Box# 31

Folder# 618
Word's Fair:
Newsletters ( 4)
May ,1964
NEW YORK
ROBERT F. WAGNER,
MAYOR OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK
ELEANOR CLARK FRENCH,
NEW YORK CITY COMMIIIIONIER TO THE UNITED NATIONI
OFFERS

Vol. 2: No .. 5
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May, 1964
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Fa·
orkers are already aware of the impact of the World·s Fa1r
on the C1ty. One of its major man1festations is the increase
in traffic. Department of Traffic estimates that an addi-
tional 25,000 to 50,000 cars will come into New York every day.
We urge you, therefore, to be particularly mindful of the traf-
fic regulations. Doui· le parking is one of the chief causes of
tra fhc tie-ups. On Third Avenue, for instance, each lane
carries 800 cars per hour at peak times. If a lane is blocked
by a double parked car, the efficiency of the street is de-
creased by 35%. In addition, double pdcking constitutes a se-
rious accident hazard: it reduces drivers' visibility, hinders
emergency vehicles and endangers the driver of the double parked
car who might have to get out in the middle of the street.
A major problem area in this respect seems to be Third Avenue
between 46th and 48th Streets Our Traffic Department is now
conducting a survey of the neighborhood and will attempt to
provide more space for DPL cars. We appreciate your cooperation.
We are enclosing a copy of the World·s Fair Subway published
by the New York City Trans1t Authority, giving subway routes to
the Fair, and At Your Service. a helpful booklet issued by the
Police Department. Add1tional copies of these publications may
be obtained by calling this The Map is also available
at subway stations.
The World's Fair is a private, profit-making corporation which
is not under the jurisdiction of the City government in any way.
This Office, therefore, is not in a position to arrange for any
special privileges or programs for United Nations personnel with
respect to the Fair. If you wish to make such arrangements,
please call Mr. Gates Davison or Mr. Sneed Khan at WF 4-5383.
With regard to City Departments. we are ready, as always, to be
of help to you in every way ;;ossible. l.Ve are delighted to welcome
to New York City Jr,y c::f '/OUr cnileagues who are here for the World's
Fair: and shall be haP!''!· .1po.-. rtcq•Jcst, to arrange visits to City
Departments and projects.
r:leanor Cle:cf.: F.cench

ou :ce of t.ht> r•:ay·'r
·, 1 ' t : 1 . ' .
r: .Y. uvw-
1;. s. r-1iss ion to the United Nations
7'':9 "Jr.1. ted Nations Plaza, Room 112
York, N.Y. 10017
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REMARKS OF
ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT OF
THE NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR
1964-1965 CORPORATION
AT THE OPENING OF THE
FIFTIETH ANNIVERSARY CONVENTION
OF THE
AMALGAMATED CLOTHING WORKERS
OF AMERICA AFL-CIO
SINGER BOWL
FLUSHING MEADOW
SATURDAY MORNING, MAY 9, 1964
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President johnson, Mr. Potofsky and Friends,
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Some of my most cherished recollections as a
public official are rooted in working with the
)
great needle trades on civic projects in which
the unions have combined concern for their own
members with a generous regard for others. This
,il
has been particularly true in the case of coopera-
rive housing, the best hope of comfortable, a mac-
tive middle income shelter
under other than

exclusive public auspices.
I am sure Jack Potofsky will not resent it if
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on this occasion, and in the presence of so many
of his members, I address him as an enlightened
non-profit capitalist. The unions today are big
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business.
They have their own management
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problems. They are among our leading prag-
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matists.
The Fair welcomes the Amalgamated on the
occasion of half a century of distinguished serv-
ice and urges your members to spread themselves
over Flushing Meadow to visit our pavilions, .i,
v
exhibits, shows and entertainments, foreign and
domestic. We have attempted to assemble here
the best the world has to offer in free competi-
tion, without the trappings of diplomacy. At this , .
.
Olympics of progress and achievement we de-
voutly hope that new friendships, based on our
common humanity and need, will be formed and
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cemented, and that as a result peace will be
brought nearer to a torn and troubled world.
0 1964 New York World's Fair 1964-196'
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REMARKS OF
ROBERT MOSES
CHAIRMAN OF
THE TRIBOROUGH BRIDGE
AND TUNNEL AUTHORITY
AT A LUNCHEON OF THE
NATIONAL HIGHWAY USERS
AT THE
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INDONESIAN PAVILION REST AU RANT
WORLD'S FAIR
FLUSHING MEADOW
FRIDAY, MAY 8, 1964
12:15 P.M.
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0 1964 New York World's Fair 1964-1965 Corporation
I gather that my role here is by a few words to
pave the way for more detailed examination of ar·
terial road problems in the motor age. At the risk
of being charged with dogmatism and in the interest
of brevity, I suggest that we attempt to agree on a
few underlying facts and principles to serve as a
basis for a realizable program.
These seem to be the ten underlying facts:
1. We live in an increasingly motorized civiliza·
tion.
2. The car with internal combustion in its
various manifestations is here to stay and must
somehow be accommodated.
3. Manufacture of cars is one of our biggest
industries and employers of labor. It must increase.
It is indispensable. Its diminution would cause seri·
ous maladjustments in our economy.
4. Cars must have good roads to ride on, and
the building of roads must catch up and keep pace
with the output of cars. We have not yet caught up.
We are behind and shall keep losing ground unless
we act fast. Congestion is here. Strangulation is not
far off.
The number of motor vehicles now registered
in the country, an estimate made by the U. S.
Bureau of Public Roads, in round figures, is 69,-
000,000 passenger cars and taxis and 13,500,000
trucks and buses. Production increases gradually at
about the rate of 2V2% a year. A larger proportion
of cars is scrapped each year. The net result is a
gradual increase in registration of about 2,000,000
a year. Total national registrations of passenger
cars in 1970 will be about 83,500,000 as against
less than 70,000,000 today.
The top car makers have at last waked up. Their
lively exhibits at the New York World's Fair amply
demonstrate alertness. The indifference and indeed
hostility of the thirties and forties are gone. It is
accepted doctrine now that a car without a road is
as futile as a ship without an ocean or a plane
without air and is kin to the proverbial reveler all
dressed up but with no place to go.
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5. The car owner and motorist is paying the bill
directly or He must be prepared to pay
even more, bur should be guaranteed against large
diversions for other purposes. About $3,000,000,
000 a year has been going into the Federal highway
aid trust fund. Increasing taxes to provide a 50%
increase in federal aid from 1964 to 1970 would be
relatively simple. The main revenue flows from
the tax on gasoline. If this tax were increased by
50% of the present rare, this would do. This in-
crease in taxes would bring in some $4,500,000,000
a year now which would be increased in 1970 by
some 14% to 20%. The maximum might be over
$5,000,000,000 a year. Federal aid would be in-
creased from the 1963 allocation of $3,300,000,000
to $4,500,000,000.
6. Federal aid of for main arteries of a
regional, metropolitan and continental character is
fully justified. The fifty-fifty system should be made
70 and 30. This is indispensable to progress.
7. Public authorities financed by prudent in-
vestors are required for many bridges, runnels and
thruways to supplement government funds, expe-
dite work and avoid unimaginative, routine bu-
reaucracy.
8. Commuter mass transportation by rail should
be coordinated with highway as well as air and
water transport, but no good purpose is served by
attempts to consolidate all transport agencies under
one administrative head nationally or regionally.
In recent years the railroads have not produced
leaders with the ingenuity, courage and pioneer
spirit of their founders.
We must use the pragmatic approach to im-
proved commuter rail service-perhaps by extension
of the public authority device-at any rate, with
complete frankness and cold arithmetic. If the
railroads are to be further subsidized and sup-
ported, they must produce convincing proof of a
new attitude. Meanwhile, the sideline pundits must
abandon their demand for one Big All-Embracing
Elephantine Transportation Monopoly operated by
as yet undiscovered geniuses.
If it can be demonstrated that the highway users
should, as a matter of logic and enlightened self-
interest, contribute out of their tax payments to
help specific railroads in special cases, I believe
that car drivers and owners can be persuaded to
take a large view of the entire rransportation prob-
lem and help such railroads in exceptional instances
to help themselves. Such a broad viewpoint should
not, however, be extended to justify all sorts of
handouts or to attempt to encompass consolidated
transport administration.
9. The monorail has irs undeniable uses in spe-
cial settings, but it is no panacea for conventional
travel facilities. I am all for helicopters and hydro·
foils, but they are adjuncts, auxiliaries and inci·
dental aids in the big movements. Walking isn't
bad either and swimming is the best exercise. Still
you can't walk back and forth to work or use the
six beat crawl from beach to office. The turbine
engine car may make travel cheaper and smoother,
if not faster. It may prolong the life of the auto
and perhaps revolutionize fuel usage and manu-
facture, but one thing is quite certain. It will not
lessen the demand for good roads.
10. Pay no attention to slanted, irresponsible
criticism. I refer you to a horrid picture book en-
titled "God's Own Junkyard" by Peter Blake, Man-
aging Editor of the Luce Architectural Forum. By
selecting the most ugly, grotesque pictures of land
and city scapes, and skilfully avoiding evidences
of devoted, intelligent, courageous and successful
planning, Mr. Blake proves to the satisfaction of a
s?ur audience that our expressways, parkways,
nbbon parks and landscapes are exclusively the
result of unregulated private profit, that man-made
America is an unrelieved mess, that the so-called
esthetics and amenities have been entirely absent
and that only the Blakes can save us.
Blake has not examined factual, honest pictures of
progress. He has never visited pleasant scenes, even
those near his office. He manifestly doesn't know the
points of the metropolitan compass. He has never in
my rarher long experience offered a single constructive
suggestion in any specific instance in the field of major
arterial or other public improvements. Wholesale de-
nunciation, smearing and scorn have never built, im-
proved or saved anything yet. Something better is
owed to those who love the rocks, rills and templed
hills of our beloved country, who all their lives have
mer opposition and made sacrifices to produce results
that some miserable little scribbler and candid snap-
shot raker claims do not exist.
Based on these ten findings, what must we do? lr
is simple enough to state. Implementation, however,
is something else. The three levels of government,
the public authorities, the press, the manufacturers,
labor and the engineering societies must impress upon
the public the vital need of an expanded highway
program which will insure prompt location of all
major arteries, immediate acquisition of rights of
way, forthright plans to move people and business in
a humane, orderly and systematic way, and as early
a start on construction as increased appropriations
will permit. The picture which presents itself at the
moment is not pretty-slowdown in the federal pro-
gram, failure of many states to show initiative and
courage, municipal indifference and obstruction, add-
ing up to appalling waste through rising cost of land
and building in the very bed of rights of way.
We need that vaunted, phantom shelf of genuine
public works, not made work and boondoggling, ready
when a recession, automation and other temporary
threats to full employment become menacing. The
RFC and PW A of the thirties, including projects
largely but not wholly self-liquidating, left durable
facilities which are still in good order and use.
Road work must be planned in relation to housing,
recreation and business, bur balanced, semi-political
boards to insure cooperation are like all boards-long,
narrow and wooden. Genuine leaders can find ways
to work together without being shovelled inro new
administrative bureaucracies with fine sounding com-
prehensive objectives announced in the best Madison
Avenue tradition, a wonder for the proverbial nine
days.
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Why are these obvious realizable step-by-step ob-
jectives of metropolitan transportation improvements
neglected in favor of grandiose administrative mon-
strosities? In 1949 the Long Island Railroad was
forced into bankruptcy. In 1951 a commission of
three, on which I served with the late Judges Robert
P. Patterson and Charles C. Lockwood, recommended
to Governor Dewey converting the Long Island Rail-
road, a local commuter, neglected orphan of the
Pennsylvania system, into a genuine public authority.
Instead, a sort of bastard standby apology for an
aurhoriry was established to rehabilitate the road and
in 1954 it went back to the Pennsylvania with noble
stipulations, and a provtsiOn that tax exemption
would run our in 1966.
Meanwhile, the basic proposal of consolidation of
the Pennsylvania and New York Central systems,
which would offer an opportuniry to do something
constructive about commuter as well as continental
travel, has been the subject of hearings by Examiners
lasting 128 days, involving 36,000 pages of testimony,
and moulders in the Interstate Commerce Commis-
sion, one of those curious floating kidneys, neither
court nor executive agency, which bedevils the metab-
olism of the body politic. The rail applicants seem
incapable of either initiative or indignation and
become picaresque mendicants wailing up and down
the streets for handouts and showing their sores and
spavins at the entrances ro public buildings.
Let me give you another illustration of obstacles
piled up in front of public works: The Niagara im-
provement included power, parks, parkways, highways,
railroad grade eliminations and just about everything
else at the Niagara River and Gorge from Lake Erie
to Lake Ontario. In August 1956 the Power Authority
of New York applied to rhe Federal Power Com-
mission for a Niagara license. The Commission held
against it and refused even to consider the applica-
tion on irs merits. In June 1957 rhe Unired States
Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia re-
versed the Commission and ordered it to consider
rhe application. In August 1957 Congress passed
legislarion specifically directing the Commission to
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issue a license to the Authority. The Commission re-
fused to schedule hearings until the Fall of 195 7. Then
it consumed rwo months in hearings, took 4,000
pages of testimony and spent two more months de-
liberating to reach a compromise, the apparent pur-
pose of which was to placate obstructionists. The
result was to add $25,000,000 to the cost of the
project. In the Fall of 1958 after the United States
Court of Appeals ordered the Commission to make
findings on the Tuscarora Indian Reservation aspects,
it used up another six weeks in hearings, rook another
2,000 pages of testimony and spent another month
deliberating before making a 3 to 2 decision. Finally
in March 1960 the Supreme Court reversed the Court
of Appeals in the Indian case and the Commission's
findings became academic. The Power Authority at
last was able to build the project.
Let me turn now to land acquisition for highways.
Proper location of rights of way is almost never a
complex question until prolonged packed hearings,
fomented and stimulated opposition and pressure
politics enter into the dec1sion. Clearance of rights
of way is always tough and gets worse with rime.
Obvious, logical routes become dubious because of
understandably stubborn residents, encumbrances with
friends in high places and astronomical costs. In such
contexts compromises without principle and unhappy
alternatives are resorted to by timid officials. These
second-rare expedients show up later and become the
targets of critics who know nothing of rhe original
circumstances.
The Wrens and Baron Haussmanns, who stubborn-
ly cut wide swaths through the accumulations of cen-
turies in old cities, are few and far between. A stomach
for fighting and thirst for martyrdom are rare among
bureaucrats, bur fortunately still appear at critical
rimes and in the oddest places. You can draw any
kind of picture you like on a clean slate and indulge
your every whim in the wilderness in laying out a
New Delhi, Canberra or Brazilia, but when you oper-
ate in an overbuilt metropolis you have to hack your
way with a meat axe. Do nut fall for rhe cliche that
fancy planners lay out entire communities on such
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clean slates. The framework, including arterial and
transportation as well as topographical and water
system, is very likely to come first. Industry and resi-
dence follow. It is the road builder who usually de-
termines what will come next. If he doesn't know
what will flow over his stone stream and crop up
beside it, he is a lousy road builder and should be
repairing holes in pavement.
Finally, traffic control, which is always in the end
a police problem, sf,ould be handled by the police,
work hours staggered, emphasis shifted from styling
to safety, safety regulations drastically raised and am-
plified and something like status, reward and respect
given to those who achieve measurable results.
Major roads are no incidental matter in planning.
The road system fixes the pattern of the future. It
touches life at all levels. It runs full tilt into taboos
and preJudices. And so it becomes harder and harder
to find men who can stand the gaff. How can com-
plete honesty and candor be expected in an atmos-
phere of small politics, expediency and the unwritten
l!lw, where there is a conspiracy of silence on contro-
versial questions, where "keep off the grass" and
"don't stick your neck our" signs abound, and the
unlit lamp and ungirt Join are standard equipment?
The solution of the road problem lies with men, not
with machines, methods, formulas, laws, trick financing
and magic.
Metropolitan and regional highway programs are
bedevilled by real estate and commercial promotion
campaigns, as well as legitimate engineering obstacles.
Because whale-shaped Long ! s i a n ~ runs out east into
the Atlantic, with its head in New York and its
fluked tail in New England, local boosters have con-
ceived the idea of nmning a causeway rwenry-rhree
miles long across the Sound to Connecticut and Rhode
Island. It would cost as much as over $300,000,000
of somebody's money at a time when every nickel in
sight for twenty or thirry years ahead is required to
finish projecred main east and west and north and
south arteries where the fast growing year round
population demands action. Years hence perhaps, bur
nor today.
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There could not conceivably be enough federal and
state money to build the chimerical New England
causeway, and no bankers or prudent investors in their
right minds would visualize sufficient reliable traffic
to make it attractive as an investment. On the basis
of conservative guessing, it would take about fifty
years to amortize this project. A car or truck driver
on a wintry night halfway across this trestle, with
Atlantic Ocean spray breaking over it and surrounded
by mist, sleet and gloom, would be just about the most
lonesome creature in the known world. This would
be a swell picture to offer a prudent investor in au-
thority bonds. At any rate, the Legislature has passed
a bill to investigate this subject and see what it is
all about.
Planners, professors, editors and pundits advocate
long-range, comprehensive and regional programs
with all the parts boldly proclaimed and integrated,
but they are usually silent when influential elected
officials shy away from sensible projects which at the
moment are politically embarrassing, and promise an-
other look after election when the public can more
safely be taken into their confidence. Builders with
ants in their pants and the itch for action, who lind
this stultifying and even maddening, are admonished
that this is the democratic process and little can be
done about it. As in so many contexts today, the
people ask for bread and they get a stone. They ask
for action and get committees, reports and oratory.
Our New York World's Fair, if it does nothing
else, will demonstrate new ideas, processes and mate-
rials and a welcome to youth and originality. The
withered hand and the hollow sounding ~ h e l l with the
echoes of the past in it, these can not any longer
dominate road building and transportation, or any
other modern building endeavor merely because they
represent tradition and experience. As Browning said,
"Greet the unseen with a cheer."
Immense, shattering changes are before us. The
turbine or jet car engine is in the offing with revolu-
tionary effects on design and fuel. Is it not a fact that
in most major revolutionary power changes involving
simplification and economy, the engneers often move
cautiously by temporary intermediate steps to what
is the obvious objective-for example, from propeller
to prop jet to jet instead of straight to jet? The auto
manufacturers have immense investments, commit-
ments and sales campaigns under way. They naturally
want to cushion the shock of invention.
Sounds engagingly simple, you will say. You will
recall the yarn about the cockroaches who, tired of
their contemptible place in the animal kingdom,
appointed a committee to wait on the head lion who
ran the great open spaces. The roaches complained
of their miserable crawling life. "Why," said the lion,
"don't you get yourselves wings like the grasshoppers
and fly through the air with the greatest of ease?"
"Thar's all very well," said the cockroach leader, "but·
how do we get the wings?" The lion roared at them,
"On your way, you silly insects. I gave you the idea.
Now you work out the details."
The derails, my friends, are for your subsequent
attention.
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THE
TEXAS
PAVILIONS
THE
MUSIC
HALL
AT THE NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR
WYNNE·COMPASS FAIR. INC, THE CHATHAM. SUITE 606. 33 EAST 48TH STREET. NEW YORK CITY 17, NEW YORK. PLaza 2·7810
Mr. Paul R. Screvane
Executive Committee
Fair Corporation
Administration Building
Flushing 52, New York
Dear Mr. Screvane:
May 15, 1964
We would be happy to have you, as a member of
the Executive Committee of the Fair, use the facilities of the
Astrojet Lounge at your convenience. The Skipper in charge has
been so instructed.
AGWJr:hw
ANGUS G WYNNE. JR . P 0 BOX 191. ARLINGTON. TEXAS. TELEPHONE 214 AN 2·3571
i
UN !.SPHERE

