Box# 32

Folder# 621
Word's Fair:
Newsletters (7)
Aug ,1964
8/l•Rl
UNISPHERE
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NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
FLUSHING 52, N.Y. • TELEPHONE· AREA CODE 212·WF 4·1964 • CABLE ADDRESS "WORLOSFAIR"
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ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT
NEWS:
August 3, 1964
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Peter J. McDonnell
Jerome Edelberg
Joyoe Martin·
Bill Whitehouse
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NEW YORK 1264-1965 WORLD'S FAIR NEWSLETTER NO, 46
Hot Dogs and Hamburgers Popular Fair Fare ••••
Soviet Scientists Visit Pair ••••
Blind Visitor and Family "See" Fair ••••
New York Power Authority Display ••••
64 Year-Old Man Pedals To Fair From Coast ••••
Jack Dempsey Visits Chrysler Exhibit ••••
Bernard Baruch Lauds Flushing Meadow Exposition ••••
500th Performance of Lea Poupees de Paris ••••
Vatican Pavilion Displays Paintings by Congdon ••••
u.s. Youth Council Hosts Visit to Fair ••••
RCA Pavilion Lounge Offers Restful Atmosphere ••••
Ranger 7 Replica at u.s, Space Park ••••
Westinghouse Time Capsules ••••
Georgie Jessel Narrates American-Israel Pavilion Display ••••
Manual for Blind Fair Visitors Issued ••••
Maryknoll Sisters Tour Fair ••••
Los Angeles Dodger Players Visit Fair ••••
Eighteen fvl1llionth Visitor ••••
Christian Science Day ••••
Puerto Rico Nationality Day Folk Festival ••••
Civil Air Patrol Day ••••
UAR Day ••••
FROM: Wm. J. Donoghue Corporation
10 Columbus Circle, N.Y.C.
(more)
Newsletter, ••
SWiSS Day., ••
Vermont Day ••••
Colorado Day ••••
- 2 -
Equitable Life Assurance Society, •••
Sales Executive Day, •••
Prime Minister of Malayeia at Fair ••• ,
Malagasy Republic President Tours Fair ••• ,
Visit or Thailand Deputy Prime Minister to Fair ••••
AMP Scout Fitness Program Launched,,,,
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World's Fair Food Fact: although the exotic cuisine available
at the New York Fair is proving a major attraction, visitors
are not neglecting the good old American standbys, The Braes Rail
organization, operators or 25 refreshment stands and 6 restaurants
at the Flushing Pari<: expqstt.1on, has sold more than 8 million
hot doge and hamburgers since tbe Fair opened,
- 0 -
"Peace Through Understanding," the theme of the New York World's
Fair, was given a noteworthy application when a group or high-ranking
Soviet scientists toured the international exposition as guests or
Fair President Robert
The six man official party, including A.I. Churin, Chief Adminis-
trator or the Soviet State Committee on Co-ordination or Scientiric
Work, and N. Sinev, Deputy Chairman or the Soviet State Committee on
Atomic Energy, had been touring the u.s., visiting government research
and development installations as part of a u.s.-soviet exchange
program,
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"The realization of a dream", an "astounding sight", and "most
amazing" were some of the comments made by Frank w. Orrell, 47-year-
old blind Chattanooga (Tenn,) resident, his 17-year-old crippled son,
Donald, and his wife, Florence, who is afflicted with an eye ailment,
as they toured the New York t'lorld'a Fair recently,
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After a busy day Fairgoing, the handicapped visitors said, " O n l ~
exhaustion prevented us from seeing even more." The blind Orrell,
enthusiastic over his impressions of the Fair, said: "You can't help
but feel the spirit or the World's Fair, the sound or musio, the pene-
trating smell or food, the bouncing of balloons by children, and the
'pushing' of milling crowds. These things get you immediately."
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An impressive graphic display of the largest hydroelectric
complex in the western world, the Niagara and st. Lawrence Power
Projects, is attracting crowds to the exhibit sponsored by the Power
Authority of the State of New York in the New York State Pavilion at
the New York World's Fair.
The complex, completed during the nine-year tenure or Robert
Moses, now Fair President, as Power Authority Chairman, has an annual
energy output or 26 billion kilowatt hours of low-cost electricity.
More than 650,000 Fair visitors to date have toured the 3,000
square root exhibit. On view are striking photographs, including a
12-by-24 foot illuminated photo mural of Niagara Falls, dioramas and
cutaways. A recording explains how the Power Authority has utilized
water made available by a treaty with Canada to develop and operate
publicly owned power resources ot the Niagara River and the !nter-
national Rapids Section of the St. Lawrence River.
The Power Authority of the State of New York is a non-profit
organization created by the legislature to develop the hydroelectric
potential of the Niagara and st. Lawrence Rivers while preserving
their beauty. No state or federal money is used by the Authority.
It has sold more than a billion dollars in revenue bonds to prudent
private investors who are being repaid out of earnings from the sale
of the Authority's low-cost power to industry, municipal, rural co-
operatives and to private utilities.
The Authority is composed of five trustees appointed by the
Governor. Heading the group is James A. FitzPatrick, Plattsburgh,
N.Y., Chairman; Theodore Hill, Jr., Jefferson Valley, N.Y., Vice-
Chairman; F1nla G. Crawford, Andover, N.Y.; Edmund H. Brown, Lockport,
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Newsletter •••
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N.Y., and Arthur M. Richardson, Rochester, N. Y. Williams. Chapin
is the General Manager and Chief Engineer •
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A 64 year-old physical fitness enthusiast set a new distance
record tor those hardy souls who have thus far cycled to the New York
World's Fair. Willy Wright's record is not likely to be bested. The
Palm California man took six weeks to pedal from his home to
Flushing Meadow Park. "I tried to make 100 miles each day, but the
mountains slow a fellow down," said the stalwart bicyclist.
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Jack Dempsey, one of boxing's immortals, visited the Chrysler
Exhibit at the New York World's Fair recently and gave a
sample or his famous wry wit.
To a query about what had induced him to become a professional
pugilist, the Champ replied, grinning: "I always wanted to own my
own I'estaurant.,"
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Ninety four year-old elder statesman Bernard Baruch toured the
New York World's Fair recently and commented, "I never dreamed I'd
live to see a Fair like this one."
He was accompanied by Fair President Robert Moses and Fgtr Corpo-
ration advisor Judge Sam I. Roseman and Mrs. Roseman. Asked by Mr.
Moses if he would return to the Fair, the elder statesman said, "This
was the most interesting evening I've ever had. You couldn't keep me
away."
- 0 -
"Lea Poupees de Parts," the smash hit puppet show at the vlalter-
Krofft Theater in the New York World's Fair Amusement Area, chalked
up its 500th performance recently.
The Sid and Marty Krofft production features 250 French dolls
who sing, dance, swim, ice-skate and entertain in the Ztegfteld
manner. The one hour revue plays five shows a day, with siX on week-
ends.
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Newsletter •••
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Ten abstract paintings on a religious theme by William Congdon
have been put on display in the Vatican Pavilion at the New York
World's Fair. Among the

torks displayed are "The Eucharist," "The
Crucifixion," "The Black City," and "Christ on the l8ke.
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Congdon, presently residing in Assist, Italy, has paintings
hanging in museums all over the world, including the Whitney Museum
and the Museum of Modern Art in New York.
- 0 -
More than 300 youths from some 100 nations, guests of the u.s.
Youth Council here to attend the World Assembly or Youth at the
University of Massachusetts, Anmerst, toured the New York World
1
s
Fair recently.
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The "Staging Lounge" in the RCA Pavilion at the New York World's
Fair is a wonderful place for a visitor to rest his tired teet and
at the same time be entertained 1n soothing, relaxing fashion.
Classical and popular music is piped through hidden loud speakers
set in the walls high up around the pleasantly draped, air-conditioned
room, which is darkened to just the right degree for TV, and the color
television is shown in this room from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. daily.
- 0 -
A full scale replica of the Ranger 7 spacecraft which photo-
graphed the moon's surface was placed on temporary display at the
u.s. Space Park at the New York World's Fair along with tour of the
photos or the moon taken by Ranger 1.
The u.s. Space Park at the Fair is sponsored by the National
Aeronautics and Space Administration and the Department ot Defense.
- 0 -
Future archeologists probing the site or the New York World's
Fair will owe a debt of gratitude to the Westinghouse Electric Corpo•
ration.
The company's Time Capsule Pavilion, located in the international
exposition's Federal and States Area, features three cycloramic
(more)
Newsletter •••
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displays showing many of the contents or a 1938 Time Capsule, a record
ot progress over the past 25 years, and a 5,000-year calendar ofstgnif•
icant historical events.
site'!
The original Capsule is buried at this same
Time Capsule II will be buried there on Oct. 16, 1965. Contents
ot the new capsule will go on display at the pavilion during the Fair•s
1965 season.
- 0 -
11
A Journey Through 4,000 Years ot Jewish History," the audio-
visual tour taken by visitors to the American-Israel Pavilion at the
New York World's Fair, has a taped narration by Georgie Jessel,
veteran entertainer.
The taped narration has ten sections, each relating to a different
aspect or Jewish history, from the Biblical era to modern Israel.
Pavilion guides point out displays related to the narrative.
- 0 -
A pamphlet to guide blind visitors at the New York World's Fair,
titled "A Fingertip Trip Through The Fair," has been published by
Convention Planners, Inc.
The only such aid for the sightless, the new publication presents
an itinerary of exhibits which can be most easily toured -- and
enjoyed -- by the blind. It also lists dining places and entertain-
ments.
The idea for the pamphlet originated with Mr. Al Sperber, Presi•
dent of Convention Planners, Inc., who is himself blind.
- 0 -
Fifty seven laryknoll Sisters from more than a dozen nations
visited the New York World's Fair recently as guests of Mr. and Mrs.
James A. Roe of Queens (N.Y.).
The Sisters, who had gathered from all over the world to attend
a conclave at the Order's establishment in Ossining, N.Y., spent a
day at the Fair that included visits to many foreign pavilions and a
Mass at the Vatican Pavilion. The group was headed by Mother General
Mary Colman. A daughter of Mr. Roe, their host, is a Maryknoll Sister.
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Newsletter,,,
- 7 -
8/64-Rl
Eight members of the Los Angeles Dodgers spent a day at the New
York World's Fair recently,

Related Interests

Ially Moon, Darrell Griffith, Mauey Willa,
Jim Brewer, Tommy Davis, Howie Reed, Larry Miller and Joe Moeller saw
the film "Triumph of Man" at the Travelers Insurance Pavilion, The
players lunched at the Millstone Restaurant in the New England States
Exhibition, where they received World's Fair Medallions from Fair
Sports Director William Adams. After lunch, they toured the General
Motors and Denmark Pavilions,
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Two o.I.'s stationed at Fort Dix, New Jersey, were the lucky 18
millionth visitors to the New York World's Fair.
Priv.ate Michael R. Davis, 64 Pleasant Street, Athol, Mass., and
Private Robert J. Permoda, 443 Schiller Street, Buffalo, N,Y,, were
making their first visit to Flushing Meadow Park when they were greeted
by Fair official Leigh Chamberlain and told that they were to be ac-
corded a VIP tour complete with special aide, automobile, and topped
with a three hour luau at the Hawaiian EJmibit.
The occasion proved providential, The servicemen, on a weekend
pass from their base, revealed that they had only six dollars between
them.
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Christian Science Day at the New York World's Fair drew 12,000
people to Singer Bowl. It was one of the largest crowds to attend an
event at the Fair's open-air stadium. They came to hear a one-hour
talk by Herbert E. Rieke of Indianapolis, Indiana, a member of the
Christian Science Board of Lectureship.
Mr, Rieke told his audience that "one of the greatest desires in
the hearts of men is to establish and maintain harmonious relation-
ships with others," and said that "the only sure way to peaceful
relationships is through an understanding of man's relationship to God:
After the Singer Bowl ceremony, thousands visited the Christian
Science Pavilion in the International Area. The Pavilion, staffed by
volunteers from all over the world, is a striking structure shaped like
a 7-point star.
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(more)
Newsletter •••
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Puerto Rican Nationality Day at the New York t·lorld' s Fair was
characterized by a colorful whirl of island music and dancing. At a
festival in The Pavilion, Puerto Ricans residing in the New York metro-
politan area enjoyed a 2-hour evening program featuring popular Joe
Valle and his orchestra, singer Ruth Fernandez, dancers Polly and Jimmy
Rogers of "West Side Story" fame, a native combo headed by Ladi Marinez,
soprano Amalia Duarte, and Puerto Rican actress Miriam Colon.
Miss Magdalia Jordan, San Juan Festival Queen and a student at the
University of Puerto Rico, was introduced to the gathering. The cele-
bration marked 12th anniversary of the creation of the Commonwealth
of Puerto Rico.
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Civil Air Patrol Day at the New York World's Fair was celebrated
with an official ceremony at the Federal Pavilion in honor of the 17th
Annual International Air Cadet Exchange Program.
One hundred and forty-five young airmen from 22 countries partici-
pated in the celebration. At the Federal Pavilion, Fair Executive Vice
President General William E. Potter presented a World's Fair Silver
Medallion·to Colonel W. Turner of the Civil Air Patrol. Also
present for the occasion were Colonel Jess Strauss, Commander of CAP•s
New York Wing, and Major Dorothy L. Welker of the CAP. Colonel Strauss
_presented CAP New York Wing public service award ceritficates to the
Fair Corporation and the u. s. World's Fair Commission.
FQllowing the presentation ceremony, and luncheon at the Pavilion
or Mexfco
1
the 145-.air cadets toured several major Fair pavilions, in ..
eluding the U, s. Space Park.
- 0 -
United Arab Republic Day at the New York Worldts Fair
was occasion for a reception and buffet dinner hosted by the U.A.R.
Consul General in New York, Mr. Mohamed Kamel Ahmed, at the U.A.B.
Pavilion.
Heading the list of 300 dignitaries who attended the affAir: His
Excellency Dr. Mostafa Kamel, Ambassador of the U.A.R. to the U.S.;
His Excellency Mohamed Awad El Kouny, Ambassador to the United Nations
(more)
Newsletter •••
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and head of the U,A.R, Permanent Delegation; His Excellency Ambassador
Amtn Hilmy II, Deputy Permanent Representative of the U.A.R. to the
United Nations.
- 0 -
The Swiss Pavilion at the New York World's Fair celebrated Swiss
Independence Day by inviting a group of 45 orphans to enjoy some of
the delights the Fair provides for children.
The youngsters, from the Bethlehem-Lutheran Orphanage in Staten
Island, and their counselors participated in Swiss Pavilion flag
raising ceremonies marking the official opening of "Swiss Day
11
at the
Fair, and were provided with balloons, samples of cheese, boxes of
chocolate and all the ice cream they could eat.
Their tour included a visit to the Ford Pavilion, a ride through
Disney's "Small World" in Pepsi Cola's Pavilion, the Swiss Sky Ride,
the porpoise show at the Florida Pavilion and lunch in the African
Pavilion's "Treehouse" restaurant.
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Vermont's 40 year-old Governor Philip H. Hoff, keynoted Vermont
State Day at the New York World's Fair.
After receiving a World's Fair Silver Medallion from Fair President
Robert Moses, the Vermonter donned a pair of five foot skis and exe-
euted an intricate "side step" manuever down a 35 foot, 30-degree nylon
carpeted "snow slide" in front of the New England States Exhibit. He
also christened a subway oar "State of Vermont,
11
At the ceremonies marking his state's day at the international
exposition, Governor Hoff called the Fair "a most delightful spectacle
which shows the world of today and tomorrow." He added: "I can't
conceive anybody in this country or abroad who is able to visit the
World's Fair not doing so."
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Colorado State Day at the New York World's Fair was celebrated
with special ceremonies at the Fair's Federal Pavilion where an offi-
cial delegation from the Centennial State was greeted by General
William E. Potter, Fair Vice President.
(more)
Newsletter •••
8/64•Rl
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u. s. Senator Gordon L, Allott headed the delegation that included
19 year-old Kathleen Knight, "f·1ias Colorado" and Chief Justice of the
Colorado Supreme Court Robert H. McWilliams.
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Ceremonies marking the l05th anniversary of the Equitable Life
Assurance Society of the u.s. were celebrated at the Equitable
exhibit at the New York World's Fair,
James F. Oates Jr., chairman of the board, greeted more than 500
leading agents and their families attending the anniversary "Day" held
under a tent adjoining the exhibit, The Choral Group from Equitable's
New York home office entertained the guests. Box lunches, novelty
"skimmer" hats and balloons for the children gave the affair a picnic
atmosphere.
General William E. Potter, Executive Vice President of the World's
Fatr extended birthday greetings and welcomed the group on behalf of
Fair President Robert Moses,
- 0 -
At a luncheon marking Sales Executive Day at the New York World's
Fair, members of the sales Executive Club of New York paid tribute to
a young lady who has done an outstanding selling Job for the Flushing
Meadow exposition.
Miss Anne McKeon, who is "Miss World's Fair Summer Festival Queen"
and has traveled to nearly every state in the Union on behalf of the
international e:tpoeition, received a "Supersalesman Award" from the
club's president, John Timothy Collins.
After the luncheon at the Top of the Fair restaurant in the Fair's
Port Authority Building, members of the sales organization toured Fair
pavilions,
- 0 -
The Prime Minister of Malaysia, His Excellency Prince Tunku Abdul
Rahman, visited the New York World's Fair on the occasion of Malaysia
Day at the international exposition.
The Prime Minister's visit was highlighted by a visit to his
nation's colorful pavilion at the Fair and the presentation of a
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Newsletter ••• 8/64-Rl
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World's Fair Gold Medallion by Governor Charles Poletti, the Fair's
vice president for international affairs. There were also receptions
at the Federal Pavilion and the Official Women•s Hospitality Center
in the Purex Penthouse of the Better Living Center. Accompanying him
was His Excellency Dato Ong Yoke Lin, Malaysian Ambassador to the u.s.
Dr. Ralph Bunche was among the dignitaries who greeted the Prime
Minister during his Fair visit.
- 0 -
His Excellency Philibert Tsiranana, President of the Malagasy
Republic, toured the New York World's Fair recently and was presented
with the World's Fair Gold Medallion by Thomas J. Deegan, Jr., chairman
of the Fair's executive committee.
The Malagasy Republic, once the French overseas territory of
Madagascar, is a large island off the African east coast.
- 0 -
The Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Interior of Thailand,
His Excellency General Praphat Charusathian, visited the New York
World's Fair recently.
After a welcome by Fair officials, the Prime Minister toured the
Pavilion of Thailand, the Federal Pavilion, and other major exhibits.
A luncheon was tendered him by the Fair Corporation at the Pavilion
of Malaysia.
In the evening, the Prime Hinister was the guest of honor at a
reception and dinner in the "Nid of Thailand," the restaurant in his
nation•s pavilion.
- 0 -
The American Machine & Foundry Company launched its $30,000
"Sports That Last A Lifetime" fitness program for Explorer Scouts at
the New York World's Fair.
At the AMF Monorail site, the first check for $2,750, raised by
setting aside the eightieth penny from each Monorail fare, was
sented by AMF chairman Carter Burgess to Charles member of
the BSA National Executive Board and chairman of the Scout's New York
World's Fair Committee.
(more)
Newsletter •••
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"Sports That Last A Lifetime" medallions will be won bJ Explorers
who equal or surpass standards set in bowling, golf, and
physical fitness established jointly by the Boy Scouts ot America and
the AMP Company.
# # #
8/64-R6
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NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
FLUSHING 52, N.Y. • TELEPHONE· AREA CODE 212-WF 4-1964 • CABLE ADDRESS "WORLDSFAIR"
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Jerome Edelberg
Joyce Martin
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MUSIC AT THE WORLD'S FAIR
ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT
August 3, 1964
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR, Aug. 3 --Visitors to the World's Fair
have shown a tremendous response to the free public dance programs
presented regularly by the nation's leading maestros on the Flushing
Meadow Fairgrounds.
Music tempos to suit every mood are offered by famous orchestras
in the "dance under the stars
11
presentations, with Guy Lombardo and
his Royal Canadians playing six nights weekly, Tuesday through Sunday,
at the Tiparillo Band Pavilion.
The Singer Bowl has also been a popular stomping place for the
world's most popular jazz stars and will also become a ballroom for
"sw1ngers
11
for the first time on Aug. 5, with the public invited to
dance to the music of Duke Ellington and his 15-man orchestra.
The dance sessions will follow a jazz festival starring Ellington
and Dave Brubeck and his popular quartet.
The Singer Bowl will echo to the rhythm of a "new beat" on Friday,
Aug. 7, when it becomes the scene of a Jamaica "ska
11
party featuring
the songs and music of several pop artists and groups.
The music trend changes on Aug. 18_, at the Singer Bowl,
when Grand opera will be presented for the first time. Students of
the music school of Indiana University will stage the first of two
performances of "Turandot.
11
FROM: Wm. J. Denoghue Corporation
· tO Columbus Circle, N.V.C.
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More than 400 people have been literally hopping at the Carousel
Park in the Lake Amusement Area on Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights
from 1 to 9 P.M., to the strains of the Crestmen, a popular 5-piece
recording combo. The combo plays everything from rock 'n' roll to
fox trots. The combo started playing there on July 19 and has had the
park "jumping" at the sessions held three nights a week.
Dixieland Jazz will be a new feature of the park starting Sunday,
August 2. A jazz combo will entertain the patrons ot the park every
Sunday afternoon.
"Fair Is Fair", composed by Richard Rodgers, is the theme song
tor the World's Fair, but the music of every nation is in evidence for
touring visitors in the various pavilions.
One of the most popular musical features of the exposition is the
Cities Service World's Fair Band of America, which travels throughout
the grounds in its unique bandwagon, playing as it rolls and providing
at least six concerts daily.
conducted by the renowned bandmaster, Paul Lavalle, the 50-piece
band plays anything from jazz to the classics, from the twist to
stirring marches.
Fraternal organizations, colleges and high schools have all con-
tributed to the daily presentation of music at the Fair, along with
ethnic groups and foreign exhibitors expressing their cultural
heritage through music.
Every musical phase is represented, including the barbershop
quartet. From Monday, August 31, through Friday, September 4, the
Mid-Atlantic District Association of the Society for the Preservation
and Encouragement of Barbershop Quartet Singing in America will have
two male choruses entertaining at the Fair each evening.
.Jl
;t # #
8/64-R7
UNISPHEIIE
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NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
FLUSHING 52, N.Y. • TELEPHONE· AREA CODE 212·WF 4·1964 • CABLE ADDRESS "WORLDSFAIR"
PEACE THROUGH
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REFER INQUIRIES TO:
Peter McDonnell
Jerome Edelberg
Joyce Martin
- WF 4-6531
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- NP 4-6543
FOR RELEASE: AT NOON, TUESDAY,. AUGUST_!!.
ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT
August 3, 1964
WORLD
1
S FAIR PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS FOR WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 5
NEW YORK WORLD
1
S FAIR, Aug. 4 -- There will be highlights on the
Pair's program of daily events for Wednesday that will be a treat to
the eyes, ears, dancing feet and for camera buffs. At 10 A.M. twenty-
five foreign beauty queens, contestants 1n the International Beauty
Pageant at Long Beach, Calif., will begin their day at the Fair. From
8 to 9:30 P.M., there will be a free concert followed by an hour of
free dancing at the Singer Bowl. The concert will feature the music
of the Dave Brubeck and Duke Ellington bands.
Although the music of Duke Ellington has been an American (and
world-wide) institution for decades, Ellington's greatest renown is as
a composer. Almost 20 years ago in one of Ripley's "Believe It Or Not"
cartoons, it was stated that it would take 2-l/2 days of steady play-
ing, without repeating, to play all of Duke's compositions. In view
of the great flow of the proverbial water under the bridge and composi-
tions from the talented Ellington pen, Duke was recently asked to up-
date this estimate. His reply was, "we don't count them --we just
compose them". Although his popular compositions like "Solitude",
111
A'
Train
11
11
11
Black and Tan Fantasy", "Mood Indigo", etc. are
well known, he has also composed the words and music (as well as doing
the choreography, producing and directing) for the Stratford
Shakespearean production of
11
Timon of Athens". He also did the score
FROM: Wm. J. Donoghue Corporation
10 Columbus Circle, N.Y.C.
(more)
8/64-R7
- 2 -
f'ol' the National Theater's production of' the Turcaret classic, "Lesage".
In addition he has composed the scores for such movies as "Anatomy of'
a Murder" and "Paris Blues". He has written the scores for operettas,
musical comedies and plays including his own productions of "Beggars'
Holiday" and "My People". He and his band have done command perform-
ances on many occasions before the rulers of' many countries.
Brubeck, one of the leading exponents of' modern jazz, recently
played at the White House at President Lyndon B. Johnson's request on
the occasion of a visit by King Hussein or Jordan (just prior to his
visit to the world's Fair). He and his group have toured the Middle
East for the State Department and he also has the distinction or having
appeared on the cover of Time Magazine. He has made many appearances
with symphony orchestras blending the idiom of modern jazz with that
of' classical music.
Fa1rgoers can do a double "take" -- "Take Five" and "Take the
1
A'
Train" -- on Wednesday night. Brubeck and Ellington respectively are
sure to render these standards during their dual concert. Brubeck and
his group will play from 8 to 9 P.M.; Ellington will play in concert
from 9 to 9:30 P.M., and for dancing from 9:30 to 10:30 P.M.
The 25 foreign contestants in the International Beauty Pageant
will spend the morning touring pavilions near the Cla1rol Color
Carousel, cutting a color video tape at the RCA Pavilion at 11 A.M.
and having a 12:30 luncheon at the Belgium Village. They will tour
the Fair during the afternoon and depart via helicopter at 5 P.M. for
Kennedy Airport.
Suffolk County, N. Y. Day will be celebrated at the New York State
Pavilion beginning at 11 A.M. with the St. James, N. Y., Royalaires
Drum and Bugle Corps, repeating at 2:30 P.M. At 11:30 A.M. and 3:30
P.M., the Avolese Accordion Band of' Commack, N. Y., will entertain.
At Noon and 4 P.M., the Junior Wing No. 101, Vasa Order of America,
Swedish Folk Dancers of Greenlawn, N. Y., will dance. The Hi Fi
1
s
from Kings Park, N. Y., will play from 12:30 to 5:30 P.M. At 1 P.M,
and again at 5 P.M., the Blue Wanderers Drum and Bugle Corps from
Blue Point, N. Y., will perform. The Vibrations of Huntington, N. Y.,
(more)
8/64·R7
... 3 -
play at 2 and 6:30 P.M., The Mighty Gospel Keys of Southampton, N. Y.,
entertain at 3 and 1 P.M., and at 4:30 and 7:30 P.M., the Beverly Hill
School Vocal Group from South Huntington, N. Y,, sings. From 8 P.M.
until the 10 P.M. closing the Long Island Square Dancers Federation
entertains.
At the New England States Exhibition at 1:30 and again at 3:30
P.M., the Milford, Conn., Youth Band Concert will be held.
The Rotary Club luncheon and meeting will be hosted, beginning
at Noon, by the Derby-Shelton, Conn., 798 and the Guilford, Conn., 798
Rotary Clubs at the Texas Pavilions Restaurant.
Charles Coiner, Midtown Galleries artist and pioneer in commis-
sioning fine art for advertising purposes, will be guest lecturer in
the Decorating Theatre in the Pavilion of American Interiors on
Wednesday, August 5, at 2:30 P.Mo Mr. Coiner will discuss "Nature
and Art in Your Home". He will demonstrate his painting techniques
and portray the artist at work.
"Dialogues in Depth
11
, a program from the Hall of Education, will
feature an interview with Hy Gardner, noted columnist and television
personality, at 7 P.M. "Dialogue in Depth" interviews are released
over Channel 31.
The Fireworks and Fountain display at the Fountain of the Planets
begins at 9 P.M. with the "Patriotic Show
11

