (KA) 28:51; 116. Alexa
Halker (CG) 29:17; 117. Mikinzie
Dull (LV) 29:20; ... 119. Cassie
Stechshulte (CG) 30:11; ... 122.
Precious Shields (CV) 30:50; 123.
Madison Penix (CV) 31:21; 124.
Adrijana Ilic (CG) 31:59; 125.
Madie Enyart (LV) 32:52;
126. Fern Vangvichien (LV)
35:06.
Large School Team
Scores: Coldwater 40,
Wauseon 77, Van Wert
91, Ottawa-Glandorf 141,
Shawnee 142, Tinora 146,
Bluffton 203, Bryan 216, St. Marys
Memorial 219, Lakota 280, Fairview
310, Wayne Trace 319, Elida 336,
Parkway 358.
Top 10 Individuals: 1. S.
Kanney (CO) 18:03; 2. Vernot
(WA) 19:02; 3. Andrea Foster (VW)
19:30; 4. J. Kanney (CO) 19:35;
5. C. Seas (CO) 19:44; 6. Cohorn
(SH) 20:11; 7. L. Seas (CO)
20:17; 8. Reese (LA) 20:45;
9. Scott (SH) 20:48; 10. Chloe
Gamble (VW) 20:50.
Other Local Finishers
(173 Runners): 13. Schelissa
Williams (VW) 21:06; ...
27. Meghan Barnhart (VW)
21:48; ... 31. Aly Turrentine (EL)
22:0; ... 42. Allisha Danylchchuck
(VW) 22:23; ... 47. Tori Bowen
(EL) 22:37; ... 61. Whitney Meyers
(VW) 23:07; ... 96. Leah Brubaker
(VW) 24:57; 97. Marissa Sperry
(VW) 24:59; ... 103. Karlyn
Koontz (VW) 25:17; ... 122.
Rachel Kerber (EL) 26:21;
... 128. Hannah Malone
(EL) 26:41; ... 135. Kaiti
Hinegardner (EL) 27:13; ...
155. Ashley Ulrich (EL)
28:47; ... 160. Torrye Brinkman
(EL) 29:51.
Cross Country Results
By Brian Bassett
Times Bulletin Sports Editor
sports@timesbulletin.com
VAN WERT - Minster’s
Dominic Slonkosy took con-
trol of the small-school boys
race during the Van Wert
County Hospital Invitational
early Saturday morning at the
Van Wert Hospital - jump-
ing out to an early leading
and holding on over halfway
through. It was Columbus
Grove’s Jake Graham, how-
ever, who was first when the
runners turned the final cor-
ner and held off Slonkosky
down the home stretch for a
first-place finish in 16:24.
Graham’s finish helped
pace the Bulldogs to a second-
place finish overall with 63
points. Minster took first with
42 points and Lincolnview
placed third with 107. Kalida
placed 14th in the 15-team
field, with 350 points, and
Ottoville placed 15th with
423.
Alex Shafer took fifth
place for the Bulldogs
(16:53), good for second
on the team. Also scoring
for Grove were: Colton
Grothaus (10th, 17:13), Grant
Schroeder (19th, 17:36), and
Jerry Kesselmeyer (28th,
18:00).
Nick Schmiesing (30th,
18:10) and Logan Douglas
(31st, 18:11) just missed
scoring for the Bulldogs in
the 178-runner field.
Bayley Tow paced the third-
place Lancers with an 11th-
place finish in 17:15. Tow
was just behind Crestview’s
Mycah Grandstaff, who came
in eighth in 17:08.
Also part of the
Lincolnview pack were: Ben
Bilimek (14th, 17:30), Jeff
Jacomet (22nd, 17:44), Alex
Rodriguez (23rd, 17:50)
and Skyler Whitaker (38th,
18:25).
“On the guys side, we
were extremely happy to see
how we placed. It was an
extremely competitive race
in our division. We’ve seen
Columbus Grove and Minster
all year. Minster obviously
was very strong and that was
probably as close to Grove
as we’ve been all year,” said
Lincolnview coach Matt
Langdon.
Grant Zeller paced Kalida
with a 55th-place finish in a
time of 18:41. Also scoring
for the Wildcats were: Alex
VonderEmbse (65th, 19:09),
Eric Warnecke (82nd, 19:32),
Jacob Dunn (88th, 19:41) and
Trevor Maag (146th, 22:06)
Ottoville was led by Luke
Schimmoeller, who placed
63rd in a time of 19:07.
Schimmoeller was followed
by: Ryan Kimmet (112th,
20:28), Mark Waldick (132nd,
21:10), John Landwehr
(137th, 21:29) and Andy
Horstman (151st, 22:27).
St. John’s was topped
by Curtis Pohlman (18:30),
Aaron Hellman (21:36) and
Anthony Hale 21:49.
In the small-school girls
race, Kalida placed three run-
ners in the top 13 but only
managed a fourth-place finish
with 136 points. Minster nar-
rowly missed a clean sweep,
placing runners first, second,
third, fifth and sixth en route
to a dominating 17-point,
first-place finish.
Spencerville took second
with 105, Edgerton placed
third with 128, Columbus
Grove earned sixth place
with 181 points and Ottoville
failed to field a full team and
did not place.
Jessica Doepker placed
eighth in a time of 20:29
to lead the Lady Wildcats.
She was followed closely by
teammates Jackie Gardner
(11th, 20:43) And Katelyn
Siebeneck (13th, 20:52).
Also scoring for Kalida were
Katie Schmitz (60th, 23:59)
and Becca Brinkman (76th,
24:47.
Alexis Ricker led the
sixth-place Bulldogs with a
20th-place finish in a time
of 21:27. Megan Langhals
was close behind with a
27th-place finish in 21:45.
Rounding out the top five
for Columbus Grove were:
Kayla Parlette (55th, 23:25),
Mackenzie Wurth (63rd,
24:17), and Sienna Gerdeman
(75th, 24:45).
Linnea Stephens (81st,
25:18), Morgan Messer (83rd,
25:21), Lindsay Langhals
(84th, 25:28), Brooke
Schnipke (88th, 25:36) and
Melissa Amstutz (91st, 25:43)
made up the second pack of
Lady Bulldogs runners, who
just missed the team’s top
five.
Elizabeth Luersman led a
pair of Lady Green runners
in the race, placing 73rd in
24:44. Kara Hoersten placed
108th for Ottoville in a time
of 27:22.
Megan Joseph led the way
for three Lady Blue Jays with
a time of 21:45 (season-best),
along with Anna Mueller
(23:20) and Teresa Pohlman
(25:38).
Van Wert won the big-
school boys race with a score
of 55 despite missing their
number-three runner, Connor
Holliday, with illness, fol-
lowed by Coldwater (71) and
Wauseon (103).
“On both sides, I thought
we performed very well.
On the guys side, obviously
walking away with a win. We
didn’t expect it to be handed
to us and Coldwater gave us a
great race,” Van Wert coach
Brendon Moody said.
The senior duo of Jared
Fleming (16:20) and Kase
Schalois (16:35) took first
and second place, respective-
ly, to lead Van Wert. Jordan
Butler took Holliday’s usual
spot at third, with a 14th-
place time of 17:12.
Connor Schaffer took 18th
for Van Wert in 17:33 and
Nick Keber rounded out the
scoring with a 20th-place fin-
ish in 17:37. Just missing the
top five for Van Wert were:
Cade Fleming (23rd, 17:45),
Daniel Perry (24th, 17:48),
Spencer Prichard (27th,
17:53), Eric Easley (32nd,
18:07) and Ryan Rice (34th,
18:12).
Joel Genter led the host
Knights with a third-place
finish in 16:40.
“Joel has been running
really consistent here lately
and at a high level. He ran
a smart race. I haven’t had
a chance to look exactly at
the splits but I think he had
a really evenly-split race. He
just kept working his way
through,” said Crestview
coach Jeff Bagley.
Behind Genter and
Grandstaff for the Knights
were: Shelby Ripley (17th,
17:35), Copsey Bogle (34th,
18:15) and Branden Clayton
(61st, 18:57). Tanner Skelton
(62nd, 18:59) and Bryce
Richardson (69th, 19:15) just
missed the Crestview top
five.
The Van Wert Lady
Cougars placed third in the
big-school girls race, despite
missing senior captains
Jacey Eikenberry and Kelsey
Wagner.
“Both of our senior cap-
tains sat out due to injury
and illness... We came away
third. Wauseon was within
14 points of us. Knowing
that they went to state last
year and for us to run that
close to them with a really
underclassman-led squad,
that gives us confidence,”
said Moody.
Coldwater took the big-
school girls title with 40
points, Wauseon was second
with 77 and Van Wert had
91.
The Lady Cougars were
led by a third-place finish
from Andi Foster (19:30).
Chloee Gamble placed 10th in
20:50 and Shealissa Williams
took 13th in 21:06. Meghan
Barnhart (27th, 21:48) and
Allisha Danylchuk (42nd,
22:23) rounded out the Van
Wert field.
The Crestview Lady
Knights placed eighth in the
13-team small-school field.
“They continue to work
at it. Their attitude remains
good. They’re just trying to
get a little bit better each
day,” Bagley added.
Crestview was led by
Courtney Perrott, who placed
21st in 21:35. Also scoring
for the Lady Knights were:
Chelsea Hancock (54th,
23:52), Halie Finfrock (59th,
23:52), Janelle May (64th,
24:20) and Cora Finfrock
(107th, 27:16).
Lincolnview did not field
a full team on the girls side
but Langdon said they are
coming close.
“We are close to being
able to field a full team. Our
top girl had been sick all
week, so we rested her. We
hope this next weekend to
have all five girls for the first
time all season. We’re really
looking forward to that. It
really raises their spirits to
know they are going to score
as a team,” he added.
The Lady Lancers were led
by Taylor Miller, who placed
62nd in 24:04. Mikinzie Dull
(117th, 29:20), Madie Enyart
(125th, 32:52) and Fern
Vangvichien (126th, 35:06)
rounded out the rotation.
Crestview is in a 3-way
meet Tuesday at Faurot
Park (4:30 p.m.); St. John’s
is in the Kalida Invitational,
Spencerville at the Botkins
invite and Lincolnview in
the Edgerton meet, all 9 a.m.
Saturday. Van Wert treks to
Otsego, Mich., for a meet
TBA.
Brian Bassett/Times Bulletin photo
St. John’s junior Aaron
Hellman runs through
the park at the Van Wert
County Hospital Cross
Country Invite Saturday.
He completed the 5K
course in a time of 21:36.
Also running for the Blue
Jays in the boys race was
Curtis Pohlman (18:30)
and Anthony Hale (21:49).
Megan Joseph led the way
in the girls race with a time
of 21:45 for a season-best.
Anna Mueller (23:20) and
Teresa Pohlman (25:38) also
competed.
season and tournament) 34-32
over runner-up Versailles.
The Jays were also sixth there
with eight points.
Team Scores:
Minster 323: Xavier Francis 78,
Freddie Purdy 80, John Burke 81, Josh
Tumbusch 84, Austin Brackman 84, Sam
Schutte 88.
Versailles 330: Brandon Groff 79,
Tyler Drees 79, Mitchell Stover 83, Ryan
Knapke 89, Adam Atwan 97, Alex Stucke
99.
Parkway 332: Jordan Bollenbacher 77,
Brian Schatzer 83, Jordan Stephenson 85,
Tommy McDonough 87, Austen Stukey
93, Jeremy Tribolet 96.
New Bremen 341: Darin Bergman
78, Alex Britton 84, Travis Bertlsen 88,
Tyler Hagen 91, Alex Feltz 96, Aaron
Hegemier 96.
St. Henry 343: Brian Kremer 80,
Alex Evers 83, Jordon Rammel 86, Justin
Mescher 94, Troy Pottkotter 99, Joe
Hemmelgarn 101.
St. John’s 356: Nick Kayser 78,
Craig Klausing 85, Cole Fischbach 90,
T.J Hoersten 103, Aaron Miller 108,
Sean Flanagan 129 (Scorecard error).
New Knoxville 366: Tyler Shreve
78, David Boesche 93, Connor Samuel
98, Michael Porter 97, Jake Allen 104,
Brandon Steinke 107.
Fort Recovery 391: Elijah Kahlig 91,
Josh Pohl 98, Chase Bruns 100, Stewy
Alig 102, Kent Retz 103, Derek Backs
104.
Marion Local 394: Derek Platfoot
94, Conner Unrast 96, Adam Kremer 97,
Randy Knapschaefer 107, Luke Knapke
110, Darrin Broering 110.
Coldwater 404: Mitch Diller 90, Tyler
Kanney 102, Alex Bowler 102, Jarren
Kunk 110, Brennan Osterfeld 119, Andy
Roessner 128.
MAC Final Team Standings:
Minster 34, Versailles 32, Parkway
28, New Bremen 26, St. Henry 20, St.
John’s 8, Ft. Recovery/Marion Local/New
Knoxville 4, Coldwater 0.
MAC Player Points:
Player School
Season Tourney Total
FIRST TEAM
Nick Kayser SJ 94 57.5 151.5
Darin Bergman NB 92 57.5 149.5
Tyler Shreve NK 90.5 57.5 148
J. Bollenbacher PA 87.5 60 147.5
Xavier Francis MI 87.5 57.5 145
Brian Schatzer PA 93 49 142
Brandon Groff VE 86.5 54.5 141
Tyler Drees VE 84 54.5 138.5
Brian Kremer SH 84.5 52.5 137
Freddie Purdy MI 73.5 52.5 126
Alex Britton NB 79 46 125
John Burke MI 71 51 122
SECOND TEAM
Alex Evers SH 68.5 49 117.5
Elijah Kahlig FR 80 34.5 114.5
A. Brackman MI 68.5 46 114.5
J.Tumbusch MI 65.5 46 111.5
Craig Klausing SJ 65 43.5 108.5
J. Stephenson PA 65 43.5 108.5
Cole Fischbach SJ 71.5 36.5 108
T. McDonough PA 65 41 106
HONORABLE MENTION
Travis Bertlsen NB 64.5 39.5 104
Mitchell Stover VE 53.5 49 102.5
Ryan Knapke VE 64 38 102
Jordon RammelSH 59 42 101
Mitch Diller CW 61 36.5 97.5
Tyler Hagen NB 61.5 34.5 96
Derek Platfoot ML 59 30.5 89.5
Justin Mescher SH 53.5 30.5 84
Other St. John’s Finishers (Golfers):
36. Sean Flanagan 68.5 1 69.5
52. Aaron Miller 28.5 7 35.5
56. T.J Hoersten 15.5 12.5 28
MAC GOLF
(Continued from page 6A)
ROUNDUP
(Continued from page 6A)
Sports Story idea...
Comments...
email Jim Metcalfe, sports editor
at jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com
Yeatts lifted a free kick
from 30 yards out, which
bounced high and found
Branco heading the ball over
the reach of the Musketeer
keeper for their third and
final goal of the day.
Jennings visits Riverdale
5 p.m. Tuesday.
------
Lady ’Dawgs battle at
Rebel Spike Classic
TOLEDO — The Elida
volleyballers played at
The Rebel Spike Classic at
Toledo Bowsher Saturday
morning.
The Lady Bulldogs fell
25-17, 25-14 to the hosts.
Stat leaders were Torie
Adams (4 blocks, 2 kills),
Katie Hawk (2 kills), Katie
Hawk (4 assists), Erika Kiel
(13 digs) and Summer Grogg
and Bethany Koch (4 aces
each).
They then played familiar
foe Defiance, falling 28-26,
25-23 in two close sets.
McAdams had six kills,
Hawk 17 assists, Koch two
aces and Kiel 14 digs.
Elida (7-6) visits Miller
City 6:30 p.m. Wednesday
(no junior varsity match).
-----
Elida girls fall
to Knights
ELIDA — The Elida
girls soccer unit fell 2-1
to invading Van Buren
Saturday at the Elida
Soccer Complex.
Lindsey Hall had the
Lady Bulldogs’ goal.
They visit Bath 7 p.m.
Thursday.
Graham wins VWC Hospital race
2
…Force Christian organizations to pay for abortions
…Force Christian schools to hire non-Christian teachers
…Force all states to permit same-sex “marriages”
…Force military chaplains to perform same-sex “marriages”
…Force doctors to assist homosexuals in buying surrogate babies
…Force employers to give illegal immigrants the jobs of U.S. citizens
…Force States to pay the college tuition of illegal immigrants’ children
…Force courts to accept Islamic Sharia Law in domestic disputes
…Force police agencies to allow Muslim brotherhood to select staff
…Force local authorities to allow Occupy protestors to live in parks
…Force creation of a permanent government funded “underclass”
the only President in history who has deliberately removed the words “endowed by their
Creator” when referring to our Declaration of Independence, not once, but several times.
Barack Hussein Obama believes human rights come from government, not from God,
and that he as President can take those rights away for the “social good.”
Say NO to Barack Hussein Obama’s
vision for America on Election Day:
Tuesday, November 6, 2012
This is the true agenda of Barack Hussein Obama,
www.GINGPAC.org
BARACK
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Will Move America to...
For more information visit
Paid for by the Government Is Not God – PAC (WWW.GINGPAC.ORG) and not authorized by any candidate or candidate’s committee
8A– The Herald Monday, September 24, 2012
www.delphosherald.com

