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World's Fair
Corporation:
Executive Committee
Meeting Reports ( 4)
Mar 16,1962
1o1 N II I'H It" It e>ael
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964·1965 CORPORATION
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
FLUSHING 152, N. V. • TELEPHONE ·AREA Coot 212 • WF 4·1964 • CAsu: ADDRESS "WORLDSFAIR"
NACI THIIOUOH
UNDIIIITANDINO
I .
767 DAYS TO OPENING OF FAIR
AGENDA
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE Iv.IEETING
MARCH 16, 1962
r-"/ AGENDA ITEM 1, Approval of minutes of Executive
I Committee meeting-February 9, 1962
/ AGENDA ITEM 2. Financial status
(See reference memorandum)
!· Fair Notes
£. Financial report
/AGENDA ITEM 3. Report on industrial and
special exhibits
!· Industrial sales program
(See reference memorandum)
£. .Ratification requested
1. World of Food, Inc. (2-26-62)
Modification of existing lease
£. Status of negotiations
{See reference memorandum)
ROBERT MOSES
,AitiiDINT
Mr. Spargo
Mr.Panuch
Mr. Moses
Mr. Panuch
Mr. Panuch
~ : 0 0 A. M - PRESENTATION OF NEW UNISPHERE MODEL- BOARD ROOM
v AGENDA ITEM 4. Report on Transportation area
!· .Ratification requested
1. Sinclair Refining Company (2-15-62)
2. Others
£. Status of negotiations
{See reference memorandum)
Mr. Tozzoli

•••••
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964·1965 CORPORATION
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
F'LUIHING 152, N.Y. • TELEPHONE ·AREA COD£ 212 • WF 4·1964 • CABLE ADDREII"WORLDSFAIR"
IICAO& TMIIOUOH

ITEM 5. Marina and Marine Exhibit
\.oo""". AGENDA ITEM 6, Report on International exhibits
!- Ratification requested
/AGENDA ITEM 7.
/AGENDA ITEM 8.
---g ..........
1. United Mexican States (11-22-61)
2. Kingdom of Thailand (2-13-62)
3. Republic of India {2-14-62)
4. The USSR Chamber of Commerce
(3-2-62)
5. Republic of Sudan
6. Republic of Guinea
7. Others
.Q. Authorization requested to reserve
site for Belgian Village
£. Status of negotiations
(See reference memorandum)
g. Report on Holy See Exhibit
Proposal of Patrick Dolan Associates
and substitute proposal of J. Walter
Thompson
United States Exhibit
State exhibits
!· Status of negotiations
(See reference memorandum)
- 2-
ROBERT NOSES
· I'AC!IIDENT
Mr. Tozzoli
Gov. Poletti
Gov. Poletti
Mr. Deegan
Gov. Poletti
Mr. Deegan
Representative
Delaney
Gen. Potter
01961

NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964·1965 CORPORATION
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
f"LUIHIHO 52,N.Y .• TtLEPHONE·AR£ACODE212·WF 4·1964 • CA8LEADDRE811WWORLDSFAIR"
THIIOUOH
UIIDCIIITAIIDIIIO
AGENDA ITEM 9, Report on concessions and operations
g.. Ratification requested
fi 1.

Video Information Service, Inc.
(1-19-62) and amendment thereto
(See reference memorandum)
/2. Gas stations
Sinclair Refining Company
(2-27-62)
3. Others
b. Authorization to execute
- (See reference memorandum)
1. Dexter Press, Inc.
World's Fair postal card
£. Reports
(See reference memoranda)
/'
1. Contract Traffic Consultant
/ 2. World's Fair Shopping Bag
/ 3. World's Fair Flight Bag
J g. Appointment of special policemen
Fred K. Nelson
John E. Joyce
AGENDA ITEM 10. Lake area
Status of negotiations
{See reference memorandum)
- 3-
ROBERT MOSES
I'IIEIIDIIIT
Mr. Constable
Mr. Constable
Mr, Constable
Mr. Constable
Mr. Weinstein
IINI.IIMCitC 81ea1
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING ME:AOOW PARK
FWSHING !52, N.Y. • TELEPHONE·AAtA Coot 212 • WF 4·1964 • CAIILE AoDRESsWORLDSFAIR"
THIIOOUOH
UMD81t8TAN01MO
\ .. .--/AGENDA ITEM 11. Fair Engineering and Construction
!-. Security Building contract
b. Amendment to Rules and Regulations
1. Low voltage electricity
(See reference memorandum)
2. Safety and Identification Regulations
.£. Status report
(See reference memorandum)
ITEM 12. Parks Department engineering and
construction schedule
(See reference memorandum)
/AGENDA ITEM 13. Report on Public Relations
J !-. .Article on Fair in Time Magazine
.Q. John Campbell Films
Amendment to contract
.£. Directors preview of second
progress film
AGENDA ITEM 14. Other business
AGENDA ITEM 15. Next meeting of Executive Committee
April 16, 1962
March 12, 1962
- 4 -
ROBERT MOSES
PIIE81DtNT
Gen. Potter
Mr. Andrews
Mr. Berns
........ ......
1
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MEMORANDUM FROM
PRESIDENT OF THE COUNCIL

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() 1961,1962 New_York World's Fair 1964-1965 Corporation
UNISPHERE PRESENTED BY @ United States Steel
EXHIBITOR CONSTRI
DATE: MAl
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EXHIBITOif.l CONSTRUCTION PROGRESS
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C> 19161,1962 New York W01ld's Fair 1964-196S Corpo1otion
....--------------. \L>t •'lfltr,
EACH SQUARE EQUALS 25,000 S. F.
LEASE SIGNED
E} INTENT
INDUSTRIAL
RENTABLE AREA
LEASE SIGNED
INTENT
TOTAL ALLOCATED
1,345,000S.F.