5/64-R65
LD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
FLUSHING 52, N.Y. • TELEPHONE· AREA CODE 212-WF 4-1964 • CABLE ADDRESS "WORLDSFAIR"
NEW YORK
onuu
.. EACE THROUGH
UNOEASTANOINQ
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NEWS:
REFER INQUIRIES TO:
Peter J, McDonnell
Je:rey Edelberg
Joyce Martin
Bill Whitehouse
YSJii A'l' WILt,
- WF 4-6531
• WF 4-6541
- WF 4-6543
- WF 4-6553
ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT
May 15, 1964
NEW XQRK 1 2 ~ 4 - 1 2 6 5 WORLD_!S FAIR NEWSLETTJm. NQ.t...l2
Announce Pavilion of Fine Art Opening Date ••••
Madonna and Child on view at Sudan Pavilion ••••
Rooketman Over Unisphere ••••
Alaskan Pavilion Opened •• ,.
Stanley Pinoh Honored ••••
"Tools for Freedom" Gift ••••
Fair is Fashion Showcase ••••
Dedication ot Indonesian Pavilion ••••
Sports Activity at the Fair ••••
Mr. Stokowski a Visitor ••••
A Pavilion of Fine Art, devoted to the works of living
American artists, will open at the New York World's Fair on June
16th. Although art works from all over the world, ancient and
modern, are displayed in many Fair pavilions, the new pavilion
will be an exclusive showcase for American artists currently
creating.
Works of 250 painters, sculptors, and graphic artists have
been selected for exhibition. This comprehensive show can be
viewed during the entire 1964 Fair season.
FROM: Wm. J. Donoghue Corporation
10 Columbus Circle, N. Y .C.
(more)
5/64-R65
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The pavilion, sponsored by the Long Island Art Center, will have
a 600-seat restaurant featuring international cuisine at popular
prices.
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Gov. Albertis s. Harrison, Jr., headed a large group of State
officials, legislators and members of the Virginians of New York
Society at the Virginia State Day ceremonies, May 13, at the Federal
Pavilion. The colorful event also marked the 357th anniversary of
the landing of the English colonists, first permanent settlers, at
Jamestown in 1607.
Jamestown Festival Park halberdiers in their striking uniforms
served as color guards. The 70-man Virginia Military Institute Glee
Club provided the music.
Gen .• William E. Potter, Executive Vice President of the Fair and
Ambassador Richard c. Patterson Jr., Chief or Protocol, officially
welcomed the party, then received by Ambassador Norman Winston, u.s.
Commissioner for the Federal Pavilion. Speaking on behalf of Fair
President Robert Moses, Gen. Potter also presented medallions to the
Governor and Mr. Lewis A. McMurran, Jr., Chairman of the Jamestown
Foundation.
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A 1300 year old painting of the Madonna and Child, one of the
earliest relics of Christianity in Africa, found recently in the
Republic of Sudan, is now on view at the Sudan Pavilion at the New
York World r s Pair .•
The nubian antiquity was unveiled at the Sudan Pavilion this week
by His Excellency Dr. Osman El Hadar!, Sudanese Ambassador to the u.s.,
and Governor Charles Poletti, the Fair r s Vice President for Inter-
national Affairs and Exhibits.
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Fair visitors viewed in astonishment last Wednesday (May 13) as
a man flew over the top of the Unisphere. The Rocketman was Robert
Courter, {better known as Col. Keds to American youngsters), who
performs his daring aeronautic exploits three times daily at
Leon1doft's "Wonder World" in the 10,000 seat amphitheatre in the
Lake Amusement Area.
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Wearing a 125-pound rocket belt designed by the u.s. and
developed by Bell Areosyatems Co., his flight from one side of the
135-foot Unisphere over the top for a perfect landing on the other
side, took 20 seconds. He is capable of flying 815 feet at speeds
up to 60-miles an hour with his equipment.
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Gov. William A. Egan officially opened the Alaskan Pavilion at
the New York World
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s Fair (Thursday, May 7) as several hundred Fair
vtsttors looked on. James J. O'Brien, Commissioner or Public Events
tor New York City, representing Mayor Wagner at the opening day cere•
montes, read a proclamation from the Mayor citing the day as Alaska
Reltef Day.
General William E. Potter, and William Berns, Vice President in
charge of Communications, greeted the Governor on behalf of the Fatr.
Nina Whaley, (Miss Alaska), will answer visitors' questions about
Alaska at the Pavilion.
The Governor plans to return with his family on July 13, which
will be Alaska Day at the Fair.
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Stanley Managing Director of the Festival of Gas Pavilion
was awarded a stlver medallion for meritorious service to the New York
1964-1965 World's Fair. He hes se .. •ved as chr.'lrman of th.e New York
World Is Fair Exhibito1•s'
The award was made ('i'D.'.t in a cer-emony at the
Festival of' Gas Pavili·:;n by l ..;nrt!n DL.:oc-:ctor of t!1e Fair's
Industrial Area. The m.edalllon was inscr.•tbed
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With af!'ect1on and