Midget Football
Delphos Vikings’ Brady Grothaus throws this pass
Sunday afternoon at Stadium Park, eventually hitting
Caleb Lucas. Despite this, the Vikings fell 12-6 to the St.
Marys Broncos, while earlier, the Delphos Reds bested
the Delphos Mohawks 28-8. Elsewhere, it was: Delphos
Raiders 38, Spencerville Red 6; St. Marys Broncos 38,
Shawnee Seminoles 12; Columbus Grove Bulldogs 14,
Spencerville Black 0; St. Marys Rams 31, St. Marys Colts
0; and Uniopolis Browns had a bye. Also, there are weigh-
ins 7 p.m. today at Peak Fitness in Delphos.
Dena Martz photo
The Associated Press
National League
East Division
W L Pct GB
z-Washington 92 60 .605 —
Atlanta 88 65 .575 4 1/2
Philadelphia 77 76 .503 15 1/2
New York 69 83 .454 23
Miami 66 87 .431 26 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
x-Cincinnati 92 61 .601 —
St. Louis 82 71 .536 10
Milwaukee 79 73 .520 12 1/2
Pittsburgh 75 77 .493 16 1/2
Chicago 59 94 .386 33
Houston 50 103 .327 42
West Division
W L Pct GB
x-San Francisco 89 64 .582 —
Los Angeles 79 74 .516 10
Arizona 77 75 .507 11 1/2
San Diego 73 80 .477 16
Colorado 58 94 .382 30 1/2
z-clinched playoff berth
x-clinched division
———
Sunday’s Results
N.Y. Mets 3, Miami 2
Atlanta 2, Philadelphia 1
Milwaukee 6, Washington 2
Pittsburgh 8, Houston 1
St. Louis 6, Chicago Cubs 3
Arizona 10, Colorado 7
San Diego 6, San Francisco 4
L.A. Dodgers 5, Cincinnati 3
Today’s Games
Milwaukee (Estrada 4-6) at Washington
(Zimmermann 11-8), 1:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh (McPherson 0-1) at N.Y. Mets
(Mejia 0-1), 7:10 p.m.
St. Louis (Lynn 16-7) at Houston (Abad
0-5), 8:05 p.m.
Arizona (Cahill 12-11) at Colorado
(Chatwood 4-5), 8:40 p.m.
-----
American League
East Division
W L Pct GB
New York 88 64 .579 —
Baltimore 87 65 .572 1
Tampa Bay 83 70 .542 5 1/2
Boston 69 85 .448 20
Toronto 66 85 .437 21 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Chicago 81 71 .533 —
Detroit 80 72 .526 1
Kansas City 70 82 .461 11
Minnesota 64 89 .418 17 1/2
Cleveland 63 90 .412 18 1/2
West Division
W L Pct GB
Texas 90 62 .592 —
Oakland 86 66 .566 4
Los Angeles 84 69 .549 6 1/2
Seattle 72 81 .471 18 1/2
———
Sunday’s Results
Minnesota 10, Detroit 4, 1st game
Oakland 5, N.Y. Yankees 4
Boston 2, Baltimore 1
Tampa Bay 3, Toronto 0
Cleveland 15, Kansas City 4
L.A. Angels 4, Chicago White Sox 1
Texas 3, Seattle 2
Minnesota 2, Detroit 1, 10 innings, 2nd game
Today’s Games
Toronto (H.Alvarez 9-13) at Baltimore
(S.Johnson 3-0), 4:05 p.m., 1st game
Kansas City (Hochevar 8-14) at Detroit
(Verlander 15-8), 7:05 p.m.
Toronto (R.Romero 8-14) at Baltimore (W.Chen
12-9), 7:35 p.m., 2nd game
Oakland (Straily 2-1) at Texas (D.Holland 11-6),
8:05 p.m.
Cleveland (McAllister 5-8) at Chicago White
Sox (Sale 17-7), 8:10 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (Pettitte 4-3) at Minnesota
(Hendriks 1-7), 8:10 p.m.
MLB Capsules
NFL ROUNDUP
TOP 25
MLB
The Associated Press
NL
CHICAGO — Kyle Lohse and the
short-handed St. Louis Cardinals won
for the sixth time in seven games,
holding their lead in the NL wild-card
race with a 6-3 win Sunday over the
Chicago Cubs.
All-Stars Yadier Molina and
Carlos Beltran were absent from the
Cardinals’ starting lineup.
Lohse (16-3) made his team-lead-
ing 32nd start, giving up three runs
and five hits in six innings. Jason
Motte earned his sixth save in the
Cardinals’ last seven games, and now
has 40 saves this season.
Cubs starter Justin Germano (2-9)
worked 5 2/3 innings, giving up four
earned runs and 10 hits.
BREWERS 6, NATIONALS 2
WASHINGTON — Jonathan
Lucroy had a pair of RBI singles and
Milwaukee beat Washington to keep
the Brewers in the playoff chase.
Rickie Weeks had three hits while
Aramis Ramirez had two doubles for
Milwaukee, which twice benefitted
from Washington outfielders losing
fly balls in the sun.
BRAVES 2, PHILLIES 1
PHILADELPHIA — Tim Hudson
tossed 2-hit ball over 7 1/3 innings to
help the Braves move to the brink of
a playoff spot with a win over the
Phillies.
Hudson (16-6) struck out four and
allowed one unearned run.
David Ross hit a solo homer for
the Braves.
PIRATES 8, ASTROS 1
HOUSTON — A.J. Burnett
allowed one run in eight innings for
his 16th win and Josh Harrison tied a
career high with four hits to jumpstart
Pittsburgh’s offense in a win over
Houston.
Burnett (16-8), who allowed four
hits and struck out a season-high 11,
won for the first time since Aug. 16 to
become the first Pittsburgh pitcher to
win more than 15 games since 1991.
He had started six games with four
losses between victories.
METS 3, MARLINS 2
NEW YORK — Ruben Tejada
singled home the winning run with
two outs in the ninth inning to give
the Mets a victory over Miami.
Scott Hairston led off the inning
with a single, took second on a passed
ball by Rob Brantly and was safe
at third when pinch-hitter Jordany
Valdespin beat the throw on what
would have been an inning-ending
double play. Instead, pinch-hitter
Fred Lewis was intentionally walked
after Valdespin was allowed to take
second.
Tejada lined a pitch from right-
hander Ryan Webb (4-3) into shallow
left field and sprinted toward first
with his finger in the air as the rest of
the Mets poured out of the dugout.
DIAMONDBACKS 10,
ROCKIES 7
DENVER — Aaron Hill hit a tie-
breaking 3-run homer in the eighth
inning and the Arizona Diamondbacks
beat Colorado, the Rockies’ season-
high ninth straight loss.
Wil Nieves had four hits and Hill
had three for the Diamondbacks.
Wilin Rosario had three hits for
the fourth game in a row and DJ
LeMahieu also had three hits for the
Rockies.
PADRES 6, GIANTS 4
SAN FRANCISCO — Yonder
Alonso’s 2-run single in the seventh
inning snapped a tie and helped the
Padres beat the Giants.
Mark Kotsay hit a home run and
Yasmani Grandal also drove in a run
for the Padres. Everth Cabrera had
four hits, walked and stole three bases
in five plate appearances.
Xavier Nady, who had two hits,
Eli Whiteside, Emmanuel Burriss and
Buster Posey each drove in runs for
the Giants, who rested their regulars
a day after clinching the NL West
Division title.
Eric Stults (7-3) worked 6-plus
innings, allowing three runs on seven
hits, to win his sixth in seven deci-
sions. He struck out four and walked
one.
Clay Hensley (4-4) took the loss
after giving up Alonso’s hit.
DODGERS 5, REDS 3
CINCINNATI — Adrian
Gonzalez hit a pair of solo homers
off Homer Bailey on Sunday night,
powering the Dodgers to a victory
over the Reds that let them keep pace
in the wild card race.
The Dodgers remained three
games behind St. Louis and a half-
game behind Milwaukee for the final
NL playoff spot. All three won on
Sunday.
Bailey (12-10) allowed five hits
in 6 2/3 innings, including the two
homers by Gonzalez, who has five in
his career off the right-hander.
Shawn Tolleson (3-1) got the vic-
tory with one perfect inning in relief.
Brandon League pitched the ninth
for his fifth save in as many chances
with LA.
AL
NEW YORK — Cliff Pennington
hit a go-ahead single in the sixth
inning after a key error by backup
shortstop Eduardo Nunez and the
Oakland Athletics bounced back to
avoid a sweep, edging New York 5-4
Sunday and stopping the Yankees’
7-game winning streak.
RED SOX 2, ORIOLES 1
BOSTON — Cody Ross doubled
in the go-ahead run in the eighth
inning, Andrew Bailey escaped a
bases-loaded jam in the ninth and the
Red Sox ended Baltimore’s 6-game
winning streak.
Boston stopped its 4-game losing
streak after Dustin Pedroia led off
the eighth with a double against Luis
Ayala (5-5) and Ross followed with
his tie-breaking hit.
A double by Jim Thome helped
Baltimore load the bases with one out
in the ninth. But Bailey got Manny
Machado on a forceout at home and
struck out pinch-hitter Ryan Flaherty
to finish it.
ANGELS 4, WHITE SOX 1
ANAHEIM, Calif. — Jered
Weaver kept the Angels within strik-
ing distance in the AL wild-card
chase, posting his league-leading 19th
victory with a decision over the strug-
gling White Sox.
Albert Pujols reached the 100-
RBI mark for the 11th time in 12 big
league seasons with a 2-run double
for the Angels. Kendrys Morales hit
a 2-run homer.
Weaver (19-4) established a
career high for wins.
TWINS 10, TIGERS 4 GAME
1, TWINS 2, TIGERS 1, 10 innings
GAME 2
DETROIT — Jamey Carroll hit
an RBI single in the 10th inning
and the Twins beat Detroit, winning
both games of a doubleheader to
prevent the Tigers from at least tying
the Chicago White Sox atop the AL
Central.
Detroit closer Jose Valverde (3-4)
allowed pinch-hitter Denard Span to
lead off the extra inning with a single
and gave up a 1-out, fall-behind sin-
gle to Carroll.
Jared Burton (2-1) got the win
and Glen Perkins pitched a perfect
10th for his 14th save in 17 chances.
INDIANS 15, ROYALS 4
KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Carlos
Santana hit two homers and drove in
five runs as the Indians routed Kansas
City in their highest-scoring game of
the season.
Santana connected for a 2-run shot
in the sixth inning off Jake Odorizzi,
who lost in his major-league debut.
Santana added his team-leading 18th
homer, a 3-run drive during a 7-run
ninth.
RAYS 3, BLUE JAYS 0
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — B.J.
Upton hit his eighth home run in 14
games and Jeremy Hellickson won
for the first time in more than a month
to help the Rays beat the Blue Jays.
Upton’s 26th home run came in
the first inning off Chad Jenkins, who
was making his first major-league
start.
RANGERS 3, MARINERS 2
SEATTLE — Ryan Dempster
allowed two runs and six hits over
6-plus innings and Mike Napoli and
Geovany Soto homered to lead the
Rangers over the Mariners and pre-
serve a 4-game lead over the Oakland
A’s in the AL West.
The Associated Press
The Top 25 teams in The
Associated Press college football poll,
with first-place votes in parentheses,
records through Sept. 22, total points
based on 25 points for a first-place
vote through one point for a 25th-
place vote, and previous ranking:
Record Pts Pv
1. Alabama (59) 4-0 1,499 1
2. Oregon 4-0 1,414 3
3. LSU (1) 4-0 1,346 2
4. Florida St. 4-0 1,340 4
5. Georgia 4-0 1,245 5
6. South Carolina 4-0 1,147 7
7. Kansas St. 4-0 1,067 15
8. Stanford 3-0 1,055 9
9. West Virginia 3-0 1,045 8
10. Notre Dame 4-0 1,003 11
11. Florida 4-0 864 14
12. Texas 3-0 856 12
13. Southern Cal 3-1 801 13
14. Ohio St. 4-0 633 16
15. TCU 3-0 616 17
16. Oklahoma 2-1 611 6
17. Clemson 3-1 588 10
18. Oregon St. 2-0 451 NR
19. Louisville 4-0 414 20
20. Michigan St. 3-1 348 21
21. Miss. St. 4-0 246 23
22. Nebraska 3-1 179 25
23. Rutgers 4-0 128 NR
24. Boise St. 2-1 114 24
25. Baylor 3-0 92 NR
Others receiving votes:
Northwestern 89, UCLA 79, Michigan
44, Ohio 40, Virginia Tech 26,
Arizona 17, Iowa St. 16, Wisconsin
13, Oklahoma St. 12, Texas A&M 11,
Cincinnati 10, Tennessee 10, Texas
Tech 10, Arizona St. 8, Louisiana
Tech 7, Purdue 5, Miami 1.
The Associated Press
From first kickoff to final field
goal, just about everything a football
fan can imagine happened in Week 3
of the NFL schedule.
Three overtime games. Long
touchdowns by offenses, defenses
and special teams. Upsets across
the nation.
Oh yeah, plenty of suspect offici-
ating calls, too.
One that the replacement offi-
cials got right, rookie Justin Tucker’s
27-yard field goal that barely
sneaked inside the right upright,
lifted Baltimore past New England
31-30 Sunday night in a rematch of
last January’s AFC title game won
by the Patriots. The officials’ deci-
sion enraged New England coach
Bill Belichick, who grabbed the arm
of one of the replacements as they
were leaving the field.
There were 24 penalties in
the game: 10 for 83 yards for the
Patriots, fewer than the Ravens’ 14
for 135 yards.
Playing just well enough to
squeeze out victories were Tennessee,
44-41 over Detroit; Kansas City,
27-24 over New Orleans; and the
New York Jets, 23-20 over Miami.
Also, it was Houston 31, Denver
25; Atlanta 27, San Diego 3; and
Arizona 27, Philadelphia 6 as all
three winners remained unbeaten.
Minnesota stunned San Francisco
24-13, while it was Cincinnati
38, Washington 31; Oakland 24,
Pittsburgh 31; Jacksonville 22,
Indianapolis 17; Dallas 16, Tampa
Bay 10; Chicago 23, St. Louis 6; and
Buffalo 24, Cleveland 14.
Tonight, it’s Green Bay (1-1) at
Seattle (1-1).
The league and its regular offi-
cials’ union held talks Sunday with-
out reaching a solution to the lockout
— even as complaints from players
and coaches, including Belichick, of
course — got louder.
RAVENS 31, PATRIOTS 30
At Baltimore, the Ravens (2-1)
won their 12th straight at home
behind Joe Flacco, who went 28 for
39 for 382 yards and three touch-
downs, and Torrey Smith.
Smith, who was playing less
than 24 hours after the death of his
19-year-old brother, had six catches
for 127 yards and two touchdowns
for the Ravens.
In the previous meeting, Billy
Cundiff missed a 32-yard field goal
in the closing seconds. In the encore,
Tucker — who took the job away
from Cundiff in training camp —
drove his kick just inside the right
upright after pass interference call
against Devin McCourty on Jacoby
Jones set it up.
Tom Brady completed 28 of 41
passes for 335 yards and a score for
the Patriots (1-2), who hadn’t been
under .500 since the opening of the
2003 season.
TITANS 44, LIONS 41, OT
At Nashville, Tenn., the Titans’
defense ended Music City Mayhem
when it stopped backup quarterback
Shaun Hill on fourth-and-1 at the
Tennessee 7 after Rob Bironas put
the Titans ahead with a 26-yard
field goal in overtime. Hill was sup-
posed to try to draw Tennessee (1-2)
offside, but instead the ball was
snapped.
The Titans blew a 20-9 half-
time lead in a crazy game featuring
big plays, scoring swings and some
suspect officiating. Detroit scored
18 straight points, then Tennessee
answered with 21 points before the
Lions (1-2) scored the final 14 of
regulation — in 18 seconds, a league
record. Detroit recovered an onside
kick and got an assist from offi-
cials who did not review a possible
turnover.
Tennessee became the first NFL
team to score five touchdowns of 60
yards or longer in a single game.
CHIEFS 27, SAINTS 24, OT
At New Orleans, Ryan Succop
kicked a team-record six field goals,
one to force overtime in the final
seconds and another from 31 yards
to lift Kansas City (1-2) and keep
New Orleans winless.
Succop’s 43-yard field goal with
3 seconds left completed a methodi-
cal comeback by Kansas City after
the Saints cashed in on a pair of
Chiefs turnovers to go ahead 24-6 in
the third quarter.
A 91-yard TD run by Jamaal
Charles highlighted his 233 yards
rushing and 55 yards receiving.
The Saints have lost all their
games without head coach Sean
Payton and interim head coach Joe
Vitt, both suspended for their roles
in the team’s bounty scandal.
JETS 23, DOLPHINS 20, OT
At Miami, both teams tried to
give this one away and the Jets (2-1)
got the victory only after Nick Folk
received a reprieve.
Folk’s blocked field-goal attempt
was negated by a Dolphins timeout
and his second try was a successful
33-yarder with 6:04 left in overtime.
Mark Sanchez hit Santonio
Holmes for a 38-yard gain to set up
the kick.
Earlier, Dan Carpenter was wide
left on a 48-yard field-goal attempt
that would have given Miami (1-2)
the victory.
It might have been a costly game
for both sides. Jets All-Pro corner-
back Darrelle Revis and Miami’s
Reggie Bush were sidelined by left
knee injuries. Each will be examined
today.
TEXANS 31, BRONCOS 25
At Denver, Houston looked like
the cream of the AFC for most of
the day as Matt Schaub outplayed
Peyton Manning, throwing four
touchdown passes against a confused
Denver defense.
Schaub finished 17 for 30 for
290 yards to help Houston move to
3-0 for the first time in franchise
history.
Six days after throwing three
interceptions in the first quarter of
a loss to Atlanta, Manning didn’t
throw any. But just as happened last
week, the Broncos (1-2) fell behind
by 20 and lost by six. Manning did
get the ball with 20 seconds left this
time but didn’t get the Broncos close
to the end zone.
FALCONS 27, CHARGERS 3
At San Diego, the Falcons (3-0)
moved to 6-0 all-time in San Diego
and also are 6-0 in West Coast games
under coach Mike Smith. All three of
this season’s wins have come against
AFC West teams in a scheduling
quirk.
Matt Ryan threw touchdown
passes and safety Thomas DeCoud
had two interceptions and a fumble
recovery for unbeaten Atlanta. Ryan
completed 30 of 40 passes for 275
yards, with his first interception of
the season, and a passer rating of
107.8. The Falcons’ NFL-high turn-
over differential is plus-10.
San Diego (2-1) saw running
back Ryan Mathews make his season
debut and he looked good until fum-
bling inside the Falcons 5-yard line,
with DeCoud recovering.
CARDINALS 27, EAGLES 6
At Glendale, Ariz., Arizona’s
defense showed why it is among the
stingiest in the league.
Arizona (3-0) sacked Michael
Vick five times in winning its sev-
enth straight home game, the second-
longest streak in franchise history.
The Cardinals got a 93-yard touch-
down return with a fumble by James
Sanders off one of those sacks to end
the first half.
Arizona is off to its best start in
38 years — when the Cardinals were
in St. Louis.
Receiver Larry Fitzgerald caught
nine passes for 114 yards and a
touchdown while becoming the
youngest player in NFL history to
reach 700 receptions.
Philadelphia (2-1) became the
first NFL team to open a season with
two 1-point wins but couldn’t handle
the streaking Cardinals, who have
won 10 of their last 12.
VIKINGS 24, 49ERS 13
At Minneapolis, as good as San
Francisco looked in its opening two
wins, it was no match for surprising
Minnesota (2-1) on Sunday. Christian
Ponder threw two touchdown passes
to tight end Kyle Rudolph and ran
for another score.
The Vikings began the game
boldly with a fourth-and-goal touch-
down pass by Ponder to Rudolph.
They finished strong by forcing three
turnovers and two punts by the 49ers
(2-1) in the fourth quarter.
Playing against his former team
in the regular season for the first
time, Randy Moss had three catches
for 27 yards. Alex Smith’s franchise-
record interception-free streak ended
at 249 passes.
BENGALS 38, REDSKINS 31
At Landover, Md., the Bengals
(2-1) blew a 24-7 first-half lead
but two touchdown passes by Andy
Dalton in the fourth quarter won it.
He completed 19 of 27 passes for
328 yards and three touchdowns.
A 6-yard throw to tight end
Jermaine Gresham broke a 24-24 tie,
then Dalton hit Andrew Hawkins for
a 59-yard score with 7:08 left.
Robert Griffin III’s 2-yard run
cut the lead to seven points but
an unsportsmanlike conduct penalty
amid confusion over how much time
remained on the clock in the final
