Box# 32

Folder# 630
Word's Fair: Tickets
1963- 1964
THE CHATTANOOGA TIMES: TENN.
Tuesday' February 5, 1963
Page 5
ESTABLISHED 1S69
WQt C!!Qutttttutngu W imts
ADOLPH S. OCHS, PubiL'Iher 1878-19311
Published Every Day In the Year by The Times Printing Company
BEN HALE GOLDEN, Pr'"ld611l and
RUTH S. GOLDEN, Prealdent WILLIAM C. M'KlllNZim, Btcretary-Trea.aurM"
/ MARTIN B. OCHS, Btlitcr ARTHUR HAYS SULZBERGER, Ch11irman of the Board
, tmd Meho \
The Metro Charter Commission has heard
much highly beneficial testimony as to the basic l
form of government it should recommend. Of
three possible forma, the question at this point
seems to have narrowed to two: the council-man-
ager or the "strong mayor" plus council.
Involved is the age-old, always Interesting Is-
sue of a hired, skilled professional In government,
with real authority to act, versus key authority as
In a mayor with a council providing some
111lderable degree of and balances.
Purely as a matter of Interest, this newspaper
asked a noted authority, Robert Moses, for com-
ment on this question as It regards Chattanooga.
One of the world's ·moat respected planning
authorities, Mr. Moses for more than 40 years has
aerved In a dozen or more capacities In the city
and state of New York. Parks, parkways, port
authorities are but a few of his specialties. Pa-
.riclan-born, the Yale Phi Bets Kappa has spent
a lifetime In public service. He Is now president
of the New York 1964 World Fair Corporation.
Of him The New York Time.! has said:
1
"He has alwaya been the strong man under all
. . . mayors, always looking far ahead of the cur-
rent visible objectives, impatient with those who
disagree with him but free of bitterne88 when
the battle Is over."
At a Washington meeting of the American So-
ciety of Newspaper Editors several years ago,
Robert Moses was one of the speakers, at a time
when the metropolitan government Issue ap·
proached the American scene. He expressed
doubts, In the last analysis, about the manager
fonn of government in the larger cities.
As to Chattanooga? Here Is his broad and
general comment, baaed I!IOlely on city-limits and
county population, and received by us yesterday
morning:
Perhapa I should aay at the start that In
.the course of tlrno I have !oat faith In fonna
of government panaceu. You don't auto-
matically acquire 1magtnatlve aound admln·
illtratlon by adopting t.hJs or U.t charter. In
the end, lt all gets down to leaderlhtp, 111d
leaderlhtp Ill much more than tecbn!cal com-
petence, The larger the City, the more need
there Ia of eomeone at the head who 11 choeen
by the voteN. I don't believe they will accept
a city manarer as a .substitute llld, .tter
the city ma.na.ger has to be answerable to
the counetl, and who will run the eouncll?
Otten the city manager Ia reduced to the
lh1DI11llatlng practice of drumming up a ma-
jority In the council, and when he losee a
majority he has lost himself.
Of course, this line of reasoning appllea
less to a small homogenow community which
has few problellll! of rapid growth than to a
spreading city with many diverse elements. ,
I d<m't know where the line Ia. My guess Is
that Chattanooga 1.} too bJg for a clly
manager. • .
You will, of course, In mind that a
good mayor will attract good II·
stlltf,Uta if he can pi.'f tllelii'.'enoup and can
get_11Jorous press 1.114- ¢tty , .
Each 'Ia a special case, aa Robert Moses
would be the fiTst to say. The Metro Charter
Commlsalon here will hold many more hearings
before maldng Its recominendatiollll as to basic
form, In March. Every val-
uable Ideas· and opinions should present them:
because a good and workable charter will provide
a growing metropolis with greater growth.
UNISPHERE. 010&1
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964·1965 CORPORATION
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
tLUSHING 52, N.Y. • TELEPHONE· AREA CODE 212 • Wt 4·1964 • CABLE ADDRESS "WORLDSFAIR"
PEACE THROUGM
UNDERSTANOINO
April 2, 1963
Mr. Bernard E. Donovan v
Acting Superintendent of Schools
Board of Education
110 Livingston Street
Brooklyn 1, New York ·
Dear Mr. Donovan:
ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT
I have your letter of March 28th with reference to prices at
the World's Fair. What you propose is out of question. Had you read the
legislation, contracts, proceedings and financial arrangements for the Fair,
which have long been a matter of public record, you would have seen that we
cannot reduce the basic admission charges in the manner you Any-
one can urge reducing charges and tolls. This is always a popular procedure,
and there are always agencies, publications and L"ldividuals who will support
such demands regardless of their legality and practicality.
The Fair is a private enterprise on City land, built by agreement
with the City. It has issued notes which must be repaid. -It has other obliga-
tions which must be met, and in the end there must be enough of a balance
remaining to meet all claims, repay City advances and complete the Park.
It must be obvious that if we reduced charges for City public
school children, they would have to be reduced for innumerable other groups,
and the result would be the financial collapse of the Fair. Let me also point
out that, measured by prices charged for anything approaching the show at the
World's Fair, ours are very much lower, that a very considerable part of all
our exhibits are free and that it is quite inconceivable that any very large
number of children will be excluded by our admission charges, especially if
arrangements. are made in advance to take advantage of the low advance sale
prices. There will also, of course, be a tremendous amount of valuable
printed matter distributed free by our many exhibitors.
Sincerely,
",>
'?_ . ···------
President
RM:bb
--...-.. @--""'
386 DAYS TO OPENING DAY
UN IS P H•E R E
01Q&I
4/63-R3
N EW Y 0 R K W 0 R L D'S FA I R 1 9 6 4-19 6 5 C 0 R P 0 RAT I 0 N
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
FLUSHING 52, N.Y. • TELEPHONE· AREA CODE 212-WF 4-1964 • CABLE ADDRESS "WORLDSFAIR"
PEAC'£ THAOUOH

ROBERT MOSES
--"'
@)u.w ........
REFER INQUIRIES TO:
Pete McDonnell - WF 4-2531
Jerome Edelberg - WF 4-2541
!Q!! IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
PRESIDENT
Erwin Wttt, comptroller of the New York 1964-1965 World's
Fair. announced today that the Fair will grant appointments as
Official Ticket and Centers to those which
purchase a minimum of 1,000 admission tickets to the international
exposition. In addition to the attractive certificates given with
the appointments, the Fair wtll supply posters, displays and
literature.
To encourage an advance sale of World's Fair admission
tickets, which will be sold at $2.00 for adults and $1.00 for
-
children, a speotal advance discount ts being offered to those Who
............. ,. ''1....: , r • • ' '' , •• • • "l ,., •' •
purohase 50 or more tickets. The discount, on both adult and'
......,J•t-l"•viO'·"·'',· ><\ ·,. '"'' '.,,. ' .,', '•"-.,., ., ' ·' ,•· __ .. __ •.-.....__ .. •• ..,; •• •._v"• ,,,.,.._., . .,.. '-> .,.., • • • • • ... -• ...
tickets, is available for a limited time only and will
. .. . ... .... ' ... · .... ' ....... ·.
be- montha before _t;h.e opens.
• •. , • .. •


...... .. ..
• • and appl1ca tiona tor
appotntment as an Official Ticket and Information Center may be
obtained by writing to Mr. John Director or
.. ..... ... • ....-.:\ ..... ... -.: ..... .... • .....
New York World's Fair, Flushing 52, New York.
FROM: Wm. J. Donoghue Corporation
10 Columbus Circle, N.Y.C.
# # #
""
NIW Yo"ll
29, Rue: CAMBON
PARIS 1
8
, FR.-.NCE
OPERA 89·31
Robert Moses, President
New York World's fair Corporation
Flushing Meadow Park
New York, N.Y.
Dear Bob 1
Welcome hams
Paris, May
This trip is going well and is being pointed by me entirely
toward the development of the box OTfice with
stress on the importance and desirability af mass purchase
of advance sale tickets.
You will be happy to know that the travel officials as well
os transportation company executives with whom I have been
talking advise that there is considerable enthusiasm about
the total number of Western Europeans who will make the trip
'"to New York during the two-year period of our fair.
little Ireland contemplates a movement by airline of 2,000
persons -in addition they Teel there may be another 2,000 moved
by ship; both forms of transportation are already plans
for special excursion rates U!lJOn the trip to the States \·li thin
the economic reach of more people. Naturally a uch movement a
are tied directly to group purchase of tickets.