Mr. Finch was also General Manager of the Gas at the
1939-1940 World t s Fair.
Phyllis Adams, Assistant Director of Exhibitor Relations parti-
cipated 1n the ceremony.
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The India Pavilion at the New York World's Fatr was the acene of
a symboltc presentation this week.
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5/64-R65
-4-
Mansfield Sprague, Vice President of American Machine & Foundry,
Ino •• presented a 100-pound electronic tube to India's Consul-General
B. K. Roy.
The tube represents a gift of $50,000 worth or industrial equip•
ment to Indian research institutions to be made by "Tools :ror Freedom',
an organization of American manufacturers which for three years has
been sending industrial machinery gifts to underdeveloped countries.
---'0 ..
The New York World's Fair is, among other things, a fashion show-
case.
The latest summer dress fashions from New York designers were
paraded this week at the New York State Pavilion here. Some 60
daytime dresses, suits, coats, and evening gowns by designers Hattie
Carnegie, Hannah Troy
1
Gothe, Donald Brooks, Davidow, Jo Copeland,
and others, were shown to Fair visitors.
Although some or the models are now in New York's specialty shops,
many will not be available until August.
- 0 -
The Indonesian Pavilion at the New York World's Fair was dedicated
this week with appropriately colorful ceremony. Artists, dancers and
musicians appearing at the pavilion in national and regional dress
enacted, before the Temple Gate of the pavilion, a ceremony used by
natives of Bali to welcome honored guests. Dr. Chaerul Saleh, Deputy
Prime Minister of Indonesia, presided at the dedication.
- 0 -
Sports commanded considerable interest at the Fair in recent days.
The National A.A.U, Judo championships, held in the East for the first
time in their 12-year history, drew an estimated 40,000 spectators
during its two-day run, May 1··2, at the Fair's Pavilion. More than
200 entries from 15 countries vied for the six titles at stake.
Speed soccer. a new and exciting version of the fast indoor brand
of the booting sport
1
made its American debut on the macadam pitch of
Singer Bowl, May 1
1
under the floodlights. Teams from the German•
American and American Soccer Leagues participated in the trfple-headen
-more•
-5·
Other sports attractions included the appearance of the Milwaukee
Braves at the Bowl to autograph from baseballs to pieces
ot paper and Stan (The Man) Musial, Hall of Farner from the Carda, who
is ohat:t'Oian of the Presidentts Physical Fitness Committee. He dedi•
cated the Physical Fitness Display at the Monorail.
- 0-
East met West - in the musical sense - at the New York World's
Fair recently when American conductor Leopold Stokowski visited the
Indonesian Pav111on.
Mr. Stokowskt was entertained at a concert performance of an
Indonesian "Kerontjong" orchestra.
The tamed maestro said he a pro:round Western influence -
Portuguese - in the music cons1«a.PPd native to Indonesia·."
-c-
FIR RBLIASK
SUIDAY I MAY 17 . 1964
CITY IP' NIW nRK
IDP'r!CB: 81" TBJ!! MAYOR
Mayor Robert F. Wagner today anno'lm.ced the appointment ot
Jolln J. Bergen and Mrs. Mortinr!r W. Rodgers, as
ception Collllli ttee .
CoDIIIittee has been establ:l.shed
to provide an appropriate welcome f'or the unprecedented nUJIIber of'
disaitaries arriving in New York to attend the World's Fair.
Tke Mayor said that the Committee will consist of' voluateers
vlao will work with the Department of' Public lvents in welcamng
cliltiDiuialaed visitors f'roa the United States and troa abroad
Adairal :8ergen is Honorary Chairman ot the MadiSOD Square
Garden Cor.poration and Honorary ChairED. of the !Jotel Corporation
ot Aaltrica, am is a member of' nl.IID8rous civic, lllilitary ad
buaiDeee organizations.
Mrs • Rodgers has been a volunteer w1 th the City's Depart.errt;
ot Public Bwnts for the last ten years . She is ChainiBll o-r tae
Departlll!nt 's Jlospitality Committee.
# # #
fiJ0111 dulhwlty, Jtelifuntt
,AI.,. ffab

fftu:Jiun? JVIJUI 1!/t>J:
111 610·?11?- .ua •. uoo
fom-.$ f9-:...
GENERAl DIRECTOR
SUNDAY BUFFET LUNCHEON
Beginning Sunday, May 17, 1964 The Terrace Club is pleased to
announce a special Sunday Buffet Luncheon for members. This Buffet will be
served from 1:00 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. The cost is $5.50 per person. The Buffet
service will feature:
HOT:
Assorted Hor d'oeuvres
Fresh Tropical Fruits
Soup du Jour
Vichyssoise Madrilene en Gelee
Seafood Salad
Chicken Salad
Assorted Cold Meats
Sliced Tomatoes
Celery - Mixed Olives - Carrot Sticks
Cold Slaw Cucumber Salad
Mixed Green Salad
Cottage Cheese
(1) Roast Beef
au Gratin Potatoes
(2) Fricasse of Chicken
Boiled Rice
(3) Beef a la Deutsch
Buttered Noodles
Choice of Two Green Vegetables
Dessert au Buffet
Coffee Tea Milk
Iced Tea Iced Coffee
Members are again urged to make their reservations by calling Raymond,
Maitre d' Hotel at (212) 888-7340.
James Clark McGuire
General Director

Monday
May 18
Tuesday
.May 19
r.
Wednesday
May 20.
Thursday
May 21
Friday
May 22
Saturday
May 23
Tuesday
May 26
Thursday
May 28
Monday·
June 1
Wednesday
June 3
New York World's Fair Corporation
Official Women's Hospitality Center- Courtesy Purex
10:00 - 5:00
7:00 - 10:30pm
12:15 - 2:15pm
12:30 - 2:30pm
7:00 - 8:30pm
5:00 - 9:00pm
7:30pm
9:30- 12:00 n
5:00 - 9:30pm
11 :30am - 2:00
5:30 - 7:30pm
Evening
llam - 1:00
Calendar of Events
May 18 - June 17
Firm
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Tent.
Tent.
ization
Michigan Day .. Open House
N. Y. Chapter of Cornell Society
of Hotelmen (150)
Mrs. Bryant (22)
Association for Relief of Aged,
Respectable, Indigent Females
(60)
Borden
1
s (100)
Mr. Thorne (30)
Four Centuries of American
Masterpieces' Party (400)
(entire Penthouse)
Natl. Council of Negro Women (175)
Camp Fire Girls Board of
Directors ( 75)
Wamen' s American ORT (125)
Parker Pen (150)
Governor of Kentucky (200)
Franklin D. Roosevelt Chapter
Bnai Brith ( 75)
Friday
June 5
Saturday
June 6
Sunday
June 7
Monday
June 8
Tuesday
June 9
Wednesday
June 10
Thursday
June 11
Friday
June 12
Saturday
June 13
'
Calendar of Events
May 18 - June 17
5:30 -8:00pm
4:00 - 6:00pm
5:30 -9:30pm
1:00 -4:00pm
7 : 30 - 9 : 30pm
6:00 - 7:00pm
7:OOpm
11: 30am - 3pm
7:00 -, 10pm
12:00 - 3:OOpm
X
X
X
X
Tent.
X
Tent.
X
X
X
N. Y. Board of Trade ( 75)
General Federation of Women (350)
Honor day: "Women Who Have
Strengthened the Arm of
Liberty"
"Lovable" Exhibitor (100)
National Council of Catholic
Women (50)
Knickerbocker Business & Prof.
Women
1
s Club (150)
Committee on Women in Public
Relations (40)
Mr. Richard (150)
League of Women Voters (225)
Philippine National Day (26)
World's Fair sponsored event
G ~ ~ a t e r N. Y. Association of
Medical Record Librarians (50)
5/64-Rll3
UNISPHERE
0Ul61
ll
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PAR
FLUSHING 52, N.Y. • TELEPHONE· AREA CODE 212-WF 4·1964 • CABLE ADDRESS "WORLDSFA
PE4C£ THROUGH
UNO£RSTANOINO
__ ..
(@),.,... ........
NEWS:
REFER INQUIRIES TO:
Peter McDonnell
Jerome Edelberg
Joyce Martin
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
.. WF 4-6531
.. WF 4-6541
.. 4-6543
YORK WORLD'S FAIR, May 21 -- Vice Chairman George V.
McLaughlin of the Triborough Bridge and Tunnel Authority; Peter J.
Executive Director, and Othmar N. Ammann, noted bridge designer,
joined today in starting the final six-month countdown for completion
or the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge, the longest suspension bridge in the
world.
Mr. Reidy represented Robert Moses, Chairman or the Authority,
also President of the New York World's Fair 1964-1965 Corporation.
In a brief ceremony at the Fair's Administration Building, the
trio activated a clock at noon to tick off the days, hours, minutes
and seconds remaining until the Nov. 21st opening or the $325-millton
bridge. It was planned, financed and built by the Triborough Authority
to link Brooklyn and Staten Island acrose the Narrows at the entrance
to the New York harbor.
On April 1963, the late President John F. Kennedy activated
the same chronometer by dialing 1964 from a White House telephone, 365
days, 22 hours, 44 minutes and 29 seconds before the Fair's opening on
April 22nd.
The bridge has been hailed by Mr. Moses as a vital link in the
two-billion-dollar interstate highway system of the metropolitan area.
Opening in time to serve motorists in the second year of the World's
Fair, the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge is expected to carry 15 million
vehicles durtng tta ftrst year of operation.
FROM: Wm. J. Donoghue Corporation
10 Columbus Circle, N.Y.C.
# # #
5/64-Rll4
UN I SPHERE
01061
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
FLUSHING 52, N.Y. • TELEPHONE- AREA CODE 212-WF 4-1964 • CABLE ADDRESS "WORLDSFAIR"
P£ACE TtiAOUOH
UNDitRSTANOINO __ ..
Iii!) ..... - ...
NEWS:
REFER INQUIRIES TO:
Peter McDonnell
Jerome Edelberg
Joyce Martin
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
- WF 4-6531
- WF 4-6541
- WF 4-6543
WORLD'S FAIR SOLVES RE-ENTRY PROBLEM
NE

1 YORK WORLD'S FAIR, May 21 -- The daily admission ticket to
the World's Fair is 11\{e a membership to the "club
11
for the day.
Visitors who may 111ant to take in a ball game at Shea Stadium,
visit their yacht at the World's Fair Marina, or go back home for a
shower and a change of clothes, may do so without being penalized an
additional admission charge.
At all eight gates "black light" lamps identify all who have left
the Fair and told the gate guard of their intention to return later
the same day. The procedure is a familiar one to anyone who has
attended a race track, swimming pool, sports arena, or dance and left
to return within a limited time.
As you leave you tell the guard at the gate you will return later
in the day. He stamps your palm, the heel of your hand, the back of
your hand, or one side of your wrist with an invisible dye --
invisible, that is, except when held under a "black" or ultraviolet
light when you re-enter.
The dye ts absolutely harmless to the skin and clothing and will
not wash off. It wears off tn about twelve to sixteen hours, and
comes in blue or green.
The Fair uses tNelve different design symbols to stamp departing-
returning visitors, varying each day the color and the position in
which it is placed on the hand. The symbol, ink color, and position
is uniform at all eight gates throughout the day. This discourages
any possibility of anyone "beating" the system.
It also assures the visitor at the World's Fair a full day's
instruction, entertainment and fun.
FROM: Wm. J. Donoghue Corporation
10 Columbus Circle, N.Y.C.
If # #
UN I SPHERE
Ot861
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CO
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING M
FLUSHING 52, N.Y. • TELEPHONE- AREA CODE 212·WF 4-1964 • CABLE ADD SS "WORLDSFAIR"
~ C E T"ROUOH
UNDEReTANOINO
--· 8--...
NEWS:
REFER INQUIRIES TO:
Peter McDonnell
Jerome Edelberg
Joyce Martin
- HF 4-6531
- WF 4-6541
.. HF 4-6543
FOR RELEASE: AFTER NOON, FRIDAY, MAY 22, 1964
ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT
May 21, 1964
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR, May 22 -- Saturday at the World's Fair is
"Dartmouth College Day" at the New England States Exhibit.
It is also a day when jazz comes to the Fair in a big way. The
Travel and Transportation Pavilion in the Transportation Area will
present its Cavalcade of Custom Cars Show featuring bandleader-
vtbraphone s t a r ~ Lionel Hampton} trombonist, Tyree Glenn, or the CBS
Jack Sterling Radio ShOWj piano-organ star, Dick Hyman, of NBC's Mitch
Miller TV Show and George Jessel as M.c. Shows are scheduled at l, 3
1
5, 7 and 9 P.M.
The "Dartmouth College Day" ceremonies at the New England States
Exhibit starts at 11:30 A.M. when Nichol Sandoe, class of 19, president
of the Dartmouth Alumni Association of New Yorlc, will introduce
Dartmouth president, John Sloan Dickey. The "Injunaires," a nine-man
choral group, will present a program of folk and jazz music after the
ceremonies, and again at 1:30 and 3:30 P.Mo
There will be meetings or the National Council of Negro Women at
10 A.M. and at 3 P.M. in the Official \vomen
1
s Hospitality Center,
Penthouse or the Better Living Center,
It

Related Interests

lill also be the first day of the National AAU Junior Weight-
lifting Championship to be held in the World's Fair Pavilion from noon
to 10 P,M,
On Saturday, the United Veterans Council of Queens presents its
"Spectacular" in Singer Bo