seconds led to a third-and-50 and the
Redskins (1-2) couldn’t convert on
the game’s last play.
Cincinnati’s A.J. Green caught
nine passes for a career-high 183
yards.
RAIDERS 34, STEELERS 31
At Oakland, Calif., the Raiders
(1-2) rallied in the renewal of a clas-
sic rivalry.
Sebastian Janikowski kicked a
43-yard field goal on the last play
as Oakland scored the final 13
points after wide receiver Darrius
Heyward-Bey was knocked out and
hospitalized by a scary hit.
The game turned somber early
in the fourth quarter when Heyward-
Bey was knocked unconscious by a
helmet-to-helmet hit in the end zone
by Steelers safety Ryan Mundy. No
penalty was called by the replace-
ment officials. Heyward-Bey was
taken to the hospital with a neck
injury.
Carson Palmer then threw his
third touchdown pass and Janikowski
kicked two field goals to beat the
Steelers (1-2) and give coach Dennis
Allen his first win.
JAGUARS 22, COLTS 17
At Indianapolis, the Jaguars (1-2)
shocked the Colts (1-2) with 45 sec-
onds left. Blaine Gabbert connected
with Cecil Shorts III on an 80-yard
touchdown pass to win it.
Maurice Jones-Drew ran for 177
yards.
The Colts took a 17-16 lead after
Adam Vinatieri’s 37-yard field goal
with 56 seconds left. But on the next
snap, Shorts got behind Colts safety
Sergio Brown and Gabbert hit him
in stride.
COWBOYS 16,
BUCCANEERS 10
At Arlington, Texas, the
Cowboys’ offense sputtered again
and Tony Romo had three turnovers,
two on plays reversed by replay.
But the Cowboys (2-1) scored
twice in the first half when starting
in Tampa Bay (1-2) territory after
turnovers and the defense that held
Tampa Bay to 166 total yards.
Dan Bailey made field goals of
32, 26 and 22 yards and DeMarco
Murray had an 11-yard touchdown
run as Dallas won its home opener.
BEARS 23, RAMS 6
At Chicago, the Monsters of the
Midway were back.
Major Wright returned an inter-
ception 45 yards for a touchdown
and Chicago had six sacks of Sam
Bradford while holding St. Louis
(1-2) to 160 total yards.
The Bears (2-1) had just kicked
a field goal to extend their lead
to 13-6 in the fourth quarter when
Wright came up with his big return.
He caught the ball at the 45 and ran
untouched to the end zone.
BILLS 24, BROWNS 14
At Cleveland, the Browns (0-3)
joined New Orleans as the only win-
less clubs as Buffalo overcame the
loss of C.J. Spiller, the NFL’s lead-
ing rusher, to snap an 8-game road
slide. Ryan Fitzpatrick threw three
touchdown passes as the Bills (2-1)
turned to their passing game after
Spiller was lost in the first quarter
with a left shoulder injury.
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Monday, September 24, 2012 The Herald — 9A
www.delphosherald.com
Mr. and Mrs.
Jeffrey Unterbrink
Allison Mack and Jeffrey Unterbrink were united
in marriage at 2 p.m. on June 16, 2012, at St. John
the Evangelist Catholic Church by the Rev. Melvin
Verhoff.
The bride’s parents are Roger and Patty Mack of
Wapakoneta. The groom’s parents are Alan and Mary
Unterbrink of Delphos.
Nuptial music was provided by vocalists Jamie
Grothaus and Mike Greve and organist Linda Schmit.
Matrons of honor were Amy Mack of Carmel,
Ind., sister-in-law of the bride; and Abby Truesdale of
Wapakoneta, friend.
Bridesmaids were Mandy Weimerskirch of Delphos,
sister of the groom; Lisa Drerup of Delphos, friend;
Shannon Greve of Van Wert, cousin; Laura Mack of
New Knoxville, sister-in-law of the bride; Christine
Mack of Botkins, sister-in-law of the bride; and Emily
Short of Vandalia, friend.
Flower girls were Makenna Mack of Botkins, god-
daughter of the bride; and Morgan Weimerskirch of
Delphos, goddaughter of the groom. Ring-bearer was
Conner Mack of Carmel, godson of the bride.
Best man was Mark Drerup of Delphos, friend.
Groomsmen were Bryan Weimerskirch of Delphos,
brother-in-law of the groom; Aaron Alt of Defiance,
friend; Jeremy Schweiterman of St. Henry, friend;
Kyle Baldauf of Fort Wayne, friend; and Dave Mack of
Carmel, Andy Mack of New Knoxville and Don Mack
and Chris Mack of Botkins, brother of the bride.
The bride’s grandparents are Mildred Mack and
Ralph Greve and the groom’s are Jim and Bernice
Unterbrink and John and Joyce Leach.
A reception was held after the ceremony at the
Delphos K of C Hall. Following a wedding trip to
Sandals Whitehouse in Jamaica, the couple reside in
Wapakoneta.
The bride is a 2002 graduate of Botkins High School
and a 2006 graduate of The University of Findlay, earn-
ing bachelor of science in education. She received her
master’s in 2009 from Wright State University. She is
employed by Wapakoneta City schools.
The groom is a 2004 graduate of St. John’s High
School and a 2008 graduate of The Ohio State University,
earning a bachelor of science degree. In 2012, he
received his Doctorate of Optometry from OSU. He is
employed by The Eyesite of Lima.
Wedding
Mr. and Mrs. Aaron Haines
Annette Bonifas and Aaron Haines were united in
marriage on Oct. 8, 2011, at St. John the Baptist Church
in Landeck by the Rev. Eric Mueller, a friend of the
couple.
The bride’s parents are Dan “Boomer” and Janet
Bonifas. The groom’s are Stacey and Tracy DePugh and
the late Andy Haines.
Nuptial music was provided by musicians Marlene,
Maggie and Nick Wehri.
Maids of honor were Bridgette Bonifas of Knoxville,
Tenn., and Juliette Bonifas of Landeck, sisters of the
bride.
Bridesmaids were Julia Horstman of Columbus,
friend; Jordan Haines of Columbus, sister of the groom;
Stephanie Schmit of Washington, D.C., friend; and
Krista Happy of Knoxville, friend.
Best man was Christian Younge of Chillicothe,
friend.
Usher was Brice Schulte of Landeck, cousin of the
bride. Groomsmen were Travis Tatman of Los Angeles,
Eric Walker of Cincinnati, Drew Anderson of Columbus
and John Greene of Memphis, Tenn., friends of the
couple.
Grandparents of the couple are Richard and Dr. Jane
Bonifas, Barbara Hurley and the late Tom Hurley, Leo
and Bernice Drerup and Monte and Elaine Haines.
A reception was held in the Dairy Barn at the Van
Wert County Fairgrounds after the ceremony. Following
a wedding trip to St. Maarten, the couple reside in
Pataskala.
The bride is a graduate of Wright State University’s
School of Nursing and is employed at Mt. Carmel St.
Ann’s in Westerville.
The groom is a graduate of Wright State University
and is employed by Nalco Company as a sales engineer.
Wedding
By DAVID BAUDER
The Associated Press
The post-Emmy cham-
pagne surely tasted sweet
for the people at “Modern
Family” and “Homeland,”
but they needed only to look
around the Nokia Theatre
to see how quickly popu-
lar tastes and Hollywood’s
most unpredictable awards
show can change percep-
tions.
“Modern Family” contin-
ued its run as television’s
most honored comedy at
Sunday’s Emmys, winning
the best comedy award for
the third year in a row, a
directing honor for co-cre-
ator Steve Levitan and act-
ing trophies for Julie Bowen
and Eric Stonestreet. They
were already conscious that
with such success may come
an inevitable backlash.
“I’m praying that every-
body doesn’t get sick of
us,” Levitan said backstage.
Maybe the Emmys’ director
did: music swelled and the
stage lights were cut off as
Levitan was in the middle
of his acceptance speech for
best comedy.
Across the theater was a
reminder that things change:
one-time Emmy darling Tina
Fey sitting barely unnoticed
and trophy-free as her show
“30 Rock” is coming to an
end. She was one of the
quickest people to bolt from
her seat and head for the exit
when the three-hour telecast
ended.
The terrorism thriller
“Homeland” won critical
plaudits and the best drama
Emmy, as well as top acting
awards for Claire Danes and
Damian Lewis. The writing
for “Homeland” was also
recognized. Showtime’s
first-ever best drama hon-
oree prevented “Mad Men”
from winning its fifth
straight best drama Emmy.
Once showered with hon-
ors, “Mad Men” set a record
Sunday with 17 nominations
and zero wins, said Tom
O’Neil of the Gold Derby
website, which follows
awards shows.
“We didn’t make our
show just to undermine
them,” Danes noted back-
stage. “We’re delighted and
thrilled and a little startled
by this. I don’t think anyone
expected to be recognized
like this right off the bat but
it feels pretty nice.”
Lewis, Danes’ co-star,
took note of “Breaking Bad”
star Bryan Cranston, winner
of three best actor Emmys
who had been trying for a
fourth on Sunday.
“I was quite convinced
he would be walking up
tonight,” he said.
Along with the awards,
there were a few cultural
moments that lit up social
media and will be water-
cooler fodder as TV fans
head back to work:
— Danes’ odd “Mandy
Patinkin, holla!” tribute to
her fellow actor.
— Host Jimmy Kimmel
and Tracy Morgan conspir-
ing to start a rumor that
Morgan had passed out
onstage.
— Curve-accentuating
dresses worn by the likes
of Kat Dennings of “2
Broke Girls,” Sofia Vergara
of “Modern Family” and
Christina Hendricks of
“Mad Men.”
— Jon Stewart punctuat-
ing his acceptance speech
with an f-bomb, resulting in
the only bleep of the eve-
ning.
Stewart’s “The Daily
Show” is one of the Emmy
Awards’ sure things. It won
the award for best variety
show for the 10th straight
year. CBS’ “The Amazing
Race” won its ninth award
for best reality show in 10
years.
Probably the least-pre-
dicted winner was Jon Cryer
of CBS’ “Two and a Half
Men” as best comic actor.
He’s won the best support-
ing actor award in the past
as second banana to Charlie
Sheen. But with Ashton
Kutcher replacing Sheen in
the cast last season, Cryer
moved up in class. Even he
was taken aback by the win,
saying he figured two-time
trophy winner Jim Parsons
of “The Big Bang Theory”
would get it.
“Don’t panic, people.
Something has clearly
gone terribly wrong. I’m
stunned,” Cryer said after
the award was announced.
HBO’s freshman com-
edy “Veep” received mixed
reviews, but Emmy voters
loved veteran actress Julia
Louis-Dreyfus, who won the
best comedy actress award
for her turn as a caustic U.S.
vice president.
Julianne Moore’s uncan-
ny take on Gov. Sarah Palin
in the TV movie “Game
Change,” about the 2008
presidential campaign,
‘Homeland’ and
‘Modern Family’
win big at 2012
Emmys Sunday
(See EMMY page 10A)
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10A – The Herald Monday, September 24, 2012
www.delphosherald.com
Hughes/Douglas
Michael and Cathy Hughes of Delphos announce
the engagement of their daughter, Lisa Marie, to David
Allen Douglas, son of the late Bill Douglas and Sandra
Douglas Adkins.
The couple will exchange vows on Oct. 6 at St. John
the Evangelist Catholic Church.
The bride-elect is a 2005 graduate of St. John’s High
School; a 2009 graduate of the University of Findlay,
earning her bachelor’s degree in occupational therapy
and her master’s in 2010. She is an occupational therapist
at Kingston of Vermilion in Vermilion.
Her fiance is a 2000 graduate of Upper Scioto Valley/
Ohio Hi-Point Career Center.
Schrecengost/Kleman
Jeff and Julie Schrecengost of Ravenna announce the
engagement of their daughter, Andrea, to Kurt Kleman,
son of George and Joyce Kleman of Wasdworth and
formerly of Delphos.
The couple will exchange vows on Oct. 27 at Holy
Martyrs Catholic Church.
The bride-elect is a 2005 graduate of Crestwood High
School and a 2009 graduate of Ohio Northern University.
She is employed by Swagelok Company.
Her fiance is a 2006 graduate of St. John’s High
School and a 2010 graduate of Ohio Northern University.
He is employed by Westfield Insurance Co.
Engagement Engagement
Mr. and Mrs.
Edward Odenweller
Mr. and Mrs. Edward Odenweller of Delphos will
celebrate 40 years of marriage on Oct. 6.
Odenweller and the former Carol Schimmoeller were
married October 6, 1972, at St. Joseph’s Catholic Church
in Fort Jennings by the Rev. Herman Fortman.
They are the parents of one daughter, Marie
(Ralph) Mertz of Pickerington; and two sons, James
(Jessica) Odenweller of Franklin and Michael (Melissa)
Odenweller of Whittington, England. They also have
four grandchildren: Vincent, Oden and Magdalen Mertz
of Pickerington and Eleanor Odenweller of Franklin.
Odenweller is a sales manager at Thermo King of
Delphos. His wife is the Business Office manager at
Vancrest of Delphos.
Anniversary
earned her best actress hon-
ors. The political film from
HBO was also honored in
the best miniseries-movie
category.
“I feel so validated
because Sarah Palin gave
me a big thumbs down,”
Moore said, beaming.
Kevin Costner was named
best actor for History’s wildly
popular miniseries “Hatfields
& McCoys,” while Tom
Berenger was named best sup-
porting actor for the project and
Jessica Lange won supporting
actress honors for “American
Horror Story.”
Standup comic Louis C.K.
won the Emmy for best com-
edy writing for “Louie” and for
the special “Louis C.K. Live
at the Beacon Theatre.” Said
the comedian after his second
win: “Thank you to audiences
around the country who still go
to see live comedy.”
Stonestreet won his sec-
ond supporting actor award in
a comedy in three years for
his portrayal of a gay stay-at-
home dad. The category was
a testament to the strength of
“Modern Family” in the com-
edy world: he beat three other
actors from the show in Ed
O’Neill, Ty Burrell and Jesse
Tyler Ferguson.
Stonestreet noted the impor-
tance of going out Sunday and
celebrating with the rest of the
cast.
By The Associated Press
List of winners at Sunday’s
64th annual Primetime Emmy
Awards presented by the
Academy of Television Arts
& Sciences:
— Drama Series:
“Homeland,” Showtime.
— Actress, Drama Series:
Claire Danes, “Homeland,”
Showtime.
— Actor, Drama Series:
Damian Lewis, “Homeland,”
Showtime.
— Supporting Actor,
Drama Series: Aaron Paul,
“Breaking Bad,” AMC.
— Supporting Actress,
Drama Series: Maggie Smith,
“Downton Abbey,” PBS.
— Writing, Drama Series:
Alex Gansa, Howard Gordon,
Gideon Raff, “Homeland,”
Showtime.
— Directing, Drama
Series: Tim Van Patten,
“Boardwalk Empire,” HBO.
— Comedy Series:
“Modern Family,” ABC.
— Actor, Comedy
Series: Jon Cryer, “Two
and a Half Men,” CBS.
— Actress, Comedy
Series: Julia Louis-
Dreyfus, “Veep,”
HBO.
— Supporting
Actress, Comedy Series:
Julie Bowen, “Modern
Family,” ABC.
— Supporting Actor,
Comedy Series: Eric
Stonestreet, “Modern
Family,” ABC.
— Writing, Comedy
Series: Louis C.K, “Louie,”
FX Networks.
— Directing, Comedy
Series: Steven Levitan,
“Modern Family,” ABC.
— Miniseries or Movie:
“Game Change,” HBO.
— Actress, Miniseries
or Movie: Julianne Moore,
“Game Change,”
HBO.
— Actor,
Miniseries or
Movie: Kevin
Costner, “Hatfields
& McCoys,”
History.
— Supporting
Actress, Miniseries
or Movie: Jessica
Lange, “American
Horror Story,” FX
Networks.
— Supporting Actor,
Miniseries or Movie: Tom
Berenger, “Hatfields &
McCoys,” History.
— Directing, Miniseries,
Movie or Dramatic Special:
Jay Roach, “Game Change,”
HBO.
— Writing, Miniseries,
Movie or Dramatic Special:
Danny Strong, “Game
Change,” HBO.
— Reality-Competition
Program: “The Amazing
Race,” CBS.
— Host, Reality-
Competition Program: Tom
Bergeron, “Dancing With the
Stars,” ABC.
— Variety, Music or
Comedy Series: “The Daily
Show With Jon Stewart,”
Comedy Central.
— Writing for a Variety
Special: Louis C.K., “Louis
C.K. Live at the Beacon
Theatre,” FX Networks.
— Directing, Variety,
Music or Comedy Special:
Glenn Weiss, 65th Annual
Tony Awards, CBS.
Winners from Emmy broadcast
EMMY
(Continued from page 9)
1
3610 Elida Road
Lima, Ohio 45807
Ph.: 419-228-1125
Fax: 419-222-7330
Website: RentLima.com
Everything you need for a job well done!
•RENTAL
•SALES
•Construction
Equipment
•Party supplies
& much more
www.kubota.com
©Kubota Tractor Corporation, 2008
Quality. Reliability. Service.
All in the family.
From lawn and garden
tractors to compact
tractors, excavators
and gasoline and
diesel utility vehicles.
Kubota delivers the
highest standards for
quality and service.
So, climb aboard the
Kubota of your choice
and join the family.
Farmers Equipment, Inc.
6008 Elida Rd., Rt. 309
Elida, OH 45807
(419) 339-7000
www.kubota.com
©Kubota Tractor Corporation, 2008
Quality. Reliability. Service.
All in the family.
From lawn and garden
tractors to compact
tractors, excavators
and gasoline and
diesel utility vehicles.
Kubota delivers the
highest standards for
quality and service.
So, climb aboard the
Kubota of your choice
and join the family.
Farmers Equipment, Inc.
6008 Elida Rd., Rt. 309
Elida, OH 45807
(419) 339-7000
www.kubota.com
©Kubota Tractor Corporation, 2008
Quality. Reliability. Service.
All in the family.
From lawn and garden
tractors to compact
tractors, excavators
and gasoline and
diesel utility vehicles.
Kubota delivers the
highest standards for
quality and service.
So, climb aboard the
Kubota of your choice
and join the family.
Farmers Equipment, Inc.
6008 Elida Rd., Rt. 309
Elida, OH 45807
(419) 339-7000
Quality. Reliability. Service.
All in the family
Farmer’s
Equipment, Inc.
6008 Elida Rd., Rt. 309
Elida, OH 45807
(419) 339-7000
From lawn and garden tractors to compact
tractors, excavators and gasoline and diesel utility
vehicles, Kubota delivers the highest standards for
quality and service. So, climb aboard the
Kubota of your choice and join the family.
See
our
display at
the 2012
Allen Co.
Fair!
419-339-6800
705 E. Main St., Elida
St. Rt. 309
(just west of Speedway)
✦ Pet Food/
Supplies
✦ Purina Feeds
✦ Softener
Salt
✦ Wild Bird Food
2
LAMGEGT OIGPLAY IA TME LGA
VITM OVEM GOO LAITG
IACLLOIAG OVEM BO LIVE ELMA AOOELG
COrH * Gæs * VOOU * PeIIez * EIeczr¡c COrH * Gæs * VOOU * PeIIez * EIeczr¡c
"LOVEGT PMICEG EEGT GEMVICE"
CELINA
5217 Tama Road
SR 127, 5 Miles North of Celina,
1 Mile West of Tama
419-S6S-22S0
LIMA
4147 EIida Road
419-224-4656
www.kernsfirepIaceandspa.com
ªFirepIaces ªStoves ªHeaters ªLogs
ªOutdoor FirepIaces
ªGas GriIIs ªSaunas & Spas
1089968
halklag huras llke a ûuaJ
KERNS
CLEARANCE
SCRATCH & DENT SALE
50-75% off
Elida Rd. • LIMA
419-224-4656
Tama Rd. • CELINA
419-224-4656
Visit Our Showrooms!
Over 200 Units on Display
www.kernsfireplaceandspa.com
Superior Quality and
Service are the reasons
we are the #1 Florist in
the Region.
“Exceeding Your
Expectations”
Give us a call
and you’ll see why!
4611 Elida Road
Lima, OH 45807
(419) 331-4426
Now Available!
Order online, 24 hours a day
at www.theflowerloftoflima.com
THE FLOWERLOFT
FLOWERS & GIFTS
Hollowell
Academy of
Dog Training
201 Kiracofe (Rt. 309), Elida, OH 45807
(419) 339-3208 (419) 339-7878
www.hollowellwhippets-dogtraining.com
Puppy Kindergarten,
Obedience Agility,
Tracking & Rally-O,
Private Behavior Counseling,
Retrieving, Tricks,
Dog Grooming, Doggie Daycare,
Retail Pet Supplies
Neidert’s
Mowers
Sales & Service
Ariens, Gravely, ExMark, Redmax