In London I was heartened by the fact that the heads of
Thomas Cook, American Express, Cunard and BOAC that the
largest number of overseas visitors to the fair will come out
of United Kingdom despite the fact that it is not exhibiting
officially at the Fair. Here the figures in the aggregate
range from a total of 150,000 to 215,000 over the two
. s l-u.-L.: J
We will have a speci fie test of the attitude here, -t'o-morrow
when we have a joint News Conference with United/Steel Corporation,
the Eiffel Tower Society and the World's Fair Corporation. It
will be held at the first floor restaurant of the Eiffel Tower
at 5 o'clock and there have been about 85 acceptances from
newsmen both from the City and the outline areas.
I am going to present the Baron de Gunzburg a replica of the
Unisphare and also he will "purchase" the first World's fair
ticket sold in france.
• ••
WASHINGTON
ST. LOUIS
LOS AWOE:l.ES
.. - ...
Mr. Robert Moe sa
MAY 27, 1963
-2-
Then I will fly to Berlin tomorrow to address the annual
meeting of the International Public Relations where
my prepared remarks will deal with "the biggest box office
in history".
I addressed the group in Venice two years They meet every
two years in a different country. This time I am inviting them
to have their 1965 at New York World 1s and we
can designate a day or even a week in their honor -provided of
course this is supported with the purchase of advance group
tickets.
1 em going to meat Cordinal Spellman in Rome end we hope to
finalize the timing and method of transportation of the Pieta and
other Vatican t:reasures which eventually will be a major news
story around the world.
I will be back in the evening of June 6th and look forward to
our joint meeting of the Executive Committee and the Finance
Committee in the morning of June 7th.
The of fie e knows my day to day movcme nt s in the event you
to reach me.
fondly,
,_ .,.., ... .... .. ·-·- .......... .

MEMORANDUM
N.E.W YORK WORLo·s FAIR 1964-!965 CORPOriATiON
TO: Mr. Stuart Constable
DATE: June 13, 1963
FROM:
SUBJECT:
Mr. William H. Ottley
MEETING WITH BOARD OF EDUCATIO:--J WORLD'S FAIR
I was asked to do a briefing for the Bo:1rd of Education World's
Fair Committee (Mr. Irving Natter, Executive Secretary and Mr.
Nicholas D'Angelo, Editor of Curriculur:1 Book on the Fair), when they
visited the Fair on Tuesday; and Howard Johnson suggested I report to
you the gist of their remarks:
The Board of Education plans an elaborate manual, probably
150 pages long, tying in the World's Fair with various aspects of the
city's curriculum. Teachers will use r:1is manual to prepare their
classes for repeated trips to the Fair for "educational purposes".
They estimate asking for at least 2, 500, 000 cut- rate admissions
during the two years of the Fair; on top of this they expect teachers
accompanying these cut-rate students to be admitted free.
Natter feels that New York City school children are a unique
and special class which cannot be denied special rates and finally they
state that no cooperation of any kind can be expected from the Board of
Education if their demands for some form of cut-rate tickets
are not met. Incidentally, they will not be able to purchase these tickets
either in bulk or in advance .
.. Fair can not hand out millions of tickets at 7 5% below gate
prices; but Natter said repeatedly that they were sure this could be handled
at the City Hall level and, indeed, would be discussed there soon.
I am certain the Fair has not heard the last of this.
jsj Bill
WHOjhln
•.
.
COPY
UNIIIPHEME 01861
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
F'LUSHING 52, N.Y. • TntPHONE ·AREA Coot 212 • WF' 4·1964 • CABLE AODRtas"WORLDSF'AIR"
THAOUOH
UHCERSTANOIHO
Wlt. Bernard E. Donovan
Acting .Superintendent of Schools
Board of Education
110 Livingston Street
Brooklyn 1, New York
Dear Iv'Ir. Donovan:
2, 1963
ROBERT MOSES
"ICIIDENT
I have your letter of with reference to prices at
the World's Fair. What you propose is out of question. Had you read the
legislation, contracts, proceecililiJS and financial arrangements for the Fair,
which have long been a matter of public record, you would have seen that we
cannot reduce th0 basic chru·ges in the manner you suggest. Any-
one can urge reducing and tolls. This is always a popular procedure,
and there are always agencies, publicatio;.1S and individuals who will support
such demands regardless of their legality and practicality.
The Fail· is a 1)rivate e.rrterprise on City land, built by agreement
with the City. It has issued note:.;; v;hich must be repaid. It has other obliga-
tions which must be met, and L."l the end there rwust be enough oi a balance
remai.nin.g to meet all claims, rc,_;ay City advances and complete the Park.
It musl i.Je obvious if we red:.1c.:;d charges for City public
school children, th12y ·,T:ould ;_v Lc:. reduced for ilJ..:1J.rllerable other groups,
and the result woulC.: w1e oi the F..:J.r. Let me also point
out that, w:;.:.::.surcd by )ricc.::.s ior a!'1yth.ing appro!l.ching the show at the
World's 1-'rn::.·} OUl'S .:-..2·.:: vwry lower, that a very considerable part oi all
our e:Xllibit.::i free: 2i.d 1t .!.:..:; quite ir.concdvable that any very large
of children v, ill be t:;xcluc.i,::d by our adl11ission charges, especially if
s are made in advcwK:...; to takt:: adve:.m.age of the low advance qale
Tho:..·e will also, of be: a tr&.clt::ndous arnou.r1t of valuable
matter distributed free .
. ::,
/s/ Robert Moses
' ..
Bernard E. Donovan

Acting SuPERINT£Noe:NT oF
BOARD OF EDUCATION
OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK
110 LIVINGSTON STREET
BROOKLYN I. NY.
Subject: Admission Prices to the World's Fair
Mr. Robert Moses, President
New York World's Fair 1964-65 Corp.
Flushing Meadow Park
Flushing 52, N. Y.
Dear Mr. Moses:
M.1rch 28, 1963
One of the major considerations of the World's Fair Committee of the Board
of Education is to determine how best to use the Fair's offerings as re
materials for classroom instruction. It is their hope to turn the World's Fair
into .an educational adventure for the pupils of New York City. At present, they
on a handbook for teachers that will develop the educational implica-
tions of the various exhibits and displays at the Fair. This handbook will in-
clude the history of fairs, a map of the World's Fair, arrangements for visits,
resources at the Fair that can be used to illustrate and dramatize the material
taught, sample instructional units concerning the Fair and sources of instructional
materials for teachers. In other words, it is the aim that the World's will
provide another means of making our teaching more meaningful.
The representatives of the World's Fair Advanced Ticket Sales Office have in-
formed us of the admission prices to be charged. We were further advised that
these prices are fixed and no special allowances will be made for the New York
school system.
Since the high cost of admission will act as a barrier to prevent many of
our pupils from visiting the Fair, we shall not be able to use the World's Fair
in the manner and to the extent explained. When teachers are arranging class
visits to it would be inadvisable to classify pupils on the basis of
those who can and those who cannot. A nominul admission fee would obviate
this.' We must keep in mind, at all times, that our pupil population numbers over
a millJ.on and our teaching staff is .:-•bout 45,000.
The only practical method of having go to the Fair would be in class
groups. This means that the teacher would accompany the class and provide super-
vision. The class visits would occur during the morning and early afternoon, when
these pupils would not ordinarily visit the Fair. The pupils cannot stay for the
late afternoon and evening hours as regular ticket buyers are able to do. Further-
more, we believe that special consideration is due to the children of the host
city, Under these conditions regular ticket prices ought not prevail.
"'
. :..,
Moses
- 2 -
March 28, 1963
.
On this basis it is recommended that there be a flat admission charge of 25C
for each pupil visiting the Fair with his class and that the teacher supervising
the group be admitted free.
It is also suggest'd that there be special prices for New York City school
children at other times. Though the children see the Fair as £un, we are more
in the educational aspect. A reasonable price schedule would mean
more visits and a greater opportunity for the school system to use the Fair as
an educational tool.
Here, too, the following scale of admission prices is recommended:
Pupils - single admission
Pupils - ten-ticket book
Teachers - single admission
Teachers - ten-ticket book
$ .so
3.50
1.00
7.50
It is our hope that a way will be found to change the ticket policy for our
mutual benefit.
Very truly yours,
1)· ;//;'1. '\
If {. :;. '• ! ' :. },: y IL_ .
Bernard E. Donovan
/.cting Su_:)erintendent of Schools
DJS:st
cc: Dr • Loretan
Dr. Swartz
Mr. Natter
·•
,.