There will be music for listening at 7:15 P.M. when Paul Lavalle
conducts the Band or America at the Court of the Universe, Pool of
Industry. Free music for dancing will be presented by Guy Lombardo
and his Royal Canadians from 9:30 P.M. to 12:30 A.M. at the Tiparillo
Band Pavilion.
An "Employees' Party" featuring danoing at the Rathskeller in the
Belgium Village will be open to all Fair employees and their guests at
a fee of $1. These parties will be held each Wednesday from 10 P,M.
to the Fair
1
s closing.
ENTERTAINMENT WILL CONTINUE IN THE LAKE AMUSEMENT AREA UNTIL
2 A,M,
# # #
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FOR IMMEDIATE R E L ~
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ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT
August 4, 1964
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR, Aug. 4 -- The 20th million person passed
through the World's Fair Main Gate No. 1 (Gotham Plaza), this afternoon
at exactly 3:25 P.M.
Robert (Bob) H. Brown, his wife, Betty, and their four children,
from Bedford, Indiana, "couldn't believe our good fortune" when
informed by William Berns, Vice President or Communications and Public
Relations at the Fair, that they had "just won more than $2,000 in
assorted gifts
11

"Gee", "Wow", were the comments made when the gifts "earned" were
described to him. From the Belgium Village came a Val St. Lambert
crystal vase valued at $1,000; from Delta Airlines a set of Hartman
luggage costing more than $100; from the Lebanon Pavilion, a mosaic
box of cedar of Lebanon wood inlaid in ivory and mother of pearl, a
ladies leather handbag, hand-printed in 22 carat gold, a handmade
Buffalo knife and a Lebanon doll dressed in folk costume.
Also: cameras to the individual family members from the Kodak
Pavilion; gold earrings and cuff links to each of them, in addition to
a vegetable blender valued at $70, from the Transportation and Travel
Pavilion, World of Ancient Gold; a dinner at the Festival of Gas as
guests of Restaurant Associates; cocktails, etc., at the Glass Tower
Restaurant of the Pavilion of American Interiors, where they viewed
the water and fireworks show at the Fountain of the Planets, and free
FROM: Wm. J. Donoghue Corporation
10 Columbus Circle, N.Y.C.
{more)
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tickets to "Around the World in 80 Days" at Jones Beach
1
and a Goodyear
Blimp ride above New York City.
Accompanying Bob and his wtre were two daughters
1
two-year-old
Lisa and 14-year-old Marilyn
1
and sons, 6-year-old Rhett and 9-year-old
Reese. Bob ts Assistant Vice President or the Stone City National Bank.
The Browns arrived in New York City yesterday (Monday) and had planned
to spend the "rest or the week at the World's Fair".
They came to the Fair for two reasons
1
said Mr. Brown, the good
things they heard about in the Mid-West
1
and because it marks "the 30th
anniversary of the last World's Fair we saw. That was in Chicago in
1934".
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FOR RELEASE: AT NOON, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 2
ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT
August 4, 1964
WORLD'S FAIR PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS FOR THURSDAY, AUGUST 6
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR, Aug, 4 -- Special Days at the Fair on
Thursday will include: American Accordionists' Association Day; the
fifth day of American Field Service week; National 4th Infantry (Ivy)
Division Association Day; State Chief Justices' Day; Women's Law Day;
Yates County Day and Metuchen Day.
The American Accordionists' Association will hold an "Accordion
Festival" made up of programs embracing three separate types of music
at the World's Fair Pavilion. At 10 A.M. there will be intermediate
band competition, at 12:30 P.M. jazz competition and at 1:30 P.M.
orchestra competition. In addition to these competitions, there will
be a concert by the Conservatory Accordion Orchestra from 11 to 11:30
A.M. at the base of the Swiss Sky Ride near the Federal Pavilion.
Metuchen Day ceremonies at the New Jersey Tercentenary Pavilion
from 2 to 4 and from 7 to 9 P.M., will include remarks by Mayor Robert
Flanagan of Metuchen; the crowning of 17-year-old Marie Toth as
"Metuchen Queen"; entertainment by the Metuchen Summer Music School
Band and Orchestra; the Metuchen H.s. Footlightera; Sharon's Range-
rettes, Mid-Atlantic Baton and Drill Team Champions; the Ultra-Sonics,
a jazz quartet; the Casuals, a vocal quartet; the Sentimentalists, a
dance band, and the Dynamics, a rock 'n' roll group.
FROM: Wm. J. Donoghue Corporation
10 Columbus Circle, N.Y.C.
(more)
8/64•Rl2
- 2 -
The New York State Pavilion will be celebrating Yates County Day
with a full program of entertainment in its Special Events Avea. Among
the groups participating will be The Varitones, a 50-member vocal and
instrumental group from Penn Yan Academy in Yates County, performing at
12:15, 3:30 and 7:30 P.M.
Other New York State talent performing throughout the day will be
Roy and Mick,folk singers from Carle Place, at 12:45, 2:45 and 6:45P.M.;
the George Connelly Dancers with the Vonels, a rock 'n' roll group from
Richmond Hill at 1:30 and 4 P.M.; Miss Terry Krupicka
1
1963 New York
State Junior Twirling Champion, with the Tremolos, an instrumental group
from Flushing at 5:45 and 8 P.M. and the 4th Dimensions from Whitestone
at 9 P,M.
There will be four programs saluting the u. s. Air Force. At the
Court of the Universe, the McGuire Air Force Band, the USAF Drill Team
and the USAF Pipe Band will perform at 11:30 A ~ M . At 1:30 P.M. at the
Court of the Universe, the Stewart Air Force Band along with the USAF
Drill Team and Pipe Band will perform. At 3:30 and 5:30 P.M. the u. s.
Air Force Pipe Band in Billy Mitchell Tartan Kilts (chosen in honor of
Billy Mitchell) will play for the u. s. Honor Guard and Drill Team at
the Federal Pavilion.
At noon the Rotary Club luncheon and meeting at the Texas Pavilions
Restaurant will be hosted by the Rotary Club of Roxbury, N. J., 747, and
co-hosted by the Rotary Club of Netcong-Stanhope, N. J,, 747.
At 1:30 and 3:30 P.M. the historical Mattatuck Fife and Drum Corps,
of Waterbury, Conn., will march and present a concert, They Will be
dressed in authentic colonial costumes.
At 2 P,M. the St. Fidelia Majestic Knights will perform at the
New York City Building and the Hedgesville, w. va. H ~ S , Band will be
performing at the Federal Pavilion at the same time.
The Children's Community Chorus of Tonawanda, N. Y,
1
will perform
at the Tiparillo Band Pavilion at 2:30 P.M.
The National Beauty Culturists League will hold a tea from 3 to
5 P.M. at the Official Women's Hospitality Center in the Purex Pent-
house of the Better Living Center.
(more)
- 3 -
The Dynamic Maturity Pavilion will hold their monthly drawing tor
a tree 50·day tour of Europe at 3:30 P.M. The drawing will be made by
the July winners, Mr. and Mrs. Howard Hagmann of west Orange
1
N. J.
This contest is open to persons 55 years old or over who are members of
the American Association of Retired Persons or of the National Retired
Teachers Association. Membership for both these organizations can be
obtained at the Dynamic Maturity Pavilion.
The "Great Masters" show will be presented at the Fountain of
Planets at the Court of the Universe at 9 P.M., right after the Band of
America, conducted by Paul Lavalle, concludes its 7:15 to 8:40 P,M. tree
twilight concert.
Guy Lombardo and his Royal Canadians will provide music tor free
public dancing from 9:30 P.M. to 12:30 A.M.
ENTERTAINMENT CONTINUES IN THE LAKE AMUSEMENT J.\REA UNTIL 2 A.M.
# # #
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Joyce Martin
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FOR RELEASE: THURSDAY, AUGUST 6
ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT
August 5, 1964
WORLD'S FAIR, Aug. 5 -- A Festival of Accordion Music --
spanning a 12-hour period and featuring more than 500 artists of the
accordion be presented in the Singer Bowl at the World's Fair,
Friday, August 7.
Among the stars of the unusual music marathon will be the
Harmonicats and the popular jazz group, the Art Van Damm Trio.
Co-stars will be "Skeets" Langley, world
1
s champion aocordionis t;
Charles Magnante, accordion star of radio, television, and the stage,
and Beverly Roberts, female accordion champion of the United States.
The accordion extravaganza will begin at 10 A.M. and run until
10 P.M., with no admission charge for visitors to the Fair.
It will follow a day-long competition on Thursday in which 2,700
young accordionists from throughout the United States will seek
national solo and ensemble championships at the World's Fair Pavilion
and at the Hotel Commodore in Manhattan.
The aeries of events is sponsored by the American Accordionists'
Association.
FROM: Wm. J. Donoghue Corporation
10 Columbus Circle, N.Y.C.
# # #
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- WF 4-6531
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FOR RELEASE: AT NOON, THURSDAY, AUGUST 6
ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT
August 5, 1964
WORLD'S FAIR PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS FOR FRIDAY, AUGUST 7
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR# Aug. 5 -- Friday at the Fair has been
designated Arizona-Sonora Recognition Day; the second day of the Women's
Track and Field Olympic Trials at Downing Stadium; the second American
Accordionists• Association Day; the final day of American Field Service
Week; Galaxies Day at the N. J. Tercentenary Pavilion; Musto Pot-Pourri
(sic) Day at the N. Y. State Pavilion# and Salute to the u. s. Air Force
Day.
Arizona-Sonora Recognition Day is part of a mutual cultural and
trade relations program between the State of Sonora, Mexico and Arizona.
The aim of the program is to develop knowledge about products needed
and products produced by these two states in order to stimulate
reciprocal trading and eventually a Common Market between them.
The Governor of Arizona, the Hon. Paul Fannin, and the Governor of
Sonora, the Hon. Luis Encinas, will head a delegation of 250 (125 from
Arizona, 125 from Sonora) to the Fair. After being greeted at the New
Amsterdam Gate (No. 2) at 10:45 A.M. by Fair officials# the party will
participate in Arizona-Sonora Recognition Day Ceremonies at the Mexican
Pavilion starting at 11 A.M. Following this ceremony# the party will
attend a reception and luncheon at the Terrace Club at 12:15 P.M. and
tour the Fairgrounds afterward. The day's program at the Fair will
conclude with a 6:15 P.M. luau at the Restaurant of the Five Volcanoes
at the State of Hawaii Exhibit tn the Lake Amusement Area.
FROM: Wm. J. Donoghue Corporation
10 Columbus Circle, N.Y.C.
(more)
8/64-Rl9
- 2 -
After a full program or accordion competition, the second consecu-
tive American Accordionists• Association Day will be climaxed with a
three-hour "Accordion Cavalcade" which will be highlighted by a concert
by a 500-piece accordion band in Singer Bowl beginning at 7 P.M. During
the day the Association will stage an "Accordion Festival" which will
include Senior Band Competition from 10 A.M. to Noon, and Band Competi-
tion at the World's Fair Pavilion from 1:30 to 3:30P.M. The "Cavalcade"
at night, will feature Jerry Murad
1
s Harmonicats in addition to the 500-
piece accordion band at the Singer Bowl.
The Salute to the United States Air Force Day Program will be
divided between the Federal Pavilion and the Court of the Universe. A
program by the Stewart Air Force Base Band and performances by the
USAF Drill Team and the USAF Pipe Band will be given at 11 A,M. and
3 P.M. at the Court or the Universe and a performance by the McGuire
Air Force Base Band and the USAF Drill Team will be given there at
1:30 P.M. The program at the Federal Pavilion will feature the Air
Force Band and the Singing Sergeants at 2 and 4 P.M. and the United
States Air Force Pipe Band in Mitchell Tartan Kilts, and the u. s.
Honor Guard and Drill Team performing at 3:30 and 5:30 P.M. The day's
program will be highlighted by a joint concert featuring the Stewart
and McGuire Air Force Base Bands at 5 P.M. at the Court of the Universe.
The New Jersey Tercentenary Pavilion will celebrate Galaxies Day.
The Galaxies, a rock •n• roll quartet from Trenton, N. Jo, will perform
from 1 to 2 P,M. The program will feature Art Sheedy as M.c., and
organ interlude music by Bolton Holmes. The program will be color
video taped at 7 P.M. at the RCA Pavilion.
Music Pot-Pourri Day at the New York State Pavilion will feature
programs by The Constellations, a rock •n• roll group from Flushing;
The Trolls, a male quartet combo from Hastings-on-Hudson; The Del-Tones,
an instrumental and vocal rock 'n' roll group from the Bronx; The
Inspirations, a rock
1
n' roll combo from Laurelton; The Problems, an
instrumental combo from Maspeth; Frank Abel and the Vanguards, a jazz
and dance band from Roosevelt, and The Collegians, an instrumental
group from Maspeth.
(more)
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ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDF.NT
August 1964
NEW YORK WORLD'S Aug. 5 -- They say that figures never lie.
That's why authorities at the Wisconsin Pavilion at the New York World's
Fair are proclaiming far and wide the huge success of their exhibit.
Wisconsin apparently has come up with a formula that ts responsible
tor the popularity of its attractions, according to General William E.
Potter, Executive Vice President of the World's Fair. "They provide
Fairgoers with good food at low prices, wholesome entertainment, a
trout fishing pool, and even a children's theatre, among other things,"
he says.
Wisconsin's participation is geared to the old adage, 'You find a
need and fill it.' That's exactly what they've done, added the Fair
official, who is in charge of state exhibits.
"Since opening day, we've had more than visitors, have
sold more than 1-million steaks in our Tad's Restaurant, and experienced
difficulty accommodating the throngs trying to get into our old-
fashioned Beer Garden," says pavilion president Charles (Chuck) Saunders
of Green Bay, Wis.
One of the last to sign for space at the Fair, six months before
opening date, the Wisconsin Pavilion is one of the top attractions, It
features an outdoor theme and displays the state's principal assets,
from fishing to beer and logging to cheese.
In its 59,336 square feet of space, the Pavilion has a complex of
five buildings with 40,000 square feet under a roof, a good thing when
inclement weather prevails.
FROM: Wm. J. Donoghue Corporation
10 Columbus Circle, N.Y.C.
(more)
8/64-R19
.. 3 -
"Cartoon Give Aways" will stage the Comics Council, Inc.'s Friday
program at the Better Living Center's Beech-Nut Theatre at 6 P.M.
There will be a color video taping of the program at the RCA Pavilion
at 1 P.M. This week's program will feature the following famous
cartoonists drawing their cartoons: Walt Kelly, "Pogo"; Frank Roberge,
"Mr. Fitts Flatts",; Greig Flessel, "David Crane", and Mike Berry, King
Features Syndicate gag cartoonist.
Joe E. Ross of the TV show "Car 54, Where A 1 ~ e You?", will be host
at the Cavalcade of Cars Exhibit at the Travel and Transportation
Pavilion from l to 10 P.M.
The New England States Exhibition will stage a program that will
include the 4-H Clubs Band of Mass. in concert; Portuguese folk dancing;
a fashion show, and a pageant contrasting colonial and present-day
living,
The Schaefer Sports Host, Joey Archer, outstanding middleweight
boxer
6
Will be at the Schaefer Center from Noon to 3 P,M, and from 5
to 7 P.M. In addition, he will cut a color video tape at the RCA
Pavilion at 11 A.M.
The Missouri Pavilion will present the Wohl Steperettes Drill
Team of St, Louis, Mo,, at 2:30 P.M. The Dunbar, w. Va. High School
Band will play at the Federal Pavilion at 6 P.Me and the St. Paul the
Apostle Girl's Drum Corps of New York City will play at the Tiparillo
Band Pavilion at 7 P.M.
Music for listening: the Band of America conducted by Paul Lavalle
from 7:15 to 8:40 P.M. at the Fountain of the Planets, Court of the
Universe just prior to the evening's mechanical fountain, lights and
fireworks display, featuring the "Broadway" show, at 9 P.M.
Music for dancing: Guy Lombardo and his Royal Canadians playing
"The Sweetest Music This Side of Heaven" nightly, except Monday, for
free public dancing at the Tiparillo Band Pavilion from 9:30 P.M. to
12:30 A,M,
ENTERTAINMENT WILL CONTINUE IN THE LAKE AMUSEMENT AREA UNTIL
2 A.M.
# # #
8/64·R9
- 2 -
Tad's Restaurant, decorated in a "Gay 90's" motif ts one of the
principal draws. It features steaks (imported from Wisconsin), flame-
grilled to individual taste, with a salad, baked potato and garlic-
toasted roll, for only $1.19. The lines are long but the wait is never
more than fifteen minutes, according to Saunders.
Wisconsin's famous brewing industry is represented to the Fairgoer
1n an old-fashioned Beer Garden with sawdust floor, chilled steins and
banjo music. Manned entirely by college boys and girls, the Beer
Garden is probably the liveliest place at the Fair, drawing heavily
from the young element, particularly the collegians.
Here you can get a beef or ham dinner for $1.95. No food is sold
after 8 P.M., only beer. With the Red Garter Banjo Band furnishing the
exciting music, the Fairgoer gets into the mood instantly, and the hand-
clapping and stomping goes on until 2 A.M. There's no dancing. As a
Dartmouth student said, "This is an inexpensive way of being together
in an atmosphere we enjoy so much,
11
Another attraction is the Exhibit Pavilion, a rectangular building
that features displays of outstanding manufactured products imagina-
tively displayed with Wisconsin's vast recreational, agricultural and
industrial facilities. Here you can buy cheese, pizza, milk shakes,
waffles, ice cream, fudge and many other items using Wisconsin-only
material and products. The Children's Theatre, showing, through
cartoons, the manufacturing of hot dogs, sausages and other meat
products made by Oscar Mayer is always jammed with youngsters.
There are terraces for outdoor dining near a reflecting pool,
where fly-casting for choice trout, eight to fourteen inches, is
offered. For 75 cents, the angler gets rod and reel and a baited hook
and is given fifteen minutes to lure any of the Wisconsin trout, whioh
is then fried for him. A tagged fish nets the lucky angler a handsome
prize. The pool is stocked with more than 350 fish.
Another highlight of the Wisconsin exhibit is the world's largest
cheese, a 1 7 ~ - t o n Cheddar, made near Denmark, Wis., to exemplify the
state
1
s role as the "Cheese f"'anufacturing Center of the Nation.
11
It il!l
6l feet wide. 5! feet high and 14! feet long, and actually weighs
(more)
8/64-R9
- 3 -
34
1
591 pounds. The little shops, such as the "Indian Trading Post", the
"Cheese Shack", the "Sugar House", the "Souvenir Store", are busy sell-
ing Wisconsin items.
There•s also the Wisconsin Rotunda, an impressive glass tepee-
shaped building symbolizing the state's Indian loreo This uniquely
designed building, 48 feet in 46 feet high and topped by a
spire lettered "Wisconsin," soars 80 feet above the ground. It contains
the official state exhibit and features Wisconsin's recreational, agri-
cultural and industrial facilities.
What makes the Wisconsin Pavilion's success more noteworthy is the
raot that it is financed entirely by private enterprise. Even though
the contract was signed less than 6 months before the Fair's opening,
the investors were able to accomplish all of this without any state
appropriation for the construction, operation, maintenance and demoli-
tion of the building at the end of the 1965 Fair season. According to
President Saunders, the investment is $1,200,000.
In the words of Saunders, who has been participating in county and
state fairs, including one in Hawaii and the World's Fair in Seattle,
for fifteen years, "You'll never see another fair like that in New York.
For $2.00 you're getting a $20 bill's worth! You get your biggest
dollar value here. You don't have to spend more than you choose.
11