54 7, 000 S.F.
1,892,000S.F. =58%
INTERNATIONAL
RENTABLE AREA 2,030,000S.F.
LEASE SIGNED
INTENT
TOTAL ALLOCATED
340, OOOS.F.
897,000S.F.
1,237, OOOS.F. = 61%
FEDERAL AND STATES
RENTABLE AREA 1,690,000S.F.*
LEASE SIGNED
INTENT
TOTAL ALLOCATED
272,000S.F.
1,020,000S.F
1,292,000SF. =77%
TRANSPORTATION
RENTABLE AREA 2,1 30,000 S.F.
LEASE SIGNED 912,000S.F.
INTENT 575,000 S.F.
TOTAL ALLOCATED I ,487,000 S.F. =70%
*
FLORIDA AND HAWAII AREAS INCLUDED IN FEDERAL a STATE
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INTENT 240,000
TOTAL ALLOCATED . 431
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NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS AND D!SBURSEMENTS
- FROM AUGUST 18, 1959 TO MARCH 6. 1962
RECEIPI'S:
Contributions
Proceeds of Bank Loans (See Contra)
Proceeds of 6% World's Fair Notes*
Rental from Leases and Licenses
Miscellaneous Income
Tar AL RECEIPTS
DISBURSEMENTS:
Repayment of Bank Loans (See Contra)
Construction Cost
Other Pre- Fair Expenses
Tar AL DISBURSE:MENTS
CASH, INVESTMENT AND DEPOSIT BALANCE 3/6/62:
DISTRIBUTION OF BALANCE:
Cash (Including Time Deposits) $ 5, 854, 154.97
Less: Unremitted Withheld Taxes 21,441.30
U.S. Treasury Bills ($1., 000,000 Principal)
Operating and Construction Deposits
* Total Subscribed
" Pledged
$ 28,.733, 000.
590,000.
$ 29, 323, 000.
$ 90,100.00
3,000,000.00
18,233,000.00
4, 759' 725. 50
9,770.51
$ 3, 000, 000. 00
4,789,614.81
7 .._4(30, 451. 70
$ 5, 832, 713. 67
984,765.00
4,025,050.83
v
$ 26,092,596.01
15,250,066.51
$ 10,842,529. 50
$ 10, 842, 529. 50


NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
FLUSHING !02. N Y. • TELEPHONE· AREA Coo£ 212 · WF 4·1964 • CABLE AooR£Ss'·wORLDSf"AtR"
JIIAGE THACiuOr.
UHDIUtSTANCIINO
ROBERT MOSES
PRt!IIOENT
Dear Mr. Moses:
March 9, H)62
J. ANTHONY PANUCH
'ti!Ct .. AUI()tNT
thiOUStfhAL ' !:IHIItiTS
I submit herewith a report of operations in this department since
my last report of February 2, 1962. For purposes of convenient refer-
ence, it is divided into six self-explanatory annexes.
Though the status of the two bank leases is reported under Annex II,
a word of explanation may be desirable to avoid confusion. These build-
ings will be banking facilities, pure and simple, with no exhibit aspects.
Both locations are outside the Industrial and Special Exhibits Area
and within the International Section (Block 21, Lot 1; Block 26, Lot 1) at
sites insisted on by the banks, which met with Mr. Witt's technical appro-
val. We thereupon negotiated the release of the two sites with the
International Division.
As a matter of courtesy to Mr. Witt, and because I knew the bank
officers involved as a result of previous negotiations which you asked me to
carry on with the Clearing House, we have conducted these initial space
negotiations with the bank people. We have done this in full coordination
with Mr. Witt, and, in reality, as his agents. It is self-evident that as
"banldng facilities" these service installations are not exhibits within my
sphere of responsibility.
When the stage is reached for the negotiation of formal leases
which define the respective relationships of the two ba."lks with the Fair, our
temporary good offices necessarily must come to an end, and the matter
becomes the responsibility of Mr. Witt, acting with Mr. Spargo's advice
and under the guidance of the Fair Corporation's legal counsel.
Attachments
The Honor able
Robert Moses, President
New York World's Fair 1964-1965 Corporation
Flushing Meadow 52, New York
..... ,_.,... @ u.-1 ........
REPORT TO PRESIDENT MOSES
Annex I Status of Leases Signed
Annex II Status of Lease Negotiations with Companies
Whose Participation Seems Certain
Annex m Status of Lease Negotiations with Individual
Companies and Industry Associations Whose
Participation is Undecided.
Annex IV Multiple-Exhibitor Pavilions Under Promotion
Annex V Status of Special Exhibits
Annex VI Promotional Activities
March 9, 1962
J. Anthony Panuch
ANNEX I
LEASES SIGNED as of MARCH 1, 1962
Rental
Category of Exhibitor Sq. Ft.:.
Down Payment
Companies
AT&T
104,935 $ 209,870
Coca-Cola
46,314 92,628
duPont
46,956 93,912
Eastman Kodak
69,497 150,994
General Electric
53,256 106,512
!BM
54,038 108,076
National Cash Register
18,892 37,784
Pepsi-Cola
93,696 187,392
Rheinqold
49,385
98,770
s. C. Johnson
17,305 *
20,000 **
Schaefer
45,478 90,956
Simmons
10,931 21,862
Travelers Insurance
49
1
487 981974
660,170 $1,317,730
IndustrY Associations
American Gas Assn. 79,290 158,580
Edison Electric Institute
45
1
153 90.306
124,443 $
248,886
MultiPle-Exhibitor Pavilions

150,677 299,840
Hall of Education
50,001 50 001 **
'
House of Good Taste
74,160 75,000 **
Pav. of American Interiors
38,110 76,220
World of Food
50,066 100,132
Graphic Arts
56
1
004 112.008
419,018 $ 713,201
Special Exhibits
Hall of Medicine & Health
70,012 None***
TOTAL
1
1
273, 643 $2,279
1
817
OPTION SIGNED as of MARCH 1, 1962
Company
Continental Insurance
12,699 $ 15,000
TOTAL - Leases & Option
1
1
286
1
342
* s. c. Johnson has option exercisable on or before July 2, 1962 on
approximately 10, 000 square feet of additional space.