UNISPH£At
"" ;/ . ) COPY
NEW YORK

WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 COR:=--ORATION
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
F'LUSHING 52, N.Y. • TELEPHONE ·AREA CODE 212 • WF 4·19 64 • CABLE: AODRE:SS "WORLDS FAIR"
PE .. CC THROU(iio'l
U"'0EN8TANDih0
Hon. Edward F. Cavanagh, Jr.
Deputy Mayor
City Hall
New York 7, N.Y.
Dear Ed:
June 17, 1963
ROBERT MOSES
PRtSIDtNT
The matter of cut-rate tickets for New York City public school
children has come up again. We have said to the heads of the City public
school system that we cannot possibly provide cut-rate tickets for this group.
Attached is previous correspondence on this subject. You are, of course,
aware of the fact that the entire financial stability of the Fair depends upon
entrance charges. This is our main source of revenue. We have made
definite pledges to our Finance Committee and noteholders on this subject.
After considerable debate, it was finally decided to issue bulk cut-rate tickets
in advance and to borrow in order to obtain cash at this time when it is badly
needed.
It must be quite obvious that we cannot make an exception of
New York City public school children. We would have to make dozens of
other exceptions including the Parochial schools and many other groups. The
cost of entrance to the Fair is relatively low compared to any otter attrac-
tion which is remotely comparable.
I am aware of the fact that the Board of Education plans a first-
rate manual tying in the World's Fair with various aspects of the City's
curriculum and that teachers will prepare their classes for trips to the Fair.
This is an excellent idea and we welcome it. So, of course, will other teachers,
supervisors, officials and so forth throughout the country and in fact the world.
There has been an unpleasant suggestion on the part of Mr. Natter
and others that if we do not meet their demands for cut-rate tickets for public
school children, we can expect no cooperation from the Board of Education.
This is hardly a threat which would do the City Board of Education or the City
Administration any good if it became public. There has also been a suggestion
from some of the staff of the Board of Education that all this can be taken care of by
an order issued at City Hall.
My suggestion is that you put the quietus on this as soon as possible.
Cordially, _
:::::------------- - ..,..

310 DAYS T 0 0 P E N I N G DAY President '
Attach.
TO:
FROM&
SUB.JECT:
MEMORANDUM
NE.W YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
MR. MOSES OATE:
STUART CONSTABLE
June 14, 1963
TICKETS - CUT RATE FOR SCHOOL
For your information I attach memorandtp' from Mr.
to me in regard to a meeting with the Board of Education World's Fair
Committee.
We have discussed cut-rate tickets to the Fair for school
children before and the decision has always been that we will not
provide free or cut-rate entrance for school children even though
they come in groups accompanied by teachers ostensibly for
educational purposes. There is a clear indication here that the
Board of Education proposes to take this matter up with the City
Administration with the idea that in the end enough pressure will be
put upon us to give the Board of Education what it obviously wants in
the way of cut rate tickets for school children.
I recommend once more against the cut rates.
--.A·
Attach.
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By all means.
RM.
12/63-R2
. .7
. UNISPHERE
01961
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
FLUSHING 52, N.Y. • TELEPHONE· AREA CODE 212-WF 4-1964 • CABLE ADDRESS "WORLDSFAIR"
Tl4ot0UOti
UNDCAITANOINO
--·
@---
NEWS:
REFER INQUIRIES TO:
Peter McDonnell - WF 4-6531
Jerome Edelberg • WF 4-6541
Joyce Martin - WF 6543
FOR IMMEDIATE
JOINT STATEMENT
BY
MAYOR ROBERT F. WAGNER
AND
ROBERT MOSES, PRESIDEWT
ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT
December 3, 1963
OF THE NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
The City administration and the World's Fair Executive
Committee have arrived at a reasonable solution of the problem
ot reduced charges for elementary and high school students 1n
public, parochial and private schools accompanied by a teacher.
This plan will cover the entire metropolitan area within fifty
miles of the Fairgrounds. Classes will be admitted five school
days each week in May, June, September and October of 1964 at
a price of twenty-five cents per pupil on certificates preaentf;td .
by a teacher covering twenty-five pupils. There will be no
charge f'or the teacher. The certificates will be available tor.··
purchase beginning January 1, 1964.
# # #
• Wm. J. Donoghue Corporation
10 Columbus Circle, N.Y.C.
TO:
FROM:
SUBJECT:

MEMORANDUM
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965
DISTRIBUTION AS BELOW -t963 PAGE 1 of 2
ERWIN WITT ( /. . // '· .. : ,
1
A ;--- r
·., i\ (_yY /' v;v
ADMISSION TICKET SALES - REPORT 1143 't l;
ADMISSION TICKET SALES
AT NOVEMBER 29, 1963
Correction - Report #42 at 11/22/63:
League of Mutual Taxi Owners
Home Savings Bank
Bnai Brith Women of New Jersey
Hartford Electric Light Co.
Brooklyn Union Gas
Mise, Sales - Mail Orders (11/20/63)
Totals at 11/22/63
R. H. Macy
A. Schrader
1
s Son
City Federal Savings & Loan Assoc.
New York University
Greenwich Savings Bank
Misc. Sales - Mail Orders (11/25/63)
Norwich Savings Society
Reliance Federal Savings & Loan Assoc.
Active Acres Association
Port New York Authority
Gift Packages 11/26/63
Misc. Sales • Mail Order {11/26/63)
Trans World Airlines Inc.
Swingline Inc.
Hillside Hospital
Veterans Admin. Regional Office
National Council of Salesmen's Organ.
Fulton Savings Bank Kings County
Mohawk Airlines Inc,
North Jersey Savings & Loan Assoc.
Misc. Sales· Mail Orders (11/27/63)
Gift Packages 11/27/63
United Scottish Clans of N. Y. & N, J.
The Tappan Co.
Steuben Society America
John Sexton & Co,
York Narrow Fabrics Co.
Hyman Co hen Foundation
Pan American World Airways
NO, OF TICKETS
500
1,250
500
4,926
4,550
4,595
1' 908,759
4,050
599
2,000
1,000
500
9,288
500
1,900
950
2,200
10,514
5,198
120,000
600
750
2,453
1 '27 2
1,100
3,300
1,300
6,568
11,053
1,000
500
1,550
1,000
800
500
4, 210
AMOUNT RECEIVED
$ 675.00
1,518.75
675.00
5,923.80
4, 914.00
5 '771. 66
$2,260,539.15
3,645.00
761.40
2,565.00
1, 350.00
675.00
10,807.66
675.00
2,295.00
1,113.75
2,970.00
14,193.70
6' 566.81
135,000.00
742.50
1,012.50
3,096. 95
1,717.20
1,417.50
3,577.50
1,552.50
7,010.78
14,921.45
1,282.50
675.00
2,058.75
1,350.00
1 ,080. 00
675.00
5,683.50
Continued
MEMORANDUM
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
TO: DISTRIBUTION AS BELOW
DATE: DECEMBER 3, 1963
FROM: ERWIN WITT
SUBJECT: ADMISSION TICKET SALES - REPORT #43
ADMISSION TICKET SALES
AT NOVEMBER 29, 1963
NO. OF TICKETS
Nurses Assoc. of the Ctys. of L. I. Inc.
Men's Club Beth Shalom of Kings Bay
The Marine Midland Trust Co. of N. Y.
Franklin Society Fed. Savings & Loan Assoc.
Misc. Sales - Mail Order (11/29/63)
1,000
1,000
1,250
5,000
17,244
Totals at November 29, 1963
2,130,908
No. of Tickets Sold:
ADULTS
Individual Tickets
1805 Books
Total Adults
CHILDREN
1,576,366
36' 100
Individual Tickets 515,602
142 Books 2,840
1,612,466
Total Children 518,442
TOTAL ALL ADMISSIONS 2,130,908
cc:
Moses j CoiiUil. Mr. Ray McCarthy
Mr. Deegan Mr. Guy lay
Mr. Spargo Mr. Wuerthner
Mr. Constable Mr. Witt
Mr. Giebe1haus Mr. Brennan
Mr. Van C1eef Mr. Dropkin
File
PAGE 2 of 2
AMOUNT RECEIVED
$ 1,350.00
1,350.00
1 ,518. 75
6,075.00
19,545.30
$2,520,850.15
UNISPHERE
CII061
l2/63-Rl8
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
FLUSHING 52, N.Y. • TELEPHONE- AREA CODE 212-WF 4·1964 • CABLE ADDRESS "WORLDSFAIR"
IIC:Ael THROUGH
UNDERSTANDING
--..