Tt # #
8/64-R20
UNISPHEI!E

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INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
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Joyce Martin
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT
August 6, 1964
- WF 4-6531
- WF 4-6541
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NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR, Aug. 6 -- A Dutch Dixieland Jazz combo,
who played for their boat passage from the Netherlands to see the
New York World's Fair, will display their talents this weekend
(Saturday and Sunday, August 8-9) at the New York World's Fair.
The seven piece combo, all university students who learned their
jazz in the Netherlands -- where jazz is the present crave, will
entertain at the Seven-Up Pavilion from 11 A,M. to Noon and in the
afternoon from 4 to 5 P,M, they will play at the T1par1llo Band
Pavilion,
The home of Dixieland Jazz, Bourbon Street, has invited the group
to play there Sunday, Monday and Tuesday, August 9, 10, and 11, from
2 to 3 P.M.
The combo includes three law students, two graduate medical
students, an architectural student and a mathematics major. They
arrived in New York aboard a Holland-America Line boat July 22 and
have been staying at the Sloan House YMCA in New York City where they
have given several concerts.
Attending different universities in Holland, they were brought
together through their mutual interest in jazz and after their school
semesters were over, decided this would be a good way to see the Fair.
Included in the group are: Hein Pentinga, 23, clarinet; Klaus
Pentinga, 19, trombone; Rtnus Kooyman, 21, trumpet; Louk van Kesel,
banjo; Bert Fleers, drums; Frans Wytema, bass, and Karel van Lelybed,
piano. They are managed by Jan Belman.
FROM: Wm. J. Donoghue Corporation
10 Columbus Circle, N. Y .C.
,1(
Jr # #
8/64-R26
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Jerome Edelberg - WF 4-6541
Joyce Martin - WF 4-6543
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT
August 6, 1964
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR, Aug. 6 -- Monday, August 10, Will be
Sir Llancelot Day at the New York world's F a i r ~ commemorating the
visit of Sir Llancelot, a rare pure white Peruvian llama, the
symbol or prosperity in South America. The golden cheeked animal
Will be the guest or the directors of the three million dollar
World of Ancient Gold Exhibit in the Travel and Transportation
Building.
Sir Llancelot will arrive at the World of Ancient Gold at
10:30 A,M. when a group of lovely dancers from the Centralamerica-
Panama Pavilion will welcome him. He will then tour the Fair in
a white Cadillac convertible until 2 P.M. when he will return to
the World of Ancient Gold.
The exhibit features a pure gold pre-Columbian priceless
collection from Peru and other South and Central American countries.
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10 Columbus Circle, N.Y.C.
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1
AUGUST 2
ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT
August 7, 1964
WORLD'S FAIR PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS FOR MONDAY, AUGUST 10
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR, Aug. 7 -- The long list of Special Days
at the Fair on Monday includes: Florida State Day (the second day of
Florida Week); Hunterdon County Agz•icul tural and Pemberton Rotary Day
(at theN. J. Tercentenary Pavilion); the first day of Inventions Week;
Kansas City Education Association Day; Play Schools Day; Rohm & Haas
Employees Recreation Association Day; Wichita City Teachers Associa-
tion Day; YM-YWHA Youth Day and Long Beach-Atlantic Beach-Point Lookout
Day (at the New York State Pavilion). In addition, it will be a day
when children under 12, accompanied by an adult, will be admitted to
the Fair for just 25 cents!
At 6:45 P.M., Lowell Thomas, world-famous commentator, traveller
and author, will host world's Fair President Robert Moses on his
nationwide broadcast originating from the Hall of Free Enterprise,
which is the American Economic Foundation's Pavilion at the World's
Fair.
Florida Day ceremonies will be highlighted by the visit of
Governor Farris Bryant. He will arrive at 10 A.M. at the Meadow Lake
Gate (No. 5) where he will be greeted by Fair officials. At 11:45 A.M.
he will be presented the Fair silver medallion by Gen. w. E. Potter,
Fair Executive Vice President at the Porpoise Stadium in the Florida
Pavilion in the Lake Amusement Area. At 12:30 P.M. the Pakistan
Pavilion singers and dancers will perform in the Exhibition Hall ot
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the Florida Pavilion, and at 1:30 and 7:30 P.M., the Hialeah H.S. Band
will play at the Porpoise Stadium.
As a feature of Sir Llancelot Lay at the Fair, a Peruvian llama
named Sir Llancelot will arrive at the world of Ancient Gold Exhibit
in the Travel and Transportation Pavilion at 10:30 A.M. Later, he will
tour the Fairgrounds. At 1:30 P,M. there will be a color video taping
of Sir Llancelot at the RCA Exhibit,
At 11 A,M. the New York Jets football team will arrive at New
Amsterdam Gate (No. 2) to tour the Fairgrounds. Each player will be
presented with a world's Fair medallion at a luncheon at New England
States Exhibition, Millstone Restaurant at 12:30 P.M.
The YM-YWHA Youth Day program will feature a program of music and
dancing by day campers from among the 2,300 youngsters visiting the
Fair.
The Hunterdon county Agricultural and Pemberton Rotary Day
program at the N. J. Tercentenary Pavilion will include concerts by
the Hunterdon County Symphony Band at 2, 5 and 7 P.M.; a public address
by Mr. Ralph Miller in which he will outline the operations of the
Hunterdon County Board of Freeholders (other members: William
Ammerman, president, and Chester Errico), and music by the Drifters
or Pemberton at 3, 6 and 8 P.M.
Long Beach-Atlantic Beach-Point Lookout Day at the New York State
Pavilion will be celebrated with a day-long program by talented groups
from New York State,
At 1:30 and 3:30 P . ~ 1 . at the New England States Exhibition, the
Granite State Graniteers of Rochester-Dover, N. H,, a drum and bugle
corps, will execute precision drill formations with lively marching
songs.
The Baptist Youth Choir of Louisville, Ky. will perform at the
Federal Pavilion at 2 P,M. At that same time, the St. Camillus Drum
Corps will perform at the New York City Pavilion.
The evening proeram at the Fair will include a band concert by
the Band of America conducted by Paul Lavalle at the Fountain of the
Planets, Court of the Universe from 7:15 to 8:40 P.M. followed by the
rountain-t1reworks-mue1c display I "Broadway" at 9 p.M.
ENTER'l'AINMENT CONTINUES IN THE LAKE AMUSEMENT AREA UNTIL 2 A.M.
#
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FOR AT NOON, SATURDAY, AUGUST 8
ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT
August 7, 1964
WORLD'S FAIR PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS FOR SUNDAY, AUGUST 9
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR, Aug. 7 -- Sunday will be Conference of
American Armies Day and the first day of Florida week at the Fair.
It will also be Milwaukee Bar Association Day; Oregon State Bar
Association Day; and, Chenango county Day at the New York state
Pavilion.
Highlight of the day will be the visit of the delegates to the
conference of American Armies to the Fair. Sixteen central and South
American countries will be represented in the delegation which in-
cludes Commanders tn Chief of Armies, Ministers of Defense, Army
Chiefs of Staff and Commanding Generals, They will arrive at the New
Amsterdam Gate (No. 2) at 10:30 A,II1, and will be welcomed by Dr.
Roberto G. deMendoza and Miss Selma Herbert, Fair Assistant Chiefs of
Protocol. They will visit the Federal Pavilion, the Venezuelan
Pavilion, the Centralamertca-Panama Pavilion, the Caribbean Pavilion,
General Electric "Progressland" Exhibit, the Women's HospitalitY
Center in the Purex Penthouse of the Better Living Center for lunch,
the Vatican City Pavilion, the Pepsi-Cola Exhibit, the General Motors
Futurama II Exhibit, the u. s. Space Park and the Pavilion of Spain,
At 4 P.M., the American Square Dance Association will present a
program at the Federal Pavilion, About 800 square dancers from all
over the u. s. will perform, with members of the Long Island Square
Dancers Association as callers.
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10 Columbus Circle, •
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A Sunday morning worship service sponsored by the Protestant
Episcopal Diocese of Long Island will be held at the Protestant and
Orthodox Center. Rev. John Malcolm Haight, Rector of Grace Episcopal
Church of Massapequa, will deliver the sermon. The Men
1
s and Boys'
Choir of Grace Episcopal Church of Jamaica will sing.
The Chenango County Day program at the New York State Pavilion
will begin at 10:30 A.M. with a program of band music by the Chenango
All County Band, with members from Norwich High School, Oxford Central
School, Bainbridge-Guilford Central School and Sherburne Central
School. Appearing throughout the day will be such groups as the
Chenango Choristers, a religious and spiritual folk-singing group from
'xford; the cavaliers, a rock
1
n
1
roll group from New Hyde Park; the
T-Birds, a rock •n• roll vocal and instrumental group from Merrick;
the Highlighters; the Torquays and the TWilighters, singing Beatle
songs. From 5:30 to 10:30 P.M. a musical program, titled "Voices of
Youth", will be presented,
The Tiparillo Band Pavilion will present the Bartlett H. s. Band
of Webster, Mass. at 2:30 P.M.; the Dutch Student Jazz Band Concert at
4 P.M., and the Columbia u. Band, Teachers' College Concert Choir at
7 P.M. The Dutch Student Band is a seven-piece Dixieland-style jazz
combo, which played for its boat passage from Holland to the World•s
Fair. The combo includes t h ~ e e law students, two graduate medical
students, an architectural student and a mathematics major. In addi-
tion to the concert at the Ttparillo Band Pavilion, they will play at
the Seven-Up Pavilion from 11 A.M. to Noon and at Bourbon Street from
2 to 3 P.M.
Bibletown, u.s.A. will present its weekly program at the Federal
Pavilion at 2:30 P.M. The program will be color video taped at the
RCA Pavilion at 6 P.M.
Paul Lavalle will conduct the Band of America in its twilight
concert at the Fountain of the Planets, Court of the Universe from
7:15 to 8:40P.M. just prior to the nightly Fountain Show (
11
Fam111.ar
Melodies" this Sunday night) at 9 P.M.
ENTERTAINMENT CONTINUES IN THE LAKE AMUSEMENI' AREA UNTIL 2 A.M.
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ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT
August 7, 1964
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR, Aug, 7 --"Happy Birthday," will echo
throughout the Montana Pavilion at the New York World's Fair on Tuesday,
I
(August 11), at 11:30 A.M., when fifty underprivileged youngsters, aged
8 through 13, from the Boys' Club of New York will be honored guests at
the seventh birthday party for Sally, Treasure State Hereford, who gave
birth last June 23 to the bull calf, Golden Nugget, at the Fair.
Prior to the activities at the Fair, the East Side children, led
by Col. Paul Akst (USAF), Director of the New York City Selective
Service and an alumnus of the BC, will present a lifetime honorary
membership card and a Boys• Club sports uniform to Fair President
Robert Moses in the Administration Building at 10:15 A.M.
"Mr. Moses has long dedicated his career to the betterment of l'·
youth and we, as East Siders, are enjoying the harvest of his bene-
ficial efforts," says Boys' Club Director George Gomes. Mr. Gomes will
be joined by several trustees of the Boys' Club, including DWight (Pete)
Davis, son of the founder and donor of the Davis Cup for international
tennis, in their day at the Fair for the underprivileged children.
Following the presentation to Mr. Moses, the boys will be greeted
at Gate No. 2 at 10:30 A.r.1., by real Montana cowboys and "Miss Montana
Centennial", 21-year-old Bonnie Jo Robbins.
They will then parade to the RCA Pavilion to appear on color tele-
vision over the world's Fair closed-circuit network. Golden Nugget,
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representing his celebrated mother
1
Golden Heiress II (Sally's regis-
tered name), and Beauregard
1
the one-month old "son" of Elsie of
Borden's tame, will also parade. On behalf of his mother Elsie,
Beauregard will present an Alfafa Birthday cake to Sally and a 60-pound
birthday cake tor the East Siders.
At the "Happy Birthday Party" at the Montana Pavilion, the boys
will present a huge replica of an honorary membership card to Sally.
Cowboy Howard Turney will turn over the Montana Bar-B-Q corral to the
youngsters tor a feast of hamburgers, roast beef, french fries, root
beer and chocolate milk.
Following their vtsit at the "Museum of the West" and the Montana
Centennial Train, the party will tour the grounds with stops at Illinois,
Wisconsin, Sinclair's Dinoland and Avis Antique cars.
Jl.
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FOR RELEASE: AT NOON, TUESDAY, AUGUST 11
ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT
August 10, 1964
WORLD'S FAIR PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS FOR WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 12
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR, Aug. 10 -- A Jamaica Ska Party will be
held in the Fair's Singer Bowl on Wednesday from 6 to 10 P.M. It will
also be the 4th day of Florida week; the third day of Inventions Week;
the second day of Essex County week (at the N. J. Tercentenary
Pavilion); Thailand Day; Podiatry Day (at the Hall of Education);
Comedy Day (at the N. Y. State Pavilion) and Connecticut Polish Day
(at the New England States Exhibition).
The Jamaica Ska Party in Singer Bowl, another in the series of
top attractions being presented free to Fairgoers, will feature the
introduction of the "Ska", a sensational new dance craze, by the
Jamaicans (BWI) who created it. Starred on the show will be Millie
Small, whose Ska-beat recording of "My Boy Lollipop" has been a best-
selling record for the past 14 weeks. Included on the program Will
be Byron Lee and his 12-piece Jamaica Ska Band; Jimmy Cliff, a popular
vocalist; the Blues Busters, and several talented dancers who will be
flown to the Fair from Kingston, Jamaica, especially for the concert.
Thailand Day will be celebrated at the Thailand Pavilion with a
6 to 8 P.M. invitational reception hosted by Deputy Commissioner
General Sangar Sukhabut. From 6:15 to 6:45 P.M. in front of the
Thailand Pavilion, classic Thai dances will be performed by girls in
traditional costumes. These girls are daughters of Thai diplomats
and the Thailand Pavilion personnel.
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10 Columbus Circle, N.Y.C.
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Comedy Day at the New York State Pavilion will be a day-long
aeries of chuckles, giggles and guffaws, as a continuous program of
humorous entertainment including the joke-telling and mimicry
ships will be staged. The laughs will begin at Noon with an outline
of the program by Frank Lee Wilde, resident satirist, and George Q.
Lewis, Executive Director of the Humor Societies of America. Thro·ugh-
out the day, humor will be heard from comedians representing various
forms of comedy. The Raconteurs, joke-telling championship partici-
pants; The Future Funnymen, young performers under 21; "Pop Comedy,
Conversations in Comedy and The Laughing Chorale", a new direction in
comedy; The Improvisers, improvisation championship participants; the
Essay Comics; the Sit-Down Comics; the Writers-in-Comedy; The Humor
Exchange; Comedy Teams; Folk Singing Comedy, and from 9 to 10
the Comedy Teams and the finals of the mimicry championships and the
joke-telling championships.
An toe-cream eating contest for youngsters from 7 to 10 years old
will be held in the Galaxy cafeteria atop the Transportation and Travel
Pavilion at 2:30 P.M. William G. Moultray, owner of the 2,500-seat
Galaxy cafeteria, will head the judging panel. The kids will compete
for the first prize of a puppy by racing against the clock and each
other to finish a specified number of plates of ice cream.
A program of special interest to those who "do" the Fair on foot
will be offered from 9 A,M. to Noon at the Hall of Education:
"Podiatry Day" featuring short lectures, illustrated by slides and
films, on foot care.
Teen-age beauties from 13 to 16 years old will attend lectures
by Jacqueline Brandwein, beauty editor of Ingenue Magazine at the
Cosmetology Hall of Fame terrace behind the Clairol Pavilion at Noon,
2 and 4 P.M. Tapings of Miss Brandwein's interviews with teen-agers
will be made at the RCA Pavilion at 10 A.M. and at 5 P.M.
The Tiparillo Band Pavilion will present the International Music
Camp Band of North Dakota at Noon; the Riptides Drum and Bugle corps
of Copiague, L. I,, at 2:30P.M.; the Modernettes of New London, Conn.
at 4 P.M., and, the nightly attraction for free public dancing, Guy
Lombardo and his Royal Canadians from 9:30 P.M. to 12:30 A.M.
(more)
8/64-R43
- 3 -
Connecticut Polish Day at the Fair will be held in the New England
States Exhibition. On the program at 1:30 and 3:30 P,M. wtll be a
gymnastic team and a drum corps from the Polish Falcon's Nest No, 68
(Meriden); the Gwizda of Hartford presenting authentic costumed Polish
dances, and the Polonia Choir of New Britain.
The Noon luncheon and meeting at the Hawaiian Pavilion's
Restaurant of the Five Volcanos will be hosted by the Rotary Club of
Jamaica, N. Y., 725, wtth the Rotary Club of Pearl River, N. Y., 721,
as co-host.
At 2 P.M. in the New York City Pavilion there will be square
dancing under the sponsorship or the New York City Department of Parks,
The second Essex County Day program in the N, J. Tercentenary
Pavilion will include programs by Evelyn Simpson and Honey Gordon,
folk singers accompanied by George Gordon at 5 and 7 P,M.; Henry Maged,
folk singer at 5:30 P.M.; Chico Mendoza and his calypso band at 6 and
8:30 P.M.; the Celestial Choir, under the direction ot Minerva Bell,
presented by George Hudson Productions; the Felton Sisters, and Ora
Williams and her group singing spiritual and gospel songs at 7:30 P.M.
The "Patriotic" show will be presented at the Fountain or the
Planets, Court of the Universe following the Band of America's twilight
concert conducted by Paul Lavalle from 7:15 to 8:40 P.M.
ENTERTAINMENT CONTINUES IN THE LAKE AMUSEMENT AREA UNTIL 2 A,M,
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...
ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDEN1
NEWS:
August 10, 1964
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NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR NEWSLETTER NO, 47
Official Opening of Picturesque Belgian Village
(Mr. Moses and Mayor of Dsmme) •• ,.
Jones Beach Marine Theater Day., ••
Keefe Family Visits ••••
Wisconsin Pavilion a Big Success ••••
Brubeck-Ellington Concert ••••
Future Events at Singer Bowl ••••
-
'
Recognition Day & Arizona State Day ••••
Cities Service World's Fair Band of America.,,.
New York Irish Feis ••••
Governor of Western Nigeria ••••
Blind Pastor at Protestant Center ••••
Operation Enterprise Day ••••
Camp Fire Girls Day.,,.
Sandy Lane at Kodak Pavilion., ••
International Beauty Contestants visit,, ••
20th Million Visitor ••••
Sudanese Painters Show at Fair ••••
Pavilion of Dynamic Maturity Free Trip Winners ••••
Justices and Court Officers Vistt ••••
Gimbels Souvenir Ashtray ••••
National True Sisters Day ••••
Panama Vistt President at Fair ••••
Bill Russell Sports Host ••••
Contest Finals, •••
Club at New England States ••••
World Peace Day Ceremontes ••••
FROM: Wni. J. Donoghue Corporation
10 Columbus Circle, N.Y.C.
(more)
Newsletter •••
- 2 ..
8/64-R39
The Picturesque Belgian Village, a 134-builcling complex that is
rapidly becoming a major attraction at the New York World's Fair, was
officially opened recently.
The village6 which might be described as a 14th century Flemish
painting come alive, transports the visitor hundreds of years back in
ttme and thousands of miles overseas to Flanders. In remarks made at
the opening ceremonies, Fair President Robert Moses said the effort
"to reproduce faithfully the cobblestones, sidewalks, facades and
atmosphere of a Belgian village" was "a triumph of architecture."
Adding to the air of authenticity that pervades the village was
the presence at the official opening of Louis Houtave, Mayor of Damme
6
the Belgian town whose town hall served as the model for the one at
the Picturesque Belgian Village. Mayor Houtave told the crowd assem-
bled for the ceremony in the village's Town Hall Square that he was
"pleased to see Belgium so authentically reproduced here."
Also at the ceremony were Alphonse de Rijdt, architect or the
village, Andrew Forthomme, Belgian Consul General, and many members
of the World's Fair Executive Committee.
- 0 -
Jones Beach Marine Theatre Day at the New York World's Fair, and
the 35th anniversary of the open!ng of New York's Jones Beach State
Park, were jointly celebrated recently at Fair ceremonies.
Guy Lombardo, producer of the Jones Beach Marine Theatre World's
Fair show, "Around the World in 80 Days
6
" and gaily garbed cast
members presented bottles of Jones Beach sand as gestures of friend-
Sllip to representatives of the Pavilions of Mexico, the Caribbean,
Florida, Hawaii, Japan and Polynesia, all representing areas noted
for beautiful beaches.
- 0 -
A story that began with a letter to New York's Mayor Robert F.
Wagner in early 1963 requesting information on the New York World's
Fair ended recently with a I
1
11Chigan f'amily of five enjoying a gala
time at the Fair.
(more)
Newsletter ••• 8/64-R39
- 3 -
The letter, written by Mrs. w. H. Keefe of 1630 Sheridan Street
1
Niles, Michigan, mentioned that her three children then aged 12, 10
and 7, had been saving pennies in a bleach bottle to finance a trip
to the Fair. The Mayor passed the letter along to Fair Corporation
officials, who forwarded the requested information to Mrs. Keefe. An
exchange of correspondence between Mrs. Keefe and Fair officials
followed. A telephone call to the Keefe family by a Fair official in
July of this year elicited the information that family plans for their
Fair trip were being formulated, and that the bottle, with a slot and
a sign reading "Put a penny there for the •64 Fair," was filling up
rapidly. The family calculated that every 30 pennies represented 16
miles of the distance from Niles to Flushing Meadow Park (based on
16 miles per gallon in the family car).
Subsequent arrangements resulted in the arrival of the Keefe
family, Mr. & Mrs., 12-year-old Kevin, 10-year-old Barry, and ?-year-
old Kathy, at the National City Bank at the Fair, where they traded
3,300 pennies for $33. They then enjoyed a VIP tour of the exposition
accompanied by the Fair's Director of Publicity, Peter J. McDonnell.
.. 0 -
The Wisconsin Pavilion Directors at the New York World's Fair
are proud of the popularity of their exhibit. Since opening day, the
Pavilion has had more than 4-million visitors, sold more than one
million steaks in Tad's Restaurant and is catering to capacity crowds
in their old fashioned Beer Garden.
According to Gen, William E. Potter, Executive Vice President of
the Fair, "the Wisconsin Pavilion has come up with a successful
formula ••• provide folks with good food at low prices, wholesome enter•
tainment, a trout fishing pool and even a children's theatre, among
other things.,
11
- 0 -
Jazz enthusiasts turned out tn record numbers to hear a dual
concert by Duke Ellington and the Dave Brubeck Quartet in the New York
world Fair's outdoor Singer Bowl. The near capacity crowd of 13,000
was the largest to attend an event in the Bowl since the opening of
the Fair in April.
(more)
Newsletter •••
- 4 -
The playing was brilliant and, in the worda of one Fair
"the audience's response was terrific; we have heard nothing like it
here or anywhere else at the Fair."
Following the the huge Bowl was turned into a dance
floor for the spectators, with the Duke and his men supplying the
music. As with all events held at the Singer there was no ad-
mission charge.
- 0 -
Music -- highlighted by a grand opera and a concert by a jazz
immortal -- continues to dominate the calendar or events scheduled
at the World's Fair Singer Bowl. Admission is free to fatrgoers.
Music with a Caribbean beat that "booms enough to shake the
earth" will be a feature of the Jamaica "Ska" party to be held in
the Bowl Wednesday, Aug. 12.
Grand opera will make ita first appearance 1n the Bowl Aug. 17-
18 when the University of Indiana presents two performances of
"Turandot" by Puccini.
Benny Goodman and his orchestra will present the Jazz concert
and also will play for the free dancing program at the Singer Bowl
on Saturday, Aug. 22.
Other scheduled Bowl events include: Scottish Nationality Day
Folk Festival on Aug. 16; Lithuanian Day Folk Festival Aug. 23, and
a five-day series or Olympic Wrestling Trials Aug. 24 through Aug. 28.
- 0 -
"Arizona-Sonora Recognition Day" at the New York World r s Fair
tightened ties already existing between Arizona and the neighboring
Mexican state of Sonora.
As part of a five-year program designed to stimulate trade and
cultural exchange, Arizona Governor Paul Fannin and Sonora Governor
Luis Encinas led delegations from their respective states to the
international exposition. In successive ceremonies at the New Mexico
and Mexican pavilions, the governors extolled their good neighbor
policy. Governor Fannin said that "the border between our two states
Joins rather than divides us," and Governor Encinas spoke or the
strengthened ties that bind them.
(more)
Newsletter ••• 8/64·R39
- 5 -
At a luncheon at the Top or the Fair restaurant
1
the governors
received proclamations of the official occasion from General William
E. Potter
1
Executive Vice President of the Fair.
The good neighbor theme was continued the following day when both
governors and their delegations participated in ceremonies marking
"Arizona State Day" at the Fair.
- 0 -
Music adds to the gaiety of a Fair and the Cities Service World's
Fair Band of Amerioa
1
conducted by Paul Lavalle, is one of the moat
popular features at the Flushing Meadow fairgrounds.
It provided at least six concerts daily on its rolling bandwagon,
with the closing concert each evening performed before the Fountain of
Planets in the Court of the Universe immediately preceding the lighted
fountain display and fireworks. The 50-piece band participates in
dedications and other official functions at the Fair.
Jazz music, classics, twist music and stirring marches are in-
cluded in the daily presentations conducted by Mr. Lavalle.
- 0 ...
The Singer Bowl at the New York World's Fair resounded with the
sounds of traditional Irish music when the United Irish Counties
Association of New York celebrated a "feis" day at Flushing Meadow
Park.
Harpists, tenors, choristers and kilted dancers were featured
at the Gaelic festival at which the Honorable John 0
1
Brien, Irish
Consul General in New York, and Judge James J. Comerford, President
of the Ancient Order of Hibernians, spoke.
- 0 -
The Governor of Western Nigeria, His Excellency Sir Odeleya
Fadahunsi, and Lady Fadahunsi, visited tha New York World's Fair
recently.
~ h e Governor and his official party, including Chief s.o. Adebo
1
Permanent Representative of Nigeria to the United Nations, toured ten
pavilions and lunched at the Pavilion of the Republic of Guinea.
(more)
Newsletter ••• 8/64·R39
- 6 -
Nigeria is represented 1n the Pavilion or Africa at the Fair.
- 0 -
The Protestant-Orthodox Center at the New York World's Fair waa
the scene recently of an unusual inter-denominational service. The
principals and many or the worshipers are blind.
The preacher for the service was Dr. Dale c. Reeker, a blind
Lutheran pastor from Cleveland Heights, Ohio, who is now secretary
for service to the blind or the American Bible Society. Scripture
lessons were read from a braille bible, and the two soloists are
blind. A braille order or worship was distributed to the congregation.
Among those present were representatives from eight countries.
The service was sponsored by the John Milton Society, which is
dedicated to a world-wide ministry to the blind.
- 0 -
71 prize-winning newspaper carrier boys from 55 papers in 22
states and Nova Scotia were guests or Newspaper Enterprise Associa-
tion on
11
0perat1on Enterprise Day" at the World's Fair recently.
The Fair visit marked the completion or a seven-day tour of the
eastern coast by the teen-age party.
The World's Fair tour included visits to Ford, General Motors,
Transportation and Travel (Navy-Marine Exhibit), Vatican City,
DuPont, IBM, General Electric, Johnson r s \vax, and RCA.
At the RCA Pavilion, the youngsters appeared on color television
over the World t s Fair closed-circuit network. r ~ u r r a y Davis, assistant
to Fair President Robert Moses greeted the party on TV and accepted a
statue carved of Hawaii's famous monkey pod wood for Mr. Moses. It
was presented by two Hawaiian boys, Russell Izu and William Cox.
- 0 -
A thousand Camp Fire Girls from every section of the country,
converged on the New York World's Fair to celebrate Camp Fire Girls
Day at the international exposition.
Following ceremonies at the Bell System Pavilion, and a video
taping of a Candlelight Ceremonial at the RCA Pavilion, the girls
enjoyed a Hootenanny featuring the Serendipity Singers.
(more}
Newsletter •••
8/64-R39
- 7 -
Officers and board members of the Camp Fire Girls honored seven
women at a luncheon in the Women's Hospitality Center, located in the
Purex Penthouse of the Better Living center. The luncheon marked the
second of the Women's Hospitality Centerra special Honor Days and
recognized women's contributions to home and community.
The women chosen by the camp Fire Girls themselves for the second
Honor Day recognition were: Mrs. Helen Beardsley of Carmel 1 Calif, 1
for rearing twenty children; Dr. Mary Ingraham Bunting, Pre(!ldent of
Radcliffe College and the only women appointed to the Atomic Energy
Commission; Mrs. Constance Stathakos Condos of Dallas, Tex.,, honored
for her work with the handicapped; Mrs. LOis Boren Scholes of Alfred1
N.Y.
1
cited for her work with youth music groups; Mrst Bernice Wood
of Marysville, Calif,, selected for her work in mental health and
education.
- 0 -
The Kodak Pavilion at the New York World's Fair was the scene
recently of a Lilliputian press conference when Sandy Lane, 11 year-
old star of the Pavilion' a documentaz'Y film, "The Searching Eye," was
interviewed by children whose parents are members of the press corps
covering the international exposition.
At the press conference was veteran Hollywood producer Sol
Lesser, who said that he will star Sandy in a major TV series now
being prepared.
- 0 -
Beauty queens from nineteen nations graced the New York World's
Fair when contestants for the title
11
Miss International Beauty, 1965"
in the forthcoming International Beauty Pageant at Long Beaoh1
California, visited Flushing Meadow Park.
- 0 -
The 20th million visitor to the New York World's Fair, Robert H,
Brown of Bedford, Indiana, accompanied by his wife, Betty, and their
four children, passed through Gotham Gate at Flushing Meadow Park
recently.
( n:ore)
Newsletter. ••
8/64-R39
- 8 -
The surprised family e':pressed disbelief at their good fortune
when met by William Berns, Fair Vice President for Communications and
Public Relatione, and informed that they had won more than $2,000 worth
or assorted gifts presented by Fair exhibitors.
Besides the gifts, the family was treated to a performance of Guy
Lombardo's "Around The t'iorld In 80 Days" at the Jones Beach Martne
Theatre; the use of a World's Fair limousine for the drive to the per-
formance; dinner and cocktails at Fair restaurants; a Goodyear Blimp
Ride above New York.
- 0 -
The first group in the United States of paintings by
Hving Sudanese artists opened recently in the Sudan Pavilion at the
New York World's Fair.
The works of thirteen modern artists from the African republic
drew exceptionally favorable comments from art critics and others who
previewed them at a reception at the pavilion. The works will be ex-
hibited for one month.
- 0 -
Mr. and Mrs. Richard A. Mutschler of 104-40 Queens Boulevard,
Forest Hills, New York, were the lucky winners of a 50-day European
trip, the prize in a drawing at the Pavilion of Dynamic Maturity at.
the New York World's Fair.
The American Association of Retired Persons and the National
Retired Teachers Association are Joint sponsors of the pavilion and
of six drawings for free European vacations during the 1964 World's
Fair season. Members of either organization are eligible for the
drawings. The Mutschlers are the winners of the third drawing of
the series.
- 0 -
TWo hundred members or the National Conference of Chief Justices
and Court Administrative Officers visited the New York World's Fair
recently. The legal officials attended a Luau in the Hawaiian
Pavilion's Restaurant of the Five Volcanoeso The organization held
ita annual convention in New York City.
- 0 -
(more)
Newasletter •••
8/64-R39
-9-
Gimbela ot New York is introducing an excluatve and limited
edition of a World's Fair souvenir ashtray., especially designed for
store.
The ashtray features an abstract watercolor motif of the city.,
highlighted by the Empire State Building and surrounding skyscrapers.
It is edged in 14 Kt. gold and measures approx1mately.5 inches in
diameter.
- 0 -
The United Order or True Sisters., Inc., one of the oldest national
women's fraternal organizations in the United States
1
held ita annual
meeting at the New Yorlc World's Fair to celebrate the 50th anniversary
of National True Sisters Day.
Mrs. Harry A. Greene
1
national president of the organization
1
remarked., in part., to the over 900 members attending a luncheon in the
Rathskeller of the Fair's Belgian Village that., "Probably no other
organization has been more intimately entwined with service to the
helpless., oppressed and afflicted than ours. God gave us great gifts
of heart., head and hand, How we have used them and shall continue to
use them are our gifts to Him." F. J. McCarthy
1
vice president,
Thomas J. Deegan Company, representing the Fair, addressed the ladie&
and presented a certificate to Mrs. Greene., signed by Fair President
Robert welcoming the group on behalf of Fair officials.
The 118 year old organization, which has 26 lodges in the .. New
York City Area, conducts a program of service and philantrophy on
both national and community levels.
- 0 -
Jose D. Bazan., V'ice President of Panama and his w1fe
1
spent a
busy day at the World's Fair "just seeing the sights" recently. With
them were Clifford Maduro
1
president of the Colon Free Zone and his
wife1 and Andrew Weil, who represents Colon in the United States, and
his wife.
- 0 -
Bill Russell, the all-pro center of the Boston Celtics basketball
team, served as sports host at the N. Y. World's Fair Schaefer Center
{more)
Newsletter •••
8/64•R39
- 10 -
last week. The former All-America at San Francisco u, who was twtoe
voted "most valuable" NBA and also sparked the Celttcs to
world championships in six of seven play-offs, greeted visitors,
signed autographs and implanted his handprints in cement at the Center.
- 0 -
More than 1,500 teenage and younger girls from throughout the
United States and Canada came to the World's Fair to compete for
national and world championships in twirling and baton and drum corps
competition.
In day-long contests in the Singer Bowl, the Golden Arrow Drum
and Baton Corps or Tulsa, Olt:la., won the senior national drum and baton
corps championship, and 16-year-old Marty Sixsmith of Pittsburgh, Pa.,
won the title as the world's senior twirling champion.
To climax the three-day competition, 35 girls took part in a
beauty pageant in the World's Fair Pavilion to vie for the title of
"Miss Majorette or America." It was won by Judy Watson of Pensacola,
Florida.
All the events were sponsored by the National Baton Twirling
Association or Janesville, \•lise •
- 0 -
Members or the Massachusetts 4-H Club gave a variety show for
the visitors to the New England States Exhibition at the World's Fair.
The exhibitions on the Village Green included Polish dances in authen•
tic costumes, a fashion show by dressmaking contestants, and a pageant
depicting the contributions made by youth to significant events in
American History. The Mas a. 4-H Club Band accompanied the
dancers and later gave a epeciel concert of martial music and popular
songs.
- 0 -
The New York Council for a Sane Nuclear Policy celebrated World
Peace Day at the New York World
1
s Fair Hall of Education.
# #
UN! SPHERE