Related Interests

11. The program includes a 3-1/2 hour
Pageant of Drums at 1 P.M.; a Musical Interlude between 4:30 and 5 P.M.
and an International Dance Festival from 5 to 9 P.M.
FROM: Wm. J. Donoghue Corporation
10 Columbus Circle, N.V.C.
{more)
5/64•Rll2
Two Rotary Clubs from Chester, 798, of Chester, C o n n , ~ and 747
1
of Cheater, N. J., will co-host a luncheon at the Texas Pavilion
Restaurant at noon.
Mayor Rob Basso will preside at "Point Pleasant Beach Day"
testtvittes ~ n the New Jersey Tercentenary Pavilion at noon.
"Round the World" a musical program in honor of all the countries
represented at the Fair will be presented at the Florida Pavilion by
the Edgewater H.s. Band of Orlando, Fla., at l and 7:30 P.M.
More band music wtll be offered by the Joliet Public School Band
of Joliet, Ill, at the River Common at 2:30 P.M., and by the Virgin
Ialands•Caribbean Band (Christiansted H,S, Band, St. Croix, V, I.) at
the Tiparillo Band Pavilion at 4 P.M. At 7 P,M. the Colonial Ancient
Fife and Drum Corps or Bethpage, N. Y, will perform at Enterprise
common. The Male Chorus of the AC Spark Plug Division of General
Motors will gtve a one-hour concert at River Common at 8:30 P,M.
Sam Hurt, the New York Giants famous linebacker, will be Sports
Host at the Schaefer Center for 2•1/2 hour sessions at noon and at
4:30 P.M.
At 4 P.M. at the Federal Pavilion there will be a dedication of
a Love Tree for Children of the World, courtesy of Norman K. Winston,
Commissioner, in cooperation with the N. Y. Junior Citizens Festival
ot the Arts, sponsored by the Community and Allied Arts League,
through whose director, Laura King, the Love Tree was proposed.
# # #
5/64-R109
UHISPHERE
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORAT
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEAD
FLUSHING 52, N.Y. • TELEPHONE· AREA CODE 212·Wf 4-1964 • CABLE ADDRESS "WO OS
HAetTHI'IOUOH
\INOtRa'tANDINO
--· 9--..
NEWS:
REFER INQUIRIES TO:
Peter McDonnell
Jerome Edelberg
Joyce Martin
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
__.... .. .----
May 21, 1964
- WF 4-6531
- \A!F 4-6541
- \·JF 4-6543
YORK WORLD'S FAIR, May 21 -- The Worldls Fair attendance hac;l
taken a sharp upturn as of May 18, according to a report issued by
Erwin Witt, Fair Comptroller.
During the preceding ten days, total· attendance at the Fair
amounted to 1
1
844,683 for a daily average of 184,468. the first
two weeks of the Fair, total attendance was 1,982,518 with an averAge
daily figure 141,608.
The daily increase of 42,860 represents an average increase of
35 per cent.
The rtse in the scale of attendance will not hit its peak until
aohools close ror the summer and the vacation season.begins.
This trend indicates to Fair officials that there will be a much
greater in daily attendance.
FROM: Wm. J. Donoghue Corporation
10 Columbus Circle, N. Y .C.
# # #
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964·1965 CORPORATION
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
"'CACE THIOOUOH
UNDE._...ANDINO
WORLD'S FAIR, N.Y. 11380
Mr. J"ohn 1. Witowski
Saxton
Pennsylvania
Dear :Mr. Witowski:
AREA Coot 212-WF 4-1984
May 21, 1964
I was enormously pleased by your letter of
CABLI!: WORLDSFAJR
ROBERT MOSES
!'RESIDENT
May 19th with your enclosure addressed to The National Ob-
server. These critics are just impossible. They iqnore the
facts ~ d take pleasure only in malicious and mislead1nq
comment.
They are annoyinq and 1n some cases positively
vicious, but on the other hand it is easUy possible to exagger-
ate their numbers and influence. I have had hundreds of letters
about the Fair, almost all of them friendly and almost extrava-
gantly so. I place your letter high among them and am sending
it to the members of our Executive Committee and staff.
Cordially,
President
RM:MR
- . . ~ , _ .. @ __ ....
Saxton, Pennsylvania
May 19, 1964
Mr. Robert Moses, President
New York World's Fair
New York, New York
Dear Mr. Moses:
Enclosed is a copy of a letter I have sent to Mr. James
M. Perry, Staff Writer, who gave his views on the World's
F'air in the May 11 edition of I!!!! Na tiona! Observer. You
will be interested in my reaction to this great spectacular.
Cordially yours,

John J. Witowski
sas
Enclosure
Mr. James M. Perq, start Vriter
!l'he D&tional Observer
11501 Columbia Pike
811Tel' Spr.I.Ds, *r.rlAD4 20910
n.r Mr. Perr7a
MJ.7 % otter a letter ot
World's Pair? B.r tha tone ot
!ha Nlt1oDill. )'CRIIIIWit
iii's l.oak at
1D scD<mll. 'bus1msa IV
consumpt1on. IBM
J'U'st, 1187% ask trJ.p'l JUII!s1ng trcm JOUr
CaDillellts, you leti; it &UOII taJ:> al'tcrDBte
action? You coul.Un •t ate aoe , except to J&7 tar samethiJJa JUU
didn't set. ·
In 1, .1lfT wite u4 I, &cc012q8D1e4 b7 two
elderly teac 1 1n the 60•e, valke4 over 30 m:Ues at. the fair. Aa
you kn0111 the a ·ndance *J2 was ovezo 2.59,000 peopl.o, &114 w were
among them. 'f th1
1
With a little »re-:pl•nnh:JB
1
our tou.r
included Ooneral e Du Pant, Clafzol, Pepa1 Cola, Coca-Cola,
the llav York Pavi J18D7 other•.
Y011 I•inted a very extri.'VBBB!lt &Dd UDtaU picture ot a great apoc.
tacle, oimpq because ot ;rour }U'ejudices aDd lack Bec:auaCJ
wo bad planned in advance our trip to the Nr, w ¥eM aot Pl.lr.su.ed v1th
the obvioua frustrations wbich aDD.o,yed you. OD the CO!l"traey
1
vo ccqalete4
our tour at scheduled exb1b1ta, plus more--·-··-mare-------more:
Expensive? Yea, 1t ;rou lave &D expense account &lid taU "boak-11De-
&Dd-s1nker" tar evezy s:tmmick tbat canes aJ.cms. 1a saaewaa f(2
everyone. Dl.cl you. make ccmr.;.arisou traD thft illtormaticm »re:sonted 1A the
SUide bookt Dl.d you lOOk at the •P &Jld ncOGDizo that the tau COD 'be
brakeD dovn 1Dto d1st1nct areas tor &IV' twr1st'l Wllen 1D your article
did ;you 1Ddtcate &D7 1Dit1at1w on your beb&'tf I am at the opposite
extreme. Plazming llleiLD8 a 'barsaiD, ;vet not Because at
Y'QU1" OW extravagance &lid 1Deft1c10DC1', JOU critize a sre&t
the 188t1 present:' and tutun.
Our sutde boak and tickets vere bctarehtmd. Thia liC!lnt an
ad.tdcsion fco at liare :lo our outlined trip: Priday'; arriwl 9 A.M ••
admioBicm $1.35· To set across the groundB to the Jntcl'Diltioml. FlA:A,
I took the Su:lss far sevont:,r-tive cents. A short wJ.k later, I
roao the monorc11 at a cost at eichtr cents to 6ll1n a tull v:lev at tho
G.mWJc:lCnt lU"eG and points beyond. Pra:l hero % found m:1 wr to the
V(\tican xav1Uon
1
and tha Greateat----Oeno:al !orators FutUl'llllB. AlthOl(;h
the 'l'l'avel and i'ro.ns:parta.tioa buU.cU.ns :ls Dot ccrJpleted, our tour throush
it pravod intorcsttna. Go1na l4Ut Av1o and the Cll.ryslor arouDclo aot us
in a soocl mood to ta.ko 1n tM Cbrysler ohow aud. bitiona. Ford w.a too
crwcled o.t thia titlo. A bus, mrl:od pid Tmno1t, • am
ride all dJJ:f U you visb) took ws on an e1cht-o taur em the perimeter
ar the fair. !rhe Dell bu1ld.1na ws stop.
RcfreshmeDto1-------·1'Ld •o stoa.k
Idaho potato., tosa oalo.d and
tar ¢1.67. Atmoopberet---·---you'
Ollled ateeJc, baked
, tea and pie, all
hunar:l'·
cost 8UIIliiltU7 ohoucd tar the &s.:r: admiosion, $1.3;; llCilore.il
ride, 80¢ (a sood. e."Cl''rienco but Dot neacooory); SWiss oq ride, 75¢----·
a cood ael"ial vicv and time saver 1D scttillll o.cross tho Sl'O'Dlds but, cmco
acain, not nccosoor,vj tvo Orcyhound "Dlpid bnsit" bus toura, SO¢i and
a slidc-a-nde, 25¢· (All rides stve a tourist an opportunity to rest
his vea:ey teet.) l·feal• coat me $1.67 tar 1\Ulch; bars, and
tar an evcnin£r smck. Wo vere enJo:r.tns the tair too much to o:pcDd
hours looking tar places to eat. It ws mare tlan autt1c1ent. Of the
tatol $6.22 spent 4ur1Ds the day, t.b.o admioaian teo w.a DOcoeooq
1f you lGCkcd 701.1r own lunch &Dd VCIL"8 :rour w'ldD6 ahooa.
Although wu crowded, % could ollov rou alidem whore '10'1:7
tw 'Yiaitc:Jra could bo tOUD:l ec t.lat 1t vao poosi'ble to traa
the huatle-&Dd·buotlo at tbe C7."0Wd. A 11 ttl.e pre-plann1 DB could ave
avoided moBt ot :rour
SUre, I apent tift:r cants to ride the nov York Twcr elcw.tar, but
Wilt a viw to cot a true ot the 1'lle C'.uu.!13 f'J.na
dilmer cost me ninety--nino cents, 8Jlc1 tllc '\.u:f'tl.es vcro
expc!l!Jive at a dollar ten, but the dolicioua e.::pericnco wa more
vorth it.
T\To dol.l.ara co.vc u.s o.n oz>portunit:r to ccc a. vondcrtul review at
broadi.uy and tho cho-.r D:roo.d1m.y th Love. " In fact
1
I lilted the viev
so cu.ch f'rCI:l the S".rl.Gs Rille th:rt X loo.dcd cy 35 m. cru::em rmd took
anothor ricl.<J \/hen the :picture trudrl.l 'w..a tl'Jl"C fc ible.
S\lnd.Qy wo a moct 'bo!l.ut1ful dAy
1
bm since I lnd to drive about
350 m!leo to Sa.."rlon, Pcnnnylvo.nia., I dc:r.artcd v. ., rq at 2 P.U,
lllltlt a vonde1•.t'ul c;:vmcnco I 'brol