@)u.w ........
NEWS:
REFER INQUIRIES TO:
Peter McDonnell
Jerome Edelberg
Joyce Martin
- WF 4-6531
- WF 4-6541
- WF 4-6543
FOR RELEASE; TUESDAY A,M
11
DECEMBER 31, 196)
ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT
December 30, 1963
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR, December 31 --- The sale of advance
admission tickets for the New York 1964-1965 World
1
s Fair was 75 per
cent higher during 1963 than had been estimated, it was announced today
by Robert Moses, Fair President, and Thomas J. Deegan, J r . ~ chairman
of the executive committee.
A year-end ticket sales report, released by the New York World's
Fair Corporation, placed the number of advance sales at over 3,800,000
tickets, totaling more than $4,500
1
000, The original estimate was ror
a 1963 sale of 2,000,000 tickets, The upsurge in the second half of
1963 was attributed largely to the sale of 100,000 or more tickets in
individual blocs to several business firms. The largest single sale
was 225,000 tickets to American Telephone & Telegraph Company. The
most recent purchase was made by the Equitable Life Assurance Society
of the u. s. for 80,000 tickets.
ThP.se orders accounted for approximately 20 per cent of the Fair's
advance ticket sales during 1963.
The peak sales period came in the week ending December 13
1
1963
when 525
1
000 tickets were purchased,
Mr. Deegan, under whose direction the advanced ticket sales cam•
paign is betng conducted, said it was gratifying to see the response by
exhibitors and non-exhibitor corporations, transportation groups and
individuals.
FROM: Wm. J. Donoghue Corporation
10 Columbus Circle, N.Y.C.
(more)
l2/63•Rl8
- 2 -
Many companies are buying the tickets for resale later to their
employees, thus passing on substantial savings. "The large purchaser
of a bloc or 100,000 tickets, for example, saves he said.
"Individuals are buying tickets now, not only to take advantage or the
discount but to help their own budgets. When they go to the Fair next
spring and summer their admission costs will already be taken care of
and they will have more money for food and other purposes.
"But the most encouraging response was the Christmas gift package
promotion. Our offices were swamped with orders for hundreds of
thousands of tickets which were given as Christmas gifts. These gifts
wtll be enjoyed twice -- once when they are received and the second
time when they are presented at the World's Fair gates for admission
to the greatest show.ever seen."
The Fair's goal of total advance sales of tickets by
February 29, 1964
1
deadline for discounts, was regarded by Erwin Witt,
Fair comptroller, as being within reach.
Mr, Witt said he looks forward to a large number of 100,000-untt
or larger ticket orders during the last weeks in February, just prior
to the February 29 deadline, when sales of tickets in bulk lots (50 or
more) at a discount of 32-1/2 per cent will be discontinued,
Mr. Witt said that the dollars represented by such a large advance
sale of tickets would enable the Fair to keep its borrowing, in notes
and bank loans, to $33,000,000
1
instead of the anticipated $35,000
1
000
1
thus effecting a considerable saving in interest
Fatr officials expressed confidence that a new all-time record tor
advance ticket sales would be set. The New York 1939-1940 World's Fair
sold 6
1
000,000 advance tickets; the Brussels Fair in 1958, - 4,ooo,ooo •.
# # #
• - 0....).
2/64-R6
UNISPHERE 01V61

NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
FLUSHING 52, N.Y. • TELEPHONE· AREA CODE 212-WF 4-1964 • CABLE ADDRESS "WORLDSFAIR"
n ~ ROBERT MOSES
PI:ACE. THFIOUOH
UNDERSTANDING
--..
~ u . w ........
NEWS:
REFER INQUIRIES TO:
Peter McDonnell -
Jerome Edelberg -
Joyce Martin
'{{\
~ PRESIDENT
WF 4-6531
WF 4 ... 5541
WF 4-6543
February 14, 1964
FOR RELEASE MONDAY, FEB. 17
1
1964
Thomas J. Deegan, Jr., chairman of t h ~ executive committee of
the New York 1964 .. 1965 World
1
s Fair, today paid tribute to tlte great
majority of banks in New York, New Jersey, Connecticut and New England
for the record-breaking advance sale of discount admission tickets
before the "opening day, " April 22 of the World's Fair.
He pointed out that four of New York's major banks, First
National City Bank, Chase Manhattan Bank, Chemical Bank of New York
Trust Company, and Manufacturers Hanover Trust Company, each had pur-
chased more than a quarter-million tickets to date for its depositors
and its personnel.
Mr. Deegan also noted that more than 200 banks have purchased
in excess of two million tickets, principally because of the great
demand for New York World's Fair admission tickets at discount rates.
He has been most optimistic, and repeatedly stated
1
that the advance
sale of World's Fair admission tickets will exceed anything of its
kind in history. This has been borne out by the fact that 7-million
tickets thus far have been sold to the public.
Bank officials have shared the enthusiasm about the New York
World's Fair and its impact on the economy of New York business.
They strongly believe that the Fair will bring great benefits to the
City and to all business interests.
Following are comments by bank officials expressing their keen-
ness for the World's Fair and reasons for the huge advance sale:
FROM: Wm. J. Donoghue Corporation
10 Columbus Circle, N.Y.C.
(more)
2/64-R6
APeak1[lS for the National City Bank, Geore;e P. McCallum,
in charge of Press Re}.ations,. said: National, City the
only bank at the World's Fair,. whose travelers checks have been
designated •Official Travelers Checks New York World•s Fair 1964-1965•
and whose 123 branches in the Metropolitan New York area are official
ticket and information centers for the Fair, is the largest single
purchaser of advance World's Fair tickets in the country.
have supported the concept of a New York World's Fair since
its inception and are one of the largest subscribers of World's Fair
Notes, First National City's advance discount ticket purchases as
of Feb. 15 amount to more than $500,000.
"The Bank is operating two branches at the Fair. One is a
-· . . . . ·····---- - =-.-.- ,
service""bl'airohfOr-"-eihibitors, concessionaires and World's Fair
Personnel. The other is a •Visitors Branch' on the Court of the
Five Boroughs, featuring a multilingual starr, experts in foreign
currency globe and a pylon bearing
the flags of the 35 nations on five continents in which First
National City operates branches.
"First National City expects to handle more than $500-million
through its services during the two-year run at the Fair.
11
Eusene B. Mapel, vice president in charge of marketing and
advertising for Chase ''We have been pleased to
demonstrate that the World's Fair has a friend at Chase Manhattan
Bank. The results of our television promotion on the sale of tickets
at a discount price has far exceeded our expectations.
"All of us at the bank believe that the 1964-1965 World's Fair
will make a substantial contribution to the New York City economy,
as well as provide much education and pleasure for the millions who
will be privileged to come to the Fair. We also are pleased with the
many thousands of people who have come into our branches and receive
copies of our Fair City. This is a map or New York specially devel•
oped for the promotion of the Fair. We currently are planning other
activities to encourage attendance at the Fair.
11
Said William H. Miller, senior vice president of Manufacturtrs
Hanover Trust Company: are most pleased to have the privilege
(more)
2/64·R6
ot purohae1ng 365,000 advance tickets to the Fair so far. We mq
purchase ad41tional tickets should our needs so require. In this
way, we have been able to accomplish two purposest TO help the
business organizations of the City by providing advance financial
support to the World's Fair, and at the same time, benefit our
customers by the sale, at cost to ourselves, or tickets at prices
well below those which wil1 prevail at the Fair gates. "
# # #
1 l ·.' .3/64-Rl
UNISPHERE 0!0&1
N EW Y 0 R K W 0 R L D ' S FA I R 1 9 6 4 -19 6 5 C <fR P 0 RAT I 0 N
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
FLUSHING 52, N.Y. • TELEPHONE- AREA CODE 212-WF 4-1964 • CABLE ADDRESS ''WORLDSFAIR"
PEACE THPOUOH
UHOEASTANDINQ
......... _ ..

NEWS:
REFER INQUIRIES TO:
Peter McDonnell
Jerome Edelberg
Joyce Martin
ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT
March 2,; 1964
- WF 4-6531
- WF 4 ... 5541
- WF 4-6543
FOR RELEASE: AFTERNOON, MONDAY, MARCH 2, 1964
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR, March 2 --- The following statement
was released today (Monday) by Robert Moses,_president of the New
York World's Fair 1964-1965 Corporation:
On October 9, 1962, the executives of the Fair announced an
advance package sale of entrance tickets, beginning May 1, 1963 and
ending February 29, 1964, The purposes were to advertise attractions,
fec111tate early family plans by visitors and obtain cash to reduce
borrowing. The target at that time was 10,000,000 tickets involving
. c.:::: : = ... ;
'· . $12,000,000 in cash.