PI:ACC: THf:tOUOH
UHDER&TANDINO
--..
@---
8/64-R39
01061
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
FLUSHING 52, N.Y. • TELEPHONE· AREA COOE 212·WF 4·1964 • CABLE ADDRESS "WORLDSFAIR"
ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT
NEWS:
August 10, 1964
REFER INQUIRIES TO:
. I: --•
Peter J. McDonnell
Jerome Edelberg
Joyce Martin
- WF 4-6531
- WF 4-6541
Bill Whitehouse
- WF 4-6543'
- WF 4-6553
NEW YORK 1964-1965 WORLD'S FAIR NEWSLETTER NO, 4z
Official Opening of Picturesque Belgian Village
(Mr, Moses and Mayor or Damme) ••••
Jones Beach Marine Theater Day ••••
Keefe Family Visits ••••
Wisconsin Pavilion a Big Success ••••
Brubeck-Ellington Concert ••••
Future Events at Singer Bowl ••••
Arizona-Sonora Recognition Day & Arizona State Day ••••
Cities Service World's Fair Band of America ••••
New York Irish Feis ••••
Governor of western Nigeria ••••
Blind Pastor at Protestant Center ••••
Operation Enterprise Day ••••
Camp Fire Girls Day ••••
Sandy Lane at Kodak Pavilion ••••
International Beauty Contestants visit ••••
20th Million Visitor ••••
Sudanese Painters Show at Fair ••••
P a ~ ~ ! 1 o n of Dynamic Maturity Free Trip Winnere ••••
Justices and Court Officers Visit ••••
Gimbels Souvenir Ashtray ••••
National True Sisters Day ••••
Panama Visit President at Fair ••••
Bill Russell Sports Host ••••
Twirling Contest Finals ••••
4-H Club at New England States ••••
World Peace Day Ceremonies ••••
FROM: Wm. J. Donoghue Corporation
10 Columbus Circle, N.Y.C.
(more}
Newsletter •••
8/64-R39
- 2 -
The Picturesque Belgian Village, a 134-buildtng complex that is
rapidly becoming a major attraction at the New York World's Fair, was
officially opened recently.
The village, which might be described as a 14th century Flemish
painting come alive, transports the visitor hundreds of years back in
time and thousands of miles overseas to Flanders. In remarks made at
the opening ceremonies, Fair President Robert Moses said the effort
"to reproduce faithfully the cobblestones, sidewalks, facades and
atmosphere of a Belgian village" was "a triumph or architecture."
Adding to the air of authenticity that pervades the village was
the presence at the official opening of Louis Houtave, Mayor of Damme
1
the Belgian town whose town hall served as the model for the one at
the Picturesque Belgian Village. Mayor Houtave told the crowd assem-
bled for the ceremony in the village's Town Hall Square that he was
"pleased to see Belgium so authentically reproduced here."
Also at the ceremony were Alphonse de R i j d t ~ architect of the
village, Andrew Forthomme, Belgian Consul General, and many members
of the World's Fair Executive Committee.
- 0 -
Jones Beach Marine Theatre Day at the New York World's Fair, and
the 35th anniversary of the opening of New York's Jones Beach State
Park
1
were jointly celebrated recently at Fair ceremonies.
Guy Lombardo, producer of the Jones Beach Marine Theatre World's
Fair show, "Around the World in 80 Days," and gaily garbed cast
members presented bottles of Jones Beach sand as gestures or friend-
ship to representatives of the Pavilions of Mexico, the Caribbean,
Florida, Hawaii, Japan and Polynesia, all representing areas noted
for beautiful beaches.
- 0 -
A story that began with a letter to New York's Mayor Robert F.
Wagner in early 1963 requesting information on the New York World's
Fair ended recently with a Michigan family of five enjoying a gala
time at the Fair.
(more)
Newsletter •••
8/64-R39
- 3 -
The letter, written by Mrs. w. H. Keefe of 1630 Sheridan Street,
Niles, Michigan, mentioned that her three children then aged 12, 10
and 7, had been saving pennies in a bleach bottle to finance a trip
to the Fair. The Mayor passed the letter along to Fair Corporation
officials, who forwarded the requested information to Mrs. Keefe. An
exchange of correspondence between Mrs. Keefe and Fair officials
followed. A telephone call to the Keefe family by a Fair official in
July of this year elicited the information that family plans for their
Fair trip were being formulated, and that the bottle, with a slot and
a sign reading "Put a penny there for the •64 Fair," was filling up
rapidly. The family calculated that every 30 pennies represented 16
miles of the distance from Niles to Flushing Meadow Park (based on
16 miles per gallon in the family car).
Subsequent arrangements resulted in the arrival of the Keefe
family, Mr. & Mrs,, 12-year-old Kevin, 10-year-old Barry, and 7-year-
old Kathy, at the National City Bank at the Fair, where they traded
3,300 pennies for $33. They then enjoyed a VIP tour of the exposition
accompanied by the Fair's Director or Publicity, Peter J. McDonnell.
- 0 -
The Wisconsin Pavilion Directors at the New York World's Fair
are proud of the popularity of their exhibit. Since opening day, the
Pavilion has had more than 4-million visitors, sold more than one
million steaks in Tad's Restaurant and is catering to capacity crowds
in their old fashioned Beer Garden.
According to Gen. William E. Potter, Executive Vice President of
the Fair., "the Wisconsin Pavilion has come up with a successful
formula ••• provide folks with good food at low prices, wholesome enter-
tainment, a trout fishing pool and even a children's theatre, among
other things."
- 0 -
Jazz enthusiasts turned out tn record numbers to hear a dual
concert by Duke Ellington and the Dave Brubeck Quartet in the New York
World Pair's outdoor Singer Bowl. The near capacity crowd of 13,000
was the largest to attend an event in the Bowl since the opening of
the Fair in April.
(more)
Newsletter •••
8/64-R39
- 4 -
The playing was brilliant and, in the words of one Fair official,
"the audience's response was terrific; we have heard nothing like it
here or anywhere else at the Fair."
Following the concert, the huge Bowl was turned into a dance
floor for the spectators, with the Duke and his men supplying the
music. As with all events held at the Singer Bowl, there was no ad-
mission charge.
- 0 -
Music - ~ highlighted by a grand opera and a concert by a jazz
immortal -- continues to dominate the calendar of events scheduled
at the Worldts Fair Singer Bowl. Admission is free to fairgoere.
Music with a Caribbean beat that "booms enough to shaka the
earth" will be a feature of the Jamaica "Ska" party to be held in
the Bowl Wednesday, Aug. 12.
Grand opera will make its first appearance in the Bowl Aug. 17-
18 when the University of Indiana presents two performances of
"Turandot" by Puccini.
Benny Goodman and his orchestra will present the jazz concert
and also will play for the free dancing program at the Singer Bowl
on Saturday, Aug. 22.
Other scheduled Bowl events include: Scottish Nationality Day
Folk Festival on Aug. 16; Lithuanian Day Folk Festival Aug. 23, and
a five-day series of Olympic Wrestling Trials Aug, 24 through Aug. 28.
- 0 -
"Arizona-Sonora Recognition Day" at the New York World's Fair
tightened ties already existing between Arizona and the neighboring
Mexican state of Sonora.
As part of a five-year program designed to stimulate trade and
cultural exchange, Arizona Governor Paul Fannin and Sonora Governor
Luis Encinas led delegations from their respective states to the
international exposition. In successive ceremonies at the New Mexico
and Mexican pavilions, the governors extolled their good neighbor
policy. Governor Fannin said that "the border between our two states
joins rather than divides us," and Governor Encinas spoke of' the
strengthened ties that bind them.
(more)
Newsletter. ••
8/64-R39
- 5 -
At a luncheon at the Top ot the Fair the governors
received proclamations or the official occasion from General William
E. Fetter, Executive Vice President of the Fair.
The good neighbor theme was continued the following day when both
governors and their delegations participated in ceremonies marking
"Arizona State Day" at the Fair.
- 0 -
Music adds to the gaiety of a Fair and the Cities Service World's
Fair Band of America, conducted by Paul Lavalle, is one of the most
popular features at the Flushing Meadow fairgrounds.
It provided at least six concerts daily on its rolling bandwagon,
with the closing concert each evening performed before the Fountain of
Planets in the Court of the Universe immediately preceding the lighted
fountain display and fireworks. The 50-piece band participates in
dedications and other official functions at the Fair.
Jazz musio, classics, twist music and stirring marches are in-
cluded in the daily presentations conducted by Mr. Lavalle.
- 0 -
The Singer Bowl at the New York World's Fair resounded with the
sounds of traditional Irish music when the United Irish Counties
Association of New York celebrated a "feis" day at Flushing Meadow
Park.
Harpists, tenors, choristers and kilted dancers were featured
at the Gaelic festival at which the Honorable John O'Brien, Irish
Consul General in New York, and Judge James J. Comerford, President
ot the Ancient Order of Hibernians, spoke.
- 0 -
The Governor of Western Nigeria, His Excellency Sir Odeleya
Fadahunsi, and Lady Fadahunsi, visited New York World's Fair
recently.
The Governor and his official party, including Chief s.o. Adebo,
Permanent Representative of Nigeria to the United Nations, toured ten
pavilions and lunched at the Pavilion of the Republic of Guinea.
(more)
Newsletter •••
- 6 -
8/64-R39
Nigeria is represented in the Pavilion of Africa at the Fair.
- 0 -
The Protestant-Orthodox Center at the New York World's Fair wae
the scene recently of an unusual inter-denominational service. The
principals and many or the worshipers are blind.
The preacher for the service was Dr. Dale c. Recker
1
a blind
Lutheran pastor from Cleveland Heights, Ohio, who is now secretary
for service to the blind of the American Bible Society. Scripture
lessons were read from a braille bible, and the two soloists are
blind. A braille order or worship was distributed to the congregation.
Among those present were representatives from eight countries.
The service was sponsored by the John Milton Society, which is
dedicated to a world-wide ministry to the blind.
- 0 -
71 prize-winning newspaper carrier boys from 55 papers in 22
states and Nova Scotia were guests or Newspaper Enterprise Associa-
tion on "Operation Enterprise Day" at the World's Fair recently.
The Fair visit marked the completion of a seven-day tour of the
eastern coast by the teen-age party.
The World's Fair tour included visits to Ford, General Motors,
Transportation and Travel {Navy-Marine Exhibit), Vatican City,
DuPont, IBM
1
General Electric, Johnson's Wax, and RCA.
At the RCA Pavilion, the youngsters appeared on color television
over the World's Fair closed-circuit network. Murray Davis, assistant
to Fair President Robert Moses greeted the party on TV and accepted a
statue carved or Hawaii's famous monkey pod wood for Moses. It
was presented by two Hawaiian boys, Russell Izu and William Cox.
- 0 -
A thousand Camp Fire Girls from every section of the country,
converged on the New York • Fair to celebrate Camp Fire Girls
Day at the international exposition.
Following ceremonies at the Bell System Pavilion, and a video
taping of a Candlelight Ceremonial at the RCA Pavilion, the girls
enjoyed a Hootenanny the Serendipity Singers.
(more)
Newsletter •••
8/64-R39
- 7 -
Officers and board members of the Camp Fire Girls honored seven
women at a luncheon in the Women's Hospitality Center1 located tn the
Purex Penthouse of the Better Living Center. The luncheon marked the
second of the Women's Hospitality Center's special Honor Days and
recognized women's contributions to home and community.
The women chosen by the Camp Fire Girls themselves tor the second
Honor Day recognition were: Mrs. Helen Beardsley of Carmel, Calif. 1
for rearing twenty children; Dr. Mary Ingraham Bunting, President of
Radcliffe College and the only women appointed to the Atomic Energy
Commission; Mrs. Constance Stathakos Condos of Dallas, Tex., honored
tor her work with the handicapped; Mrs. LOts Boren Scholes of Alfred,
N.Y., cited for her work with youth music groups; Mrs. Bernice Wood
of Marysville, Calif., selected tor her work tn mental health and
education.
- 0 -
The Kodak Pavilion at the New York World's Fair was the scene
recently of a Lilliputian press conference when Sandy Lane1 11 year•
old star of the Pavilion's documentary film
1
"The Searching E y e ~ " was
interviewed by children whose parents are members of the press corps
covering the international exposition.
At the press conference was veteran Hollywood producer Sol
Lesser
1
who said that he will star Sandy in a major TV series now
being prepared.
- 0 -
Beauty queens from nineteen nations graced the New York World's
Fair when contestants for the title
11
Miss International Beauty., 1965
11
in the forthcoming International Beauty Pageant at Long Beach,
California, visited Flushing Meadow Park.
- 0 -
The 20th million visitor to the New York World's Fair, Robert H.
Brown of Bedford
1
Indiana, accompanied by his wife1 Betty, and their
tour children
1
passed through Gotham Gate at Flushing Meadow Park
recently.
(more)
Newsletter •••
8/64·R39
- 8 -
The surprised family expressed disbelief at their good fortune
when met by William Berns, Fair Vice President for Communications and
Public Relations, and informed that they had won more than $2,000 worth
of assorted gifts presented by Fair exhibitors.
Besides the gifts, the family was treated to a performance of Guy
Lotnbardors "Around 'l'he l'lorld In So Days" at the Jones Beach Marine
Theatre; the use of a World's Fair limousine for the drive to the per-
tormanceJ dinner and cocktails at Fair restaurants; a Goodyear Blimp
Ride above New York.
... 0 ..
The first group exhibition in the United States of paintings by
living Sudanese artists opened recently in the Sudan Pavilion at the
New York World's Fair.
The works of thirteen modern artists from the African republic
drew exceptionally favorable comments from art critics and others who
previewed them at a reception at the pavilion. The works will be ex-
hibited for one month.
- 0 -
Mr, and Mrs. Richard A. Mutschler of 104-40 Queens Boulevard,
Forest Hills
1
New York, were the lucky winners of a 50-day European
trip, the prize in a drawing at the Pavilion of Dynamic Maturity at
the New York World's Fair.
The American Association of Retired Persons and the National
Retired Teachers Association are Joint sponsors of the pavilion and
of six drawings for free European vacations during the 1964 World's
Fair season. Members of either organization are eligible for the
drawings. The Mutsohlers are the winners or the third drawing or
the series.
- 0 -
Two hundred members of the National Conference of Chief Justices
and Court Administrative Officers visited the New York World's Fair
recently. The legal officials attended a Luau in the Hawaiian
Pavilion's Restaurant of the Five Volcanoes. The organization held
its annual convention in New York City.
- 0 -
{more)
Newsletter •••
8/64-R39
- 9 -
Gimbels New York is introducing an exclusive and limited
edition of a World's Fair souvenir ashtray, especially designed for
the store.
The ashtray features an abstract watercolor motif of the city,
highlighted by the Empire State Building and surrounding skyscrapers.
It is edged in 14 ICt. gold and measures approximately.5 inches in
diameter,
- 0 -
The United Order of True Sisters, Inc., one of the oldest national
womenrs fraternal organizations in the United States, held its annual
meeting at the New Yorlc World's Fair to celebrate the 50th anniversary
of National True Sisters Day.
Mrs, Harry A. Greene, national president of the organization,
remarked, in part, to the over 900 members attending a luncheon in the
Rathskeller of the Fair's Belgian Village that, "Probably no other
organization has been more intimately entwined with service to the
helpless, oppressed and afflicted than ours. God gave us great gifts
ot heart., head and hand. How we have used them and shall continue to
use them are our gifts to Him." F. J. McCarthy, vice
Thomas J. Deegan Company, representing the Fair, addressed the .ladies
and presented a certificate to Mrs. Greene, signed by Fair President
Robert I<loses, welcoming the on behalf of ·Fair officials.
The 118 year old organization, which has 26 lodges in
York City Area, conducts a program of service and philantrophy on
both national and community levels.
- 0 -
Jose D. Bazan, Vice President of Panama and his wife, spent a
busy day at the World's Fair "just seeing the sights" recently. With
them were Clifford Maduro, president of the Colon Free Zone and his
wife, and Andrew Weil, who represents Colon in the United States., and
his wife.
- 0 -
Bill Russell, the all-pro center of the Boston Celtics basketball
team, served as sports host at the N. Y. World's Fair Schaefer Center
(more)
Newsletter •••
8/64-R39
- 10 •
last week. The former All-America at San Francisco U
1
who was twice
voted "most valuable" NBA player, and also sparked the Celtics to
world championships in six of seven play-offs, greeted visitors,
signed autographs and implanted his handprints in cement at the center.
- 0 -
More than 1,500 teenage and younger girls from throughout the
United States and Canada came to the World's Fair to compete for
national and world championships in twirling and baton and drum corps
competi t1on.
In day-long contests in the Singer Bowl, the Golden Arrow Drum
and Baton Corps of Tulsa, Olcla., won the senior national drum and baton
corps champioqship, and 16-year-old Marty Sixsmith of Pittsburgh, Pa.,
won the title as the world's senior twirling champion.
To climax the three-day competition
1
35 girls took part in a
beauty pageant in the World's Fair Pavilion to vie for the title of
"Miss Majorette of America." It was won by Judy Watson of Pensacola,
Florida.
All the events were sponsored by the National Baton Twirling
Association of Janesville
1
tvisc.
- 0 -
Members of the Massachusetts 4-H Club gave a variety show for
the visitors to the New England States Exhibition at the World's Fair.
The exhibitions on the Village Green included Polish dances in authen•
tic costumes, a fashion show by dressmaking contestants, and a pageant
depicting the contributions made by youth to significant events in
American History. The Mass. 4-H Club Band accompanied the
dancers and later gave a special concert of martial music and popular
songs.
- 0 -
The New York Council for a Sane Nuclear Policy celebrated World
Peace Day at the New York World's Fair Hall of Education.
JJ.
7r
# #
8/64•R50
UNISPHERE
01861
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
FLUSHING 52, N.Y. • TELEPHONE- AREA CODE 212-WF 4-1964 • CABLE ADDRESS "WORLDSFAIR"
PEACE THROUGH
UNDCASTANOINO
--·