507 E. Kiracofe (Rt. 309)
Elida, OH 45807
419-331-LAWN
RUBY
TUESDAY
We Cater
and Deliver!
Ian E. Murray
General Manager
Johnny Addington
Assistant Manager
2404 Elida Rd., Lima, Ohio 45805
W: 419-331-7829/ F: 419-331-7835
C: 419-509-4230
www.rubytuesday.com
SIMPLE FRESH AMERICAN DINING
The Hodge
Podge Store
With garage
sale prices.
211 S. Greenlawn Ave.
Elida, OH 45807
Thur.-Sat. 9:00 a.m.-5:30pm, Sun. 11a-4p
110
Consignees
You name i t we have i t.
D S T
Down Sound Town
1950 Elida Rd.
Lima, OH 45805
331-1112
M-F 10a-7p
Sat. 10a-4p
www.dt-sounds.com
dtsounds2002@yahoo.com
• Mobile Audio
• TVs - DVD
• Remote start/alarms
• Custom installation
• Window Tinting
• Custom Rim/Tire
• Custom Graphics
• Auto detailing
$
10
00
OFF
ANY PURCHASE
OVER
$
100
00
OR MORE
EXPIRES 7/31/10
Summers Landing
3930 Elida Rd., Lima
1/2 mile West of Lowe’s
419-224-7676
• Playsets
• Playhouses
• Porch Swings
• Gazebos
• Polyvinyl Deck Furniture
OPEN
10am-5pm Daily
Closed Sunday
(Up to a total of $10.00 off. No other discounts apply)
Not valid on specials. Not valid for parties getting Birthday discount. Exp. 6-30-2010.
2nd entree of equal or lesser value. Must present coupon.
Buy one entree get
the 2nd entree
1/2 off
$
10
00
OFF
Elida Rd., Lima
Next to WENDY’S
419-225-
PACK
Come step back
in time, relax by
the open fireplace
and enjoy the
aroma of the
awaiting home
style meal
prepared in 1800’s
log home tucked
in at the edge of
the “sugar bush”
Our Own *maple syrup,
home grown produce,
free range chicken, eggs, fresh
ground grains and in house
baked goods make for not only
a unique dining experience but
a meal long remembered.
Mervin & Beverly Shirk
ò7OO L|lda kd. · L|lda, Oblo 4òòO7
|oc keoecva¡lono ca||
413-òò3-2ò37
The first group to make reservations for
the night will set the dining time
and choose the meat entré
Hours: Mon. 10-8 Tues.-Fri. 10-6, Sat. 10-3
At 4129 Elida Road
Lima
(across from
Tracy’s Appliances)
If you suffer from
• Foot pain
• Leg pain
• Back pain
We can help!
Revolutionary design greatly reduces
impact to the body. Doctor recommended.
www.kubota.com
©Kubota Tractor Corporation, 2008
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3^^[`fZWXS_[^k
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Farmers Equipment, Inc.
6008 Elida Rd., Rt. 309
Elida, OH 45807
(419) 339-7000
Monday, June 14, 2010 The Herald — 2B
www.delphosherald.com
These businesses invite you to
ELIDA
Check out these Elida businesses for the best in
local service, quality and exceptional deals!
2
LAMGEGT OIGPLAY IA TME LGA
VITM OVEM GOO LAITG
IACLLOIAG OVEM BO LIVE ELMA AOOELG
COrH * Gæs * VOOU * PeIIez * EIeczr¡c COrH * Gæs * VOOU * PeIIez * EIeczr¡c
"LOVEGT PMICEG EEGT GEMVICE"
CELINA
5217 Tama Road
SR 127, 5 Miles North of Celina,
1 Mile West of Tama
419-S6S-22S0
LIMA
4147 EIida Road
419-224-4656
www.kernsfirepIaceandspa.com
ªFirepIaces ªStoves ªHeaters ªLogs
ªOutdoor FirepIaces
ªGas GriIIs ªSaunas & Spas
1089968
halklag huras llke a ûuaJ
KERNS
CLEARANCE
SCRATCH & DENT SALE
50-75% off
Elida Rd. • LIMA
419-224-4656
Tama Rd. • CELINA
419-224-4656
Visit Our Showrooms!
Over 200 Units on Display
www.kernsfireplaceandspa.com
Superior Quality and
Service are the reasons
we are the #1 Florist in
the Region.
“Exceeding Your
Expectations”
Give us a call
and you’ll see why!
4611 Elida Road
Lima, OH 45807
(419) 331-4426
Now Available!
Order online, 24 hours a day
at www.theflowerloftoflima.com
THE FLOWERLOFT
FLOWERS & GIFTS
Hollowell
Academy of
Dog Training
201 Kiracofe (Rt. 309), Elida, OH 45807
(419) 339-3208 (419) 339-7878
www.hollowellwhippets-dogtraining.com
Puppy Kindergarten,
Obedience Agility,
Tracking & Rally-O,
Private Behavior Counseling,
Retrieving, Tricks,
Dog Grooming, Doggie Daycare,
Retail Pet Supplies
Neidert’s
Mowers
Sales & Service
Ariens, Gravely, ExMark, Redmax