** Additional Payments Due
*** Rental Payments Waived
Two-Year
Rental
$ 839,480
370,512
375,648
555,976
426,048
432,304
151,136
749,568
395,080
138,440
363,824
87,448
395.896
$5,281,360
634,320
361.224
$ 995,544
1,199,360
400,008
593,280
304,880
400,528
448.032
$3,346,088
None
!9.622.992
$
101,592
me.724.584
ANNEX II
Status of Negotiations with Companies Whose Participation is
Regarded as Virtually Certain
Chase Manhattan Bank
All essential factors have been negotiated. Lease signing
awaiting approval of state banking department for opening of a new
branch. Architects are working on design.
First National City Bank
Status same as Chase, with the added feature that approval by
the Comptroller of the Currency is required. At a recent conference
at the Fair with the bank's officials and a representative of the Comptroller
of the Currency, it was indicated that no difficulty was anticipated in this
respect and Federal approval is expected shortly.
Metropolitan Life Insurance Company
Charlie Dougherty, Senior Vice President, and the closest man
in the company to Chairman Fred Ecker, tells me that since November 1,
1961, he has talked to Mr. Ecker at least· once and often twice a week
about signing the lease. Last week he managed to obtain Mr. Ecker's
consent to have the matter scheduled on the agenda of the Compaey's
Executive Council of which Mr. Ecker is Chairman. However, at Mr.
Ecker's direction, the item was passed when reached.
America Fore Loyalty Group (Continental Insurance Company)
This company had paid us $15, 000 for a sixty-day option on a
12, 699 square foot site facing the Rodman Street entrance. This option
expires on April 3. The purpose of the option payment was to enable
VEK Associates to submit a feasibility study to Continental before a
lease was signed.
ANNEX ffi
Status of Negotiations with Individual Companies and Industry
Associations Whose Participation is Undecided
Beech-Nut Lifesavers, Inc.
A presentation of a second rendering of the Children's Zoo
which included the company's suggestions as to additional product
identification, was made to Mr. Gordon Young, Executive Vice
President of the company and his staff, on March 8 by Messrs.
Young, Patten and myself. Mr. Clyde Vandeburg of VEK Associates
participated. As requested by Mr. Young, preliminary cost estimates
were submitted which come to $2,100,000.
Va.ndeburg' s renderings and models of carousel animals were
left with Gordon Young who was intensely interested and impressed.
It was agreed to neet again early in the week of March 12 to present
the matter, including preliminary cost estimates to A. B. Chapman,
Chairman of the Board and E. J. Jordan, President. The Children's
Zoo is designed to occupy Lots 2 and 3 of Block 8, an area of 63, 000
square feet.
American Machine & Foundry
Since my last report, all efforts to activate this matter with
the World's Fair Committee of AMF were met with the statement that
Chairman Morehead Patterson would have to make the policy decision
on participation.
AMF claims that the pivotal issue is one of costs. This is only
partially true. The real question is one of priorities in the allocation
of company resources. AMF is heavily involved in the new Madison
Square Garden building going up on the site of the Pennsylvania Station,
and in a massive missile project in Denver, Colorado which is regarded
so important that Carter L. Burgess, President of tbe Company, is
stationed in Denver on a fulltirne basis.
So far, we have been tmable to find anyone who has sufficient
influence with Mr. Patterson to open a door for us to make a presentation
to him either in Washington or in New York.
- 2-
National Dairy
The decision on Fair participation depends on the action of
the Board of Directors on whatever recommendation Mr. J. Huber
Wetenhall, President and Principal Executive Officer of the company,
may make.
All efforts on the part of Bill Robinson and myself to induce
Mr. Wetenhall to visit the Fair site have proved unavailing. In a
recent conference with the company's World's Fair liaison officer
Mr. Joseph Caliri, who is Secretary of tl1e company and Assistant
to Mr. Wetenhall, he told me flatly that (1) the company is satisfied
with the new site allocated to it; (2) that it is fully briefed, and no
visit to the Fair by Mr. Wetenhall is necessary; and (3) that a decision
whether the company will exhibit and, if so, how, will be reached
probably within three weeks.
Ballantine
As previously reported, Donald Deskey Associates were
commissioned by Ballantine to design its proposed exhibit and building.
Deskey is working on three concepts each tailored to a $1. 5 million
budget, with self-liquidating features. Selection of the site will depend
on which Deskey design Ballantine prefers. Deskey 's original plan
which will be included among those to be submitted, was designed for
the bld Heineken site on the Flus bing River.
Budd Manufacturing Company
Mr. Budd, President of the company, has written us that after
a reconsideration of our exhibit proposal by his Board and himself, the
unanimous decision was to adhere to the company's original decision not
to exhibit, which was reached in the summer of 1961 after a presentation
made in Philadelphia.
Budd's heavy involvement in its new joint venture in Argentina
mitigated against the allocation of any substantial resources for a World's
Fair eY..hibit.
All efforts to have Mr. Budd visit the Fair site were unsuccessful.
- 3-
Avon Products Corporation
On February 15, 1962, we had a meeting at the Fair with top
management of Avon. We gave them a comprehensive briefing which
induced them to reconsider their original decision not to participate.
The effect of the diorama was most helpful.