NEWS:
REFER INQUIRIES TO:
Peter McDonnell
Jerome Edelberg
Joyce Martin
FOR fMMEDIAT§ RELEASE
WF 4-6531
WF 4-6541
WF 4-6543
ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT
August 1964
NEW YORK WORLD'S Aug. 11 --Washington D. C.'s National
Shrine of the Immaculate Conception, a spiritual focal point for the
nation's Catholics, will celebrate "National Shrine Day" at the Fair's
Vatican Pavilion on August with a program of special
masses, exhibits, and a Candlelight Procession.
The program coincides with the Feast of the Assumption. Special
Masses, open to the will be celebrated in the Vatican Pavilion
chapel at the following hours: 10 A.M., Noon, 4, 5 and 6 P.M.
At 8 P.M., a Solemn Benediction will begin the outdoor Candlelight
Procession, which will end with the placing of a garland of flowers at
the feet of the Pieta on view at the pavilion. The Most Reverend John
J. Dougherty, Auxiliary Bishop of Newark, will preach and preside at
the Procession.
Continuous showings of the half-hour film "Our Lady
1
s Shrine"
will be presented at the pavilion during the day. Other special
exhibits will include the showing or colored a display of
black and white photographs, and the free distribution of 100,000
prayer-cards.
FROM: Wm. J. Donoghue Corporation
10 Columbus Cln:le, N.Y.C.
# # #
8/64-R47
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ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT
August 11, 1964
WORLD'S FAIR CELEBRATES GOLDEN ANNIVERSARY OF PANAMA CANAL
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR, Aug. 11 -- Fifty years after the opening
of the Panama Canal on August 15, 1914, the New York World's Fair will
present a program commemorating the event at the Tiparillo Band
Pavilion beginning at 4 P.M., Saturday.
Gen. William E. Potter, Fair Executive Vice President, will
accept special greetings from Robert J. Fleming, Jr., Governor of the
Canal Zone, along with that Government's official medallion and a
bound copy of the 50th Anniversary Commemorative Book.
Gen. Potter himself was Governor of the Panama Canal Zone from
1956 to 1960.
Entertainment will be provided by Lucho Azcarraga and his Quintet.
Azcarraga, a Panamanian, is one of Latin America's leading recordtng
stars, and this will be his first performance in this country.
One of the highlights of the progran1 \v:l.ll be the appearance of a
group of 65 members of the United Students of America, representing
Chile, Argentina, Colombia, Panama, Mexico, Costa Rica and
Puerto Rico, who will sing and dance in native costume.
As part of the festivities, the Postal Division of the Canal Zone
Will present a special display in the Fair's Pan American Highway
Gardena. Commemorative Panama Canal Postage Stamps and First Day
covers will be on sale at the exhibit from August 15 through 19.
FROM: Wm. J. Donoghue Corporation
10 Columbus Circle, N.Y.C.
ff # #
8/64-R5l
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FOR RELEASE: AT NOON, JYEpJmSDAY, AUGUST 12
ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT
August 11, 1964
WORLD'S FAIR PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS FOR THURSDAY
1
AUGUST 13
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR, Aug. 11 -- Thursday will be Better Homes
and Gardens Day; the fifth day of Florida Week; the fourth day of
Inventions Week; the third day of Essex County Week (at the N. J.
Tercentenary Pavilion) and, Dutchess county Day (at the New York State
Pavilion).
Better Homes and Gardens Day will represent the House of Good
Taste's public appreciation of the 18-page spread on the exhibit which
appears in the September issue of the magazine. The "Day" Will be
attended by the ten top editors of BETTER HOMES AND GARDENS; the
architects, designers and decorators of the House of Good Taste; Lady
Malcolm Douglas-Hamilton, president of the host pavilion, and execu-
tives of the approximately 150 participating sponsors of the House of
Good Taste exhibit. The program will start with a reception at 12:30
P.M., followed by a 1 P.M. luncheon in Jim Downey's House of Good
Taste Restaurant. Martin Stone, Director of the Fair's Industrial
Area, will be guest speaker at the luncheon.
From 3 to 5:30 P.M., the Better Homes and Gardens party will
conduct Fair visitors on tours of the House of Good Taste.
Dutchess County Day at the New York State Pavilion will be
celebrated with an 11 A.M. to 10 P.M. talent show which will include
the following: the Wappinger (Falls) Central H.S, Concert Band; The
FROM: Wm. J. Donoghue Corporation
10 Columbus Circle, N.Y.C.
(more)
8/64-R51
Sportsmen, a rock 'n' roll singing group from Poughkeepsie; Lenny
Frank and the Rhythm Rockers; The Estelle ana Alfonso Dancers, dance
pantomime and twirling (from Poughkeepsie); Ernie Bruno and the Tri-
Tonea; The Galaxies; "DO·C·DO" Square Dance Club of Poughkeepsie; the
Jay-Vees, rhythm-vocal group, and the Torqueys, a rock 'n' roll group,
both from Poughkeepsie, A highlight of the day will be the 2:30 P.M.
radio broadcast over station WEOK-FM by Dutchess County Day performers.
Hosts for the day at the Protestant and Orthodox Center's Baptist
Exhibit Will be Senor Roger G. Duck and Miss Sue Snider, Southern
Baptist missionaries to Colombia and Ghana respectively.
The program for the third day of Essex County Week at the New
Jersey Tercentenary Pavilion will include performances by the
following: Henry Maged, folk singer; Fred Grimm, pianist; The
Entertainers, music and comedy acts; Evelyn Simpson and Honey Anderson,
folk singers; Phil Terry, comedian; Bobby woods, M,C., and the Stage
Six Productions Program from 8 to 10 P.M.
Matne artiste will be presented at the New England States Exh1bi-
t1on1s Steeple Court at 2 and 3:30 P.M. The following will demonstrate
their painting techniques -- George A. Curtis, William Then, Laurence
P. Sisson, Jeanne Dale Bearce, Philip Olmes, Jean Quick Eberle, Denny
Winters and James Elliot,
At 11 A,M. at the RCA Pavilion, an interview with Howard Schwartz,
composer of "Dancing in the Dark", will be color video taped. The
1 P.M. taping will star the Gikles Dancers from the Belgian Village;
and at 3 P.M., the taping of Bibletown, U,SoA., will feature an inter-
view of West Point football coach, Paul Dietzel, by Dr. Ira Lee
Eshleman.
Service club meetings at Noon: The Kiwanis Club luncheon and
meeting, hosted by the Tarrytown Kiwanis Club, will be held at the
British Lion Pub; the Rotary Club luncheon and meeting hosted by the
Harrison, N. J., 747 club, and co-hosted by the Kearney, N. J., 747
club, will be held at the Restaurant of the Five Volcanos in the State
of Hawaii Exhibit in the Lake Amusement Area.
(more)
8/64 ... R51
- 3 -
The Tiparillo Band Pavilion will host The Talented Teen Troupe, a
variety show from Itasca, Ill., at 1 P,M.; the Nebulas, a rock 'n' roll
group from Kennett Square, Pa., at 2:30 P.M.; the William Tennent H.s.
Dance Band from Johnsville, Pa., at 4 and 7 P.M. and,. as their nightly,
except Monday, feature, Guy Lombardo and his Royal Canadians from
9:30 P,M_. to 12:30 A.M. playing for free public dancing.
The William Tennent H,S, Band will also play at the Federal
Pavilion at 2 P,M., and the Nebulas will perform at the World's Fair
Pavilion at 2:30 P.M.
An International Hospitality Headquarters Party, primarily for
employees of foreign pavilions, will be held at the Official Women's
Hospitality Center in the Purex Penthouse of the Better Living Center
from 10 P,M. to 12:30 A,M.
The twilight concert by the Band of America, conducted by Paul
Lavalle, at the Fountain of the Planets, Court Of the Universe, Will
be held from 7:15 to 8:40 P,M. just prior to the 9 P,M, fountain show,
"Great Masters".
ENTERTAINMENT CONTINUES IN THE LAKE AMUSEMENT AREA UNTIL 2 A.M.
# #
8/64-R59
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FOfi Rg,EASE: AT NOON.t THURSQAY
1
AUGUST 13
ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT
August 12, 1964
WORLD'S FAIR PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS FOR FRIDAY, AUGUST 14
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR, Augo 12 -- Friday at the Fair will be
Pakistan National Day; the sixth day of Flor:l.da Week; the fifth day or
Inventions Week; State Capital Life Insurance Co. (Raleigh, N. c.) Day;
the fourth day of Essex County Week (N. J. Tercentenary Pavilion) and,
Dutchess County Day (N. Y. State Pavilion).
Pakistan National Day will be observed at a 6 to 8 P.M. invita-
tional Pakistan Independence Day reception at the Pakistan Pavilion.
The 4th Essex County Day will again be celebrated with a day-long
alate of entertainment starting at ll A.M. at the N. J. Tercentenary
Pavilion. Featured in the program, which lasts until 8:30 P.M., will
be entertainment by folk singers, vocalists, a pianist, a singing
group and a group which will present music and comedy acta,
Dutchess County Day at the New York State Pavilion will also be
the raison d'etre for a continuous 10:30 A.M. to 10 P.M. program by&
a school band; a school mixed chorus; a dance band; singing groups; a
folk singer; an instrumental group; a 4-H Club Chorus; a group that
will sing country and "bluegrass" music; a square dance club; a folk
music group and a vocalist -- all talent from Poughkeepsie and the
Dutchess County area. At 2:30 P.M., the Dutchess County performers
will broadcast a condensed two-hour version of the day's program back
home over Radio Station WEOK-FM, Poughkeepsie. The station's Ralph
FROM: Wm. J. Donoghue Corporation
10 Columbus Circle, N.Y.C.
(more)
8/64•R59
- 2 -
Mark, who assembled and scheduled the talent for the Dutchess county
Days, Will act as M.c., not only for the radio broadcast, but also for
the entire program.
The weekly program of the Newspaper Comics Council, "Cartoon Give-
aways", during which famous cartoonists draw their popular cartoons,
will be held at the organization's exhibit at the Better Living Center
from 6 to 7 P.M. Featured on this week's program will be Bob Montana,
drawing "Archie"; Frank Johnson, "Einstein", and Doug Bergstedt, an
editorial cartoonist for King Features. Between Noon and 3 P,M., the
same group will appear for a color video taping of their talents at the
RCA Pavilion,
Sports Host at the Schaefer Center this week-end will be Sid
Gordon, slugging star for the New York Giants. The former baseball
great Will appear from Noon to 3 P.M., and from 5 to 7 P.M. He, too,
will cut a color video tape at the RCA Pavilion at ll A.M.
The New England States Exhibition has scheduled the Rhode Island
State Ballet in "Salute to the Fair", a progr.s:n of d::1nc1ng from colonia:
times to the 20th century in colorful pioneer and folk costumes.
Performances will be at 1:30 and 3:30 P.M.
The Mountain Lion Band from Charleston, W, Va.
1
High School will
play at the Tiparillo Band Pavilion at 2:30 P.M., and at the Federal
Pavilion at 4 and 6 P.M.
Other programs at the Tiparillo Band Pavilion will include the
Hyde Park Baptist Chapel Choir or Austin, Tex., at 1 P.M.; the
Aristocrats ot Song, from Chicago, Ill., at 7 P,M. and
1
Guy Lombardo
and his Royal Canadians, playing for free public dancing from 9:30 P.M.
to 12:30 A.M,
The Noon Rotary Clubs' luncheon and meeting at the Restaurant of
the Five Volcanos in the State of Hawaii Exhibit in the Lake Amusement
Area will be hosted by the Rotary Club of Milford, Del., 764
1
and co-
hosted by the Rotary Club of Toms River, N. J., 751,
Paul Lavalle will conduct the Band of America in its twilight
concert at the Fountain of the Planets, Court of the Universe, from
7:15 to 8:40 P.M. The 9 P,M. fountain show at this site will be the
"Broadway" show.
ENTERTAINMENT WILL CONTINUE IN THE LAKE AMUSEMENT AREA Um'IL 2 A.M
# # #
8/64-R58
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Joyce Martin
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FOR RELEASE: AFTER NOOl':J..,_lWJRSDAY_, AUGUST 13
ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT
August 12, 1964
NEW YORK WORLD
1
S FAIR, Aug. 12 -· Some 85 hosts and hostesses
in native costume representing various International Pavilions of the
New York World's Fair will fly to Washington Friday, August 14, to
participate in the first of two tours arranged by the Fair Corporation
as part of its new International Hospitality Center program.
The visit will include tours of the National Archives, the
Capitol, the State Department, Arlington Cemetery and the National
Gallery. At 4 P.M. the group will visit the White House.
A reception and buffet supper given by the Hotel Association of
Washington and the washington Convention and Visitors Bureau at the
Gramercy Inn will follow with washington officials and embassy
representatives in attendance.
Included in the pavilions represented on the tour are: Berlin,
Caribbean, China, Denmark, Greece, Hong Kong, India, Ireland, Japan,
Jordan, Korea, Malaysia, Mexico, Sierra Leone, Sudan, Thailand and
Venezuela.
The International Visitors Information Service and The Hospitality
and Information Service have planned the entire visit in cooperation
with the Fair Corporation,
Schedule attached,
FROM: Wm. J. Donoghue Corporation
10 Columbus Circle, N. Y .C.
# # #
7:00 A.M.
7:15 A,M.
8:00 A,M,
9:15 A.M.
9:45 A.M.
10:30 A.M.
12:30 P.M.
3:00 P.M.
4:00 P.M.
5:00 P.M.
6:15 P.M.
7:00 P.M.
9:30 P,M.
10:00 P.M.
11:00 P.M.
SCHEDULE - WASHINGTON TRIP
Friday, August 14
8/64-R58
International staff members meet at World's
Fair at New Amsterdam Gate (No. 2).
Departure for La Guardia Airport.
Flight to Washington.
Arrival in Washington Airport.
National Archives {Bill of Rights, tour of
the Justice Department).
Capitol (tour the Capitol and observation
of the Senate in session).
State Department {tour) then lunch.
Arlington Cemetery -- Lee Mansion -- Kennedy
Grave (wreath ceremony at the grave).
White House
Drive to Mall -- visit to the National
Gallery.
Drive past Embassy Row (Massachusetts Avenue)
and through Georgetown.
Reception at the Gramercy Inn and buffet
supper (here they will be greeted by
Washington officials and embassy representa-
tives).
Return to Airport.
Departure
Arrive back at La Guardia Airport.
8/64-R57
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ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT
August 12, 1964
- WF 4-6531
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NEW YORK WORLD
1
S FAIR, Aug. 12 -- "Getting to know you -- to like
you --" are more than just the words of a song now for several hundred
young people in the International Pavilions of the World •s Fair.
A recently launched International Hospitality Service has
brightened the lives of these youngsters by providing them with a
social center for their off duty hours where they can meet and learn
about each other and their American counterparts.
It all began when Robert Moses, President of the Fair, heard
reports that many of the hosts, guides, restaurant workers and enter-
tainers from foreign lands expressed a desire to meet other young
people. Though surrounded by streams of people all day, theirs were
only the transitory, impersonal relationships made in the line of duty.
Language difficulties added to the innate shyness of those who had
always led sheltered lives, and social mores proscribed the freedom
of action customary among American youth.
In addition there was a realization that these young people would
be the focus of attention when they returned home. They would be
expected to interpret America to their own people. Yet they had seen
almost nothing or our country or even New York City.
Mary Jane McCaffree, director of women's activities for the Fair,
was handed the responsibility of formulating a program which would not
only foster a spontaneous mingling, but would also introduce the
foreign nationals to various phases of American life.
FROM: Wm. J. Donoghue Corporation
10 Columbus Circle, N.Y.C.
(more)
8/64-R57
.. 2 -
Working with representatives of the Fair's International Division
and Public Relations Department, Mrs. McCaffree enlisted the enthusi-
astic support of pavilion managers and the Women's Advisory Council.
Quarters were provided, temporarily, in the lounge of the Women's
Hospitality Center, located in the Purex Penthouse of the Better Living
Center, and volunteers from the corps of press aides and protocol
guides offered their services as hosts and hostesses at a series of
afternoon parties which kicked off the program.
The youngsters were taken on a trip of the Stock Exchange, a
swimming party was arranged on a private estate in Roslyn, Long Island,
and tn the offing are several beach parties, visits to theaters and
other cultural institutions, and boat trips around Manhattan.
The cooperation of the Midtown International Center and UN
Hospitality Service was enlisted to make arrangements for invitations
to American homes.
At the suggestion of the managers of the Pavilions of Spain and
Japan, the two largest employers in the International Area, Thursday
evening "get-togethers
11
were initiated.
As news of the program spread, several of the Industrial Pavilions
volunteered to provide free soft drinks and young Americans, working in
various pavilions at the Fair, were invited to join the parties.
The majority of the International Pavilion guests are in their
early twenties. The men, as a rule, show up in business suits, but
the girls overwhelmingly prefer their flattering -- and ult1•a feminine
national dress. The sexes are about evenly divided at the parties.
Mrs. MoCaffree finds the crowd an unusually well-mannered one.
Though there is provision for dancing, just talking -- forming and
reforming conversational groups -- seems to offer the greatest enjoy-
ment.
The youngsters are beginning to take an initiative in making
their own contribution towards the Socials. They have volunteered to
entertain the rest and provide national food delicacies they are
particularly proud of.
(more)
8/64•R57
- 3 -
As a highlight or the program, two air trips to Washington, D.o.,
on August 14 and 21, have been arranged, They will visit the National
Archives, the Capitol, Arlington Cemetery, National Gallery,. and the
White Houae and they will be greeted at a reception by Washington
officials and embassy representatives,
Eventually, the Fair's International Hospitality Center hopes to
aerve all or the approximately 4,000 employees in the International
Pavilions creating, in its fashion, a manifestation or "Peace through
Understanding."
# # #
8/64-R60
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FOR RELEASE: P,M.•S, F R I ~ , AUGUST 14
ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT
August 13, 1964
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR
1
Aug. 13 -- A basketball carnival, showing
outstanding amateur youth quintets from Metropolitan New York and
Philadelphia
1
and winding up with an exhibition contest between pro•
resstonal stars from the National Basketball Associatton1 will take
place Saturday, August 15
1
at the Singer Bowl of the New York World's
Fair.
The program will start at 4 P.M,
1
continue for five hours and is
free to Fairgoers. It is sponsored by the Courtsmen A.A., Inc,, and
run in conjunction with the Recreation Division of the New York City
Department of Parks, The Fair games are a part of the youth program
of the Courtsmen A.A., Inc., a non-profit philanthropic organization
which conducts such summer events for youngsters as the Ray Felix
tournament.
Among the pro court stars, who are expected to thrill Fairgoers
with their artistry, are 7 ft. l in. Wilt Chamberlain1 sensational
all-time record scorer in the NBA
1
his "assist man" Guy Rodgers, and
Al Attles, all of the San Francisco Warriors.
Other top performers include Art Heyman, former Duke luminary1
who was fourth high-scorer for the Knicks in his rookie year last
season, h ~ s Knicks teammates, Johnny Green and Tom Hoover1 and former
NYU intercollegiate star
1
Tom Sanders, now a member of the champion
NBA Boston Celtics.
FROM: Wm. J. Donoghue Corporation
10 Columbus Circle, N.Y.C.
(more)
8/64-R60
- 2 -
For the followers of the Knicks, the game also will gtve them an
opportunity to see the club's newest draft choices in action. These
include Willis Reed or Grambling College (La.), Howard Komives ot
Bowling Green (Ohio), who led all college scorers last season with a
game average of 33.5 points, and Fred Crawford of St. Bonaventure
(N. Y. ).
Opening the marathon basketball program will be games between
young championship teams representing New York and Philadelphia.
These Will be in the midgets' division, 12-13 years of age; juniors,
14-15J high school, 16-17, and seniors, 18-21.
All the pros and officials are volunteering their services. As
Walter Kennedy, president of the National Basketball Association says,
"They are doing it all for the kids."
Founded in 1959 by former college and professional athletes to
help guide youngsters on and orr the fields of sport, the Courtsmen
A.A., Inc. has granted more than 35 scholarships to needy youngsters.
lf: # #
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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT
August 13, 1964
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR, Aug. 13 -- Academy Award winner
Gregory Peck will visit the American Cancer Society exhibit
at the Fair's Hall of Science on Saturday, August 15, at
10:30 A,M., where he will view "Time for Life,
11
a film, in
which he stars, made for the Society.
Peck will enter the Fairgrounds at New Amsterdam Gate
(No. 2) and go directly to the Hall of Science, After the
film showing, he will go to the Pavilion of Spain (11:15 A.M.)
where he will view the Salvador Dali "Art In Jewels" exhibit,
which benefits the American cancer Society, the American Heart
Association and the Institute of Physical Medicine and
Rehabilitation.
Following his visit to the Dali exhibit, he will visit
the Johnson's Wax Pavilion.
FROM: Wm. J. Donoghue Corporation
10 Columbus Circle, N.Y.C.
# #
8/64·R64
UNISPH£R£
II
WORLD'SFAI'R 1964-1965 CO·R:PORAttdN
·:' fNT.ER:NAl:(ONAL EXP.OSITION AT .FLUSHING MEADOW
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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT
August 13, 1964
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR, Aug. 13 -- On Scottish Nationality
Day at the Fair (Sunday, Aug. 16), Scotland's foremost enter-
tainer, Andy Stewart, "The Scottish Soldier,
11
and Sally Logan,
the bonnie lass Scottish song, will headline a program of
song and dance at the Singer Bowl.
Also featured at the open-air fete, scheduled to start
at 5 P.M., will be Stan Hamilton and his Clansmen, a Scottish
country dance band. pipers and drummers and Highland
dancers will round out the program.
Admission to the gala at the Fair's Singer Bowl is free
to Fairgoers.
FROM: Wm. J. Donoghue Corporation
10 Columbus Circle, N.Y.C.
# # #
8/64-R65
UNISPH£RE 01961
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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
1
ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT
August 13, 1964
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR, Aug. 13 -- The New York Journal-
American Sandlot Baseball Squad, seventy players between
seventeen and nineteen years-old, will visit the Fair on
Sunday, August 16.
The boys will arrive at the Fairgrounds by chartered bus
at 1:30 P.M. They will tour pavilions and exhibits in the
Fair
1
s Transportation Area in a body. Later
1
they will split
into smaller groups and visit exhibits in other areas.
They are scheduled to leave the Fairgrounds at 8 P.M.
FROM: Wm. J. Donoghue Corporation
10 Columbus Circle, N.Y.C.
# # #
8/64-R67
UNISPHERE 01861
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FLUSHING 52, N.Y. • TELEPHONE· AREA CODE 212·WF 4·1964 • CABLE ADDRESS "WORLOSFAIR"
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FOR IMMED!ATE RELEA§!
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ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT
August 13, 1964
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR, Aug. 13 -- Visiting the New York
World's Fair on their honeymoon, a Lake Forest, Illinois, couple
became the 22 millionth and one persons to enter the Fair.
The surprised newlyweds, Audrie and Geoffrey Drisson, were
greeted at the Fair's Meadow Lake Gate (No. 5) by W.L. Stenegaaed,
executive vice president of the Florida World's Fair Authority,
and the newly-crowned ~ 1 1 s e Florida, Prtaoilla Joan Schnarr.
Mr. Stensgaaed presented the bride with a shell plant as he took
the couple on a tour of the pavilion.
They were then taken on a whirlwind tour as guests of the
Fair. They visited the General Cigar Favilion, Julimar Farms,
the Oregon Timber Carnival, had dinner at the International Cafe
in the Better Living Center and concluded with a visit to the
Montana Exhibit where they were given free hats.
Mr. and Mrs. Drisson arrived at the Kennedy Airport at
2 P.M. and came directly to the Fair for the lucky and unexpected
3 P.M. greeting. They are taking a late flight to Bermuda tonight
where they will honeymoon.
FROM: Wm. J. Dono1hue Corporation
10 Columbus Circle, N.Y.C.
# #
8/64-R66
UNISPHERE ' 01961

NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
FLUSHING 52, N.Y. • TELEPHONE· AREA CODE 212-WF 4·1964 • CABLE ADDRESS "WORLDSFAIR"
PEACE tHAOUOH
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IDIIIPIIII P111D11D WI
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FOR RELEASE: A,M, MONDAY
1
AUGUST 17
ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT
August 13, 1964
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR, Aug, 13 -- A special booth will
be set up by the New York World's Fair 1964-1965 Corporation
in Convention Hall, Atlantic City, during the forthcoming
National Democratic Convention. The booth will open on
Saturday, August 22, and remain until Friday, August 28, for
the convenience of accredited members of the press and their
immediate families.
The booth will handle requests by the press to visit
the World's Fair on August 28 through August 30. Motor coach
transportation from Atlantic City to New York City will be
provided by the General Tire and Rubber Company, and passes
to the World's Fair will be issued to the press and their
families. In addition, assistance will be provided in obtain-
ing hotel reservations in the New York area as well as easy
access to Fair exhibits.
Representatives of the Thomas J. Deegan Company and the
William J. Donoghue Corporation will be on hand to take care
of press requests.
FROM: Wm. J. Donoghue Corporation
10 Columbus Circle, N.Y.C.
#
8/64-R68
UNISPHERE
.... ,
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
FLUSHING 52, N.Y. • TELEPHONE· AREA CODE 212-WF 4-1964 • CABLE ADDRESS "WORLDSFAIR"
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Joyce Martin
- WF 4-6531
- WF t ~ - 6 5 4 1
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FOR RELEASE: AT NOON., FR,IDAY, AUGUST 14
ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT
August 13, 1964
WORLD'S FAIR PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS FOR SATURDAY, AUGUST 15
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR, Aug. 13 -- Special Days at the Fair on
Saturday include Panama Canal Day (at the Tiparillo Band Pavilion);
National Shrine Day (at the Vatican Pavilion); Korea National Day;
Croatian Day (at the N. Y. State Pavilion); Turkic Tatar Day (at the
World's Fair Pavilion); United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners
of America Day; the final Day of Florida Week; the sixth Day of
Inventions Week; Cranford, N. J. Day, and
1
South River Day and
Sayreville Day (at the N. J. Tercentenary Pavilion).
National Shrine Day will be celebrated at the Vatican Pavilion
by the holding of masses for the Feast of the Assumption at 10 A.M.,
Noon, 3, 4 and 6 P.M. At 8 P.M. Shrine Day ceremonies will be in the
form of a solemn Benediction and Candlelight Procession at the Vatican
Pavilion. The Most Reverend John Dougherty, President of Seton Hall
u. and Auxiliary Bishop of the Archdiocese or Newark, will preside.
The World's Fair will celebrate the 50th anniversary of the
opening of the Panama Canal on Aug. 15, 1914, with a program beginning
at 4 P.M. at the Tiparillo Band Pavilion. As a highlight of this
program, Fair executive vice president, Gen. William E. Potter, who
was Governor of the Panama Canal Zone from 1956 to 1960, will accept
special greetings, an official medallion from the Canal Zone govern-
ment and a bound copy of the 50th Anniversary Commemorative Book from
Robert J. Fleming, Jr., present Governor of the Panama Canal Zone.
FROM: Wm. J. Dono1hue Corporation
10 Columbus Circle, N.Y.C.
(more)
8/64-R68
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Entertainment for the celebration will be provided by Lucho
Azcarraga and his quintet. Azcarraga, a Panamanian and one of Latin
America's leading recording will be performing in this country
for the first time.
Sixty-five members of the United Students of an organiza•
tion representing various Latin American will sing and
dance in native costume.
The Postal Division of the Canal Zone will have first-day covers
of Commemorative Panama Canal Postage Stamps on sale at the Fair's
Pan American Highway Gardens from Aug, 15 through 19. A special dis-
play of these stamps will be a feature at this exhibit on Panama canal
Day.
Croatian Day entertainment at the New York State Pavilion will
begin with an 11 A,M, program (to be repeated at 3 and 6 P.M8) by St.
Cecilia's Sts, Cyril and Methodius Roman Catholic Church of
New York City. At 12:30 (and again at 4:30 and 7:30 P.M.) the st.
Mary's Roman Catholic Church of Steelton, Pa., will give a special
"Marian" program of ethnic dancing by its Kolo club in honor of the
Feast of the Assumption.
Sports fans will be offered a rare free treat from 4 to 11 P.M.
in the Singer Bowl where the courtsmen Athletic Association Basketball
Exhibition will be held, Featured will be a game between several top
NBA stars, headed by Wilt "the Stilt" Chamberlain., the NBA
1
s all-time
high scorer and two of his San Francisco Warrior Guy
Rodgers and Al Attles. Also playing will be the Knicks' Art Heyman
(former Duke All-American), Johnny Green and Tom Hoover, as well as
ex-NYU ace Tom "Specs" Sanders of the world-champion Boston Celtics.
All eyes will be focused on the Knicks' two draft choices, Willis Reed,
of Grambling College and Howard Komives, of Bowling Green
(Ohio). the nation's high (collegiate) scorer, and how they will fare
against the established NBA stars. Preceding this exhibition, there
will be several games between outstanding amateur teams from
Metropolitan New York and Philadelphia.
(more)
8/64-R68
- 3 ..
At 10:30 A.M., Academy Award-winning movie star, Gregor.y Peck,
will visit the American Cancer Society's Exhibit at the Hall of Science
to eee the Society's movie "Time for Life" in which he stars. After-
wards he will tour the Fairgrounds stopping to see the Salvador Dali
Exhibit, "Art in Jewels," at the Pavilion of Spain, and the Johnson's
Wax Exhibit's film, "To Be Alive".
The 'l'urkic Tatar Nationality Day FOlk Festival will be held at
the World's Fair Pavilion between 8 and 10 P.M. This evening of ethnic
songs and dances will be staged by Turkic Tatar communities in the
u.s., made up of refugees from Soviet rule who fled their native
countries after world Wars I and II.
Sports Host Sid Gordon will be joined at the Schaefer Sports
Center by the Meta• friend Jim Bunning of the league-leading Phillieo
from Noon to 2 P.M. Bunning recently achieved baseball immortality by
pitching a perfect game against the Meta.
Meanwhile starting at 8 P.M. in nearby Shea Stadium, the Meta
will try to halt the runaway progress of the league-leading Phillies,
Fairgoers may return to the Fair free after the game by getting their
wrists stamped when exiting from the Fair.
A pipe smoking contest, in which more than 100 men and women will
compete for the pipe smoking championship of the world, will be held
at the Wisconsin Pavilion at 2 P,Mo This contest is being run under
the auspices or the Pipe and Tobacco Council.
Professor Lau Ta-po, noted Chinese artist, will demonstrate his
skill in Chinese painting at the Pavilion of the Republic of China at
3, 4 and 7:30 P.M.
ENTERTAINMENT WILL CONTINUE IN THE LAKE AMUSEMENT AREA UNTIL
2 A.M.
# # #
8/64 .. R71
UNISPHERE 01'161
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
FLUSHING 52, N.Y. • TELEPHONE· AREA CODE 212·WF 4·1964 • CABLE ADDRESS ''WORLOSrAIR"
~ I : A C I : THROUGH
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Jerome Edelberg - WF 4-6541
Joyce Martin - WF 4-6543
ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT
August 14, 1964
ADDITION TO RELEASE NO. 8/64-R66
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR, Aug. 14 -- The special booth to
be operated by the New York world
1
s Fair at the Democratic
National Convention 1n Atlantic City, will be equipped to
receive press requests. The telephone number in Atlantic City
is: (Area Code 609) 348-5176.
FROM: Wm. J. Donoghue Corporation
10 Columbus Circle, N.Y.C.
# # #
8/64·R76
UN I SPHERE 01001
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
FLUSHING 52, N.Y. • TELEPHONE- AREA CODE 212-WF 4-1964 • CABLE ADDRESS "WORLDSFAIR"
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UNDE'PtSTANDINO
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Jerome Edelberg
Joyce Martin
FOR
- WF 4-6531
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- WF 4-6543
ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT
August 14, 1964
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR, August 14 -- Close to 100 members of the
Aviation/Space Writers Association, from many parts of the country,
plan a busy day at the New York World's Fair on Monday, August 17,
1964. As an early part of the Fair's observance of National Aviation
Day (Aug. 19), the writers will mark the 35th anniversary of air
passenger service by making a tour of aerospace and air transport
exhibits at the Fair.
Eastern Airlines Senior Vice President and General Manager
Arthur D. Lewis, New York City, will be the principal speaker at the
luncheon-meeting to be held at the Malaysian Pavilion Restaurant.
Special honors will be paid to three pioneers who were aboard the
Eastern Air Transport Ford Trimotor flight which inaugurated New York
City's first scheduled passenger and airmail service out of the old
North Beach Airport, now LaGuardia, on August 18, 1930. Recognition
also will be given to National Aviation Day designated for Wednesday,
August 19, by President Lyndon B. Johnson.
Elmer H. Sperry Jr., Hilton, Conn., first passenger and well-
known inventor, will join with Capt. E. H. (Pete) Parker, Summit
6
N. J., and his co-pilot John B. Armstrong, Miami, Fla., both retired
after long careers in the air, in recalling that first flight nearly
ten years before New York City boasted a municipal airport. Mr.
Sperry's gyroscope and other navigational instruments invented three
decades ago have made possible today•s high standards of safety in
FROM: Wm. J. Donoghue Corporation
10 Columbus Circle, N.Y.C.
(more)
8/64·R76
- 2 -
air navigation and night flying, and are presently guiding our explora-
tion of outer space and missiles to the moon.
Pilot Parker recalls that the "Tin Goose" carried only 11
passengers, five pounds of airmail and a spare tailwheel in the 12th
seat, and served six cities, New York, Newark, Camden (Philadelphia),
Baltimore, Washington and Richmond.
"They rated the 'Tin Goose' at 120 miles an hour cruising," the
veteran captain says, "but I could never get more than 90 out or it,
a headwind slowed us to about 40 or 50. On our first flight we
bucked a headwind to camden from Newark. It slowed our Ford Trimotor
so that four-wheeled Fords on the highway which served as my 'flying
beam
1
zipped past going in the same direction."
In the beginning there was one flight daily, except Sunday,
serving a round trip to six cities over a 310-mile route each way. A
total of 22 passengers made the round trip. The time one way was 4
hours 35 minutes. "Today," says Pilot Parker, "Eastern's newe3t trt-
motors, Boeing 727 Whisperjeta, can fly 2,175 miles from LaGuardia to
Mexico City with nine times as many passengers in five minutes less
time."
Before the luncheon, the AWA members will visit the Fair's s.
Space Park and the Eastern Airlines Exhibit at 10 enjoy a coffee
"break" at the TWA display in the Transportation and Travel Pavilion,
view the sights of the Fair from the air through the courtesy
of the World's Fair Sightseeing Helicopters, operated by New York Air•
ways or United Aircraft International, from the Port Authority Heliport
and see the "Trip to the Moon" in the T&T Building.
Following lunch, the writers will visit the Missouri Pavilion to
see the "Spirt t of St. Louis", a replica of the special Ryan monoplane
flown by Charles Lindbergh from New York to Paris, May 20-21
1
1927.
Visits to the New York City Building for a simulated helicopter ride
over a model of the City with its 800,000 structures, to the Hall of
Science {Navigation equipment), General Motors (Allison engines, etc.)
and Chrysler (missiles) are included in their agenda.
(more)
8/64-R76
- 3 -
From 100 miles an hour to 600 miles an hour, from ll Eastern
passengers to 118 million, from one flight to 1
1
456 a day, from zero
to a billion dollars a year, from a fog over Staten Island (inaugural
flight) to closeup photos of the moon -- THESE ARE SOME OF THE THINGS
AVIATION AND SPACE WRITERS WILL RELIVE ~ ~ THEY ASSEMBLE MONDAY AT
THE WORLD'S FAIR WITH THE PIONEERS WHO STARTED IT ALL!
Schedule follows:
9 :30·9: 45 A.M.
10:00 A.M.
10:30·11:00 A.M,
11:00-12:00 Noon
12:30-2:00 P.M.
2:30 P.M.
3:15 P.M.
4:15 P.M.
5:00 P.M.
6:00 P.M.
AWA members arrive at Gate No. 2, where
they should be met by 3 Press Aides.
Visit NASA Space Park and Eastern Airlines
Exhibit.
Coffee Break at TWA Exhibit in the Trans-
portation and Travel Pavilion.
Helicopter trips over World's Fair,
courtesy of WF's sightseeing Helicopter
Service. Also see Port Authority Exhibit.
Luncheon and ceremonies at Malaysian
Pavilion where Arthur D. Lewis, Senior
Vice President and General Manager,
Eastern Airlines, will be principal
speaker; honored guests will include
Captain E. H. (Pete) Parker, Summit, N.J. 1
pilot; Captain John B. Armstrong, Miami,
Fla., co-pilot, and Elmer H. Sperry, Jr.,
Wilton, Conn., first passenger and well-
known inventor
1
who were aboard Eastern
Air Transport Ford Trimotor flight in-
augurating New York City's first scheduled
passenger and airmail service out of the
old North Beach Airport (now LaGuardia) on
August 18, 1930.
Visit New York City Building for simulated
helicopter ride over the City.
Visit Missouri Building. See "Spirit of
St. Louis" replica.
Visit General Motors. See Allison Engine,
etc.
Visit Chrysler Exhibit (missiles).
Hall of Science: Navigation Equipment,
# # #
8/64-R77
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Peter McDonnell
Jerome Edelberg
Joyce Martin
- WF 4-6531
- WF 4-6541
- WF 4-6543
FOR RE@ASE: AT NOOTL. SAT!JRDAY, AUGUST 15
ROBERT MOSES
PRtSIOENT
August 14, 1964
WORW•S FAIR PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS FOR SUNDAY, AUGUST 16
NEW YORK WORID•S FAIR, Aug. 14 -- Among the "Special Days
11
at
the Fair on Sunday,_ Scottish Nationality Day Folk Festival in Singer
Bowl, from 5 to 8 P.M., will offer a rare chance to see and hear a
stirring spectacle of' rousing, joyful Scottish highland and country
music. The awesome "skirl of the pipes" will be performed by: 100
pipers and drummers; 32 highland dancers; four sets of' Scottish
country dancers, accompanied by Stan Hamilton and his Clansmen from
Ontario, Canada -- all ceremoniously dressed in traditional highland
costumes and colorful tartans of' the ancient clans of Scotland.
The highlight of the evening will be the appearance of Scotland's
foremost entertainer, Andy Stewart, the "Scottish Soldier", who is
"jetting" from Scotland to Singer Bowl for this special appearance.
Other Special Days to be celebrated on Sunday: Alpha Kappa Alpha
Day; Soap Box Derby Championrs Day; United Scottish Clans of New York-
New Jersey Day; Vacationers Club of America Day; Rutgers University
Rangers Day, and New York State Fife, Drum and Bugle Corps Day.
At Noon, the Alpha Kappa Alpha Day ceremonial observances at the
Top-of-the-Fair Restaurant in honor of the outstanding Negro women of
the last century will pay tribute to Miss Marian Anderson, honorary
member of the sorority. The world-famous contralto will attend the
luncheon in person.
FROM: Wm. J. Donoghue Corporation
10 Columbus Circle, N.Y.C.
(more)
8/64-R77.
- 2 -
The Rutgers University Rangers will demonstrate karate and hand-
to-hand self-defense maneuvers at the N.J. Tercentenary Pavilion at
1
1
3
1
5
1
7 and 9 P.M. Appearing at each performance with the Rangers
will be the "Valiants", a rook 'n' roll group from Plainfield.
The Lucho Azoarraga Band from Panama, continuing their celebration
of the Panama Canal•s 50th anniversary, will perform Panamanian music
and traditional dances at various points around the Fair. They will be
at the Pan American Highway Gardens at 2 P.M.; the Centralamerica-
Panama Pavilion at 4 P.M., and the Court of the Universe at 6 P.M.
Among the groups performing for New York State Fife, Drum and
Bugle Corps Day,. from 11 s15 A.M. to 10 P.M. at the New York State
Pavilion, will be 1 The Candleirs, precision drill champions of Mighty
Monarch Elks (NYC); St. Michael's Archangels Drum and Bugle Corps
(Flushing); Thunderstreaks Drum and Bugle Corps (Bellmore);· St. Leo's
Cadets (Corona); St. Clement•s Drum Corps (so. Ozone Park); The Ascots
Drum and Bugle Corps (Sea Cliff); 109th Precinct Youth Council Rebels
Concert Drum and Bugle Corps; St. Fidelis Majestic Knights, fife, drum
and bugle corps with Color Guard (College Point); Colonial Ancient Fife
and Drum Junior-Senior Corps (Bethpage); OUr Lady of Czentochowa
Ramblers, drum and bugle corps (Brooklyn); Hewlett-Woodmere Police
Boys Drum and Bugle Corps; St. Brigid•s Fife, Drum and Bugle Corps
(Westbury); Skylarks Drum and Bugle Corps (Holbrook), and the Smithtown
Freelancers and Smithtown Plebes of the Sndthtown Drum and Bugle Corps.
Religious services at the Fair on Sunday will include& Sunday
morning worship conducted by the Salvation Army, with music by the
Salvation Army Singers and Brass Ensemble, at the Protestant and
Orthodox Center Theatre at 11 A.M.; the Bibletown, U.S.A. program
featuring church bands and choirs from Bocaraton, Fla., at 2:30 P.M.
In the Federal Pavilion, and the New England Armenian Chorus Concert
of Sacred and Secular Music, sponsored by the Armenian Church of
runerica at 2 P.M. in the Protestant and Orthodox Center Theatre.
The Tiparillo Band Pavilion will present the Central Parkway Youth
Symphonic Band from the YMCA of Cincinnati and Hamilton County, Ohio,
at 2:30P.M.; the ottawa Township (Ill.) High School Band at 4 P.M.,
(more)
8/64-R77
- 3 -
and OUy Lombardo and his Royal Canadians playing for tree public
dancing from 9:30 P.M. to 12:30 A.M.
The 86-piece MOntana first place winners in the Pasadena
Tournament or Roses Parade last will continue to play at the
MOntana Big Sky Pavilion and to salute various exhibitor states
by playing at their pavilions. The band's schedule: lt30-Montana;
l:45•HOllywood; 2:00-New Jersey; 2:15-Wisconsin; 2:25-M1ssouri; 2:40-
Alaska; ·3:15 Bourbon Street, and from 6 to 7 the Federal
Pavilion •.
ENTERTAINMENT CONTINUES IN THE LAKE AMUSEMENT AREA UNTIL 2 A.M.
# # #
8/64-RSO
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FLUSHING 52, N.Y. • TELEPHONE· AREA CODE 212·WF 4-1964 • CABLE ADDRESS "WORLDSFAIR"
PEACE THROUGH
UNDERSTANDING
...................
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REFER INQUIRIES TO:
Peter MCDonnell - WF 4-6531
Jerome Edelberg - WF 4-6541
Joyce Martin - WF 4-6543
FOR . RELEASE 1 AT NOON, . AUGUST 12,
ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT
August 14, 1964
WORLD'S FAIR PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS FOR MONDAY, AUGUST 17
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR, Aug. 14 -- The State of Indiana, as their
contribution to the World's Fair, will present a program of live opera
free to Fairgoers when Indiana University Opera Theater presents
'"l'urandot" in the Singer Bowl from 9:30 P.M. to midnight on Monday
(Indiana State Day) and Tuesday. This presentation of Puccini's most
lavish opera will come to the Fair after having been presented four
times on the largest outdoor stage in the world at Indiana Universityrs
Memorial Stadium in Bloomington.
Featured in the title role will be Margaret Harshaw, supported by
a cast or more than 200, and a lOO·pieoe symphony orchestra conducted
by Ixler Solomon. Special outdoor settings and stage designs for the
opera at the Singer Bowl have been created by Mario Oristini.
Other Special Days on Mondays Indonesian Independence Day; AC
Spark Plug Division of General MOtors Day; HUghes Club Day; Joseph
Schlitz Brewing Co. Day; Orange County Day (N.Y. State Pavilion).
Indonesian Independence Day at the World's Fair will be celebrated
at the Indonesian Pavilion and its Theatre-Restaurant between 6:30 and
8:30 P.M. A reception will be held for U.N. dignitaries and other
guests. A special two-hour cultural performance by the entire troupe
or Indonesian dancers, singers and musicians will be held. Among the
guests will be: Indonesian U.N. Ambassador and Mrs. L. N. Palar;
FROM: Wm. J. Donoghue Corporation
10 Columbus Circle, N.Y.C.
(more)
8/64-R80
- 2 -
and Mrs. Ralph Bunohe, Uhder Secretary to the U.N.; M. and Mme.
Roger Seydoux# French Ambassador to the U.N.; Mr. and Mrs. Silvert
President ot the U.N. Security Council; Mr. and Mrs. Lee
ot Actor•s Studio; Mr. and Mrs. Rolf Bennett, Former U.N.
Administrator in West New Guinea; Major General Raikkye, Military
Advisor to the U.N. Secretary General; Mr. Roy Neuberger; Mr. Harvey
CUshman; Mr. and Mrs. Lincoln Kerstein, Director ot L1nooln Center;
Mr. Armason, artist and Mr. Waldo Rasmussen, artist.
ENTERTAINMENT CONTINUES IN THE LAKE AMUSEMENT AREA UNTIL 2 A. M.
# # #
8/64·R94
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WF 4-6543
FOB BJLEASE! AT NOON, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 19
ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT
August 18, 1964
WORLD
1
S FAIR PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS FOR THURSDAY, AUGUST 20
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR, Aug. 18 -- A king-sized traffic jam should
develop around the World's Fair Unisphere at about 10:30 A.M. on
Thursday. The beloved, redoubtable New Yorl( Mete will pause there and
then during their "Day" at the Fair to give out autographed sheets and
photos to their fans.
Other special ''Days" at the Fair on Thursday include: General
MOtors Locomotive Delivery Day; American Institute of Planners• Day;
National Supreme Council, A.&A.S.R. Masons, Inc. Day; Betail Jewelers
of America Day; National District Attorneys' Day; Camden County Week
(4th day), and Schuyler County Day.
As a highlight of General Motors Locomotive Delivery Day, Seaboard
Railroad will return to General MOtors Corporation, the railroad
engine which was on display at General Mbtors Futurama in the 1939-40
World's Fair. In exchange for this historic engine, Seaboard Railroad
will take delivery or a new Electro-Motive engine at the L.I.R.R.
tracks near the Montana Pavilion at 11:30 A.M. Fair President Robert
Moses and members of the cast of "Fade Out, Fade In" will participate
in the ceremonies.
The Mete will arrive at the Fair at 10:15 A.M. via New Amsterdam
Gate (No. 2), and after their Unisphere appearance, will visit the
Travelers Insurance Pavilion at 11 A.M. and the Hall of Free Enterprise
FROM: Wm. J. Donoghue Corporation
10 Columbus Circle, N.Y.C.
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8/64 ... R94
- 2 ..
at 11:45 A.M. A 12:30 P.M. luncheon at the Millstone Restaurant in the
New England States Exhibition will be hosted by United Air Lines.
After lunch, the Mets will visit the United Air Lines Exhibit at
la45 P.M.; General MOtors Futurama II (2:15 P.M.); The New York City
Pavilion (3 P.M.); the State of Hawaii ~ i b i t (4 P.M.): the AMF
MOnorail {5 P.M.); and the Coca-Cola Pavilion (5:45P.M.). They will
depart via Gate No. 2 at 6:15 P.M.
Miss Pauline Trigere will conduct a special fashion show in honor
of Retail Jewelers of America Day at the Fair at 4 P.M. in the Crystal
Palace or Fashion in the Better Living Center. This show, which will
be held on the closing day of the annual Retail Jewelers Convention in
New York, will be sponsored by Idnde Stars, an exhibitor in the Crystal
Palace of Fashion. A feature of that exhibit is "The World's Fair
Necklace", valued at $25,000. The value of the jewelry which Miss
Tr1gere will display on her models, in coordination with beautiful
gowns, is $750,000.
A day-long program of entertainment featuring talent from Schuyler
County has been scheduled at the New York State Pavilion in celebration
of Schuyler County Day.
At 11:15 A.M., Dr. Matsch of the Austrian Mission to the U.N. will
speak on "Peace for Use in OUter Space" at the Illinois Pavilion, and
at l P.M., Ginn! Clemens, folk singer from Chicago, will entertain.
The American Institute of Planners will hold a special meeting
sponsored by the Port of New York Authority at the Federal Pavilion at
1 P.M. In the same pavilion at 4 P.M., the Women's Army Corps Band
will play in concert.
Between 6 and 8 P.M., there will be a color video taping at the
RCA Pavilion of Sol Yaged and his Jazz Quintet from Bourbon Street.
At twilight, the Band of America, directed by Paul Lavalle, will
play at the Fountain of the Planets, Court of the Universe, from 7:15
to 8:40 P.M., Just prior to the fountain display for the evening "Great
Masters", at 9 P.M. Guy Lombardo and his Royal Canadians will begin
playing for free public dancing at the Tiparillo Band Pavilion at
9:30 P.M., and will continue until 12:30 A.M.
ENTERTAINMENT WILL CONTINUE IN THE LAKE AMUSEMENT AREA UNTIL 2 A.M.
# # II
8/64 .. R97
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INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
FLUSHING 52, N.Y. • TELEPHONE· AREA CODE 212-WF 4-1964 • CABLE ADDRESS "WORLDSFAIR"
PEACE THROUGH
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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT
.August 18, 1964
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR, Aug. 18 -- Ceremonies attendant to
Hawaii Statehood Day at the Fair (Friday, Aug, 21), coinciding
with the fifth anniversar.y of Hawaii's Statehood, will be high-
lighted by the presentation of an Hawaii State Silver Medallion
to Fair President Robert Moses.
The presentation will be made by former Lt. Governor James
K. Kealoha, currently Executive Officer of the Hawaiian Exhibit
at the Fair. It will follow tae presentation of the World's
Pair Silver Medallion to Governor Kealoha by Mr. Moses.
Both presentations will take place in the Aloha Theatre of
the Hawaiian Pavilion at 11:30 A.M.
The celebration of Hawaii Statehood Day will commence at
10:30 A.M. when the official Hawaiian delegation will be greeted
at the Fair's New Amsterdam Gate (No. 2) by Gen. William E.
Potter, Fair Executive Vice President and Gates Davison, Fair
Deputy Chief of Protocol.
Included in the State•s delegation are the famous Kamehameha
Alumni Glee Club, "Miss Hawaii of 1964 ", 18-year-old Le1naala
Tervya, and Maiku A1u and her hula dancers,
The Glee Club will march from Gate No. 2 through the Fair-
grounds to the Aloha Theatre where, with the dancers, they will
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10 Columbus Circle, N.Y.C.
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g1ve a one-hour concert at 11:45 A.M., following the medallion
presentation ceremonies. At 4 P.M., the group will perform at
·the Federal Pavilionts Kennedy Plaza, and at 6:30 P.M. in the
Restaurant of the Five Volcanos 1n the Hawaiian Pavilion.
~ Lombardo will also receive a special medallion from the
State of Hawaii for his contribution to the State of Hawaii in
producing "Paradise Isle" at the Jones Beach Theatre in 61/62.
# # #
8/64-Rl05
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FLUSHING 52, N.Y. • TELEPHONE· AREA CODE 212-WF 4-1964 • CABLE ADDRESS "WORLDSFAIR"
~ U C £ T H ~ O U O H
UNOERITANDINO
--"
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Jerome Edelberg - WF 4-6541
Joyce Martin - WF 4-6543
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT
August 19, 1964
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR, Aug, 19 •• Some three hundred veterans
of the U.S. Army's First Cavalry Division, the unit whose World
War II battle honors include the Leyte landing, the liberation of
Manila and the 3,700 Allied civilian internees held by the Japanese
in that city•s Santo Tomas University, will assemble at the New
York World's Fair to commemorate these dramatic events on Friday,
Aug. 21.
The day has been designated "First Cavalry Division Association
Day" by the Fair.
At 10 A.M. they will be Joined at the Fair's Philippine Pavil-
ion by survivors of the Santo Tomas Internment Camp, of the Battle
of Corregidor, of the Bataan "death march
11
, and by u.s. and
Philippine officers and officials, for ceremonies honoring those
who suffered and prevailed during those historic days.
The 10 A.M. ceremonies, at which Fair President Robert MOses
will speak, will be hosted by MaJ. Gen. Alfred G. Tuckerman. Brig.
Gen. William Bradley, former First Cavalry Division Commander, and
Ambassador Richard c. Patterson, Jr., Fair Chief of Protocol, will
also speak.
Col. Charles E. Brady, the First Cavalry officer who negotiated
to save the lives of Santo Tomas internees, will present a piece or
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Cozaregidor rock to internees and survivors of the Bataan "death
march" participating in Fzaiday•s ceremonies,
Honozaed guests at the ceremonies will include Lt. Oen. R. w.
P o r t e r ~ Jr., Commanding General, First Army in New York, and Maj.
Oen. William c. Chase, commander of the First Cavalry Division
''Flying Column" which captured Santo Tomas. The First Army Band
will participate in the commemorative ceremonies.
First Cavalry Division Association Day at the Fair will be the
highlight of the Association's four-day-long 17th Annual Reunion
beginning Thursday in New York City.
# # #
8/64-Rl07
UNISPHERE 01861