Related Interests

.:ht -oo, • • uncotcrs at Tu:Joc:r
Z.lountain lllch School, mny ot 'Vh!Xl pl.rul n... ta.:1r this au::r.lc.r.
I 'W.lltod to tell thcl:l at the pi t:f'a.l :to vh1 ell • l1lto you :f'all
vhcn this
Tho total cost at fair tar three clnys w.o 1ncludina
$2.00 tar bow and. ltll:;.:t::inoa presented to OUl" htBh ochool libxurian to
bo used aa World's FlUr rderonce mto."'ia.l.
I knov th'lt our tr.t:p acca::Jpllshmellta 'I."Crc GO!!l<nlha.t unu.atnl. and.
fa.ntaatic o.o tar no llh:l.t ve did. liatrcvcr, it is as tiUch an e:ctrc:JC
in tho Q,pDOa1te dircc:·tion at \lh'l.t you in :rour DavD))3.r>er
article. I believe tha.t 'Dr/ prcocntation alvao a mar'l acCUl.-ate picture
ot this col.oas:ll opecmcuJ.ar, end thio I o:ttribute to ey lnv1nu planned
the trip 11lthcr tho.n hnvin£: it to chlncc.
tie rebuttal 1a mde Cllll¥ to t17 to attset the Ullfa1.raua at JOUr
&rUole Wbich '11A7 Jave been read b.Y Amelicau aid perbapa, made them
decide 188' ust 1Dcludi»a Wa oae ot their l:lte 'a VOilderful
experiences.
Ye17 ;roura
;:/ ·
//
Jolm J. Vitonk:l
b p.rties 1ncluded:
Mr-. Jabn J. W1towsk1, Saxton, Pa.
J.fra, Jolm J. W1tovokl, 8axtOD
1
Pa.
M:l.ss .Roso McO&ban, a.xtou, Pa.
Kl.ss Orace .. S1x HUe Run,
••
ca: Mr. Hosea
5/64-Rlll
UNISPHER£
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAI 1 64-1965 CORPORATION
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
FLUSHING 52, N.Y. • TELEPHONE· AREA CODE 212-WF 4-1964 • CABLE ADDRESS "WORLDSFAIR"
THROUGH
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Peter McDonnell
Jerome Edelberg
Joyce Martin
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
.. WF 4-6531
- WF 4-6541
- WF 4-6543
ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT
May 21, 1964
YORK WORLD'S FAIR, May 21 -- A temporary restraining order was
signed today by Justice Albert H. Bosch of the State Supreme Court,
Queens County. forbidding Colourpicture Inc •• a postcard
manufacturer of Boston, Massachusetts, from manufacturing, distributing
or selling postcards containing scenes of the Wor1dls Fair.
The restraining order was obtained by New York World's Fair 1964-
1965 Corporation as the first step in a suit by the Fair to atop the
sale of unauthorized World's Fair postcards. The Fair's legal papers
named a number or retail stores in the City which have been selling the
Colourpicture cards.
Judge Bosch also enjoined SNA Post Card Company, Inc. of New Hyde
Park, Long Island, the Colourpicture distributor in the New York area
1
from selling the cards.
Several years ago Colourpicture sought a license from the Fair to
put out vlorld's Fair postcards. Colourpicture
1
s bid was turned down by
the Fair, and the license was granted to another company, Dexter Color
New York, Inc.
1
which made a better bid.
Although the license had been granted to Dexter, Colourpicture
entered the Fair site and took photographs of the exhibits, and manu-
factured and distributed cards with Fair scenes on them.
The Fair asserts that Colourpicture is violating its rights and
also criminal statutes against trespassing and using the Fair's name
without the Fair's consent.
FROM: Wm. J. Donoghue Corporation
10 Columbus Circle, N.Y.C.
(more)
5/64-Rlll
- 2 -
The Fair is asking the eourt to order Colourp1eture and SNA to
account for all profits wh1oh have been made on the cards and to pay
the Fair for all damage to the Fair's licensing program.
In addition, the Fair is seeking punitive damages of $250.000 and
a permanent tnjunot1on against Colourp1oture and SNA. It asks that all
the unauthorized postcards be delivered up to the court and destroyed.
The matter will come on for a hearing in Queens Supreme Court next
May 28. At that t1me Colourp1cture and SNA will be obliged,
under the terms or Judge Bosch's order, to show cause why a preliminary
injunction should not be issued against them to apply until the t1nal
decision is made in the case,
# # #
5/64-R109
UII.ISPIIEII.E
••
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSIT! ON AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
FLUSHING 52, N.Y. • TELEPHONE- AREA CODE 212-WF 4-1964 • CABLE ADDRESS "WORLDSFAIR"
PlACE THitOUOH
UMOI:IIaTANDINO
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Pete%" McDonnell
Jerome Edelberg
Joyce Martin
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
• WF 4-6531
- ###BOT_TEXT###gt;JF 4-6541
- vlF 4-6543
ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT
May 21, 1964
NEW YORK WORLD
1
S FAIR, May 21 -- The World's Fair attendance haq
taken a sharp upturn as of May 18, according to a report issued by
Erwin Witt, Fair Comptroller.
During the preceding ten days, tot-al· attendance at the Fair
amounted to 1,844,683 for a daily average or- 184, lJ6§_. During the first
two weeks of the Fair, total attendance was 1!282
1
518 with an average
daily figure ~ f 141,608e
The daily increase of 42,860 represents an average increase of.
35 per cent.
The rise in the scale of attendance will not hit its peak until
schools close for the summer and the vacation season begins.
This trend indicates to Fair officials that there will be a much
greater increase in daily attendance.
FROM: Wm. J. Donoghue Corporation
10 Columbus Circle, N.Y.C.
# # #
UNISPHER£
01861
5/64-Rlll
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
FLUSHING 52, N.Y. • TELEPHONE- AREA CODE 212-WF 4-1964 • CABLE ADDRESS "WORLOSFAIR"
.. &AC:C THROUGH
UNDCittfANOINO
--·
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REFER INQUIRIES TO:
Peter McDonnell
Jerome Edelberg -
Joyce Martin
FOR RELEASE
WF 4-6531
WF 4-6541
WF 4-6543
ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT
May 21_, 1964
YORK WORLD'S FAIR, May 21 -- A temporary restraining order was
signed today by Justice Albert H. Bosch of the State Supreme Court
1
Queens County_, forbidding Colourp1cture Publishers, Inc._, a postcard
manufacturer or Boston, Massachusetts_, from manufacturing, distributing
or selling postcards containing scenes of the World's Fair.
The restraining order was obtained by New York World's Fair 1964-
1965 Corporation as the first step in a suit by the Fair to stop the
sale of unauthorized World's Fair postcards. The Fair's legal papers
named a number of retail stores in the City which have been selling the
Colourpicture cards.
Judge Bosch also enjoined SNA Post Card Company, Inc, of New Hyde
Park_, Long Island_, the Colourpicture distributor in the New York area,
from selling the cards.
Several years ago Colourpicture sought a license from the Fair to
put out World's Fair postcards. Colourpicture•s bid was turned down by
the Fair_, and the license was granted to another company_, Dexter Color
New York, Inc., which made a better bid.
Although the license had been granted to Dexter, Colourpicture
entered the Fair site and took photographs of the exhibits, and manu-
factured and distributed cards with Fair scenes on them.
The Fair asserts that Colourpicture is violating its rights and
also criminal statutes against trespassing and using the Fair's name
Without the Fair's consent.
FROM: Wm. J. Donoghue Corporation
10 Columbus Circle, N.Y.C.
(more)
5/64-Rlll
- 2 -
The Fair is asking the court to order Colourpicture and SNA to
account for all profits which have been made on the cards and to pay
the Fair tor all damage to the Fair's licensing program.
In addition, the Fair is seeking punitive damages of $250
1
000 and
a permanent inJunction against Colourpicture and SNA. It asks that all
the unauthorized postcards be delivered up to the court and
The matter Will come on for a hearing in Queens Supreme Court next
Thursday, May 28. At that time Colourpicture and SNA Will be obliged,
under the terms or Judge Bosch's order, to show cause why a preliminary
inJunction should not be issued against them to apply until the final
decision is made in the case.
# # #
5/64-Rll2
UN !SPHERE
01861

NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
FLUSHING 52, N.Y. • TELEPHONE· AREA CODE 212-WF 4-1964 • CABLE ADDRESS "WORLDSFAIR"
PEACE THROUGH
UNDCtt81"ANbiNO
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Jerome Edelberg
Joyce Martin
- 'l'IF 4-6531
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- HF 4-6543
FOR RELFASE: AFTER NOON, FRIDAY, MAY 22, 1964
ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT
May 21
1
1964
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR1 May 22 -- Saturday at the World's Fair is
"Dartmouth College Day" at the New England States Exhibit.
It is also a day when jazz comes to the Fair in a big way. The
Travel and Transportation Pavilion in the Transportation Area will
present its Cavalcade of Custom Cars Show featuring bandleader-
vibraphone star, Lionel Hampton; trombonist, Tyree Glenn, of the CBS
Jack Sterling Radio Show; piano-organ star
1
Dick Hyman
1
of NBC's Mitch
Miller TV Show and George Jessel as M.c. Shows are scheduled at 1
1
3,
5 ~ 7 and 9 P.M.
The '=Dartmouth College Day" ceremonies at the New England States
Exhibit starts at 11:30 A.M. when Nichol Sandoe, class of 19
1
president
Of the Dartmouth Alumni Association of New Yorlc
1
will introduce
Dartmouth president
1
John Sloan Dickey. The "Injunaires," a nine-man
choral group, will present a program of folk and jazz music after the
ceremonies, and again at 1:30 and 3:30 P.fll.
There will be meetings of the National Council of Negro Women at
10 A.M. and at 3 P.M. in the Official Women's Hospitality Center,
Penthouse of the Better Living Center.
It will also be the first day of the National AAU Junior Weight-
lifting Championship to be held in the World's Fair Pavilion from noon
to 10 P.M,
On Saturday, the United Veterans Council of Queens presents its
"Spectacular" in Singer Bm'll. The program includes a 3-1/2 hour
Pageant of Drums at 1 P.M.; a Musical Interlude between
and an International Dance Festival from 5 to 9 P.M.
FROM: Wm. J. Donoghue Corporation
lOColumbus Circle, N.Y.C.
(more)
5/64-Rll2
- 2 -
Two Rotary Clubs from Chester, 798, of Chester, Conn., and 747
1
of Chester, N. J., will co-host a luncheon at the Texas Pavilion
Restaurant at noon.
Mayor Rob Basso will preside at "Point Pleasant Beach Day"
festivities in the Net'l Jersey Tercentenary Pavilion at noon.
"Round the World" a musical program in honor of all the countries
represented at the Fair will be presented at the Florida Pavilion by
the Edgewater H.s .• Band of Orlando, Fla.
1
at l and 7:30 P.M.
More band music Will be offered by the Joliet Public School Band
of Joliet, Ill. at the River Common at 2:30 P.M., and by the Virgin
Islands•Caribbean Band (Christiansted H.S. Band, St. Croix, V. I.) at
the Tiparillo Band Pavilion at 4 P.M. At 7 P .• M. the Colonial Ancient
Fife and Drum Corps of Bethpage, N. Y. will perform at Enterprise
Common. The Male Chorus of the AC Spark Plug Division of General
Motors will give a one-hour concert at River Common at 8:30 P.M.
Sam Huff, the New York Giants famous linebacker, will be Sports
Host at the Schaefer Center for 2-l/2 hour sessions at noon and at
4:30 P.M.
At 4 P.M. at the Federal Pavilion there will be a dedication ot
a Love Tree for Children of the World, courtesy of Norman K. Winston,
Commissioner, in cooperation with the N. Y. Junior Citizens Festival
of the Arts, sponsored by the Community and Allied Arts League,
through whose director, Laura King, the Love Tree was proposed.
# # #
UNISPHERE ooeeo 5/64-Rll3
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
FLUSHING 52, N.Y. • TELEPHONE· AREA CODE 212·WF 4·1964 • CABLE ADDRESS "WORLDSFAIR"
THROUGH
LINDE .. aTANDINO
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Peter McDonnell
Jerome Ed.elberg
Joyce Martin
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
.. WF
- WF 4-6541
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ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR, May 21 -- Vice Chairman George V.
McLaughlin of the Triborough Bridge and Tunnel Authority; Peter J.
Reidy, Executive Director, and Othmar N. Ammann, noted bridge designer,
joined today in starting the final six-month countdown for completion
of the Verrazano-Narrowa Bridge, the longest suspension bridge in the
world.
Mr. Reidy represented Robert Moses, Chairman of the Authority,
also President of the New York World's Fair 1964-1965 Corporation.
In a brief ceremony at the Fair's Administration Building, the
trio activated a clock at noon to tick off the days, hours, minutes
and seconds remaining until the Nov. 21st opening of the $325-million
bridge. It was planned, financed and built by the Triborough Authority
to link Brooklyn and Staten Island across the Narrows at the entrance
to the New York harbor.
On April 22, 1963, the late President John F. Kennedy activated ,,,
. ·'···-,··-
the same chronometer by dialing 1964 from a White House telephone, 3Ei5 .
days, 22 hours, 44 minutes and 29 seconds before the Fair's
April 22nd.
The bridge has been hailed by Mr. Moses as a vital
two-billion-dollar interstate highway system of the metropolttanar•,a•
Opening in time to serve motorists in the second year of the WoJ;tld. .··.·
Fair, the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge is expected to carry
vehicles during its first year of operation.
FROM: Wm. J. Donoghue Corporation
10 Columbus Circle, N.Y.C.
# # #
5/64-Rll4
UNISPHERE
II
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
FLUSHING 52, N.Y. • TELEPHONE· AREA CODE 212·WF 4-1964 • CABLE ADDRESS "WORLDSFAIR"
PI:AC£ THROUGH
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allftiiii'IDDIDif
........
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Peter McDonnell
Jerome Edelberg
Joyce Martin
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
- WF 4-6531
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WORLD'S FAIR SOLVES RE-ENTRY PROBLEM
ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT
21, 1964
YORK WORLD
1
S FAIR, May 21 -- The daily admission ticket to
the World's Fair is like a membership to the "club" for the day.
Visitors who may want to take in a ball game at Shea Stadium,
visit their yacht at the World's Fair Marina, or go back home for a
shower and a change or clothes, may do so without being penalized an
additional admission charge.
At all eight gates "black light" lamps identify all who have left
the Fair and told the gate guard or their intention to return later
the same day. The procedure is a familiar one to anyone who has
attended a race track, swimming pool, sports arena, or dance and left
to return within a limited time.
As you leave you tell the guard at the gate you will return later
1n the day. He stamps your palm, the heel of your hand, the back of
your hand, or one side of your wrist with an invisible dye --
invisible, that is, except when held under a "black" or ultraviolet
light when you re-enter.
The dye is absolutely harmless to the skin and clothing and will
not wash orr. It wears orr in about twelve to sixteen hours, and
comes in blue or green.
The Fair uses tNelve different design symbols to stamp departing-
returning visitors, varying each day the color and the position in
which it is placed on the hand. The symbol, ink color, and position
is uniform at all eight gates throughout the day. This discourages
any possibility of anyone "beating" the system.
It also assures the visitor at the V./orld
1
s Fair a full day's
instruction, entertainment and fun,
FROM: Wm. J. Donoghue Corporation
lOColumbus Circle, N.Y.C.
II # #
tfltJ·,II?- t!t!t!·.UtJtJ
fo- ......
GENERAl DIRECTOR
May 21, 1964
TERRACE CLUB GUEST PRIVILEGES
At the request of many Club Members, guest privileges, without the
necessity of the Club Member being present, are now available on a basis.
To assure that members themselves continue to have priority use of
Club facilities at all times, guest arrangements will be accepted on a "first
come" basis. Your Board of Governors has reserved the right to withdraw guest
privileges at any time.
Enclosed are six (6) guest cards for the use of members in arranging
for their guests to dine at The Terrace Club. Members are requested to complete
the card and state the specific date on which it will be presented, before giving
it to their guest.
Upon arrival at the Club, the guest will present the card as
to use the Club facilities on the day for which it is issued. Charges
the guests will be included on the member's regular monthly statement.
card will be picked up by a Club employee when it is presented.
Additional guest cards may be obtained by writing to:
RESERVATIONS
The Terrace Club
230 Park Avenue
New York, New York 10017
authorization
incurred by
The guest
MR.
MRS.
MISS
AND PARTY WILL BE MY GUEST (S)
__ Ar ______ T.:....Z:.:..IP:.:... 1"Prmre ClufJ
ON
MEMBER'S NAME
COMPANY NAME
MEMBER'S SIGNATURE
MEMBERSHIP NUMBER
James Clark McGuire
General Director
Hon. Paul R. Screvane
TRIBOROUGH BRIDGE AND TUNNEL AUTHORITY
TRI BOROUGH STATION, BOX 35
NEW YORK, N.Y. 10035
TELEPHONE TRAf"ALGAR 6·9700
MEMBitll•:
ROBI:RT MOSES, CHAUIMAH
PETER J. REIDY
EXECUTIVE DIIII!:CTOII
Hon. Robert Moses
President
GEORGE V. McLAUGHLIN, VICE CHAIIINAN
"'""" ,, .. ..