While Avon is the largest cosmetic company in tile United States,
unlike Revlon, it is a direct Bales operation with practically no advertising
a.nd no retailing. It manufacturers all its products under the Avon name
a.nd manufacturers !!Q products for any other company.
For these reasons, exhibiting at the Fair would be a radical
departure from Avon's previous policies. Accordingly, we have stressed
advantages which the Fair offers of (1) providing Avon personalized
advertising to a live audience (2) dramati.c possibilities of demonstration
of its product lines and community method of operations, and (3) a perfect
forum for the attraction, recruitment and on-the-job training in a glamorous
setting, of personnel from all parts of the country.
While the chances for partic1.pation must be regarded as slim, we
are giving A von the "college try.
11
If anybody on our Board of Directors
can help in this respect, an assist would be most welcome.
Revlon
A meeting was held with William Mandel, Executive Vice President
on March 8. Some progress was made but it is sticky going. Mandel has
worked on several -proposals, but is still, he admits, stuck for a satis-
factory idea. Charles Revson, the President and the man who makes the
big decisions will, of course, make this one. For this rea.son, I gather
Mandel wants to make sure "all his ducks are in a row" before he goes to
Revson with a concrete proposal calling for an expenditure of three million.
This is a live prospect and I see no way of forcing the issue without risking
an irrevocable
11
NO.
11
We propose to keep after Mandel and plan to meet
with him again in 10 days.
- 4-
We have been awaiting Mr. Deegan's return from Florida to
bring Mr. Engstrom, the new President of RCA, and Mr. Bilby, Vice
President of Public Relations, to the Fair in ;m effort to obtain a decision
on participation. We have a proposal for a pavilion wllich might be of
interest to General Sarnoff. ·
Swift & Company
Swift's decision to participate or not to participate in the Fair will
be reached on President Jarvis' return from Europe within the next two
weeks. Mr. Schiewe, EY.hibition and Construetion Manager of Swift, has
told me that he would definitely recommend against Swift's participation
in a multiple-exhibitor pavilion; that he would recommend a one-story
pavilion housing an appropriate display. It is this or nothing and costs
will determine the issue when Mr. Jarvis returns.
Corning Glass Works
As previously reported, this matter of Corning's participation has
been reactivated by General Electric, one of its principal customers. So
far, GE's efforts for reconsideration have not been rebuffed by Mr. Decker,
the principal executive officer of Corning, which leav(Ssome hope that he
might reconsider the decision reached last September against participation.
Should this occur, the Board approval would be forthcoming as a matter of
COW'Se.
As I have said before, I do not regard the Corning situation as
hopeless, now that GE has intervened with Mr. Decker to reconsider.
Pittsburgh Plate Glass
This project emanated through the good offices of J. Walter Thompson.
The company is seriously considering an exrubit of 50, 000 square
feet, which in addition to PP&G conventional product line display, will
have a Marconi System of large screen closed circuit television as a major
feature of its exhibit.
- 5-
Armour & Co.
Mr. Fairfax Cone as a result of the visit of Messrs. Young and
Patten to Chicago in February has discussed with Mr. E. R. Wilson, the
president of the company, an exhibit at the Fair.
Mr. Wilson stated that participation in the Fair was a matter of
such high policy that it would have to be taken up directly with Mr. W. W.
Prince, the Chairman of the Board and Pri.l1cipal Executive Officer of
Armour.
This Mr. Cone proposes to do shortly, but strongly suggests that
a member of our Finance Committee, Mr. William M. Moore, Chairman
of the Bankers Trust Company and a personal friend of Mr. Prince, "open
the door" for Mr. Young and myself to meet with Mr. Prince in Chicago,
accompanied by Mr. Cone.
Mr. Whitney is trying to arrange this with Mr. Moore before he
leaves for Europe on March 10.
American Petroleum Institute
At a recent meet.i.ng of the Production Committee, it was proposed
to abandon the effort to induce the Institute to reconsider its 1961 decision
to withdraw from the Fair.
In lieu thereof, it was recommended that the Port Authority,
because of its contacts ~ l i t h the oil industry, should concentrate on the
possibility of inducing an oil company or a group of individual companies
to join in organizing a pavilion of their own. I concurred in tl'Js proposal.
You will remember that in my memorandum to you of July 14, 1961
I reported that after API had withdrawn as an exhibitor Jack Rathbone,
Chairman of the Standard Oil Company of New Jersey, advised me to
forget about a petroleum industry exhibit because of the virtual impossibility
of satisfying the smaller companies who ··Here members of API. Rathbone,
who is a personal friend and former client, advised us to go after an
individual oil company or a 9roup of companies.
We did not immediately abandon the plan for an industry eY.hlbit
sponsored by API because Jay GouJd and Stan Hope believed it could be
done. The late .Alton (Pete) Jones of Cities Servic:e also felt that way.
The same is true of Red Motley, who h3.s been working on the industry
exhibit idea through Mr. McCollum, t h e ~ President of API. However,
so far all the efforts of the .Fair 8.Dd of Messrs. Gould, Hope and Motley
for an industry exhibit have been unproduc:tlve.
- 6-
Wm. Wrigley, Jr. Company
Mr. A. G. Atwater, Vice President of the company, visited the
Fair on February 15 and was given a comprehensive briefing in an effort
to change the company's decision to participate in a multiple-exhibitor
pavilion.
OUr efforts to induce Wrigley's participation in a pavilion of its
own were unsuccessful. The reason for this, according to Mr. Atwater,
is that the company's policy is NOT to promote the Wrigley name or
company image, but to push its .f?rands, such as SPEARMINT, DOUBLEMINT,
etc.
Mr. Atwater, who is a good friend of Bill Robinson's, promised to
lay out pavilion proposals before Mr. Wrigley, whom he expected to visit
in Phoenix, Arizona, within the next few days, but held out no hope for a
change in the company's position.