N EW y 0 R K w 0 R L DIs FA I R 1 9 6 4-19 6 5 c 0 R p 0 RAT I 0 N
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
FLUSHING 52, N.Y. • TELEPHONE- AREA CODE 212-WF 4-1964 • CABLE ADDRESS "WORLDSFAIR"
PEACE THAOUOH
UNDERSTANDING
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Peter MCDonnell • WF 4-6531
Jerome Edelberg - WF 4-6541
Joyce Martin • WF 4-6543
FOR RELEASE: AT NOON, TODAY, AUGUST 20
ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT
August 19, 1964
NEW YORK WORLD•S FAIR, Aug. 19 -- The final tryouts to select
the strongest teams for the u. s. Weightlifting Squad in the
XVIII Olympic Games in Tokyo, Japan, Oct. 10-24, will be contested
tomorrow (Friday) in the World's Fair Pavilion. Admission is free.
Other Olympic finals are also slated within the next few weeks
in wrestling, water polo, rowing, gymnastics, swimming and diving,
volleyball and canoeing. There will be no charge for the
events conducted on the exposition grounds at Flushing Meadow Park.
More than 60 of the country's outstanding lifters have qualified
for the competition starting at noon tomorrow and finishing Saturday.
Matches will be in eight classes, The appearance or three former
Olympic titleholders will highlight the weightlifting tournament.
Tommy Kono, Hawaii, 1952 lightweight ruler, Norbert Schemansky
of Detroit, 1952 middle heavyweight champion, and Isaac Berger of New
York, the 1956 lightweight titleholder, will seek further Olympic
laurels. Other favored contenders are Joseph Puleo, middleweight,
Bill March, York, Pa., middle heavyweight, and Tony Garey, lightweight
winner -- all 1963 Pan-American champions.
The World's Fair Singer Bowl will be the scene of Olympic wres-
tling tryouts starting Monday and continuing through Friday.
This will mark the finale of five Olympic tryouts held at the
World's Fair, which serves as co-sponsor with the New York City's
Department of Parks or fifteen Olympic events held in the metropolitan
area this spring and summer.
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8/64-Rl07
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There also will be a trio of Olympians from the 1960 team on
hand tor the wrestling, which will be in free and Greco-Roman.
Eliot Gray Simons, free Russ Camilleri, Greco-Roman
middleweight, and Dan Brand, light heavyweight free showed
their fine form in the recent National A.A.U. championships, also
held at the World's Fair, winning five gold medals among them.
In addition to these veteran grapplers, other favorites include
Greg Ruth 1n the 154-pound free style and Private Jim Raschke. The
former, a student at the University ot Oklahoma, carried off the
national title, and Raschke, ex-University of Nebraska ace, won both
heavyweight crowns for a "double" in tree style and Greco-Roman.
Other upcondng tryouts include water polo, swimming and
diving at Astoria Pool in Queens, Aug. 25-Sept. 6, with some 1,000
top men and women aquatic stars participating in the three-sport
13-day water carnival.
The men's and women's tryouts, Aug. 26-29, at
the u.s. Merchant Marine Kings Point, L.I.; cycling (speed
races), Aug. 31-Sept. 3, at the Stern K1ssena Park, Queens;
Sept. 2-5, at Queens College, Flushing; cycling (road races) at
Central Park, Sept. 5-6, and canoeing for men and women at Orchard
Beach, Bronx, Sept. 12-13, wind up the "Olympic Days" in the metro-
politan area.
# II
U N I S P H E I! £ 0 1ea1
8/64-RlOl
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INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
FLUSHING 52, N.Y. • TELEPHONE· AREA CODE 212-WF 4·1964 • CABLE ADDRESS "WORLOSFAIR"
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FOR RELEASE
ROBERT MOSES
FI!ESIOENT
August 19, 1964
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR, Aug. 19 -- Notables from the world of
aport, entertainment, literature and religion will be represented on
the IAthuania Day program at the New York World's Fair on Sunday,
Aug. 23.
Miss Ruta Lee, screen and television star, who recently freed
her grandmother from behind the Iron Curtain, will be Mistress of
Ceremonies for the Lithuania Day program to be held in the Singer Bowl.
MOre than 20,000 L1thuanian-Americans are expected to attend.
A memorial ceremony at the Wayside Cross,
located at Meditation Lane and Avenue of Africa, will inaugurate the
program at noon. will be followed by a Mass in the Singer Bowl
at 12:30 P.M., to be celebrated by Lithuanian Bishop Vincent Brizgys.
Following the Mass, 1,400 choristers and more than 700 folk
dancers will parade into the Singer Bowl to present the cultural songs
and dances of their homeland.
The Hon. Joseph Kajeckas, Charge d'Affaires for Lithuania in the
United States, will deliver the keynote address. John Unitas, quarter-
back star of the Baltimore Colts, and Major John Yesulaitis, former
director of the U.S. Air Force Band, will also speak at the Singer
Bowl ceremonies. The entire program will be telecast in color by RCA
on the Fair's closed circuit.
FROM: Wm. J. Donoghue Corporation
10 Columbus Circle, N.Y.C.
# # #
8/64-Rl03
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CIO&I
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INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
FLUSHING 52, N.Y. • TELEPHONE· AREA CODE 212·WF 4·1964 • CABLE ADDRESS "WORLDSFAIR"
PE.ACE THAOUOH
Ut-tOER!TANOING
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Jerome Edelberg - WF 4-6541
Joyce Martin - WF 4-6543
FOR RELEASE: AT NOON, TliUfiSDAY
1
AUGUST 20
ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT
August 19, 1964
WORLD'S FAIR PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS FOR FRIDAY, AUGUST 21
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR, Aug. 19 -- Friday at the Fair has been
designated as Hawaii Statehood Day; the first day of the Olympic
We1ght11fting Trials; Antigua Day; First Cavalry Division Association
Day; Greene County Day, and the fifth day of Camden County Week.
Hawaii Statehood Day ceremonies will be held in commemoration of
the fifth anniversary of Hawaii's being proclaimed a State by President
Eisenhower on Aug. 21, 1959. A highlight of the ceremonies will be an
exchange of silver medallions between Fair President Robert MOses and
former Lt. Gov. of Hawaii James K. Kealoha, now Executive Officer of
the State of Hawaii Exhibit. This exchange will take place at the
Aloha Theatre, State of Hawaii Exhibit in the Lake Amusement Area at
11:30 A.M.
The official Hawaii Statehood Day party, which will include the
Hon. Valentine Marciel, Comptroller of the State of Hawaii; Ralph
Honda, Member, State of Hawaii New York World's Fair Committee, and
the Kamehameha Alumni H.S. Glee Club, will arrive at the New Amsterdam
Gate (No. 2) at 10:30 A.M. Here they will be greeted by Michael R.
Pender, Director of State Exhibits and by Gates Davison, Fair Deputy
Chief of Protocol.
There will be a 1 P.M. luncheon hosted by the Fair at the
Restaurant or the Five Volcanos, State of Hawaii Exhibit, and, as a
feature or the Dayrs ceremonies, the Kamehameha Alumni H.S. Glee Club
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10 Columbus Circle, N.Y.C.
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will perform at the 11:30 A.M. program at the Aloha Theatre, and again
at 4 P.M. at the Federal Pavilion.
First Cavalry Division Association Day will be attended by some
300 veterans of that unit whose World War II combat honors include
the Leyte landing, the liberation of Manila and 3,700 Allied civilian
internees held by the Japanese in that city•s Santo Tomas University.
Fair President Robert MOses will address the group at ceremonies
at 10 A.M. at the Philippine Pavilion. It will be attended by survi-
vors of the Santo Tomas Internment Camp, the Battle of Corregidor and
the Bataan "death march. "
Maj. Gen. Alfred G. Tuckerman, Brig. Gen. William Bradley and
Ambassador Richard c. Patterson, Jr., will also speak.
One of the finest examples of "Peace Through Understanding" will
take place at the New England States Exhibition at 10:30 P.M. when
the pavilion will re-open after its 10 P.M. closing to host over 400
employees of 33 international pavilions at the Fair. It will be a
multi-lingual, multi-costumed affair at which songs, music and dances
from the far corners of the earth will mingle. The get-together,
labelled International Day, has been planned as an expression of the
traditional hospitality and friendship of New Englanders and as an
opportunity for the development of understanding by having fun to-
gether. Traditional New England food will be served at the party.
The Antigua Steel Band, which won the British West Indies Cham-
pionship, will appear from 11 A.M. to 1 P.M. at the Seven-Up Pavilion
and from 7 to 8 P.M. at the Tiparillo Band Pavilion.
As part of the Fair's Olympic Trials program, the Olympic Weight-
lifting Trials will be held at the World•s Fair Pavilion from noon to
5 P.M.
The Sports Host at the Schaefer Center from noon to 3 P.M. and
from 5 to 7 P.M. each day throughout the weekend, will be the famed
''Big 0," Oscar Robertson, of the Cincinnati Royals. Proclaimed by
many sports writers and coaches to be the best all-round basketball
player in the world, Oscar was star of the 1960 Olympic team, three
times All-American at Cincinnati U., and an All-Pro star in the NBA •
.1/.
lt # #
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NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
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ROBERT MOSES
August 19, 1964
,, . \ .
MEMORANDUM TO PAUL
FROM ROBERT MOSES
By way of explanation, I was enormously
impressed by tile number, appearance, behavior and
happiness of the small children at the Fair last Monday,
and therefore after talks with the operation people, sent
out the telegrams as to adding Friday to the twenty-five
cent Monday.
As to the school kids with teachers in 1965,
we can add about two weeks by beginning at the opening
of the Fair. As to the family tickets, strongly recommended
by G. M. and other big exhibitors, I am inclined to favor
something along this line in connection with the advance
sale we are planning. We can talk about this a little later.
President
RM:vr
. ,commufiications Department
' ' P r e $ ~ Building
New Yor'k World's Fair Corporation
'World·' s Fair, New York 11380
Miss Leona Jonpoll
City Hall
!low Yorl\
1
:;c·•t Yor:, .JOJ7 P-1
Cammunications Department
Press Building
New York World's Fair Corporation
World's Fair, New York 11380
LEPANTO NEWS RECORD, POINSETT COUNTY ARKANSAS
FRI. JUNE I9, 1964
Editor Takes World's Fair In "Capsule Form" For 12 Hours
An American Airlines ticket in high style along tJ1.e Magic level exhilbit was crevoted to the we foood ikind and courteous
of $56.85 from Memphis' Inter- Skyway through a "time twt- technology of modern commun- PEOI>le.
national Al.rporlt to New York nel" .. the wheel of industry, ioations .:liltt its h;istory of contin- Of inte t ..
Ol.ty, a· lifiocent sub\¥3Y !are from the e:x:hlD.lit poi:nted out, was IWS devi!Oprnent SUCh as the . · r.,...
0
eva,-- ._.
downtown Mlanbnttan, .and a $2 started when a OaJVe-man oontriv- one we enjoy now in our area mg from the crowds In the per-
ticket at the wor.JJd's Fair tum· ed a crude wheel of stone, and ' ticuar areas, was the Intema-
atile, ad!mitted thJe weekly new- it was devel.qled down thlrough Just as our parents related the Uon:tl p:llvillons where countries
editor 1oto a World of .!Jhe :&gle$, to oam-ry us into thts wonders of other World's iairs, from the worlds dis-
Today and TolOOIT.l'OW. hdgney industrialized and mech- so will thL" gencro.tion of yoUJJlg their in batt.aal'·
lt was eveeybb.ing tthe anized ertl of today All of the people tell it to their children hltc smal·l ibu:llkiings eond often•
D'1eClli:ls bad proclaimed magn- to mBn>s ascend· and grandchildlren and what times there were adjacent patios
ilfioon.t, atupendous, ::OlUilllcll. ancy from an Olll1maJ. kingdom could !be more ·thrilling than that lloir eating and a closer people-
am.azine, cultiJrol and in were created iby Walt Disney whfuh we ;•iewed, people talking to-<people (."()Clli1ottltbl 1n
instances, gaudy, but eveeytihd.n.g fact two sets of hands appee; to over the telephone and looking keeping with the Fair's one
I 9lllW and did WQS in "capsuie have guided ·the whole world's stradght into the face of their world symbol.
lfo11m" for 12 continuous hours, Fadr into its luring oonversaltionallst ·. · I still don't and footsore, I sat on
90 you can't take my word for those of New York's Moses and tmdierStand television, so how one of the benches across trorn
there was nevar eno1.1(!1h time OaliJomi:a's Disney. Disney's could I !IP"IlflP such .a phenomenal the F<>untrun Lake display, and
d!or You must .go and txn.Lch Is everywhere to the de- feat. We gazed in .amaze- let my fri.end wander on
see arnd you will be Lt(dht of ewryone. It was terri- Idea of ring ·to watclh lblte people erom
gliad you did. After all, you have fiic. . sweatmg out that line to try every part of the worlo' pa!i8 in
tmtU the 1966. lt out. reNiew .. .aU, wbalt would
Firat Look Bell System giiiVe As for the Eastman Kodak ex- tlhe e:xhilbits be without 1lbe peo.
'llhe first ·look alfter entering us another rest£ul period .. a hilbit .. it was among my favor!.- pie .. nothin&l And it was peo-
the fllli.rgrounds of approx!imllllte- 1:5-irninute a!l"llll&hair ride in the .tJes, for here a klind eJChdlbiltor pie who MWkenod me erom a
540 acres, Is like that of BillY upper st01:y of the building. We heLped in the solluition of a minr- si<tltinlg-upri:ghit doze . . a group
Stlate Fair. only on a scale all liStened c.grain by way of ear- or trou!ble with nl3' camera and of Americans who were IBueh·
out cxf proportion in CIOOJIPillriSon phones .as the nar.rotOO" told the rprovld.ed irufonnaltion ocr untoJ.d ing at rn;y pbenomenal :teat and
at a coat of what must be bil- stoitY of the telephone .. a lower valiue. Here, as in 'IIUI'IliY' places, (Continued on back page)
ocr do'Uialrs. There :is every-
It() Beet depoodi.ng 0111 what
you want to view, ood so ldttle
time in. wbidl. to do it, and there
Is an aiitematire, Ulllless
:twwc three t.hinll!s, ample
moooy, am1l ample
walking capacity.
out of the maze of exhilbits
viewed at random and without
plannillg on my part and
of a newspaper friend, it
generaUy ogreed, the beSt
saw, were "for free." Name-
General Motor's Fluturama,
rthe Ford Bdl'll Tele-
System, General Electric,
Eru!rt.trtan Kodla•!t; and countless
were given cll!I'sory once-
LEPANTO NEWS RECORD
FRI. JUNE !9, !964
Worlds F•lr - I
(Coll'tinUed from page one)
It oo film. We
Jlll.1&bed .tolethet' aDd
'floot,ootes.'
Aeain we p.dled oo to the'
Oooa Oola and PC!I,1d.C0la ex-
blbl'IIIP end were refreshed with
:tileD- refreshintg dTlDlat and
ahibl.ta aDd I lW'8S
r8niDded of en .incident durln8
DIU 1980 t.rip in Moscow, Rus-
sia when with a group of news-
paper people we t.clm'ed their
acblevanent park aDd dol-tired
and weary we stqJped to buy a
cold drink. but tbere was no
cold drinks, Clllly wanD peaa'
juice. Wbat a 'bonanZa' these
two finDs would reap in RUIBia.
'.I'hcre was a Greyboond trip
tbat revealed more sights and
IOUDdlll as we passed by the ex-
bibitu of 81) natio.. and 57
r;:avili1ioos of culture, IJIIJSic,
arl, .religion, industrY. -you name,
1.t 8Dd it was there, but it would '
bave taken 30 days to see it.
Only tii1W, baCk borne, does the
real pic:Nre begin to unfold in
penoram.fc vieoN and the startl-
- realization of tbe wonder-
ful, exdti!J.I era in whk:b we are
living. - EBtber Blndursky
NEWARK SUNDAY NEWS, JULY !2, !964
Parking at the Fair
----------·-----
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR
- The emergence of a highly
sophisticated, electroni<:ally con-
trolled parlting operation at the
New York World's Fair was re-
veled today with the announce-
ment by Stuart Constable, vice·
president in dulrge of operations
for the Fair, that the l,OOO,OOOth
car had been clocked into one
of the Fair's four parting lots.
With thousands of travelers
from all over the country ar-
riving by private automobile at
the Fair daily, the orderly
handling of traffic and parking,
thO\IIIl careMlY planned long
be!.. tbe Fair opened, has
since undergone many refine·
menta.
: The four parking facilities
'have a capacity of more than
120.000 ears. A new guidance
. system greets the traveler long
'before he reaches the Fair-
groun!ls. Fifteen electronically;
controlled orange and blue signs.
, witb green bulb arrows reach
'out for five miles in aD direc·
tiOns to help the visitor. The
signs are operated by the
Queens Traffic Control Depan-
ment in Long Island City under
the direction ol1tte World's Fair
parting supervisor who coordi·
nates up-to-tile-minUte .informa-
tion from NtW York City police
and traffic bureaus with reports\lthat the number or can uJeCI
from the parking areas. by a potential of 300.000 to 400.000
At each or the four Jot11 ob· visitors can be handled l!!fi·
servers with binoculars perched ciently.
on 20.foot high towers watch The four parlting areas run by
the flow of cars into their areas the Fair with 111ggestlons as to
and . keep in touch by how the)' may belt be Ulf'Al by
mob1le radio With the supervisor villtorl follow:
.that there is a.n orderly feed· 1. Tile t,llkar l'lallllll w
m mto each p;rrkmg section. til ......,_ Partway, ..a.
Oa a normal day with Fair i' t1 tile 11 .....-
atteftdaace betweea 211,111 llleiMied u 1111& _.... fer
aad 251,111 more thaa 15,111 tra111e eoalq rr.. U..ute
can can be expected to enter ' New York ... Hew
its parldag ladlltles, nlcll tvet' tile Ina·....._ ...
are opera,ted for the Fair by 'I'IINp Meek llrtdpl.
Piakertoa s Natloaal Detect!