N.Y. World's Fair 1964-65-Cor.p. /
P.O. Box L964
Flushing, York 11352
Re: Nor 1ver Development
1bition HaJl ',,
·------- Dear Bob:·----
You sent me a copy of Howard Sloane's letter dated
April 30, 1964 with a notation "who is back of this scheme?"
Arthur Hodgkiss' memorandum dated May 12, 1964
refers to tlle report made by Ebasco Services Inc., Moran, Proctor,
Mueser & and Eggers & Higgins in November 1962 which
recommen,led this facility.
The proposed exhibition haJl with an area of 144,500
square fee:. is part of a complex which extends roughly between
West 38th ;)treet and West 43rd Street on the North River. The
complex in:::ludes an arena, a heliport, an observation tower,
slips for s· ghtseeing vessels and elevated parking decks. The
estimated ':ost is $87, 300, 000 of which the exhibition hall and
entertairun ?nt center amounts to $84, 000, 000. In my opinion
these are 1·ather conservative estimates .
. \s far as I know this idea was proposed origjnally by
Commissit,ner Vincent 0
1
Conner and members of his staff and
later end01·sed by Commissioner Leo Brown. Their idea is to
build this \lith city funds as a self-liquidating project. To
Hon. Robert Moses
- 2- May 21, 1964
•'-....;
accomplish this someone must make a long term rentcl commitment.
I ·think you will agree that this is rather wishful thinkij 1g.
Naturally, the exhibition hall and the arena, if built,
would probably have a serious effect on both the ColiStlum and the
new Madison Square Garden now under construction. However,
I cannot see how this facility will ever be anything but a paper
project unless the city is willing to underwrite it. I tldnk this is
extremely doubtful.
Sincerely,
\ •• 1 :._ \.
Executive Diredor
May 12, 1964
MEMORANDUM TO PETER J. REIDY
FROM ARTHUR S. HODGKISS
The Convention Hall on the North River was initially recom-
mended in a report "North River Development Plan" to the Department
of Marine and Aviation by Ebasco Services Inc., Moran, Proctor,
Mueser & Rutledge, and Eggers & Higgins in November 1962.
The report recommends the construction of an arena with a
central floor area 100 x 270 feet, with surrounding accommodations for
between 20, 000 and 23, 500 spectators. It also recommends an exhibition
hall with an area of 144, 500 square feet. The location would be on the
water front, roughly between West 38th Street and West 43rd Street.
The consultants' report is outlined beginning on Page 29 in
the attached brochure.
Since publication of the report the convention hall and exhibition
halls have been enthusiastically supported by the New York City Convention
Bureau.
ArthurS. Hodgkiss
Deputy Executive Director
• 't.",

Mr. Royal w. l :ya..,
York Corm ·ntton and Vlsltors Dureau
GO East J3t; ·cot
New York 1 '1, IS. Yorlt
Daar P..ol7'J:
April SO, 1 Q64
n1,preciatc your co:.nments at ou.r Annual Meet•
lng o! ti!c roard or Lircctorz of tile Convention and Visitors Burenu.
The ColtGcu!l'l h: tS, P.S you 1:0 !dndly stBte£1, been a hulc success. Al• '
lle no from we can cll tnrJ!it !.:.:!r. ?l!oses,
creator net o:uy cf bm ox tho ro.tr wJ.o:ra
lnnch:on .. '3 he ".;,tua c\·c.ryor.3 rccc;:;nizco tho mu:cess, ,tt ..
·- .. ...... .. ..... to r,... .... ,..,, .... o p•·"..,1·ic ..... ,_ ... ,..,ion f·•o ... l ...... t ... ·lnnrt .....
W ......... 1.) \.iw·-v.....t"-1. J. •· u -.u•
o,lnion m:!:;tJr s
. l •
t' '"' .
..
·CO)
You spoclf!cclly moutton also the t:.ml a Ccnventtons.
As JOU well know:
1 • voHt!cal o::!y hold cvcx y fo·trJ:
yo:u"s, end rct=.to
2 • If thJy to CC:::lC to NO'fJ "'S.'bz-1:, !Jc
G:n-,:cn l9 l::.t0[) ond C:.::y &Ot n.cod an
elht:Jttron
3 • Thct cll cc;_ur::.l, fuDC:C CO lVCr"tf;On:J
go to Li3 hf.:hc:::t an:l tt'3 c! tt.s :nt! :er tn
thnt Now outb!u.
Mr. An';lolt, our now I t.!ill:.:; a c!:!.:) ,:;:n you, ato.tecl
the l!eed for n and mc:.:ttc:!:d O.:J • 11 co:.:z;cUUom
ttlo Cow to f:::-."l F 'l'h!s b c c:tic;.::::tcd, to b:ml
type stru.eture b tto d £::.."1 f c.= i tll'rouzhout
thEt yonr o!moJt r:.O d: elL I tJCdd tl::! tbiJ Bl"ODX
Armory In ttaw b by c.ny n
O'.uo fear ta that ot.:Cb th3 t.C':!€::aa of a
.Jarzet facw.ty, co:.1b:3 from vco)!.a e:.::cll :w l'D 1 cncl Mr. Anholt,
wW bs glvon crcdc::.ca by wh3 ara M: l"!JI tl!:J&Oot that
while the Colle cum to tho u'Orl!S' s most ti!=Utbit1c 11 we
are elway.s open to: more bustlWaa. Let' a oo-."Cto to that tack.
KIDdest personnl rcr;arc!s.
HGS/dd
cc: nobert Moses
&lr. Peter J. Rotdy ·
Hr. sarrr M. Atl!u)J.t
Stnccrely,
4)'
f!oward o. Sl< ane
Jt.anast!!g Dlrtctor
V N IS PH ERE O>Q&I
5/64-Rl24
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
FLUSHING 52, N.Y. • TELEPHONE- AREA CODE 212-WF 4-1964 • CABLE ADDRESS "WORLDSFAIR"
P ~ A C £ THROUGH
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FOR ·,RELEASE: SA'l.'URDAY I MAY 23, 1964
ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT
May 22, 1964
NEW YORK WORLD IS FAIR, May 23 -· Sunday, May 24, has been
designated "Salute to Israel Day" at the World's Fair.
At 9:30A.M., the official party, including Senators Jacob K.
Javits and Kenneth B. Keating; Nahum Shamir, Economic Minister to the
United States from Israel; Abraham Beame, Comptroller of New York City;
Harold s. Caplin, Chairman or Board of American-Israel Corp.; and
Zechariah Sitchln, President or American-Israel Corp., will arrive at
New Amsterdam Gate No. 2. '!'hey will be greeted in the Fair's Adminis-
tration Building by Gov • Charles Poletti, Vtce President in Charge of
International Affairs and Exhibits.
In addition, Sunday is "Air Force Association Day" (New York
Wing); "Criers Lodge No. 651, Knights of Pythtas Day"; "Philco Day" J
11
Riveredge Day" (in the New Jersey Tercentenary Pavilion), and "Otsego
county .. Qneonta Day
11
in the N. Y. State Pavilion. continuous enter-
tainment will be offered from 10 A.M. to 10 P.M. by groups from these
communities.
The
11
Salute to Israel Day" Will continue in the American-Israel
Pavilion at 10 A.M. with dedication ceremonies in the Pavtlton•s
garden and speeches by all participants. In the afternoon at 2:30 P,M.
and in the evening at 7 P.M., an Israeli Folk Festival will be staged
1n the Tiparillo Band Pavilion by the Amertcan Ztonist Youth Founda•
tion, Inc.
Finals of the National A,A,U. Junior Weightltfting Championships
will be held 1n the Pavilion at 2 P.M.
The C1 ties Service