4
' ::: ,.,
We are happy to announce that the exact number of tickets
purchased and the total in cash as of the close of business February
---.. ........... : ........ ..... ....
29, 1964 was 28,034,987 tickets and $35#219,602 cash, almost three
times the figures aimed at. This is a larger advance sale than any
previously achieved by any comparable enterprise anywhere, It gives
evidence of the popularity of the Fair and indicates that the pre-
dicted total of 70,000,000 visitors will probably be considerably
exceeded.
FROM: Wm. J. Donoghue Corporation
10 Columbus Circle, N.Y.C.
(more)
3/64-Rl
- 2 -
This sale was direated by- Thomas J. Deegan, Jr., 'Chairman of
the Executive committee, and supported by the Finance Committee and
many other friends.
As a result of the excess ot cash receipts from ticket sales
over the estimates, the Fair Corporation has repaid today the
$3 million in ~ bank loans made at the latter part of November,
1963, which were to mature on August 1, 1964. It is anticipated
that the $30 million 6% Notes outstanding, maturing on August l, 1966,
will be patd off before the encl or 1964.
ROBERT MOSES
President
(Attached is copy of a letter of congratulations from MayQr Robert F.
Wagner to Mr. Robert Moses and Mr. Thomas J. Deegan, Jr.)
.. 3 -
(SEAL)
City of New York
Office of the Mayor
New York 7
1
N.Y.
3/64-Rl
February 28, 1964
Hon. Robert Moses, President
Mr. Thomas J. Deegan, Jr.
Chairman of the Executive Committee
New York World's Fair 1964-1965 Corp.
World's Fair, New York 11380
Dear Bob and Tom:
Your report on the enormous advance sale or t1cketa .
to the World's Fair, adding up to more than double the volume
we expected, demonstrates widespread interest and support ot
the Fair. It is the best evidence or public confidence, here,
all over the country and abroad, in the ability ot the City or
New York to produce outstanding organizers, financiers and
builders.
I am sure that we are opening the greatest cultural,
educational, industrial, governmental and enJoyable exposition
or all time. I congratulate all the Fair executives, starr#
exhibitors and workmen on the Fairrs progress.
Cordially and sincerely,
/S/ Bob
Robert F. Wagner
Mayor
..........
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NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR TICKET PRICE INFORMATION
Individual Tickets
20 ·Ticket Book
Recognized
Travel and
Transportation Agencies
Certificates
Note
Now to February 29, 19641 March 1 to October 18, 1964
ADULTS $1.80 ADULTS $2.00
CHILDREN 0.90 CHILDREN 1.00
Children: 12 years old or less. Children under 2 years old
admitted free.
ADULTS
CHILDREN
$27.00 I ADULTS
13.50 CHILDREN
$30.00
15.00
Tickets are detachable only by collector when books are
presented at gates.
Price information for Travel and Transportation agencies
only. Request folder 100-TA. Write (on your letterhead) to:
Director of Publications, New York World's Fair Corporation,
Flushing 52, N. Y.
Applications for a certificate designating organizations as
an "Official New York World's Fair Ticket and Information
Center" may be obtained by writing to Director of Publica-
tions, New York World's Fair, Flushing 52, New York.
Discounts quoted herein apply to 1964 Season only. Gate
Prices: $2.00 adults and $1.00 children. Tickets are valid
for both 1964 and 1965 Seasons.
. I At Fairgrounds
Parkmg: At Flushing Airport
$1.50 per car per day.
. 75 per car per day .
.....
- . ~
TICKET
SALES
OFFICE
New York World's Fair
1964-1965 Corporation
Flushing 52, New York
100-GR 200M 3.15.63:<' 1963 New York World's Fa1r 1964 1965 Corporation •.oe-•"
-... ,
,: '
..
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C I ttl No.. ''"" w...w, , ... I f t . ~ I t t ~ c .. ,..-
.NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964·1965 CORPORATION
OFFICIAL ADVANCE ADMISSION TICKET ORDER FORM
' .
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Co•t Per
Regular
Ticket--
Number of
leuiO% AMOUNT
Price
Advance
Tickeh
INDIVIDUAL TICKETS Discount*
ADUlTS $2.00 $1.80
CHilDREN 2·12 YRS. $1.00 .90
Addren
BULK ORDERS -
50 OR MORE TICKETS
(Price• revert to $21
for adults, $1 for ADUlTS
$1.50 $1.35
t:hildren after
Feb. 29, 1964) CHilDREN 2·12 YRS. .75 .675
Oty
Zone State
TRAVEL OR TRANSPORT AT/ON
AGENCIES Minimum of 20 Tickets
Type af Buslneu it;.
ADUlTS $1.50 $1.35
CHilDREN 2·12 YRS. .75 .675
20 TICKET BOOK
(Tickeh are de· Co•t Ca•t Number of
tachable only by Per Book Per Book Book.
collector when boob
ADUlTS $30.00 $27.00
are presented at
$15.00 $13.50
gale)
CHilDREN 2·12 YRS.
DO NOT USE
THIS FORM AFTER
FEBRUARY 29, 1964
TOTAL AMOUNT •tO% advance diocounl expire• February 29, 1964

C•Ml-•ootW••"'•'- lfUlfiiC ....... -
........
\
Do Not
U•e Thi•
Column
.,
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Please mall
Check or
Money Order
with thl1 Form
to:
New York
World's Fair
1964-1965
Corporation
.
FLUSHING 52,
NEW YORK
ATTENTION:
TICKET
SALES
CASHIER
•'. I
I.NFORM&'IOtj COPX
4/63·R22
U N I S P H E ~ E C)l861
ll
PEACE THROUGH
UN0£R9TAN0tNO
UIIISNIIIItnmnDIT
@u.illol .........
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
FLUSHING 52, N.Y. • TELEPHONE· AREA CODE 212-WF 4-1964 • CABLE ADDRESS "WORLDSFAIR"
ROBERT MOSES
PRESIDENT
NEWS:
April 22, 1964
REFER INQUIR:tES 'l' 0 :
Pete McDonnell WF 4-2531
Jerome Edelberg WF 4-2541
fQ!i RELEASE: MONDAY, APRIL gg_, .1i§l
Thomas J. Deegan, Jr., Chairman of the Executive Committee of
the New York World's Fair, announced today that sales of advance
World's Fair tickets, one year before Fair opening, total $502,700
with approximately 450,000 tickets already delivered to purchasers.
The report was made at the meeting of the Fair Board of Direc-
tors marking one year until Fair opening, April 22, 1964.
Mr. Deegan reported that sales of advance tickets had shown a
significant upward swing ~ n the past few weeks, In his remarks to the ·
Board of Directors, Mr. Deegan said:
' ~ e have exactly a year to go. I would say that results to date
the actual cash received and the enthusiasm we have been able to
generate -- encourage me to believe that we will be able to sell at
least 10 million tickets before opening date. If so, this would be
the biggest advance sale in history for what I firmly believe will be
the biggest box office in history. I appreciate all the help you have
been giving the Deegan organization in this effort."
Among major purchasers are Firat National City Bank with
"'--<:::., · ? - ~ - - - -
$108,000; American Airlines with $101,000; Interpat1onal ausiness
Machines with $100,000; Chase Manhattan Bank.J•_!ith $87,750, and The
Travelers Insurance Company, Hartford, Conn., with $37,000.
-
The advance ticket drive features discounted admission tickets,
and will continue until February 29, 1964, when the advance sale enda.
FROM: Wm. J. Donoghue Corporation
10 Columbus Circle, N.Y.C.
(more)
- 2·•
Commitments to purchase tickets prior to next PebNal'f have been
made by a large number ot ol'ganizations and corporations.
Tickets are being used as promotion tie-ins bJ Pair exb1bitora,
and other uses tor the tickets include travel tour paokagea, customer
premiums, sales toree bonuses, contest prizes, incentive awards,
cbar1ty drives, retails sales, and uses among employees. customel'S and
stockholders.