Related Interests

e
1
z. ne z.-.ar ....,._.
AreacJ. I Stred ...... ., .. FU
In anticipation. however. or' II ree-mw I• ,......;
greater crowds and a possible eo.1111 fn. ...,. IAII
day when all lots may be filled, IJJud m Ntrellera ......
arrangementl have been made vard.
to divert .the overflow to a 1.500-j J. Tile 5.-at Eo& ....
ear parkmg area recently ., w 11 ,_ a.e
pleted at the Marina on nushing Va Wyck £111••• em.
Bay, west of the Fairgrounds. .._
1
The Marina u ju5t off Grand l
Central Partway at ill intersec-' t. 1'1le tslkar Wei& JleU.
tiOD with Northern Boulevard! ., I.e .._ ee.aml
and Whltettone Partnray. I l'adEnJF .... : _.._
. : Ne ..... to aDd frolr
rate for the day ati !be Fairpolmd pta 11 ....0
the Marina lot.. thougb not under\ able at the two Meadow 1a11
Fair CorporatiOn _.. • .. _
will be the 11ame SUI .... ...., F'lulbbllmu. AD 1110
. . ....... ..,..1 tiODI ol Clle ...uer l..a'lrnla
at Faa loti. Street lot are dole eaaaP t;
With tbe added capacity of the! tbe gate., fbat ba1
Karina area. World'l Fair park·! tlorl 11 IIIIIIICIIIIIJ
ing autborttiel are cxmridenti •
Saturday, July 25, 1964 qtDr .ltlanta
----Worlds' Fair Religious Centers:----.
OLD CALIFORNIA CHURCH
REVIVES CHURCH HISTORY
Thl8 t1 the second of eight
arllcle.s on the major rellgiot.l.s
pav1Uona at the Neto Yorlc
World'• Fmr. Mr. Webb, on
Atlanta natWc who is now pas·
tor of Sandtown Baptist
Church, visited the lair after
alteflding the Southern Bapli.st
C011ventlon earlier thtl aum·
mer.
By REV. GUY WERB
An insight intn a major
branch of Christianity, Ortho-
dm:• .. , not l.on •veil kaow1. to
· many Ati<tn·
tans Is avail
able at the
Russian Or-
thodox Pavll·
ion at the
New York
World's Fair.
Though
similar in
most respects
to Roman
Catholics, the
n. •• ..... ar1• not un-
der the Pope of Rome and
have nationalistic emnhases
within t h e i r organizaUon·
al structures, honoring sec·
tiona1 leaders called Patrl·
archs.
The R u s s I a n Orthodox
Church historically grew to be
the largest segment of Greek
Orthodoxy, others being the
Bulgarian, Serbian, Romanian
and Antlochan churches.
A FtJLL.SCALE replica of
the Fort Ross, Callf., Rus-
sian Orthodox Chapel (the old·
est in America besides the
one In Alaska) is the featured
pavilion building.
The restored original nmr
a state hisloriral m:•nllmcnl.
The Fort Ross St :•' Park pre·
serves the fort community
hePdquarter;; of ttussian fur-
riers who ht:n,cd sea otters in
cOAstal wntcrs.
En-;hrined within the fair's
replica is the ve11eratcd, gem·
encrusted, five-century · old
J. 1li:Dt .\tlanta]ournal
Holy Icon of Our Lady of Ka-
zan valued at a half million
dollars. ,
Icons (also spelled ikons)
are pictures or Images of
Christ, the Virgin Mary or
one of the saints to which re-
ligious devotion 'has beeh at·
tached. They are considered
holy.
'Ibis displayed Icon dated
from 1300 is a picture of the
Virgin Mary and Child origl·
nating in Kazan, Russia.
Brought by conquering troops
to Moscow, It was enshrined
in the Kazan Cathedral built
in 1630 in the Kremlin.
ALL THE PAINTING ex-
cept the faces of the Virgin
and Child is covered l:y a
1630 rizza which 1s a metal
covering. By the rr.pousse
technif]ue the thin metal is
formed in relief by being
beaten up from the reverse
side. To the original jewels
Catherine the Great added a
new crown of diamonds about
1750. Now 1,109 gems adorn
1 he icon which Is only 10 by
1'3 inches.
After the Bolshevik Revolu-
tion of 1917, the icon was sold
into private hands. On loan
to the pavilion, the Icon is
the object or a funds drive to
restore it to the Russian
Orthodox Catholic
Church of America, exhibit
Saturday, July 25, 1964
sponsors. The Church iJ1
America separated from the
Moscow Patriarchate in 1924
because of Communist lnfll·
tration. In San Francisco the
Shrine of Our Lady of Kazan
is to be built to enshrine
permanently the leon.
With over 500 churches the
Russian Orthodox Church has
a million and a half members
in North and South America
and Japan.
IN AN ADJOINING kiosk
at the Fair color reprodnc·
lions and books on Orthodoxy
may be purchased.
Brought to America by im·
migrants, Orthodox churches
of all nationalistic affiliations
have continued through their
descendants' efforts. Current
ecumenical emphases and
American Indigenous loyalty
over that to the "old coun·
tries," however, II producing
a movement to combine all
Orthodox churches within our
shores into one Ameriean
Orthodox Church.
The day may soon come
when we in America will not
speak of our nation's religious
affiliations as Protestant,
Catholic or Jt>\vish only, but
mav add a fourth m a j or
grouping, Orthodox.
NEXT SATURD.W: The
Billy Graham Pavilion.
THE NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR
YOU HAVE TO SEE IT, TO BELIEV
NEWARK SUNDAY NEWS, JULY !2,!964
World's Fair Movies Many and Good
A.nd Best of All,
Most Are Free
By ALEXANDER 1\III.Cll
Never has there been an PX·
position ofrering so many
movies. or movies so good.
as the 1964 New York World's
Fair.
And ncVl'r movies
been shown in so many ways
- front, side. aho1c, below
and wrap-around. Some of lhr
techniques im·olvrd a1·e quite
new. Best of all, most or them
are free.
It was nothing like this a
quarter of a century when
this correspondent roamed the
1939 World's Fair on lhe same
site, seeing everything
was to be seen. Movil.'s Wl'l'e
few and far hclwt•l'n lhl'n.
Out or the hundrt•ds of f1lms
now on view in pavilions of
the fail' (the Continental ln·
surance Companies of New
York and Newm·k havt• gi

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!•11
up their attl'mpt at
outside lht•ir pavil-
ion), best far. in op111·
ion, is "To Be Alin•." at lht•
.Johnson's Wax I'Xhihit.
The word is.aln•adv abroad.
and th(' public, toti, hv
vote, has chost•n thl' i>.ietui·p
as the fair's outstanding ef·
fort of its kind. People hy the
hundreds flock to the curious-
ly-archrd pavilion to stand in
lim• for a chancr to see the
mas!Prl'iece.
. .
"TO BE ,\LJVE." which is
ahout the joy of Jiving, em·
ploys a new techniqu<' -
three pictures side tw sidl',
simultaneously screened by
three projectors.
This sounds like Cin<'ranw.
but isn't, hecaus!' no effort is
made to join the three pic·
lures. The seJwns are about
a fool l'l'!'atmg the ef·
feel of two nrtical har" he-
tween. One gets usl'd t .. ll•t'lll
quickly. and hardly knows
lh<')"rc tlll're.
The thrt>P scrf'PilS can he
liSl'd to pro_jrct the full 1 It'll'
of one scene. or for thre<' spp-
arate of the same
suhject or rrlaterl OIH'S . .-\ gwl
Cor example tnes tim•!' differ·
ent hairdos at the same time
-and a last ride downhill sttll
gives the stomarh·tightrning
effect of the famed Cinerama
roller·t'Odstet· ride.
Francis Thompson and
Alexander Hammid, who pro-
duced the picture. han· no
story lim• in it. Instead. II is
simt>ly about the
world over in the ecstacv or
play llnd fun - as a Jesson
to the hu1·ry-up world or ad·
nits. There are sct•nes from
New York's tenrments. the
Amcrinm countryside, ItalY.
Africa; It is all in color. it ·is
beautiful. it is free, and it is
non-commercial.
. . .
SECOND PL.\CE would go
lo "Pat·able," a 221:,-minutc
rolor film at the theater in
lhc Protestant and 01·thodox
Cente1·. This picture, wh1ch
has already hl'en inrol\·pd in
SOiliP l'Onll'O

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!'I'SI', IS <I lllOd·
ern-clay ret>l'l'Sl'litation of thl'
Crue1fixion. It was pmuuced 1
b)' Fred A. Nilt•s.
The point of contention has 1
been 0

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PI' the repl'esPntat inn
of Christ as a whHe-faced
l'lown in a cirrus operatrd by
Magnus the· Gn•<Jt (Herod).
Considering thl' reverpnce and
good taste in which the pic·
lure IS dont>, lhe argumPnt
seems 0

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CI'hlown. particularly
since the actions of the
"clown" are anything but
clownish. Clarenee 1\litl'hell of
th(' Srcond City Company, i
Chicago, plays this central 1
figure.
Thr picture. whic·h has a
mus1cal sound track. is silent
otlwnnsr rXl'l'pt for the
Agony 011 the Cross. Jt is ex-
l'l'Pilonail)' w!'ll done, w1th
many of the characjrrs and !Tt·
ridt•nts of the :'lew TP,tament
storY shown in a nrcus Sl'l·
ling: Filming was at the C1r·
l'Us World 1\luseum grounds in
, Baraboo. Wis., hrMne of tohe
1
Ringling Brothers show.
Becaust• of the eontrovrrsy,
thrre was some question at
first as to wlwther "Par·
· ahtr" would hl' kept on. Most
! fl'ill'itously, thr d<'rision has
I bl'en made that thr film is to
1 r.tav. At first. offerl'ing'> were
: an:rplrd from sJwctatorG but
! now th<'l'r is a admis-
1 sion charge.
1 (There are two free religious
! films immediatrly on hand.
· An IR-minute "What Is Chris·
tianity''" now shown
; on hehaif of the Chnrrhl's of
: Christ. sharmg theater space
· with "Parable" until its own
sereening area l"an be pre-
pared. In the Billy Graham
parilion nearby, that e\·ange.
list !PcturPs <Jbout the n!'ed for
rP!igion in ":\fan in the Fifth
Dimension." In color. lh!' pic·
lure runs for 2R minutes. F.ar·
phones are offered for f;imu·.
tam•ous translations in other
languages.)
TIIIRD PLAl:F. • goes to an
unpretentious little film. some
R' minutes long, shown for
fn•e by United Airlines in its
bandbox .Jl'terama Theater in
the Transportation and Travel
Pal'ilion. Called "From Here
to There," it is by Saul Bass.
who has bern associated with
many big-lime Hollywood ef·
forts.
The gem depicts the poig·
nancy of goodbyes at an air·
port, and the gladness of
greetings when the traveler
anives at his destination. In
b<'tween arc some
lovely lamlscapt•s to be seen
from the air.
Hating fourth is "To the
Moon und Beyond." a Ciner-
ama picture shown al lhc
same T&T building (admis·
sion 75 cents). The showing of
this science film. with sprc·
tacular

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