Related Interests

lorld' s Fair Band of America, under the direc-
tion of Paul Lavalle, is now giving its daily concerts 1n the Lake
Amusement Area from 1:45 to 5:45 P.M. and from 7:15 to 8:45 P.M.
FROM: Wm. J. Donoghue Corporation
10 Columbus Circle, N.Y.C.
#
./.'
7t
UNl&PHERE
,.EACI TtilltOUOH
UND£RITANOINO
__ ..
@>--...
5/64-Rll7
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
FLUSHING 52, N.Y. • TELEPHONE· AREA CODE 212-WF 4·196
ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT
NEWS:
May 22, 1964
REFER INQUIRIES TO:
Peter J. McDonnell
Jerry Edelberg
·Joyce Martin
Bill Whitehouse
- WF 4-6531
.. WF 4-6541
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WF 4-6553
NEW YORK 1Q64-1965 WORLD'S FAIR NEWSLETTER NO, ~ 6
Irish Open Fair Pavilion ••••
M1ch1gan•s Governor at Fair ••••
Austria Day Marked by Distinguished
Visitors ••••
South Carolina Governor "Adopts" Band ••••
Hungary Nationality Fete at Fair .•••
Association for the Relief of Aged, Indigent
Females Have Day at Fair ••••
MOrmons Open Fair Pavilion ••••
Trade Union Park Inaugurated at Fair ••••
Ribbon-Cutting at Fair Has Daring Twist ••••
Florida Porpoises Present Housekeeping
Chore at Fair ••••
WAC Fashion Pageant at Fair Reflects History ••••
Former President of Mexico a Visitor ••••
.. 0 -
Saturday, May 16th, was a great day for the Irish at the New
York World's Fair. To the piercing strains of a bagpipe band,
Ireland's Minister for Industry and Commerce, the Hon. John ~ c h ,
dedicated the Pavilion of Ireland.
The pavilion, housing historical, cultural and economic
exhibits, boasts two dominant architectural features: a modern
FROM: Wm. J. Donoghue Corporation
10 Columbus Circle, N.Y.C.
(more}
Newsletter •••
5/64-Rll7
.. 2 -
version of the medieval round towers that still stand in many places
in Ireland, and a 7•toot high enclosure or native Irish stone.
A large delegation ot Irish dignitaries were welcomed to the
F a i ~ tor the dedication by Governor Charles Poletti, the Fair's vice
president tor International Affairs and Exhibits, who spoke on behalf
ot Fair President Robert Moses. They included: William P. Pay,
Ireland's Ambassador to the U. S.; Cornelius Cremin, Ambassador to
the UN, and John O'Brien, the Republic's Consul General here.
- 0 -
M1chigan•s Governor George Romney and his official party headed
a delegation of thousands from his state visiting the New York
World's Fair on M1eh1gan State Day this week.
New York's Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller welcomed the official
party at the Fair gate; General William E. Potter, the Fair's
Executive Vice President, presented Governor Romney with a silver
medallion at a Federal Pavilion ceremony.
Later, Michigan's first citizen addressed 1,500 at a Belgian
Village Rathskeller luncheon at which another famous Michigan native
also spoke - comedian Danny Thomas. After lunch, the Governor toured
major Transportation Area exhibits, including General Motors, Ford,
and Chrysler.
- 0 -
Austria, whose striking "A" shaped pavilion at the New York
World's Fair eXhibits the cultural and industrial history of the
Danubian country, marked Official Austria Day at the Pair this week
by formally dedicating the pavilion.
His Eminence Francis Cardinal Spellman blessed the Austrian
Pavilion after presiding at a high mass, attended by 200 Austrian
dignitaries, at the Vatican Pavilion.
Dr. Fritz Bock, Minister of Trade and Reconstruction, headed
Austria•s delegation at the dedication. The delegation was welcomed
to the Fair by Governor Charles Poletti, the Fair's Vice President
for International Affairs and Exhibits.
- 0 -
(more)
Newsletteze •••
5/64-Rll7
.. 3 -
South Cal'Olina Governor Donald s. Russell "adopted" 65 teenage
members of the Hicksville, tong Island (N.Y.) Junior High School Band
this week, dubbing the group South Carolina• a "official" band at the
New York World's Pair.
At the Fair tor South Carolina State Day ceremonies, the Governor
and his official pal'ty were offered the services of the IDng Island
school band in the absence of a unit from the Palmetto State.
The South Carolinians were welcomed to the Pair by General
William E. Potter. Ambassador Norman K. W1nston, ComDdssioner of the
United States Exh1bit
1
greeted the party at the Federal Pavilion.
- 0 -
Thousands of Hungarian-Americans from the New York metropolitan
area marked "Hungary National! ty Day" at the New York World r s Fair
this week.
Their focal point was an afternoon Folk Festival at the World's
Fair Pavilion. The gala, featuring Hungarian folk dancers, singers
and instrumentalists, was organized by the New York Chapter of the
American Hungarian Society.
- 0-
The Association for the Relief of Respectable, Aged, Indigent
Females in the City of New York marked its 150th anniversary with a
luncheon, fashion show and dinner at the New York 1964-1965 World's
Fair this past week.
Celebration of the anniversary coincided with the launohing of
a campaign to raise $250,000 to modernize the plumbing at the asso•
ciat1on•a home on Amsterdam Avenue, between 103rd and l04th Streets,
the oldest and largest private for the elderly home in the state.
- 0 -
One hundred and thirty-four years after its founding in New Yo:rk. ·
State and a covered wagon trek to Utah by its members, The Church ot
Jesus Christ of Saints - Mormons - symbolically
home" this week.
The Mormons dedicated their pavilion at the New York World's
Fair.
(more)
Newsletter •••
- 4 -
5/64-Rll7
HiSh•ranking Mormon dignitaries - including Joseph Fielding
Smith., a descendant or the Church's f'ounder - came trom Salt Lake
01t1; Utah, the Mormon world center., to attend the dedication or the
pavilion, which features a 127-toot-high replica of the eastern
apiree of the tamed Salt Lake Oi ty tt:>rmon Temple.
- 0-
A 61,000 square-toot National Maritime Union Park., a trade union-
sponsored exhibit., was dedicated in the New York World Fair's Trans-
portation Area recently.
Joseph Curran., National Maritime Union AFL-CIO president, and
20 seamen who had been torpedoed in World War II unveiled a plaque
to seamen "who died in the struggle to build our Union and in the
service or our country. "
- 0-
Everything is on a grandiose scale at the New York World's Pair ..
even ribbon-cutting. Dedicating the "Hall of Magic" at the General
Cigar Pavilion recently., magician Mark Wilson, creator of the pav11-
1on•s magic show, not only cut through the traditional ribbon., but
also sliced a blonde beauty neatly in twain ... then "reassembled" her.
The act will be a part or the show.
- 0-
The porpoises that gambol for delighted Florida Pavilion visitors
at the New York World's Fair present a king size daily "housekeeping"
problem. 20.,000 gallons of their 40.,000 gallon salt water tank
"home" must be changed every day. Fresh New York water is carefully
salin1zed., and constant salt-level checks are made by pavilion starr.
- 0 -
An unusual fashion show, w1 th eight members of the Women t s Arrtrs
Corps (WAC) as models, was staged twice at the New York World's Pair
on Saturday (May 16th).
"A Century ot Women in Uniform," featuring the changing look in
women's uniforms since the Civil war. was seen by visitors to the
(more)
Newsletter ••• 5/64-Rll7
- 5 -
Transportation and Travel Pavilion, and at an earlier showing by
diners at the • • restaurant.
- 0 -
former President or Mexico, Don Aleman, was a recent
Pair With his family. He was greeted by the Director ot
Tourists tor the Mexican Pavilion, Gonzales De La Vega. Following
dinner at the Mexican Pavilion, the party toured the Fair.
Presently, Mr. Aleman is chairman of the National Board or
Tourism ot Mexico, to which post he was appointed by President Lopez
Mateos. He was President of Mexico from 1946 to 1952.
# # #
UNISPHERE
01061
5/64-Rll8
ll
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION T FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
FLUSHING 52, N.Y. • TELEPHONE· AREA COD
PEACE TH .. OUOH
UNDERS1'ANDIHO
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REFER INQUIRIES TO:
Peter McDonnell
Jerome Edelberg
Joyce Martin
- vJF 4-6531
-

Related Interests

IF 4-6541
- WF 4-6543
J!QB. RELEASE: MONDA.X, £2.
1
1964
WF 4-1964 • CABLE ADDRESS "WORLDSFAIR"
ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT
May 22, 1964
NEW YORK WORLD'S May 25 -- It all depends on your taste.
is not a luxury at the World's Fair.
According to a survey made today, more than 50 per cent of the
Fatr food service facilities offer food at prices ranging from 25
cents for a frankfurter to a main course for $1.50. Sixty-stx food
establishments with a total seating capacity of 13,091 fall tnto this
low-cost category.
In the $1.50 to $3,00 price range, the survey found 22
seating Eleven restaurants with 3,853 seats charge from $3.00
to $4.50, Another 11 restaurants with 3,146 seats offer meals from
$4.50 to $6,00 while 13 restaurants seating 3,214 are in the over
$6,00 category,
Snack bars located throughout the Fair grounds but without seat-
ing facilities were not included in the survey. This would have sub-
stantially increased the total of inexpensive eating places.
The present restaurant and dining area capacity at the Fair of
28,734 seats will be augmented by 8,150 within the next two weeks.
More than half of these new facilities Will be offering inexpensive
menus, according to the survey.
Among the low-priced food service facilities now operating, the
25 Brass Rail refreshment centers, with a 2,160 seating capacity,
offer 25-cent frankfurters, 35-cent hamburgers and a wide variety of
sandwiches under 65-cents. The Chun King Inn, with 600 seats serves
a seven variety dinner for 99 cents, A complete steak dinner for
$1.19 is obtainable at Tad's Steak House in the Wisconsin Pavilion.
The New York State Pavilion provides a full turkey dinner for $1.50.
Louisiana has steak and chicken dinners for $1.99. The survey also
showed many restaurants serving entrees in the $1.50 range.
FROM: Wm. J. Donoghue Corporation
10 Columbus Circle, N.Y.C.
If # #
5/64-Rl20
UHISPHERE
01061
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-19 5
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHI G MEADOW PARK
FLUSHING 52, N.Y. • TELEPHONE- AREA CODE 212-WF 4-1964 • CAB ADDRESS "WORLDSFAIR"
PI:.ACE THAOUOH
UNDEASTAHOINO
__ ..
.......
NEWS:
REIPER INQUIRIES TO:
Peter McDonnell
Jerome Edelberg
Joyooe Martin
POR EMMEDIATE RELEASE
- WF 4-6531
- WF 4-6541
- \VF 4-6543
ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT
May 22, 1964
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR, May 22 ·- The last day of his vacation
paid ott today in prizes for John J. Fitzgerald, thirty-three, WhO
became the five millionth visitor to the New York World's
Pair just a month after opening day.
The magic number came up as Mr. Fitzgerald, his wife, Grace,
twenty-eight, and their children, John J., Jr., five, and Eileen, two,
clicked through the turnstile at Gate 6 leading to the Fair's Amuse-
ment Area.
"I was never so surprised in my life," said Mr. Fitzgerald as he
and his family were greeted by Stuart Constable, Fair Vice President
ot Operations, and William Berns, Fair Vioe President of Communications
and Public Relations.
An accountant with the General Service Administration of the
u. s. Government, Mr. Fitzgerald lives at 72-16 Woodhaven Boulevard,
Glendale, Queens.
The Fitzgeralds entrance at the Fair was filmed on an 8 mm. Kodak
Electric 8-Zoom Camera. The camera then was presented to Mr.
Fitzgerald by Roy F. Horne
1
assistant manager or the Kodak Pavilion.
Mrs. Fitzgerald received a Kodak Instamattc 300 Camera and the
children were presented with Kodak World's Fair Flash Cameras and film.
Mr. Fitzgerald eaid that this was the last chance he and his
family had to enjoy his nine-day vacation, which had been interrupted
by Eileen's bout with the German measles.
FROM: Wm. J. Donoghue Corporation
10 Columbus Circle, N.Y.C.
# # #
UNISPHERE
OtQ61
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
FLUSHING 52, N.Y. • TELEPHONE- AREA CODE 212-WF 4-1964 • CABLE ADDRESS "WORLDSFAIR"
THAOUO"
UNDEFI&TANDtNO
--·
@) ..... --
NEWS:
REFER INQUIRIES TO 1
Peter McDonnell
Jerome Edelberg
Joyce Martin
• WF 4-6531
WF 4-6541
- WP 4-6543
lPOR RELEASE AFTEfi NOON SA'fURDAY I MAY 23, 1964
ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT
May 22, 1964
NEW YORK WORID'S FAIR_, May 23 -- Mot·e than 2,250,000 frankfurters
at 25 cents each were sold to visitors at the New York World's Fair in
the first month, according to David J. Berge, president, Brass Rail
World's Fair Organization, Inc. Mr. Berge stated that almost
hamburgers at 35 cents each were sold in the same period.
The Brass Rail World's Fair Organization, Inc., a service of
Interstate United Corporation, is the largest food service operator
at the Fair, with 25 refreshment centers and six specialty restaurants.
Interstate United is a nationwide concern operating in 37 states.
"Our restaurants and refreshment centers are very moderately
priced and they have been well patronized," Mr. Berge said.
"For the first 30 days of the Fair we have sold almost 2,000,000
hamburgers at 35 cents apiece, over 2,250,000 frankfurters at 25 cents
each, almost 2,000,000 orders of French fries and over 320,000 sand-
wiches or all kinds -- just to take a few food items that we sell,"
he said.
The six Brass Rail restaurants at the Fair are also moderately
priced. Two restaurants, the Steak House and the Pan American Pat1o
1
offer a complete sliced steak salad
1
dessert and choice of
beverages for $2.95; complete chicken dinners are offered at the
Garden and Country Farm restaurants for $2.75; a smorgasbord dinner is
served at the Danish Garden restaurant for $2.75 and a complete
Italian dinner with spaghetti
1
ravioli and meat balls, salad, dessert
and choice of beverages at the Italian Festival restaurant for $2.75.
Dinners for children are $1 less than the regular price.
"There is a restaurant or an eating place at the Fair for every
taste and for the financial means of every visitor, and this is ex-
actly what a great Fair should provide," Mr. Berge concluded.
FROM: Wm. J. Donoghue Corporation
10 Columbus Circle, N.Y.C.
# # #
UNIS.PHERE
PI.AC:C: THROUGH