507 E. Kiracofe (Rt. 309)
Elida, OH 45807
419-331-LAWN
RUBY
TUESDAY
We Cater
and Deliver!
Ian E. Murray
General Manager
Johnny Addington
Assistant Manager
2404 Elida Rd., Lima, Ohio 45805
W: 419-331-7829/ F: 419-331-7835
C: 419-509-4230
www.rubytuesday.com
SIMPLE FRESH AMERICAN DINING
The Hodge
Podge Store
With garage
sale prices.
211 S. Greenlawn Ave.
Elida, OH 45807
Thur.-Sat. 9:00 a.m.-5:30pm, Sun. 11a-4p
110
Consignees
You name i t we have i t.
D S T
Down Sound Town
1950 Elida Rd.
Lima, OH 45805
331-1112
M-F 10a-7p
Sat. 10a-4p
www.dt-sounds.com
dtsounds2002@yahoo.com
• Mobile Audio
• TVs - DVD
• Remote start/alarms
• Custom installation
• Window Tinting
• Custom Rim/Tire
• Custom Graphics
• Auto detailing
$
10
00
OFF
ANY PURCHASE
OVER
$
100
00
OR MORE
EXPIRES 7/31/10
Summers Landing
3930 Elida Rd., Lima
1/2 mile West of Lowe’s
419-224-7676
• Playsets
• Playhouses
• Porch Swings
• Gazebos
• Polyvinyl Deck Furniture
OPEN
10am-5pm Daily
Closed Sunday
(Up to a total of $10.00 off. No other discounts apply)
Not valid on specials. Not valid for parties getting Birthday discount. Exp. 6-30-2010.
2nd entree of equal or lesser value. Must present coupon.
Buy one entree get
the 2nd entree
1/2 off
$
10
00
OFF
Elida Rd., Lima
Next to WENDY’S
419-225-
PACK
Come step back
in time, relax by
the open fireplace
and enjoy the
aroma of the
awaiting home
style meal
prepared in 1800’s
log home tucked
in at the edge of
the “sugar bush”
Our Own *maple syrup,
home grown produce,
free range chicken, eggs, fresh
ground grains and in house
baked goods make for not only
a unique dining experience but
a meal long remembered.
Mervin & Beverly Shirk
ò7OO L|lda kd. · L|lda, Oblo 4òòO7
|oc keoecva¡lono ca||
413-òò3-2ò37
The first group to make reservations for
the night will set the dining time
and choose the meat entré
Hours: Mon. 10-8 Tues.-Fri. 10-6, Sat. 10-3
At 4129 Elida Road
Lima
(across from
Tracy’s Appliances)
If you suffer from
• Foot pain
• Leg pain
• Back pain
We can help!
Revolutionary design greatly reduces
impact to the body. Doctor recommended.
www.kubota.com
©Kubota Tractor Corporation, 2008
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3^^[`fZWXS_[^k
8da_^Si`S`VYSdVW`
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Farmers Equipment, Inc.
6008 Elida Rd., Rt. 309
Elida, OH 45807
(419) 339-7000
Monday, June 14, 2010 The Herald — 2B
www.delphosherald.com
These businesses invite you to
ELIDA
Check out these Elida businesses for the best in
local service, quality and exceptional deals!
Visit Our Showrooms!
Over 200 Units on Display
CLEARANCE Up to 75% OFF
Scratch & Dent Floor Models
& One-of-a-Kind
2
LAMGEGT OIGPLAY IA TME LGA
VITM OVEM GOO LAITG
IACLLOIAG OVEM BO LIVE ELMA AOOELG
COrH * Gæs * VOOU * PeIIez * EIeczr¡c COrH * Gæs * VOOU * PeIIez * EIeczr¡c
"LOVEGT PMICEG EEGT GEMVICE"
CELINA
5217 Tama Road
SR 127, 5 Miles North of Celina,
1 Mile West of Tama
419-S6S-22S0
LIMA
4147 EIida Road
419-224-4656
www.kernsfirepIaceandspa.com
ªFirepIaces ªStoves ªHeaters ªLogs
ªOutdoor FirepIaces
ªGas GriIIs ªSaunas & Spas
1089968
halklag huras llke a ûuaJ
KERNS
CLEARANCE
SCRATCH & DENT SALE
50-75% off
Elida Rd. • LIMA
419-224-4656
Tama Rd. • CELINA
419-224-4656
Visit Our Showrooms!
Over 200 Units on Display
www.kernsfireplaceandspa.com
Superior Quality and
Service are the reasons
we are the #1 Florist in
the Region.
“Exceeding Your
Expectations”
Give us a call
and you’ll see why!
4611 Elida Road
Lima, OH 45807
(419) 331-4426
Now Available!
Order online, 24 hours a day
at www.theflowerloftoflima.com
THE FLOWERLOFT
FLOWERS & GIFTS
Hollowell
Academy of
Dog Training
201 Kiracofe (Rt. 309), Elida, OH 45807
(419) 339-3208 (419) 339-7878
www.hollowellwhippets-dogtraining.com
Puppy Kindergarten,
Obedience Agility,
Tracking & Rally-O,
Private Behavior Counseling,
Retrieving, Tricks,
Dog Grooming, Doggie Daycare,
Retail Pet Supplies
Neidert’s
Mowers
Sales & Service
Ariens, Gravely, ExMark, Redmax