Worldts Fair admission tickets are $2.00 tor adultsJ and
children's tickets (ages 2•12) are priced at $1.00. Ticket puroha8e:ra
ot quantities can receive a discount up to Pebruary 29, 1964,.
when the advance ticket drive ends.
on advance tickets 1s available from World's
Pair Tickets. Room 2762, Time & Lite Building,. New York 20. N.Y.,
telephone CO 5•4161.
Other substantial blocks of tickets or 1,000 er more have been
purchased by Brass Rail Restaurants, Long Island university, Textile
Workers • Union ot America, Roamer Tourl,. Trans World Airlines,
P1nkertonrs,D1me Savings Bank of Brooklyn,. Franklin National Bank,
Belmont Plaza Hotel, George A. Fuller Company,. fteso Travelbureau,
Federation Bank & Trust Company
1
National tead Company, Bxprea,
Company, Life Insurance Company or Virgin1a
1
J. Walter Thompson CompatlV'•
Brown Brothers Harriman & Company
1
Hayden Stone & Company, and Courtesy.!'
'
Club Corporation.

FAIR
NEVVS
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN OF
THE NEW YORK
WORLD'S FAIR
1964-196!5
UN I SPHERE®
- .. 4!>---
c 1f61 Ntw v ... r. w.,w·. f.U 1964.1965
VOL. 3, NO.3 MARCH 22, 1964
ADVANCf TICKH
PAVIUON OF JORDAN TO DISPLAY on Monday, March
2
nd, _a PLANS READIED FOR SPECTACULAR
HISTORY AND CULTURE OF HOLY LAND press was held m the Fatr s OPENING PARADE AND CEREMONIES
Press Butldmg, where Robert Moses, pres-
His Majesty King
Hu<sein I nf the Ha-
shemite Kingdom of
Jordan will visit the
Fair in late April, ac-
cording to word re-
ceived by Mr. Moses
and Governor Poletti.
His Majesty The monarch is ex-
King Hussein
1
peered to roue the
grounds and inspect, especially, his coun-
try's pavilion.
The Pavilion of the Hashemite King-
dom of Jordan is a unigue architectural
undertaking which was designed to depict
the ancient Land of Jordan -the cradle
of all Western civilization. In Jordan, a
country rich in religious background, arc
found the great shrines of Jerusalem, Beth-
lehem and Jericho, and the storied River
Jordan and Dead Sea.
Through the centuries, the art of Chris-
tian man has continually strived to repre-
sent the glory and the suffering of Christ
as He approached Calvary. The stained
glass window< nf the Jordan Pavilion at-
t<:mpt to convey The Holy Sp1m wh1ch
emanates from the 14 St.uions of the W.ty
of the Cross in the Holy City of Jerusalem
The Pavilion's skylights of multicolored
many-faceted glass reflect the spirit of light
ever present in the Holy Land --the light
from abol'e which brings inspir.ttion and
direnion to man below.
On exhibitron 10 the pavilion will be .1
collection of Dead Sea Saolls which were
discovered during 1')4 7 in caiTS on the
hanks of the Dead Se,1. These Scrolls com-
prise the earliest known manuscripts of
the Old Testament. An ancient column
hrought from the old Jordani.m my of
]crash wdl stand ncu the pavdton. Th1s
column is .1 gift from His M.1jesty King
Hussein tu the World's Fair and the City
of New York, and will remam in Flushing
Meadow Park after the conclusiOn of th<:
Fair.
© 1964 New York World's Fair 1964 1965 Corporation
ident of the Fair Corporation, issued a
statement announcing the results of the
Fair's advance ticket sale program. The
pre-opening admissions sale was the largest
for any single event in history.
The thronged conference, attended by
every major metropolitan daily, in addition
to radio, television and magazine reporters,
revealed that the advance sale had soared
ro 28,034,987 tickets as of February 29 for
a total of $35,219,602 in cash, almost three
times greater than the target figures.
Among important effects of the huge
sale were the ability of the Fair Corpora-
tion to repay $3 million in 5% bank loans,
not due until August 1st, 1964, thus saving
substantially in interest charges; and the
Fair's anticipation of paying off the $30
million 6% notes outstanding, before the
end of 1964, even though the notes will
not mature until August 1, 1966.
Thomas J. Deegan, Jr., chairman of the
executive committee, supplemented Mr.
Moses' statement with comparative statis-
tics, showing that the advance ticket sale
exceeds the entire attendance at the 1939
New York World's Fair.
( C olllilltled 011 page 2, col. I)
\
. '
When the first ticket holder enters the
Fairgrounds at 9:00 a.m. on Opening
Day, April 22nd, he will be greeted not
only by Fair officials but, undoubtedly, by
a barrage of reporters for newspapers,
magazines, radio and television outlets
around the world.
Promptly at 9:15 on the Fair's red letter
day, the American and World's Fair Rags
will be raised with appropriate ceremonies
at the Court of the Universe. The national
anthem will be played by the World's Fair
Band.
At the conclusion of the flag cere-
monies, General William E. Potter as
Marshal, will lead the great parade accom-
panied by his staff and the Color Guard.
When the marchers reach the reviewing
stand in front of the Central Pool and
facing the Court of the Universe, General
Potter will enter the stand to review the
entire parade.
The hour-long, colorful parade will fea-
ture exhibitors' floats, numerous high
school and college bands, international
representatives in native costume and
pr.mung, decor.tted an1mals · all keyed
ro g.tiety .tnd exmement.
After the conclusion of the parade at
10: 30, Guy Lombardo will entertain Fair
guests .tnd the press in the Singer Bowl
until the visiting dignitaries tile into the
Bowl.tnd rake their places on the speakers'
pl.uform.
After Richard Tucker smgs the Star
Sp.lllgled Banner, Thomas J. Deegan, Jr.
wdl st.trt the otficial ceremonies by intro-
dming H1s Eminence Francis Cardinal
Spellman, who will deliver the invocation.
After brief addresses by Mr. Moses, City,
State, and Gol'ernment officials, Postmaster
Gener.tl John A. Gronouski will present
the lim folders of World's Fair Commem-
m.ltll·e Sr.1mps ro the principals.
The ceremonies will be concluded by a
rend1t10n of Richard Rodger's official
World's Fair song, .. Fair is Fair."
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965
World'• Fair, N.Y. 11380 • 212-WF 4-1964
IOIEIIT MOSES, Prelldent
QUOTE OF THE MONTH
FAIR OUTLOOK FINI:'-;JD-
VANCE S!lLES of tllkl'li to tf,e
W/orld'.r /;all' durm!!. I l>r /,iJ/ I() 11111111 J, 1
to"d $.3 5,2/lJ,602 111 '"'h
reporiJ Roher/ M()Jr.l, Jnnulcnt oj
the corpor,l/mll, "t/;,/11 •Ill)' pret·iouli)
achiet•nl by "") enla-
pri.le illl.YU hrre."
W·e .1hare the prule of 1\lr. Mo1n
tdJe/1 he ,u/dr. u·it!> colrJ\J,d 1/lldcr-
J/a/cmelll, "u·e IIIII)' h.ne" J/IU'£'1.1 o11
our /;,md.r." -- EJironal, New York
Journal-American, March ·I, I <)(,.I.
( Col//11/flt:d from • I, to/. 2 I
FAIR'S ADVANCE TICKET SALE
A lc:rrrr from Mayor W.tgnu .lddn:,,ed
w Mr. Moses md Mr. Dccg.Hl w.ts ""
rnhurc:d w rhc press. In wngr.uul.n1ng the
F.1ir c:xc:wrin·s, sr.llf. c:xhd,Hors .tnd work
men on rhc: F.ur's progrt:", rht: M.tyor s.ud
rlur rht: enormous ,,,h-.tmt· s.dc .,f ucket'>
ts "rht· best t:ndencc of publt, wnlldcn'c
here: .. dl over rhc: co11nrry .md ,d,r!l.ld 111 tiK
.tbdiry of the C1ry of New York ru pro-
duce: mHsr.md111g org.lntzers. lul.lm1ns .tnd
huddus."

Tower of the Winds, part of Pepsi-Colo ex-
hibit at the Fair, is readied for Opening Day,
April 22. Titled "It's A Small World," the
exhibit will present a spectacular lour of the
globe designed and built by Walt Disney. A
UNICEF pavilion and garden operated by
U.S. Committee for UNICEF is also port of
the Pepsi-Cola project.