Fairbanks-Whitney
David K arr, President of Fairbanks-Whitney, has told me that the
desalting plant which its subsidiary Fairbanks Morse, built for Israel at
the port of Elath at the Gulf of Aquaba, is now in volume operation where
it promises to be economic. He feels this volume can be substantially
increased if a few technical "bugs" which have developed can be ironed out.
He tells me t:b.at his Board has instructed him !Ito let the technology
catch up with the advertising" on the Zarchin process by getting four plants
mto operation at a commercial level by the end of August. If this succeeds,
and he seems to have no doubt as to the outcome, he says that Fairbanks
"will be pounding on our doors" to exhibit with an actual plant operating
with salt water drawn from the Flushing River. I explained that this would
involve sedimentation problems to wMch he replied that these could be
"licked" by a filtering plant.
The company is intensely public relations minded and its earnings
have improved in 1D61. The eompany and Karr are former clients of mine,
and if there is any hope of gettin!J a desaJ.ting plant as an exhibit, the
Fairbanks- WhHney plant represents OlJT best chance. I regard Fairbanks
as a live prospect which I intend to pursue.
ANNEX IV
Multiple- Exhibitor Pavilions Under Promotion
Project '64
The key figures in this undertaking are the firm of St. Phalle &
Spalding of 230 Park Avenue. This project has been carefully researched
by the firm of Arthur D. Little & Company of Boston on behalf of its sponsors.
Participants in the project include ten partners of the firm of
Scudder Stevens & Clark, Charles A. Spalding, a close personal friend
of President Kennedy and Chairman of the Department of Commerce
Advisory Committee on U. S. participation in the Fair, Mr. James Linen,
former publisher of Time and a number of other substantial persons of
like calibre.
The manager selected for the project is Pat Weaver and the designers
are the Ivel Corporation which participated in the creation of the beautiful
Hawaiian exhibit. This project has been under negotiation for almost a year,
but a lease is expected to be signed during the week of March 11.
Business Pavilion
After a great deal of intensive effort this project is about ready to
be launched. The promoter, Irwin Kahn of Unified Management Consultants,
has been able to negotiate a contract for the support of the pavilion with the
Business Equipment Machines Exposition (BEME). This is the official
service organization of the Business Equipment Manufacturers Association
and it has permitted its Managing Director, Mr. Rudolph Lang, to act as
Director of Rentals for the Business Pavilion.
All essential basic details have been negotiated and a lease is
expected to be signed shortly. This is the pavilion whose attractive
brochure I submitted to you sometime ago and which elicited your
favorable comment. It would occupy a site of 90, 988 sq. ft.
Building: Materials Pavilion
This project is proceeding in satisfactory fashion and I have
systematically routed to it all companies in the building materials lines
which desire to exhibit at the Fair but are not in a position to finance
their own pavilions.
-2-
The organizers of the pavilion advise me that they will be in
a position to negotiate for a large site of 100,000 square feet or more
in the very near future.
Because of your request to me of March 7, I have suspended all
further activity with respect to these pavilions until you have had an
opportunity to review the entire multiple-exhibitor pavilion situation as
a whole.
In this connection, I attach hereto a pamphlet recently issued
by the Association of National Advertisers entitled
''Key Facts for Advertisers
<Dn the
1964-65 World's Fair in New York"
This information was compiled as a result of specific inquiries
by ANA's corporation clients. You will note that these companies have
expressed interest in nine multiple-exhibitor pavilions.
Attachment
ANNEX V
Special Exhibits
Synagogue Council of America
Since my last report we have been successful in resolving a
potentially dangerous jurisdictional conflict between the Council, and
the New York Board of Rabbis, Inc.
I expect to hear shortly from Dr. Julius Mark, Chief Rabbi of
Temple Emanu-El and President of the Synagogue Council of America
as to when the lease to the Council's site will be signed.
Protestant Center
The Board of Directors of the Protestant Council of the City of
New York has authorized Dr. Potter to go ahead with plans for an exhibit
(tentatively called "The Protestant Center"), to appoint a steering committee
to raise $30,000 for preliminary work, to recruit a staff and engage an
architect. A portion of the money is in hand, and there is no question in
Dr. Potter's mind that the full amount will be subscribed. He is presently
interviewing candidates for the staff.
The Executive Committee of the Protestant Council meets on March
20th. At that time, the approval of an agreement with the World's Fair
Corporation, and the selection of an architect will be on the agenda. Formal
signing of the agreement can take place at a date to be determined thereafter.
Dr. Potter has plans well in hand and has done a great amount of
preliminary work. He himself is a "pro", and he has at hand a complete
public relations staff to assist in raising necessary funds throughout the
country. This will be a nation-wide Protestant project, leaning most
heavily on the eight major denominations that comprise approximately 85%
of the Protestant community in the United States. On March 1, the National
Council of Churches in convocation unanimously adopted a resolution supporting
and endorsing the religious efforts at both Century 21 and the New York
World's Fair.
- 2-
Hall of Labor
In my last report it was stated that the International Fair
Consultants, Inc. bad arranged with Labor Secretary Goldberg to
send Assistant Secretary George L. P. Weaver to New York to sit
in on a conference to discuss ways and means to proceed with a Hall
of Labor. Before this meeting was held, Dean Carman and Dr.
Stavisky met with Harry Van Arsdale to discuss Labor participation
in the Fair. Harry asked Dean Carman to postpone the meeting which
had been scheduled for February 15, until he bad bad a chance for a
preliminary discussion of the matter of Labor participation in the Fair
with George Mei3Ily.
Alex Rose had suggested that one feature of the Fair might be
a modernized version of "Pins and Needles
11
to be put on with an all-Labor
cast.