507 E. Kiracofe (Rt. 309)
Elida, OH 45807
419-331-LAWN
RUBY
TUESDAY
We Cater
and Deliver!
Ian E. Murray
General Manager
Johnny Addington
Assistant Manager
2404 Elida Rd., Lima, Ohio 45805
W: 419-331-7829/ F: 419-331-7835
C: 419-509-4230
www.rubytuesday.com
SIMPLE FRESH AMERICAN DINING
The Hodge
Podge Store
With garage
sale prices.
211 S. Greenlawn Ave.
Elida, OH 45807
Thur.-Sat. 9:00 a.m.-5:30pm, Sun. 11a-4p
110
Consignees
You name i t we have i t.
D S T
Down Sound Town
1950 Elida Rd.
Lima, OH 45805
331-1112
M-F 10a-7p
Sat. 10a-4p
www.dt-sounds.com
dtsounds2002@yahoo.com
• Mobile Audio
• TVs - DVD
• Remote start/alarms
• Custom installation
• Window Tinting
• Custom Rim/Tire
• Custom Graphics
• Auto detailing
$
10
00
OFF
ANY PURCHASE
OVER
$
100
00
OR MORE
EXPIRES 7/31/10
Summers Landing
3930 Elida Rd., Lima
1/2 mile West of Lowe’s
419-224-7676
• Playsets
• Playhouses
• Porch Swings
• Gazebos
• Polyvinyl Deck Furniture
OPEN
10am-5pm Daily
Closed Sunday
(Up to a total of $10.00 off. No other discounts apply)
Not valid on specials. Not valid for parties getting Birthday discount. Exp. 6-30-2010.
2nd entree of equal or lesser value. Must present coupon.
Buy one entree get
the 2nd entree
1/2 off
$
10
00
OFF
Elida Rd., Lima
Next to WENDY’S
419-225-
PACK
Come step back
in time, relax by
the open fireplace
and enjoy the
aroma of the
awaiting home
style meal
prepared in 1800’s
log home tucked
in at the edge of
the “sugar bush”
Our Own *maple syrup,
home grown produce,
free range chicken, eggs, fresh
ground grains and in house
baked goods make for not only
a unique dining experience but
a meal long remembered.
Mervin & Beverly Shirk
ò7OO L|lda kd. · L|lda, Oblo 4òòO7
|oc keoecva¡lono ca||
413-òò3-2ò37
The first group to make reservations for
the night will set the dining time
and choose the meat entré
Hours: Mon. 10-8 Tues.-Fri. 10-6, Sat. 10-3
At 4129 Elida Road
Lima
(across from
Tracy’s Appliances)
If you suffer from
• Foot pain
• Leg pain
• Back pain
We can help!
Revolutionary design greatly reduces
impact to the body. Doctor recommended.
www.kubota.com
©Kubota Tractor Corporation, 2008
CgS^[fkDW^[ST[^[fkEWdh[UW
3^^[`fZWXS_[^k
8da_^Si`S`VYSdVW`
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=gTafSaXkagdUZa[UW
S`V\a[`fZWXS_[^k
Farmers Equipment, Inc.
6008 Elida Rd., Rt. 309
Elida, OH 45807
(419) 339-7000
Monday, June 14, 2010 The Herald — 2B
www.delphosherald.com
These businesses invite you to
ELIDA
Check out these Elida businesses for the best in
local service, quality and exceptional deals!
Available in Gas • Wood
• Electric • Pellet • Corn
• Twin Set starting at $179
• Full Sets starting at $199
• Queen Sets starting at $299
• King Sets starting at $449
• Queen Visco Elastic Memory Foam
Starting at $699
• Queen Latex from $699
• Queen Pillow Tops starting at $399
• Split Queen Box Springs $159
MATTRESS SETS
A+ Rating with
Better Business Bureau
WELLCARE
SERTA
ENGLANDER
LADY AMERICANA
Locally Owned and Operated
SAME DAY DELIVERY
Over 30 models on display
(FREE Delivery • FREE Setup
• FREE Removal $599 & up)
419-224-7117
or 1-877-502-2788
Open 7 Days a Week
2151 Elida Rd., Lima (across from Toys-R-Us)
DISCOVER YOUR
DREAMS THIS YEAR!
The
Flower
loFT
FLOWERS & GIFTS
4611 Elida Road,
Lima, OH 45807
(419) 331-4426
www.thefowerloftofima.com
Residential / Commercial
3626 Allentown Rd., Lima, Ohio 45807
CARPET - VINYL - CERAMIC - FLOOR TILE - ACOUSTICAL CEILINGS
Ph. (419) 331-4372 Fax (419) 331-8243
www.tdinteriorsinc.com
Stop by and see our new showroom!
THE ELIDA
FLEA MARKET
“Inside & Open Year Round”
LOCALLY OWNED
Antiques, Collectibles,
Furniture & A Lot
More “STUFF”
Open:
Thur., Fri. & Sat. 9-6;
Sun. 11-6
216 S. Greenlawn, Elida
(419) 339-2225
ASAP
SELF
STORAGE
2466 N. Cable Rd.
Lima, OH 45807
419-225-9333
ANDREA
Real BioLife
donor since
April 2012.
ANYONE CAN BE A LIFESAVER AT BIOLIFE.
It doesn’t matter who you are or what you do, your plasma
donation has the potential to save countless lives.
Learn more at BIOLIFEPLASMA.COM
4299 Elida Rd • Lima, OH 45807 • 419.224.0117
1789 E. Melrose Ave • Findlay, OH 45840 • 419.425.8680
VISIT BIOLIFEPLASMA.COM TO
SCHEDULE YOUR DONATION
$
2
2
0