--·

5/64-JU17
01861
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
FLUSHING 52, N.Y. • TELEPHONE· AREA CODE 212-WF 4-1964 • CABLE ADDRESS "WORLDSFAIR"
ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT
NEWS:
May 22, 1964
REPER INQUIRIES TO:
Peter J. MCDonnell
Jerry Edelberg
Joyce Martin
Bill Whitehouse
- WF 4-6531
- WF 4-6541
• WF 4-.6543
- WF 4·6553
Irish Open Fair Pavilion ••••
M1ch1gan•s Governor at Fair ••••
Austria Day Marked by Distinguished
Visitors ••••
South Carolina Governor "Adopts" Band ••••
Hungary Nationality Fete at Fair .•••
Association for the Relief of Aged, Indigent
· Females Have Day at Fair ••••
MOrmons Open Fair Pavilion ••••
Trade Union Park at Fair ••••
Ribbon-Cutting at Fair Has Daring 1Wist ••••
Florida Porpoises Present Housekeeping
Chore at Fair ••••
WAC Fashion Pageant at Fair Reflects History ••••
Former President or Mexico a Visitor .•••
- 0 -
Saturday, May 16th, was a great day for the Irish at the New
York World's Fair. To the piercing strains of a bagpipe band, ·
Ireland's Minister for Industry and Commerce, the Hon. John
dedicated the Pavilion of Ireland.
The pavilion, housing historical, cultural and economic
exhibits, boasts two dominant architectural features: a modern
FROM: Wm. J. Donoghue Corporation
10 Columbus Circle, N.Y.C.
(more)
Newsletter •••
5/64-Rll7
- 2 -
version or the medieval round towers that still stand in many places
in Ireland, and a 7-toot high enclosure of native Irish stone.
A large delegation of Irish dignitaries were welcomed to the
Fair tor the dedication by Governor Charles Poletti, the Fair's vice
president for International Affairs and Exhibits, who spoke on behalf
ot Fair President Robert Moses. They included: William P. Fay,
Ireland's Ambassador to the U. S.; Cornelius Cremin, Ambassador to
the UN, and John O'Brien, the Republic's Consul General here.
- 0 -
M1ohigan•s Governor George Romney and his official party headed
a delegation of thousands from his state visiting the New York
World's Fair on Michigan State Day this week.
New York's Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller welcomed the official
party at the Fair gate; General William E. Potter, the Fair's
Executive Vioe President, presented Governor Romney with a silver
medallion at a Federal Pavilion ceremony.
Later, Michigan's first citizen addressed 1
1
500 at a Belgian
Village Rathskeller luncheon at which another famous Michigan native
also spoke - comedian Danny Thomas. After lunch, the Governor toured
major Transportation Area exhibits, including General Motors, Ford,
and Chrysler.
- 0 -
Austria, whose striking "A" shaped pavilion at the New York
World's Fair exhibits the cultural and industrial history of the
Danubian country, marked Official Austria Day at the Fair this week
by formally dedicating the pavilion.
His Eminence Francis Cardinal Spellman blessed the Austrian
Pavilion after presiding at a high mass, attended by 200 Austrian
dignitaries, at the Vatican Pavilion.
Dr. Fritz Bock, Minister of Trade and Reconstruction, headed
Austria's delegation at the dedication. The delegation was welcomed
to the Fair by Governor Charles Poletti, the Fair's Vice President
for International Affairs and Exhib:tts.
- 0 -
(more)
Newsletter •••
5/64-Rll7
- 3 -
South Carolina Governor Donald s. Russell "adopted" 65 teenage
members ot the Hicksville, Long Island (N.Y.) Junior High School Band
this dubbing the group South Carolina • s "official" band at the
New York World's Fair.
At the Pair for South Carolina State Day the Governor
and h1s otticial puty were offered the services of the IDng Island
school band in the absence of a unit from the Palmetto State.
The South Carolinians were welcomed to the Fair by General
William !. Potter. Ambassador K. Winston, Commissioner of the
United States EXhibit, greeted the party at the Federal Pavilion.
- 0-
Thousands ot Hungarian-Americana from the New York metropolitan
area marked "Hungary Nationality Day" at the New York World •a Fa1zt
this week.
Their focal point was an afternoon Folk Festival at the World's
Fair Pavilion. The gala, featuring Hungarian folk dancers, singers
and instrumentalists. was organized by the New York Chapter of the
kmerican Hungarian Society.
- 0 -
The Association for the Relief of Respectable, Aged, Indigent
Females in the City of New York marked its l50th anniversary with a
luncheon, fashion show and dinner at the New York 1964-1965 World's
Fair this past week.
Celebration of the anniversary coincided with the launching of
a campaign to raise $250,000 to modernize the plumbing at the asso-
ciation•s home on Amsterdam Avenue, between l03rd and l04th Streets,
the oldest and largest private tor the elderly home in the state.
- 0 -
One hundred and thirty-four years after its founding 1n New York
State and a covered wagon trek to Utah by its members, The Church of
Jesus Christ or Latter-day Saints - Mormons - symbolically "came
home" this week.
The Mbrmons dedicated their pavilion at the New York World's
Fair.
(more)
Hews letter •••
5/64-Rll7
- 4 -
MOrmon dignitaries • including Joseph Fielding
Sm1tl), a descendant or the Churoh•s founder - came from Salt Lake
City, ·Utah, the Mormon world to attend the dedication of the
pavilion, which features a 127-foot-high replica or the eastern
spirea of the ramed Salt Lake City Mbrmon Temple.
- 0-
A 61,000 square-root National Maritime Union Park, a trade union-
sponsored exhibit, was dedicated in the New York World Fair's
portation Area recently.
Joseph Curran, National Maritime Union AFL-CIO. president, and
20 seamen who had been torpedoed in World War II unveiled a plaque
to seamen 'who in the struggle to build our Union and in the
service of our country. "
- 0-
Everything is on a grandiose scale at the New York World's Fair -
even ribbon-cutting. Dedicating the ''Hall of Magic" at the General
Cigar Pavilion recently, magician Mark Wilson, creator of the pavil·
ion•s magic show, not only cut through the traditional ribbon, but
also sliced a blonde beauty neatly in twain .. then "reassembled" her.
The act will be a part of the show.
.. 0 ...
porpoises that gambol tor delighted Florida Pavilion visitors
at the New York Wottld 's Fair present a king size daily "housekeeping"
problem. 20,000 gallons or their 40,000 gallon salt water tank
"home" must be changed every day, Fresh New York water is carefully
salinized, and constant salt-level checks are made by pavilion staff.
- 0 -
An unusual fashion show, with eight members or the Women r s Army
Corps (WAC) as models, was staged twice at the New York World's Fair
on Saturday (May 16th).
"A Century of Women in Uniform," featuring the changing look in
women's uniforms since the Civil War, was seen by visitors to the
(more)
Newsletter •••
- 5-
.
TranspQrtat1on and Travel Pavilion, and at an earlier showing by
diners at the Top-of·the•Fa1r restaurant.
- 0 ...
Former President or Mexico, Don M1guel Aleman
1
was a recent
Fair v1s1tor.with his family. He was greeted by the Director or
Tourists tor the Mexican Pavilion, Gonzales De La Vega. Following
dinner at the Mexican Pavilion, the party toured the Fair.
Presently, Mr. Aleman is chair.man or the National Board of
Tourism of Mexico, to which post he was appointed by President Iopez
Mateos, He was President of Mexico from 1946 to 1952.
# # #
UNISPHERE
01061
5/64-RllS

NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
FLUSHING 52, N.Y. • TELEPHONE· AREA CODE 212·WF 4·1964 • CABLE ADDRESS "WORLDSFAIR"
Pt:AC£ THROUGH
UNOirASTANOINO
--..
~ - - -
NEWS:
REFER INQUIRIES TO:
Peter McDonnell
Jerome Edelberg
Joyce Martin
- WF 4-6531
- \vF 4-6541
- WF 4·6543
!Q! RELEASE: MONDAY, ~ £2., 1964
ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT
May 22, 1964
NEW Y O ~ WORLD'S FAIR, May 25 -- It all depends on your taste.
Eating is not a luxury at the World•s Fatr.
According to a survey made today, more than 50 per cent or the
Fair food service facilities offer food at prices ranging from 25
cents for a frankfurter to a main course for $1.50. Stxty-stx food
establishments with a total seating capacity of 13,091 fall into this
low-cost category.
In the $1.50 to $3.00 price range, the survey found 22 restaurants
seating 5,430. Eleven restaurants with 3,853 seats charge from $3.00
to $4.50. Another 11 restaurants with 3,146 seats offer meals from
$4.50 to $6.00 while 13 restaurants seating 3,214 are in the over
$6.oo category.
Snack bars located throughout the Fair grounds but without seat-
ing facilities were not included in the survey. This would have sub-
stantially increased the total oC inexpensive eating places.
The present restaurant and dining area capacity at the Fair of
28,734 seats will be augmented by 8,150 within the next two weeks.
More than half of these new facilities will be offering inexpensive
menus, according to the survey.
Among the low-priced food service facilities now operating, the
25 Brass Rail refreshment centers, with a 2,160 seating capacity,
offer 25-cent frankfurters, 35-cent hamburgers and a wide variety of
sandwiches under 65-cents. The Chun King Inn, with 600 seats serves
a seven variety dinner for 99 cents. A complete steak dinner for
$1.19 is obtainable at Tad's Steak House in the Hisconsin Pavilion.
The New York State Pavilion provides a full turkey dinner for $1.50 •. ·
Louisiana has steak and chicken dinners for $1.99. The survey also ·
showed many restaurants serving entrees in the $1.50 range.
FROM: Wm. J. Donoghue Corporation
10 Columbus Circle, N.Y.C.
# # #
5/64-Rl20
UN.ISPHEIIE
01861
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
FLUSHING 52, N.Y. • TELEPHONE- AREA CODE 212-WF 4·1964 • CABLE ADDRESS "WORLDSFAIR"
PIIEACt THROUGH
UtiiOEASTANOINO
--·

NEWS:
REFER INQUIRIES TO:
Peter McDonnell
Jerome Edelberg
Joyce Martin
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
- WF 4-6531
• WF 4-6541
- 'VJF 4-6543
ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT
May 22, 1964
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR, May 22 •• The last day of his vacation
paid ott today in prizes for John J. Fitzgerald, thirty-three, who
became the five millionth visitor to the New York 1964-1965 World's
Fair just a month after opening day.
The magic number came up as Mr. Fitzgerald, his wife, Grace,
twenty-eight, and their children, John J., Jr., five, and Eileen, two,
clicked through the turnstile at Gate 6 leading to the Fair's Amuse-
ment Area.
"I was never so surprised in my life," said Mr. Fitzgerald as he
and his family were greeted by Stuart Constable, Fair Vice President
of Operations, and William Berns, Fair Vice President of Communications
and Public Relations.
An accountant with the General Service Administration of the
u. s. Government, Mr. Fitzgerald lives at 72·16 Woodhaven
Glendale, Queens.
The Fitzgeralds entrance at the Fair was filmed on an 8 mm. Kodak
Electric 8-Zoom Camera. The camera then was presented to Mr.
Fitzgerald by Roy F. Horne, assistant manager of the Kodak Pavilion.
Mrs. Fitzgerald received a Kodak Inatamattc 300 Camera and the
children were presented with Kodak World's Fair Flash Cameras and
Mr. Fitzgerald said that this was the last chance he and his
family had to enjoy his nine-day vacation, which had been
by Eileen's bout with the German measles.
FROM: Wm. J. Donoghue Corporation
10 Columbus Circle, N.Y.C.
# # #
UN I SPHERE
5/64-Rl23
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
FLUSHING 52, N.Y. • TELEPHONE· AREA CODE 212·WF 4·1964 • CABLE ADDRESS "WORLDSFAIR"
.. lACE THROUGH
UNOEFtSTAJtDINQ
--..
~ ..... -....
NEWS:
REFER INQUIRIES '1'0 s
Peter MCDonnell • WF 4-6531
Jerome Edelberg • WF 4-6541
Joyce Martin • WF 4-6543
FOR JmLEASE APTER NOON SATURDAY, MAY 23, 1964
ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT
May 22, 1964
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR, May 23 ·- More than 2,250,000 frankfurters
at 25 cents each were sold to visitors at the New York World's Fair in
the first month, according to David J. Berge, president, Brass Rail
World•s Fair Organization, Inc. Mr. Berge stated that almost 2,000,000
hamburgers at 35 cents each were sold in the same period.
The Brass Rail World•s Fair Organization, Inc., a service of
Interstate United Corporation, is the largest food service operator
at the Fair, with 25 refreshment centers and six specialty restaurants.
Interstate United is a nationwide concern operating in 37 states.
"our restaurants and refreshment centers are very moderately
priced and they have been well patronized," Mr. Berge said.
' ~ o r the first 30 days of the Fair we have sold almost 2,000,000
hamburgers at 35 cents apiece, over 2,250,000 frankfurters at 25 cents
each, almost 2,000,000 orders of French fries and over 320,000 sand•
wiches of all kinds -- just to take a few food items that we sell,
11
he said.
The six Brass Rail restaurants at the Fair are also moderately
priced. Two restaurants, the Steak House and the Pan American Patio,
offer a complete sliced steak dinner, salad, dessert and choice of
beverages for $2.95; complete chicken dinners are offered at the
Garden and Country Farm restaurants for $2.75; a smorgasbord dinner is
served at the Danish Garden restaurant for $2.75 and a complete
Italian dinner with spaghetti, ravioli and meat balls, salad, dessert
and choice of beverages at the Italian Festival restaurant for $2.75.
Dinners for children are $1 less than the regular price.
"There is a restaurant or an eating place at the Fair f o ~ every
taste and for the financial means of every visitor, and this is ex-
actly what a great Fair should provide," Mr. Berge concluded.
FROM: Wm. J. Donoghue Corporation
10 Columbus Circle, N.Y.C.
# # #
5/64-Rl24
UNISPHERE

II
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
FLUSHING 52, N.Y. • TELEPHONE· AREA CODE 212·WF 4·1964 • CABLE ADDRESS