Hall of Medicine and Health
A meeting of executives of principal Pharmaceutical companies
was held at the Metropolitan Club on February 20.
Commissioner of Health Dr. Leona Baumgartner, Dr. Willard A.
Rappleye, President of the Josiah Macy Foundation and formerly Vice
President of the Medical Department at Columbia University, Dr. Howard
A. Rusk, Director of the Rehabilitation Center at New York Bellevue, and
Arthur H. Motley, President of Parade Publications all spoke of the
necessity for an outstanding medicine and health exhibit at the Fair.
Mr. Edwin A. Salmon, President of the American Museum of
Health, outlined the features of the proposed American Museum of Health
Pavilion.
President Moses as the principal speaker of the meeting, stated
frankly that the support of the pharmaceutical companies was essential
to a Medicine and Health Exhibit at the Fair. He pointed out that while
they were free to choose between the Salmon proposal or some other form
of exhibit, the choice would have to be made promptly if any expectations
for a respectable Hall of Medicine and Health were to be realized.
The present status of the Hall of Medicine and Health is set forth
in the attached letter dated March 7, 1962 from Mr. Moses to Dr. Leona
Baumgartner, Commissioner of Health of the City of New York.
Attachment
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
FLUSHING MEADOW PARK • P. 0. BOX 11i184 • FLUSHING 82, N. Y.
T I ~ O N K WJI •·till .. - All14 Coos 212 CA8LK ADDIIIA "WORLOSPAIR"
llOIIItT MOSU
--
Dr. Leoaa Bawnprtner
Commlaalooer ot Health
125 Worth Street
Nn York 13, New York
Dear Leona:
March 7, 1962
I have your letter about the centenary of tbe
Metrop>lican Board of Health. Tbe Idea of celebrating tbla event a
year early sounds rather contrived and artlflclal to me. Anyway, it
would complicate an already mixed up attuation.
Tbe wbole thlDi bolla down, as I think we bave aareed.
to two possible alternatives. Firat, we could bave something lite the
Hall of Man and Health Exhibit propoaed in the brochure wtth the pbarma·
ceutlcal element somewhat muted and played down. but financed and run
by the pbarmaceuttcaltnduatry as conatructi ve advertising to promote
&ood wUl and preaent a better 1 mage than the one whtch emeraed from
COPY
the Coaareuional hearinga. Tbeae companies would pay rent in the uaual
way. They would need an abaolutely topnotch person to head the thing
and run lt.
Second. there could be a pharmaceutical bullding aa
1ucb wltb the broad health aapecta a minor factor. 'lbla would be a
commercial adverttaemens:.
I don't aee any advantage whatever ln pursuing thla sub•
ject with the medical group with whom we have been dealing, tncludln1
Ted Salmon, and 1 see no reason to approach the headl of tbe pbarma·
ceutlcal companies through one advertising agency wblcb aeema to repre·
HDI aeveral of them. Our contacts wtll have to be directly wttb the beada
of the compantea, and I believe we can exhauat thta 1ubject very quietly.
The method we have been puraulni ln good faltb baa been
a fallure and the Pair acknowledges It, tf some of our medical frteadl do
noc. We have certainly made every effort to persuade the medical pro·
te•too to take the lead. We have also helped ln every way we could to
Dr. Leona Baumgartner
Marcb 7, 1962
persuade Cbe various foundations to partlclptte, without eltcltlng the
allpreat Interest on tbelr part. It ia a strange buaineal, but ao tt ta.
Anyway, th• vaudeville is over, and from now on tt
wW be legitimate drama.
. Contrary to the oplnton of a good many people wbo
take lt out in aubllmatton and advice, we can run a Pair Without a Hall
of Man or The Hall of Medlctne and Health Exblbtt. It would be a plty,
but we simply can't continue to apend an excesalve amount of time on
tbta one subject.
1 will aee you and Nat at Waabtngton Mewa oa the 12th.
CC: Mr. Thomas Deegan
Mr. Charles Preusse
Mr. John Thornton
Mr. Martin Stone
Mr. J. A. Panuch
Gen. Wm. Potter
Mr. George Spargo
Mr. E1win Witt
Filet,/'
Miss Tappan
Library
Cordially,
jsj ROBERT MOSES
Prealdent
ANNEX VI
Promotional Activities
Midwest Exhibitors
Late in January, Mr. Fairfax Cone, head of Foote, Cone & Belding
of Chicago, wrote Mr. Moses offering to be of assistance in interesting
his client companies and possibly other companies in the Chicago area to
exhibit at the World's Fair.
Pursuant to this invitation, I wrote Mr. Cone, indicating the
companies in which we would be interested, both from his client roster
and from the Chicago area. This letter was accompanied by detailed
information on the progress of the Fair to date and on the status of
industrial rentals. It was followed up by a visit to Chicago on February 1
by Messrs. Young and Patten to confer with Mr. Cone.
After a full briefing, including the showing of the short version
of our progress film, and answering a variety of questions, Mr. Cone
proposed to approach the following client companies:
Armour
Zenith
Sunbeam
Hiram Walker
This approach would be of an exploratory character, and if any
favorable response were indicated, he would then request us to return
to Chicago for individual conferences with the top management of each
company. His efforts with respect to Armour are described in Annex III.
Chemical Industry
At the request of the American Chemical Society, I addressed
the meeting of its Public Relations Committee on February 1 at the
National Arts Club. All present were of the opinion that while it would
be difficult for individual companies to undertake the costs of individual
pavilions and exhibits, an industry exhibit is highly desirable and should
be promoted without delay.
The Allied Chemical representative made a speech to the effect
that the chemical companies were next on Senator Kefauver's list and
would undoubtedly be blamed for water and atmospheric pollution, and
now was the time to get ready to tell the real story of the industry in a
'd.ramatic way at the 1964-1965 Fair.