WOMEN'S ADVISORY COUNCIL
PLANS ANNOUNCED AT WALDORF
b1r Prnllknr Robert p.llll rrthutt·
ro rhe l'.ur\ WonH:n's llmpn.dny (enter
,It .1 lumhcon held ,l[ the W.ddorl t\.,turt.l,
,1[ wllllh 1\lr'> hthcr Pun.,on,
Sc:, n:t.try ol Ld,w. w.ts the honored guc't.
The lurH heon w.l., 'I""J'ored hy the
Womm\ i\d\I'>Of)' (uunul ol the l·.11r
Pl.tm lor speet.d Honor dunng the
1-.ur·-, were re1c.tled.
,'l.lr>. Peter>oll, who I'> Spcu.d 1\-,-,"t.lllt
ro the l'r<.c-,1dcnt lor ( un-,umt·r t\lfJifS ,md
D1rnwr of the: Womc:n's Burc.lli, wdl he
honored on rhe "Women 111 Pul1tll ·, .md
(iolcrllrncrH D.ty" ,It the F.ur.
\X'dl1.11ll Berm, 1-.ur 1 rcc
>encd ,l., rn,t-,rcr of lt:rt:muntes I or rht:
progr.un whtdl 1ndudcd rt:m.trk> hy
Adncn l't:llcucr, ,h.urm.ul uf d!L bo.ll<l
ul l'urc:x ( urpur.ltllHI, Ltd., ,\lr>. I kxtt:r
Or1s /\mold, lHl''>l•krH of rhe ( icncr.d Fc:d
tr.tuon of Wumm's ( luhs .. md Doug!."
L.tplum, ,.ILl' pre"dem of rhc: lkrrt:r Ltl-
lng ( emt:r, wh1th wdl hou'>c: tht: Wornc.:n'-;
Hosp1r.duy ( t·nrcr, tourrcsy of l'urcx.
U.S. Space Park Slated for
Fair's Transportation Area
t\ l'nm·d Sr.Hc:s Sp.ltl' P.trk. dlSf'l.t}'lll)-:
rht: most llnprtS\1\T .lfr.ty of full-st.dc
rm .tnd 'l'·lu:u.tfr nTr .ts'>tlllhkd our·
'>Ide pf ( .tpe Kennedy, wdl he .1 l11ghltghr
of the l·.11r\ Tr.tmport.Hton Arc.t, .lltord-
lllg to .1 J<lllH .lnrwunternenr hy F.1ir PrcsJ-
dmr Robert i\lo!>t'S .111d City ( ouncil
Pre'>ldenr P.tul R. St re1 .1m·. lr "'>j'<HI\Ored
h1 rhe Dep.mment of Dtfcmc, rhe N.l·
tlllll.d Acr<lll.lllfiL.d Sp.tcc Agent'\' .tnd rhc
1-'.llf
A full-sc.dc· "Bo.l((,lll" -,nunn of the
S.Hurn V m.kcr. experrcd WLnry Amc:n
Llll .!'ff!llt.lllt\ rn the.: 1\lnon. wdl ht· .1 fe.l-
rurt· of the lfllj'<l'>lll,l! cxhd,Jt The model
'rands fecr r.dl .tn,l mc:.tsures .\1 feu 111
,!J.uncrer
Towt·rlll,l! lll cr the twu·.IL re P.trk wdl he
.l TH.lll II btlll'>tl'f. II II ItT[ high. ,(,llllhllg
IL otll.dh IIHh rhe (iernlnl Llf'Sulc t>rl rop.
IU't ·'' 1t ll<lLd,l ht on rht: p.td .It ( .tpe Ken-
m··h hLfurc l.cumh111p [1\11 .tstroll.llltl IIH"
l'.trth tTrlllt.
( )rhcr cxluh1r1 11 dl lllcludc rhc '\'·Ice·-
' r.dr Af'tdltT, l.urJ.tr I xtursJ<lll Module.
r\rl.t,.\futury .tnd Tlwr-lklr.t l.lllmh I'C:-
illl k'. J.n :·( I r"' kcr -powered rcse.m h
.11rer.1fr .111.! the Agcn.1 '!'·ILl' 1·dmle. St'-lLl'
.tnd ulliltltl t11r DoD-NASr\ •
.nc hctng pro\ .It 1111 liM to rhc Co1
cmmc:nr Thcrt: 1ull be rw thHgt for 1rew
111g tht: t:Xhlhltl
PAVING THE WAY FOR OPENING DAY
-Crews working on day and night shifts
pave the huge complex of avenues which link
the hundreds of exhibits at the Fair. Most of
the paving is done at night when traffic on the
grounds is at a minimum. Because all curbing
was laid in advance, paving operation is sim-
ple and fast. Every artery will be spic-ond-
spon for Opening Day, April 22.
t Oth Exhibitor PR
Meeting Tomorrow
The exhibitor public relations meet-
ing tomorrow is the tenth such working
session. William Berns, vice president
in charge of Communications and Pub·
lie Relations, will mark the occasion
by expressing the grateful apprecia·
tion of his staff and consultants for
the fine cooperation and outstanding
contributions of the exhibitor public
relations representatives to the sue·
cess of the Fair.
Giant Saturn V rocket arrives to become port
of the United Stoles Space Pork exhibit in the
Fair's Transportation Area.
L1lft!llftr CENTER FESTIVAL
EVENTS COMPLEMENT
FAIR ATIRACTIONS
In accordance with its "Memo of Under-
standing," Lincoln Center for the Per-
forming Arts and the New York World's
Fair are co-sponsoring the Lincoln Center
World's Fair Festival, which began on
March 15 and will continue through the
fall of 1965. The Festival will present out-
standing international performing artists
in Philharmonic Hall and The New York
State Theater.
In announcing the Festival, Schuyler G.
Chapin, vice president of programming for
Lincoln Center said: "We arc looking for-
ward to the opportunity of not only
presenting these great performing arts
companies, but of playing host to new audi-
ences visiting Lincoln Center and the
World's Fair. We arc also particularly
pleased to introduce The New York State
Theater to our audiences during the Festi-
val."
Especially for Fair visitors, the Metro-
politan Opera Company will give a gala
two-week season of nine different works,
including "Falstaff," "Macbeth," and
"Otello," from April 27 through May 10.
The New York Pro Musica will dedicate
three concerts to Shakespeare on April 25,
May 2 and 9.
Among the many other outstanding
World's Fair Festival events will be the
Bayanihan Philippine Dance Company and
the Chilean National Ballet in the State
Theater, and the Sahm-Chun-Li Dancers
and Musicians in Philharmonic Hall. The
latter company, from Korea, will be on
their first tour of the United States and
represent the first successful effort to bring
together in one company all the great
dancers of Korea.
FAIR POST OFFICE
DEDICATED
The New York World's Fair Commem-
orative Stamp was unveiled last week dur-
ing the dedication of the Fair's Post
Office, described as the "most modern in
the world." The stamp, of S-cent dmoml-
nation, will go on sale nationally on April
22, the Fair's Opening Day.lt is horizontal,
green, measures eight-tenths of an inch by
llf2 inches, and bears an imprint of the
Unisphere
11
and Main Mall.
Among the 350 persons attendmg the
ceremony were Postmaster General John
A. Gronouski, Mr. Moses and former Post-
master General James A. Farley, named by
President Lyndon B. Johnson as Honorary
Postmaster for the Fair.
FAIR ZIP CODE - 11380
MOST OLYMPIC TRIALS
TO BE HELD ON OR NEAR
THE FAIRGROUNDS
The World's Fair and nearby metropoli-
tan area will host fifteen of tht scheduled
nineteen Olympic tryouts this spring and
summer. William S. Adams, Jr., Fair
Sports Director, who is coordinating this
record program, reports that more than
2,000 of the nation's foremost athletes will
vic for positions on the U.S. Olympic team
which will compete in the XVIII Olym-
piad in Tokyo, Oct. 10-24, 1964.
The City and the Fair will serve as co-
hosts of the 59 "Olympic Days," marking
the first time m U.S. Olympic annals that
so many events have been assigned to a
single region. Besides the Olympic tryouts,
the World's Fair will also be the scene of
numerous National A.A.U. champion-
ships.
Olympic tryouts in boxing, wrestling
and judo will take place at the Fair's Singer
Bowl, which has a seating capacity of 18,-
000. Fencing and weight-lifting will be
contested in the Fair's 2,1 00-seat Assem-
bly Pavilion.
Men's and women's track and field trials
are bound to attract capacity throngs to
Downing Stadium, Randalls Island, which
can accommodate 22,000. Swimming, div-
ing and water polo events will be staged at
the Astoria Pool, Queens.