RECEIVE UP TO
P
ER
M
O
N
TH
!
BioLife values all donors and does not discriminate based on race, gender, age, national origin, religion, disability, veteran status, or any characteristic
protected by Federal, state or local law. All BioLife donor eligibility criteria must be met to protect the donor’s health and product safety.
NEW DONORS OR DONORS WHO HAVEN’T DONATED IN SIX MONTHS OR MORE,
PRESENT THIS COUPON AND RECEIVE $220 IN JUST FOUR DONATIONS.
Must present this coupon prior to the initial donation to receive a total of $40 on your frst,
a total of $50 on your second, a total of $60 on your third, and a total of $70 on your
fourth successful donation. Initial donation must be completed by
9.30.12 and subsequent donations within 30 days. Coupon redeemable
only upon completing successful donations. May not be combined with
any other offer. Only at participating locations.
$220
These businesses
are proud of their
community and
ask you to visit them in
ELIDA.
They invite you to check them out
for the best in personal service,
value and price!
Monday, September 24. 2012 The Herald — 11A
www.delphosherald.com
Answers to Saturday’s ques-
tions:
Wilma Deering’s boyfriend is
Buck Rogers.
The assassination of Archduke
Ferdinand of Austria helped to
bring on World War I.
Today’s questions:
Who coached the gold-medal
winning U.S. hockey team in the
1980 Olympics?
What famous hoofer danced
opposite of Fred Astaire in Easter
Parade?
Answers in Wednesday’s Herald.
Today’s words:
Kennebunker: a large suit-
case
Zincography: printing with
zinc plates
Giant panda cub born Sept. 16 at National Zoo dies
By BEN NUCKOLS
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON — The giant
panda cub born a week ago at the
National Zoo in Washington died
Sunday morning, saddening zoo offi-
cials and visitors who had heralded its
unexpected arrival.
The 4-ounce cub, about the size of
a stick of butter, showed no obvious
signs of distress and made its final
recorded noise shortly before 9 a.m.
Sunday, zoo officials said at a news
conference.
The cub’s mother, Mei Xiang, then
made an unusual honking sound at
9:17 a.m. that her keepers interpreted
as a distress call, and she moved away
from where she had been nesting with
the cub. About an hour later, one keeper
distracted her with honey water while
another used an instrument similar to a
lacrosse stick to pick up the cub.
The cub, whose gender could not
be determined externally, was not
breathing and its heart had stopped. A
veterinarian attempted CPR before it
was pronounced dead at 10:28 a.m.
“This is devastating for all of us
here,” National Zoo director Dennis
Kelly said at a news conference. “It’s
hard to describe how much passion
and energy and thought and care has
gone into this.”
Four American zoos have pandas,
but Washington’s pandas are treated
like royalty. The zoo was given
its first set of pandas in 1972 as a
gift from China to commemorate
President Richard Nixon’s historic
visit to the country.
Mei Xiang’s first cub, Tai Shan,
born in 2005, enjoyed enormous
popularity before he was returned to
China in 2010.
The new cub, born Sept. 16, had
been a surprise at the zoo. Fourteen-
year-old Mei Xiang had five failed
pregnancies before giving birth.
Panda cubs are especially delicate
and vulnerable to infection and other
illness. The first weeks of life are
critical for the cubs as mothers have
to make sure they stay warm and get
enough to eat.
Panda mothers are about 1,000
times heavier than their cubs, and
sometimes they accidentally crush
them. On any given day in the first
two weeks of life, cubs have a mor-
tality rate of 17 to 18 percent, zoo
officials said.
A necropsy was being conducted
to determine the cause of death, and
preliminary findings were expected
Monday, said Suzan Murray, the zoo’s
chief veterinarian. The cub showed no
external signs of trauma, she said.
“The cub was just beautiful.
Beautiful little body, beautiful face,
with markings just beginning to show
around the eye,” Murray said.
As they did after Tai Shan was
born, keepers had been leaving Mei
Xiang alone with her offspring, moni-
toring her on video feeds that were
also streamed on the zoo’s website.
Mei Xiang was resting comfortably
after the cub’s death, officials said.
The zoo’s first panda couple, Ling
Ling and Hsing Hsing, had five cubs
during the 1980s, but none lived more
than a few days. One of the cubs was
stillborn; two others died of pneumonia
within a day; another died from lack
of oxygen after birth; and the final cub
died of an infection after four days.
2
StateWide
www.statewideford.com
1108 West Main St.
Van Wert, OH
800-262-3866
or 419-238-0125
Mon. & Wed. 9 AM - 8 PM;
Tues., Thurs., Fri. 9 AM-6 PM;
Sat. 9 AM-3 PM
2009 Ford
Flex SE
# 50167P. 7 passenger, great fuel
economy,
priced to sell!!
$
15,998
2007 Ford
Fusion SE
# 501049A. Alloy wheels, CD,
local trade-in,
hard to find price!!
$
8989
2008 Ford
Mustang GT
#50191P. Low miles, Deluxe,
5 spd, alloys, hood scoop,
spoiler!!
$
18,669
2010 Ford Escape
Limited
# 40060A, 1-owner, local trade-
in, moonroof, heated leather
seats!
$
17,279
2010 Lincoln
MKZ
# 50177P. Lincoln Certified!!
Nav & rear camera, low miles,
nice!!
$
19,918
2007 Ford F 150
Supercrew
# 40110A. V8 power, local
trade-in, chrome package, good
miles!!
$
16,421
2011 Mercury
Grand Marquis LS
# 50176P. All the luxury, half the
price!!
Like new!
$
15,965
2011 Ford Edge
Limited
# 50136P. Chrome wheels, Sync,
My Ford Touch, heated leather
seats!
$
23,743
2011 Chevy
Impala LS
# 50168P. Alloy wheels, extra
clean inside and out,
save big!!
$
13,778
2012 Ford
Focus SE
# 50143P, Alloy wheels, 4 door
sedan,
factory warranty!!
$
13,987
2010 Ford
Fusion SE
# 50161P. Power Moonroof,
great color, 38,000 miles,
clean carfax!
$
13,998
2008 Dodge
Grand Caravan SXT
# 50178P. Sto N Go seats, rear
DVD, power side doors, all the
goodies!
$
13,744
Go Further
45,530*
6,500
5,000
60 0.0
Incentives and discounts may require Ford Credit financing or trade-in. Offer expires 10/1/12.
www.statewideford.com
419-238-0125 800-262-3866
1108 West Main St
Van Wert , OH45891
Statewide Ford-Lincoln
USED CARS
45,530*
6,500
5,000
60 0.0
Incentives and discounts may require Ford Credit financing or trade-in. Offer expires 10/1/12.
www.statewideford.com
419-238-0125 800-262-3866
1108 West Main St
Van Wert , OH45891
Statewide Ford-Lincoln
45,530*
6,500
5,000
60 0.0
Incentives and discounts may require Ford Credit financing or trade-in. Offer expires 10/1/12.
www.statewideford.com
419-238-0125 800-262-3866
1108 West Main St
Van Wert , OH45891
Statewide Ford-Lincoln
$
6,500
off MSRP
$
45,530
12A – The Herald Monday, September 24, 2012
www.delphosherald.com
1
Monday, September 24, 2012 The Herald — 1B
www.delphosherald.com
www.delphosherald.com
950 Tree Service
TEMAN’S
OUR TREE
SERVICE
Bill Teman 419-302-2981
Ernie Teman 419-230-4890
Since 1973
419-692-7261
• Trimming • Topping • Thinning
• Deadwooding
Stump, Shrub & Tree Removal
L.L.C.
• Trimming & Removal
• Stump Grinding
• 24 Hour Service • Fully Insured
KEVIN M. MOORE
(419) 235-8051
950 Welding
419-339-0110
GENERAL REPAIR - SPECIAL BUILT PRODUCTS
Fabrication & Welding Inc.
Quality
TRUCKS, TRAILERS
FARMMACHINERY
RAILINGS & METAL GATES
CARBON STE EL
STAINLESS STE EL
ALUMINUM
Larry McClure
5745 Redd Rd., Delphos
950 Miscellaneous
COMMUNITY
SELF-STORAGE
GREAT RATES
NEWER FACILITY
419-692-0032
Across from Arby’s
SAFE &
SOUND
Security Fence
DELPHOS
SELF-STORAGE
•Pass Code •Lighted Lot
•Affordable •2 Locations
Why settle for less?
419-692-6336
POHLMAN
BUILDERS
FREE ESTIMATES
FULLY INSURED
Mark Pohlman
419-339-9084
cell 419-233-9460
ROOM ADDITIONS
GARAGES • SIDING • ROOFING
BACKHOE & DUMP TRUCK
SERVICE
950 Home Improvement
Hohlbein’s
Ph. 419-339-4938
or 419-230-8128
Windows, Doors,
Siding, Roofing,
Sunrooms,
Kitchens &
Bathroom
Remodeling,
Pole Buildings,
Garages
Home
Improvement
950 Car Care
Geise
Transmission, Inc.
419-453-3620
2 miles north of Ottoville
• automatic transmission
• standard transmission
• differentials
• transfer case
• brakes & tune up
950 Construction
950 Construction
Joe Miller
Construction
Experienced Amish Carpentry
Roofing, remodeling,
concrete, pole barns, garages
or any construction needs.
Cell 567-644-6030
POHLMAN
POURED
CONCRETE WALLS
Residential
& Commercial
• Agricultural Needs
• All Concrete Work
Mark Pohlman
419-339-9084
cell 419-233-9460
Advertise
Your
Business
DAILY
For a low,
low price!
HERALD DELPHOS
THE
Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869
Classifieds
Deadlines:
11:30 a.m. for the next day’s issue.
Saturday’s paper is 11:00 a.m. Friday
Monday’s paper is 1:00 p.m. Friday
Herald Extra is 11 a.m. Thursday
Minimum Charge: 15 words,
2 times - $9.00
Each word is $.30 2-5 days
$.25 6-9 days
$.20 10+ days
Each word is $.10 for 3 months
or more prepaid
THANKS TO ST. JUDE: Runs 1 day at the
price of $3.00.
GARAGE SALES: Each day is $.20 per
word. $8.00 minimum charge.
“I WILL NOT BE RESPONSIBLE FOR
DEBTS”: Ad must be placed in person by
the person whose name will appear in the ad.
Must show ID & pay when placing ad. Regu-
lar rates apply
FREE ADS: 5 days free if item is free
or less than $50. Only 1 item per ad, 1
ad per month.
BOX REPLIES: $8.00 if you come
and pick them up. $14.00 if we have to
send them to you.
CARD OF THANKS: $2.00 base
charge + $.10 for each word.
To place an ad phone 419-695-0015 ext. 122
We accept
www.delphosherald.com
2B – The Herald Monday, September 24, 2012
Do you need to know what is
going on before anyone else?
Do you have a burning need to
know more about the people
and news in the community?
The Delphos Herald, a five-day, award
winning DHI media company with
newspapers, website, and niche prod-
uct in Delphos, Ohio, is looking for an
energetic, self-motivated, resourceful
reporter to join its staff.
The right candidate will possess strong
grammar and writing skills, be able to
meet deadlines, have a working knowl-
edge of still photography. A sense of
urgency and accuracy are requirements.
Assignments can range from hard eco-
nomic news to feature stories.
Send resumes to:
The Delphos Herald
Attn. Nancy Spencer
405 N. Main St., Delphos, Ohio 45833
or email to: nspencer@delphosherald.com
HELP WANTED
Growing commercial printer
Looking for
EXPERIENCED SINGLE
WIDTH PRINTING PRESS
OPERATOR
Second Shift or Third Shift
Wages based on experience
Benefits include
• Health Insurance
• Dental Insurance
• Life Insurance
• 2 weeks vacation after 1 year
• 3 weeks vacation after 5 years
• 401K w/partial employer match
Send resume to:
Dennis Klausing
Eagle Print
111 E. Fourth St., Delphos, OH 45833
HELP WANTED
Growing commercial printer
Looking for
PRESS TRAINEE
Applicant must pass a series of
tests to qualify
Send resume to:
Dennis Klausing
Eagle Print
111 E. Fourth St.
Delphos, OH 45833
19176 Venedocia-Eastern Rd., Venedocia
Beautiful country 4 bedroom, 1 1/2 bath, oversized 2 car
garage. Updated everywhere. Must See! $89,900.
Approx. monthly payment -
$
482.60
www.creativehomebuyingsolutions.com
OPEN
HOUSE
9am-5pm Fri., Sat. & Sun.
Buy your new or used
vehicle from someone
you know and trust!
Lisa Williams
3500 Elida Road, Lima
Phone:(419) 331-0381
Fax: (419) 331-0882
Email: LisaW@allannott.com
STATEMENT OF OWNERSHIP, MANAGEMENT
AND CIRCULATION
THE DELPHOS DAILY HERALD
2. Publication Number: 152580
3. Filing Date: 9/20/12
4. Issue Frequency: Daily, No Sundays or Tuesdays
5. Number of Issues Published Annually: 305
6. Annual Subscription Price: $97 in county; $110
outside county
7. Complete Mailing Address: 405 N. Main St.,
Delphos, Allen Co., Ohio 45833
Contact Person: Tiffany Brantley 419-695-0015
ext. 126.
8. Complete Mailing Address of Headquarters or
General Business Office of Publisher: 405 N. Main
St., Delphos, Allen Co., Ohio 45833
9. Full names and complete mailing addresses
of publisher, editor, and managing editor: Publisher,
Murray Cohen, 405 N. Main St., Delphos, OH 45833;
Editor: Nancy Spencer, 405 N. Main St., Delphos,
OH 45833; Managing Editor: Nancy Spencer, 405 N.
Main St., Delphos, OH 45833.
10. Owner: Delphos Publications Co., Inc., 405 N.
Main St., Delphos, OH 45833; Delphos Herald, Inc.,
405 N. Main St., Delphos, OH 45833; Murray Cohen,
403 W. Fifth St., Delphos, OH 45833; Roberta Co-
hen, 125 Dunn Ave., Stamford, CT 06905; Jennifer
Shneiderman, 6606 W. Fifth St., Los Angeles, CA
90048.
11. Known Bondholders, Mortgages, and other
security holders owning or holding 1 percent or more
of total amount of bonds, mortgages, or other securi-
ties: None
12. Tax Status: Has not changed during preceding
12 months.
13. Publication Title: Delphos Daily Herald
14. Issue date for circulation data below: 9/14/12
15. Extent and Nature of Circulation; Average no.
Copies each issue during preceding 12 months; no.
Copies of single issue published nearest to filing
date
a. Total Number of copies 3010 3000
b. Paid circulation (by mail and
outside the mail)
1. Mailed outside-county, paid
Subscriptions stated on PS
Form 3541 (include paid
Distribution above nominal rate,
Advertiser’s proof copies, and
Exchange copies) 59 57
2. Mailed in-county paid subscriptions
Stated on PS form 3541 60 53
3. Paid distribution outside the mails
including sales through dealers and
Carriers, street vendors, counter
sales, and other paid distribution
Outside USPS® 2480 2472
4. Paid Distribution by other classes
Of mail through the USPS 0 0
c. Total paid distribution 2599 2582
d. Free or nominal rate distribution
1. Free or nominal rate outside-county
Copies included on PS form 3541 0 0
2. Free or nominal rate in-county
copies included on PS Form 3541 0 0
3. Free or nominal rate copies mailed
At other classes through the USPS 81 108
4. Free or nominal rate distribution
outside the mail 182 182
e. Total free or nominal rate
Distribution 263 290
f. Total distribution 2862 2872
g. Copies not distributed 148 128
h. Total 3010 3000
i. Percent paid 91% 90%
16. Publication of statement of ownership: if the
publication is a general publication, publication of
this statement is required. Will be printed in the
9/24/12 issue of this publication.
17. Signature and title of editor, publisher,
business manager or owner: Ray Geary, general
manager.
Date: 9/20/12
I certify that all information furnished on this form is
true and complete. I understand that anyone who
furnishes false or misleading information on this
form or who omits material or information requested
on the form may be subject to criminal sanctions
(including fines and imprisonment) and/or civil sanc-
tions (including civil penalties).
2012 Chevrolet Captiva 14K mi. ................ 12I96
2012 Chevrolet Cruze ............................ 12G51A
2012 Chevrolet Captiva Sport Fleet ..... 12I96
2012 Chevrolet Impala ........................... 12D39
2012 Chevrolet Impala LTZ ................... 12F69
2012 Chevrolet Malibu ........................... 12C24
2011 Chevrolet Impala LT ...................... 12D33
2011 Buick Regal CXL ........................... 12G20
2011 Chevrolet Impala LT ...................... 12D35
2011 Chevrolet Impala LT ...................... 12G55A
2011 Chevrolet Impala LT ...................... 11K152
2011 Chevrolet Malibu ........................... 11I125
2011 Chevrolet Silverado 1500 ............. 12B12
2011 Chevrolet Traverse 8 pass. .......... 12I94
2011 Chevrolet Silverado LTZ ............... 12H90
2010 Chevrolet Avalanche LTZ ............. 12I95
2010 Chevrolet Equinox LT ................... 12F71
2010 Chevrolet Impala LT ..................... 12E58
2010 Chevrolet Impala LT ..................... 11I108
2010 Chevrolet Malibu LT ..................... 12G76
2009 Buick Lacrosse CXL ..................... 12A1
2009 Chevrolet HHR .............................. 12I93
2009 Chevrolet Impala LT ..................... 12H82A
2009 Pontiac G6 ..................................... 12E66
2009 Ford Focus .................................... 12E65
CHEVROLET • BUICK
1725 East Fifth Street, Delphos
VISIT US ON THE WEB @ www.delphachevy.com
Sales Department
Mon. & Wed. 8:30 to 8:00
Tues., Thurs.
& Fri. 8:30 to 5:30;
Sat. 8:30 to 1:00
IN DELPHOS 419-692-3015 TOLL FREE 1-888-692-3015
Service - Body Shop - Parts
Mon., Tues., Thurs.
& Fri. 7:30 to 5:00
Wed. 7:30 to 7:00
Closed on Sat.
2008 Buick Enclave CXL ....................... 12H78
2008 Buick Lucerne CXL ....................... 12F50A
2008 Chevrolet HHR .............................. 12G73A
2008 GMC Envoy Denali ........................ 11K154
2008 Pontiac G6 ..................................... 12E67
2008 Chrysler Aspen ............................. 12H85
2008 Hyundai Sonata ............................ 12B109B
2007 Chrysler Town & Country LWB ... 12H88
2007 Buick Rendezvous CX .................. 11L163
2007 Chevrolet Avalanche LT ............... 12E61
2007 Chevrolet Colorado Z71 4X .......... 12D32
2006 Chevrolet Trailblazer .................... 12D59
2005 Buick Rendezvous CX .................. 12F70
2004 Chevrolet Silverado 4X4 .............. 12H74A
2004 Pontiac Montana ........................... 12H91
2003 Buick Park Avenue ....................... 12I98
2003 Dodge Ram 3/4 ton 4x4 ....................... 12I92A
2003 Chevrolet Silverado 1500 4X4 ..... 12H68A
2003 Chevrolet Trailblazer .................... 12E42A
2003 Ford Explorer ................................ 12F42B
2001 Ford Focus .................................... 12H92A
2000 Pontiac Grand Prix ....................... 12E33C
1998 Chevrolet Blazer ........................... 07H53A
1998 Chevrolet Lumina ......................... 12H96A
1966 Buick 225 Electra .......................... 06G134
Stock #
PREOWNED VEHICLES
ALL NEW! FUN TO DRIVE!
GREAT FUEL ECONOMY
2013
CHEVY
SPARK
1.2 4 cyl., front wheel drive,
aluminum wheels, rear
spoiler, daytime
running lamps, MyLink
stereo w/bluetooth &
Pandora, smart phone
compatible with 7” color
touch screen. Steering
wheel radio controls,
PW, PL, remote entry, cruise
control, air, theft deterrent
system, stable track, stability
control, 10 air bags.
ALL THIS ONLY
$
14,495
w/5 spd. manual transmission
ONLY
$
15,420
with automatic transmission
up t o
38
MPG EPA MILEAGE RATING
ONLY 2
AVAILABLE
or
ORDER
YOURS
TODAY
SERVICE DIRECTORY
001