- 2-
As an effective method of mobilizing the industry, it was suggested
that full-page advertisements should be run periodically in THE WALL
STREET JOURNAL. This message, in the opinion of those present, should
be geared to the potentialities in the Fair for big industry, including a
progress report of industry rentals to date, time schedule for construction,
etc. The report it was suggested, should be written in a way "which talks
industry's language." THE WALL STREET JOURNAL was suggested a.s a
medium because it is the one publication that is read by all levels of corporate
management which effectively reaches the industry audience that the Fair
must be interested in NOW.
Mobilizing Advertising Agencies' Supwrt
On Febr·uary 8 a luncheon was organized by the top management
of J. Walter Thompson to explore the ways and means by which advertising
agencies could be of assistance in promoting the Fair.
Present at this meeting were Frederick Gamble, President of the
American Association of Advertising Agencies; Theodore Repplier,
President of the Advertising Council; and William Heimlich, Vice President
of the Association of National Advertisers. Those from J. Walter Thompson
were: Messrs. Charles Rheinstrom, Edward Royal, Richard Brecker, and
Kennett Henks. Mr. Whitney and I attended on behalf of the Fair Corporation.
Mr. Gamble felt that the advertising agencies were not in a position
to have an exhibit at the Fair telling the story of advertising because (1) no
agreement could be reached as to what the content of such an exhibit should
be; and (2) no money was available for such a purpose.
Mr. Repplier agreed with this conclusion and stated that the Advertis-
ing Council's function was limited to promoting matters which were in the
"public interest." Therefore, in his opinion, the Council would not be a
suitable vehicle for the sponsorship of a "self serving'' advertising exhibit,
even if the money were available, which was not the case.
However, there was full agreement that the advertising agencies
should help the Fair. It was agreed that the AAAA would immediately form
a committee on the New York World's Fair composed of representatives of
agencies whose clients were exhibitors at the Fair. Such a committee has
been formed. The ANA agreed to form a parallel committee composed of
officers of clients of the ANA who were exhibitors at the Fair, This Com-
mittee is in the process of formation and will visit the Fair on March 14.
LY1 addition, the ANA reported it would shortly distribute an information
brochure to all its clients giving them the essential facts on the World's
Fair, based on inquiries the ANA had received from member companies.
This brochure has been compiled and distributed to ANA's member com-
panies. A copy is attached.
- 3-
Pharmaceutical Industry
On February 20 a meeting was held at the Metropolitan Club to
which top executives of the leading pharmaceutical companies had been
invited. This meeting is reported in full in Annex V, Special Exhibits.
Industry Meeting at Harvard· Club, March 3
This meeting was sponsored by International Fair Consultants.
Its purpose was two-fold: (1) to mobilize the interest of industry in
participating in the Fair and (2) to stress that time was of the essence
for any company which desired to exhibit, regardless of whether it would
do so in a pavilion of its own or in an existing multiple-exhibitor building.
I was requested to address this meeting, which was attended by
representatives of some 120 companies on the Fortune 500 list. I
emphasized the main theme of the meeting-- that time was a critical
factor and that whatever form any company chose as its way of
participation in the Fair, its decision should be made promptly. The
International Fair Consultants show, which preceded my address, was
an excellent "build-up" for the Fair, imaginative and accurate.
KEY FACT!S FOR ADVERTISERS
ON THE
1964-65 WORLD'S FAIR IN NEW YORK
Prepared under the auspires of the A.N.A. Shows and
Exhihits Committee, 1his report highlights basic infor-
mation about the 1964-65 World's Fair in New York
-including the nine out of fourteen multiple-exhibitor
pavilions in which A.N.A. memhers have expressed an
interest.
ASSOCIATION OF NATIONAL ADVERTISERS, INC.
155 East 44th Slreel, New York 17, N.Y.
l':ra'ldUi &tiM
:PsmM81, :Dtvf.ttm rA

., • ., JJurMtt

O:ratram M. Byrum, ,Jr.
Avtmdal8 Mfllt, Inc.
-uarold J, Clark
txeta9hon8 Co:rportatfon
Ch1rl81 S, Cor8o
tfnton lag .. Camp Paper Cot"J''ratton
Ttrm as V, Cu rey
JCJhM•Manvt118 Corporation
W.W.f11y
M11land Company
Edward L. Ot<ant
H8roultt8 Powdtr Company
H, H. Howey, Jr.
Amarloan Ctn Company
Robart F. Ktftllng
Monroe Calculating Mtaehtne Company
til Chairman, LtahJon SubClommtttee
1984-B& New York World's Fair
J# E. Lfrmrotb
:Mtnntesola Mining Manufacturing Company
J. w. Lavell
General Electric Company
Richard S. Lowell
United States Plywood Corporation
Robert A. Lyons
Inc.
F, A. Paine
Worthington Corporation
0. C. Roesemeter
H. J. Heinz Company
D. G. Stewart
Union Carbide Corporation
Bernard L. Thompson
All.led Chemical Corp.
Frank Vargish
Armstrong Cork Company
Herbert Ahlgren, A. N. A.
Administrative Secretary
,· .. ,· ',
KEY FOR ADVERTISERS·
ONTBE · ·t::
.. j964.65 W:ORLD'S FAIR IN· NEW YORK . : . .··
. . . '
February, 1962
ASSOCIATION OF NATIONAL ADVERTISERS, INC.
155 Eaat441h Street, New York 17, N, Y.
'' ' ' ' ' " ' • . : ' . - ,, '- . ',,';;< i ,_..
·,.Any-.aurplull'i•emaf,ning after otaU expenses, repaym•nt in · ..