In the words of Kenneth L. Wilson,
president of the U.S. Olympic Commit-
tee, "The New York Fair and its unprece-
dented facilities for handling huge crowds
will make it possible for a greater number
of people than ever before to witness the
tryouts for the XVIII Olympiad."
Postmaster General John A. Gronauski (left),
Fair President Robert Moses and former Post-
master General James A. Farley hold up
enlarged facsimile af World's Fair Commemo-
rative Stamp at dedication of Fair's post-
office, described as "most modern in the
world." Stamps first will be sold in all U.S.
Post Offices on Opening Day of Fair, April 22.
Mr. Farley was named by President Lyndon B.
Johnson as Honorary Postmaster for the Fair.
BOUNTY SLIPS IN- The Bounty, Metro-
Goldwyn-Mayer's World's Fair exhibit, is
shown at its slip at the World's Fair Marina as
it is opened to the public for the first time.
The Bounty, constructed in Lunenburg, Nova
Scotia in 1960, is a detailed reproduction of
the 18th century H.M.S. Bounty on whose
decks the drama of a mutiny was once played.
DANISH AND SWEDISH PAVILIONS
HAVE VARIETY OF APPEAL
Both the Pavilions of Denmark and
Sweden will have many tempting features
to offer all Fair visitors.
In the Pavilion of Denmark, a miniature
Tivoli Gardens playground for children
created by eleven of Denmark's leading
artists, is complete with slide, sandbox,
playhouse, maze, pools, canals and a cafe.
The Restaurant of Denmark will serve
Danish breakfasts, luncheons featuring
dishes from the Danish provinces, dinners
from the world-famous menus of Copen-
hagen, and the popular Danish Koldt
Bord, a table laden with meats, fish,
cheese, hams and other foods in endless
variety.
Sidewalk cafes modeled after those in
Copenhagen, will be outside both the ben-
mark Restaurant and the Kattegat Inn,
where smorrebrod will be served.
A Butik will offer a thousand and one
different gifts from food parcels to fabrics,
silver to salad bowls, toys to trays, and
pins to porcelains.
Tht: Pavilion of Sweden, dedicated to
the theme of "Creative Sweden," is a testi-
monial to that nation's private enterprise.
Sponsored by leading industries and busi-
nesses, 1t has three main sections: a large
"Hall of Industry" featuring exhibits of
Swedish technology and products; a minia-
ture branch of the Nordiska Kompaniet in
Stockholm, Sweden's largest department
store, which will display and sell hundreds
of examples of Swedish craftsmanship in
Cf\'St.llwarr, ceramics, metals, textiles and
other fields; and "Restaurant Sweden,"
sprcializmg in authentic Swedish smorgas-
bord, which will serve a selection of up
to -10 dishes daily. The Skal Bar will fea-
nne Swedish beers, aquavit and other
thirstquenchers.

ART COLLECTIOIIS OFFER VARIETY AND BEAUTY II FAIR'S PAVILIONS
The art collections to be offered at the
Fair range from priceless antiquities to ab-
stract, non-representational paintings and
sculpture, promising a rewarding experi-
ence for all visitors.
The circular base of the Federal Pavilion
will have an outdoor display of mllprure
selected for it by the Museum of Modern
Art, and an outdoor sculpture exhibit will
be featured in the New Jersey Pavilion.
Florida will present a rotating art exhibit
displaying both old masters and examples
of contemporary art loaned by museums
and private collectors. A special feature
will be its large collection of pre-Colum-
bian art.
Montana's centennial train will house
Charles Russell originals depicting scenes
of the Old West, and within the New Eng-
land Pavilion a 150-foot segment from a
mural in the New Bedford Whaling Mu-
seum will tell the story of whaling.
Hawaii will exhibit replicas of Tikis in
its Bishop Museum, and the works of con-
temporary Texans will be on display in the
Texas Pavilion.
The New York State Council on the Arts
will sponsor the art exhibitions at the State
pavilion. "The River: People and Places"
will be a survey of 17th-19th century paint·
ings featuring the Hudson River country.
Exhibits from various museums and cul-
tural institutions in the City will be dis-
played in the New York City Pavilion.
Among the highlights will be the Metro-
politan's small sculpture collection, objects
from the Museum of Primitive Art, a mon-
tage of 20th century art prepared by the
Guggenheim Museum, and important
pieces from the Whitney Museum's perma-
nent collection.
A committee of distinguished museum
directors and curators has supervised the::
selection of 40 paintings to comprise a
"Four Centuries of American Master-
pieces" exhibition in the Better Living
Cemer.
Bronzes, porcelains, jade, ancient callig-
raphy, and stone monsters from the
Shangera, representing 40 centuries of
oriental art, will be sent to the Fair by the
Republic of China. The U. A. R. Pavilion
will display the most extensive collection
of Egyptian treasures- including the King
Tutankhamen collection - ever sent ro a
foreign country.
Old masters from the Prado- works of
El Greco, Goya, Velazquez, Zurbaran -
will be on display in the Spanish Pavilion.
Supplementing this collection will be con-
temporary paintings of Dali, Picasso and
Miro, and sculptures by Sanchez and Ser-
rao.
A rotating art show in the American-
Israel Pavilion will feature the works of
Rembrandt, Lieberman, Chagall, and others
who have interpreted Jewish life in their
paintings.
Diego Rivera murals and Orozcos will
be exhibited in Mexico's pavilion and in
the Pavilion of Venezuela will be the works
of Jesus Soto and "white" landscapes by
Armondo Reveron.
There will be primitive art in the Afri-
can Pavilion, colored sand portraits in the
Belgian Village, ancient art and sculpture
in India's Pavilion, an exhibit of ornate
weapons and other artifacts in the Pavilion
of Thailand, and in the Philippine. Pavilion
the history of the Islands will be told in
paneled wood carvings.
A 50-foot abstract in stainless steel, ex-
ecuted by Bertoni, will be placed at the
entrance to Austria's Pavilion, and Greece
will show bronze sculptures by Capralos as
well as stone and marble statues by La·
meras.
The processes involved in block printing
will be demonstrated in the privately·spon-
sored Japanese Pavilion, and Indonesian
artisans will teach the ancient process of
batik printing and dyeing.
The religious pavilions will incorporate
art works as an integral pare of their ex-
hibits. The centuries-old, gem-encrusted
Holy Icon of the Virgin of Kazan will be
shown by the Russian Orthodox-Greek
Catholic Church. The Protestant and Or-
thodox Center will be beautified by a series
of stained glass windows, while the Mor-
mon Church will have giant murals and a
replica of Berte! Thorvaldsen's "Christus"
executed in marble by Aldo Rebechi.
The Fair's most noted acquisition and
one of the greatest of all works of art -
Michelangelo's Piela-- will be exhibited
for the first time outside of St. Peter's 10
the Fair's Vatican Pavilion.
Radio and Television Provide Saturation Coverage of Fair
Changes occurring in the American way
of life since the 1939 New York World's
Fair will be dramatically reAected in the
major role which the radio and television
industry will play in the new World's Fair.
The first television programs ever seen
by the public originated from the 1939
Fair, with nearly 200 TV sets in the area
carrying President Roosevelt's opening day
speech to some 1,000 people.
At the 1964-1965 Fair, there will be 300
color television sets within the Fair-
grounds itself, programming dosed-circuit
highlights of Fair events, originated by
RCA from 69 TV outlets amund the
grounds.
The Fair's radio and television center
will be located in the Singer Bowl where
each of the national networks wi II have its
own office. Additional space will be avail-
able for or her broadcasters reporting from
the Fair.
Coverage of Fair events co date has been
extensive, especially in the New York area.
WNYC.TVand Radio have carried weekly
programs for the past year featuring as
host William Berns, Fair vice president m
charge of Communications and Public Re·
lations.
Plans for covermg the Fair once it is
open are being made by broadcasters from
all over the country and from abroad. Suth
well-known attractions as the "Today"
Show and "Queen For A Day" will origi·
nate from Flushing Meadow numerous
times after Opening Day.
On Opening Day, April 22, at 7:30p.m.
EST, NBC Television Network will bring
viewers to the Fair via a special hour-and-
a-half program in color sponsored by
United States Steel. Under producer Robert
Bendick, a staff eventually co number 2 50
persons has been at work on the grounds
creating a show to capture and commem-
orate the Fair's excitement and color.
Henry Fonda will act as program host and
.tmong his area hosts will be Fred Mac·
Murray, Carol Channing and Lorne Greene.
, A ~
.\j
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