Card Of Thanks
THANK YOU to all who
sent cards, offered best
wishes or came to cele-
brate with us on our
Golden Wedding Anniver-
sary. Each of you have
touched our life in a spe-
cial way throughout the
years. Our thanks to Fr.
Chris, the men’s choir &
those who helped with the
beautiful mass of thanks-
giving. Also thanks to Ben,
Rick, Mike B. and all the
KofC crew for a job well
done.
May the Lord bless each
of you.
Leo & Gloria Wrasman
FOUND: YOUNG White
German Shepherd. Found
sout h of Del phos.
419-203-9440. Call to
identify.
010

Announcements
ACCEPTING
CHILDREN 3-5
Kreative
Learning
Preschool
340 W. Fifth St.
Delphos, OH
45833
419-695-5934
ENROLL TODAY
ADVERTISERS: YOU can
place a 25 word classified
ad in more than 100 news-
papers with over one and
a half million total circula-
tion across Ohio for $295.
It's easy...you place one
order and pay with one
check t hrough Ohi o
Scan-Ohi o St at ewi de
Classified Advertising Net-
work. The Delphos Herald
advertising dept. can set
this up for you. No other
classified ad buy is sim-
pler or more cost effective.
Call 419-695-0015, ext
138.
ON STATE RT. 309 - ELIDA
419-339-6800
We Have:
• Grass Seed
• Top Soil • Fertilizer
• Straw
040

Services
LAMP REPAIR
Table or floor.
Come to our store.
Hohenbrink TV.
419-695-1229
080

Help Wanted
CDL-A DRIVERS for de-
livery route and shuttle,
based in Delphos. 1yr and
50,000mi CDL-A experi-
ence required. Full-Time
with full benefits, 401K,
health and more.
Apply today at
www.liparifoods.com
or send resume to:
craig_spenney
@liparifoods.com
HELP WANTED: Experi-
enced Automated Embroi-
dery Machine Operator.
Part Time. Excellent work-
ing conditions. Reply to:
Kchenille
P.O #184
Middle Point, OH 45863
HIRING DRIVERS
with 5+ years OTR experi-
ence! Our drivers average
42cents per mile & higher!
Home every weekend!
$55,000-$60,000 annually.
Benefits available. 99% no
touch freight! We will treat
you with respect! PLEASE
CALL 419-222-1630
LOCAL TRUCKING com-
pany currently has a posi-
tion open for a multi-tal-
ented individual. Specifi-
cally what we are looking
for is a well rounded per-
son in the trucking indus-
try that has experience in
Safety/Human Resource
duties. The Safety Direc-
tor is responsible for audit-
ing driver’s log for compli-
ance issues & inputting
the information into our
system. This person must
also be able to handle
H.R. tasks such as work-
ing with unemployment
claims and BWC issues.
We offer a competitive
wage as well as offer
health, dental and vision
insurance. If interested
please apply in person at
Dancer Logistics, Inc. be-
tween the hours of 9am
and 3pm daily, 900 Gres-
sel Drive, Delphos, Ohio
45833 – EOE
080

Help Wanted
WORKING
MANAGER
Thermo King of
Delphos has an
opening for a Full Time
Parts Department
Manager.

If you are a team player
with a self starter
attitude, excellent
communications and
phone skills, computer
literacy (Excel, etc), email
your resume to:
careers@tkofohio.com
Excellent fringe
and wage package
commensurate with
experience,
training, and skills.
120

Financial
IS IT A SCAM? The Del-
phos Herald urges our
readers to contact The
Better Business Bureau,
( 419) 223- 7010 or
1-800-462-0468, before
entering into any agree-
ment involving financing,
business opportunities, or
work at home opportuni-
ties. The BBB will assist
in the investigation of
these businesses. (This
notice provided as a cus-
tomer service by The Del-
phos Herald.)
270

Auctions
VISA
MC
DISCOVER
PUBLIC
AUCTION
Every Saturday
at 6pm
Large Variety of
Merchandise
Everyone Welcome
Porter Auction
19326 CO. Rd. 60
Grover Hill, OH
For info call
(419) 587-3770
290

Wanted to Buy
Raines
Jewelry
Cash for Gold
Scrap Gold, Gold Jewelry,
Silver coins, Silverware,
Pocket Watches, Diamonds.
2330 Shawnee Rd.
Lima
(419) 229-2899
300

Household Goods
FOR SALE: Maytag Dryer
$75. Phone 419-695-2881
340

Garage Sales
411 & 427 W. 1st St.
Thurs. 9/27 & Fri. 9/28
9am-6pm. Golf clubs,
carts, ki tchen i tems,
Chr i st mas, assor t ed
crafts, ice fishing sled
shelter, seated walker, bi-
cycle.
550

Pets & Supplies
FREE: 2 indoor kittens,
about 3 months old.
1-Black, 1-Gray with bal-
ance problems. Tame,
f r i endl y & pl ayf ul .
419-695-3403
• Pet Food
• Pet Supplies
• Purina Feeds
419-339-6800
On S.R. 309 in Elida
590

House For Rent
2 BEDROOM, 1Bath
house available soon. No
pets. Call 419-692-3951
2 BR, 709 Jackson St.,
$495 monthly plus de -
posit. 419-996-9870
600

Apts. for Rent
1BR APT for rent, appli-
ances, electric heat, laun-
dry room, No pets.
$425/month, plus deposit,
water included. 320 N.
Jefferson. 419-852-0833.
1BR APT. $300/mo. plus
deposit. 128 N. Jefferson.
Call 419-642-6535
2 BEDROOM ranch du-
plex in Delphos. $415/mo.
NO PETS. Newly updated.
Cal l f or det ai l s
419-286-2816
620

Duplex For Rent
2 BDRM Duplex for rent.
St ove, r ef r i ger at or ,
washer/dryer, dishwasher,
all electric, $450/mo. and
deposit and utilities. No
pets. 567-204-0347
810

Auto Repairs/
Parts/Acc.
Midwest Ohio
Auto Parts
Specialist
Windshields Installed, New
Lights, Grills, Fenders,Mirrors,
Hoods, Radiators
4893 Dixie Hwy, Lima
1-800-589-6830
840

Mobile Homes
1 BEDROOM mobile
home for rent. Ph.
419-692-3951.
RENT OR Rent to Own. 2
bedroom, 1 bath mobile
home. 419-692-3951.
920

Free & Low Price
Merchandise
FREE WOOD for camp-
fires and kindling. Behind
Westrich Furniture
005

Lost & Found
020

Notice
IS YOUR
AD HERE?
Call today
Classifieds Sell
Shop Herald
Classifieds for
Great Deals
A MALE DASHSHUND was
found Sunday evening near
the Creamery in Delphos.
He is wearing a thin blue
collar and a flea collar.
Call 419-695-0116.
R
E
N
TE
D
010

Announcements
BEETLE BAILEY
SNUFFY SMITH
BORN LOSER
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
BIG NATE
FRANK & ERNEST
GRIZZWELLS
PICKLES
BLONDIE
HI AND LOIS
Tuesday Evening September 25, 2012
8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30 12:00 12:30
WPTA/ABC Dancing/Stars Private Practice Local Nightline Jimmy Kimmel Live
WHIO/CBS NCIS NCIS: Los Angeles Vegas Local Late Show Letterman Ferguson
WLIO/NBC The Voice Go On Normal Parenthood Local Tonight Show w/Leno J. Fallon
WOHL/FOX New Girl Ben-Kate New Girl Mindy Local
ION Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Flashpoint Flashpoint
Cable Channels
A & E Storage Storage Storage Storage Shipping Shipping Shipping Shipping Storage Storage
AMC Four Brothers GoodFellas
ANIM Tanked: Unfiltered Tanked Tanked Tanked: Unfiltered Tanked
BET Caught Up Get Rich or Die Wendy Williams Show
BRAVO Housewives/NYC Flipping Out Flipping Out Happens Flipping Out NYC
CMT Reba Reba Gridiron Gang Bayou Bayou
CNN Anderson Cooper 360 Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 E. B. OutFront Piers Morgan Tonight
COMEDY Work. Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Brickle. Daily Colbert Tosh.0 Brickle.
DISC Yukon Men Yukon Men Bering Sea G. Yukon Men Bering Sea G.
DISN Shake It Tinker Bel Jessie Phineas Good Luck Shake It Wizards Wizards
E! Fashion Police Kardashian Jonas Jonas Chelsea E! News Chelsea
ESPN World/Poker World/Poker Baseball Tonight SportsCenter SportsCenter
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FAM Time Wife The Notebook The 700 Club Prince Prince
FOOD Cupcake Wars Chopped Chopped Chopped Chopped
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HIST Pawn Pawn Top Gear Cnt. Cars Cnt. Cars Top Gear Pawn Pawn
LIFE Dance Moms Dance Moms Dance Moms Dance Moms Dance Moms
MTV Mean Girls Mean Girls Awkward.
NICK Full Hse. Full H'se Full Hse. Full Hse. The Nanny The Nanny Friends Friends Friends Friends
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SHOW Twilight: New Moon Twil: Eclipse Gigolos
©2009 Hometown Content, listings by Zap2it
Monday Evening September 24, 2012
8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30 12:00 12:30
WPTA/ABC Dancing/Stars Castle Local Nightline Jimmy Kimmel Live
WHIO/CBS How I Met Partners 2 Broke G Mike Hawaii Five-0 Local Late Show Letterman Ferguson
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Monday, September 24, 2012 The Herald – 3B
Tomorrow’s Horoscope
By Bernice Bede Osol
www.delphosherald.com
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2012
A number of factors that are
presently hidden from you will
emerge and come into play in the
year ahead. They will have a big role
in helping you advance your interests,
especially those that are of a material
rather than an esthetic nature.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- If
you make it obvious to your associate
that the good things you want for
yourself you want for him or her as
well, you’ll be more successful in
your dealings.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22)
-- A positive event will give you
a new perspective on a situation
that you have thus far viewed
negatively. You’ll now be able to see
opportunities where you previously
only saw opposition.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec.
21) -- You’ve been doing things the
same old way, and it hasn’t been
working. Your present conundrums
call for fresh, innovative thinking;
don’t be afraid to shake things up.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) -- Advice from a friend, albeit
it well intentioned, will not be on
par with your own thinking when it
comes to matters that pertain to your
reputation or material success.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19)
-- An elusive and hard-to- access
person whom you’ve been trying
to contact regarding an important
matter is likely to be available. Try
again to open up a valuable line of
communication.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) --
Things that you come up with on your
own are not likely to be as rewarding
as something that has been arranged
for you by another. Stick with your
best option.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) -- A
couple of friends of yours who aren’t
getting along with one another might
use you as their intermediary. Don’t
take sides or pick a favorite.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) --
For the first time, your perseverance
and fortitude will begin paying off
regarding an endeavor that you’ve
been working hard on. A friend
will get it rolling with some nice
comments.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- If
ou are feeling luckier than usual, it’s
probably predicated upon some solid
justification. However, even if it’s
not, positive thinking will go a long
way toward improving your chances
for success.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) --
A project that you’ve been dedicating
yourself to for some time will take
a big turn for the better owing to
favorable external factors. Capitalize
on these prevailing circumstances.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- You
could be exceptionally lucky in
partnership arrangements for both
social and commercial purposes. This
will be especially true when your ally
is someone of the opposite gender.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
-- Tried, true and traditional tactics
are the ones that will bring you the
kind of results you’ll want in your
financial affairs. Any departure from
these proven procedures will be less
effective.
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER
26, 2012
Take the necessary time in the
year ahead to closely examine things
that have proven to be unfulfilling.
Until you rid yourself of your
albatrosses, you are likely to remain
way off track. There will be nothing
to gain but more encumbrances.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) --
Succumbing to instant gratification
could be one of your biggest
problems. You are likely to regret it if
you spend more than you should on a
whim of the moment.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22)
-- Unless you want to turn your
household into a camp with several
warring factions, be careful not to
bring up any controversial issues.
You’ll only have yourself to blame if
war breaks out.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec.
21) -- Shelve, at least for the next
few days, certain tasks you find to
be distasteful. Any jobs you perform
under a cloud will have to be redone
in the near future.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
-- Generally, you are a rather prudent
and cautious person when it comes to
your financial affairs. Know now that
the day could tempt you to take some
unwise financial risks.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19)
-- Don’t let your ego dominate your
common sense in ways that make you
feel that you’ll lose face if you aren’t
No. 1 at all times. Overwhelming
pride is self-defeating.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20)
-- Although normally your intuition
is exceptionally reliable and can be
helpful in giving you great insight,
pride could override it and lead you
far astray.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) --
It’s nice to do someone a favor, but
be careful that you don’t unwittingly
let it take money out of your pocket,
unless, of course, the recipient is
someone near and dear and you don’t
mind doing so.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
-- Being hasty or impulsive when
putting plans together or deciding
an important issue with another will
weaken your position, not improve
it. Give your ideas the time they
deserve.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) --
Taking on an assignment that is way
over your head is not only downright
foolish, it could be harmful. You
might end up having a tough time
crawling out of the hole you put
yourself in.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) --
Once you start to point out the faults
of your friends, no matter how well
intended you are, your popularity
might take a huge hit.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- If
your tastes are totally different from
your mate’s, it’s best not to make
any expensive purchases without the
input of your better half.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) --
Think before opening your mouth,
especially when making an appraisal
of another’s efforts. If you can’t be
tactful, don’t say anything at all.
COPYRIGHT 2012 United Feature Syndicate,
Inc.
2
4B – The Herald Monday, September 24, 2012
www.delphosherald.com
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