. · prlnci.,.U of $40,000,000 of notes with interest. and .
000 advanced by the City of New York will be over ·to the .
· • York >for: purPc>ilee-... Fair (){flctais. state.tha• k . · ·
• completed. • · . , . · . .· • . . .. , ·. . . ·
P.oStTION Otr. THE J'EDEaAL .GOVERNMENT·.
The t...:tr the approval of the United States• .· tralr officials are su:,e that ' .:
the will have a ·major pavUlon and exhibit .at the :fati .. ···•· ·· ·· .. <
·.·To·thts end, President Kennedy appointed the "Citizens' Advisory Committee'' .. ·
to formulate plans for a theme; type of exhibit and general destgn. Charles ·
· F Spalding ·of New York, Chairman, has submitted a complete report and
recommendations to the White House. · ·
TIME SCHEDULE FOR EXHIBITORS
The Fair is maldng good on its pledge to have the Fair site ready for
exhibitor construction in the spring of 1962. Based on experience with the
1939-1940 Fair, building and labor costs of exhibitors "ready to go" in
1962 will average less than those of companies who start in 1963
when exhibitor construction will reach peak levels. The message is clear:
time ls short and getting shorter.
PRODUCT SALES IN EXHIBIT PAVILIONS
Sales or order-taking by a prime exhibitor within his pavilion is
provided it is incidental and subordinate to the educational purpose of the
exhibit as defined by Fair regulations.
PERIODS AND HOURS OF OPERATION
The Fair will operate dally, including Sundays and holidays, from April 22
through October 18, 1964 and from Aprll21 through October 17, 1965.
Exhibits will be operated from 10 a. m. until at least 10 p. m. Exhibits and
concessions may remain open until 2 a. m.
ADMISSION TO THE FAIR
Adults .....• $3. 00* Children .•••.. $1. 00*
Parking ... $1. 00
*Multiple Adminission Books at reduced rates
Estimated Attendance: 70, 000,000 -- 40, 000,000 in 1964
30,000,000 in 1965
ADMISSION CHARGES TO THE VARIOUS BUILDINGS
At this time only the Pavlllon of American Interiors has permission to
charge admission.
INFORMATION
Additional information appears in comprehensive brochures prepared by the
New York World's Fair Corporation. Further information, including copies
·of brochures, can be obtained by writing or calling:
2
J. Anthony Panuch
Vice President
New York World's Fair 1964-1965 Corporation
Flushing 52, New York, U.S. A.
Telephone: WF 4-1964
· .. List' .
.. . ·i,
Area
•..
<, *'League of ArabStatea
L •
These P,.rtlcipants natlona, chambers of • . · .• ·.
and non-aovemmental associations, as well'aa ·Uiternattoul
tlons. and rellllous · ·
February 1, 1962
TENTATIVE LIST OF EXJDBITORS AND CONCESSIONAIRES
Industrial Exhibits
•Aerospace Island
Air France
Aluminum Company of America
America Fore Loyalty Group
American Telephone & Telegraph Co.
Living, Incorporated
British Overseas Airways Corp.
*Business Pavilion I
Chase Manhattan Bank
Chrysler
Coca-Cola Company
Data Patterns, Inc.
du Pont de Nemours & Company
Eastman Kodak Company
Electric Power & Light
First National City Bank
Ford Motor Company
Gas Incorporated
General Electric Company
General Motors Corporation
*Graphic Arts Pavilion
Greyhound Corporation
*Hall of Education
•Hall of Medicine & Health
•House of Good Taste, Inc.
International Business Machines
*Multiple exhibitor pavilion.
4
•International FUm Fair
S.C. Johnson & Son, Inc.
Liebmann Breweries (Rheingold)
•Marine Center
Metropolitan Life Insurance Co.
Mobile Homes
National Cash Register Company
National Dairy Products
National Trailways Bus System
Owens-Corning Fiberglas Corp.
*Pavilion of American Interiors
Pepsi-Cola Company
Port of New York Authority-
Heliport
*Project
1
64
Radio Corporation of America
Revlon, Incorporated
Schaefer Brewing Company
Simmons Company
Sinclair Oil Corporation
Temple of Religion
•Transportation & Travel Pavlllon
Travelers Insurance Company
United States Rubber Company
United States Steel Corporation
•world of Food
*Youth Pavilion
,,, ·' '" -· .
. . ' '
company · • ... ·. · . , . .
:::tlfs .Pt."k.AvenueSoutb, New York ·N ... .. . ..... ·· .. ,. ",,.,
· . 'l)letrtct • :: .. ,
·· • ··etdrea; Inc.· ·. (phOtbgr8.pbf. •
.. 060 West &Oth Street, New York 19, N. Y. ·
:-' ,. :·: _._:· '::tv._ . ' ;·.< :·' _·_. ) ' : . ' .
·; .. - ·. '
:;· •Company . .
·. '"·'aon·Pa.rk.A-hnue, New York 22, N. Y.
Attention; •Mr •. Jo}m Person
Licensing
Ltoertatnl Agent: Mr. Martln Stone
Room 4600; . Time • Life BuUdlng
· ... · • Rockefeller Center• New York 20, y,.
Licensees.
Med8lllc Art Company · · ··
325 East 45th Street, New York 1'7, N.
Attention: Mr. William T. Louth, President
Time. Incorporated•
Time & Life BuUdlng
Rockefeller Center, New York 20, N. Y.
Att. : Mr. Jerome Hardy, 'Publisher. Book Division
6
Federal and States Section
Arkansas- Delaware-Florida-Georgia-Hawall-Kentucky-
Louisiana-Maryland-New Jersey-Pennsylvania-
New York City - New York State - West Virginia
Reartlapd States:
Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Nebraska,
North Dakota, South Dakota
New England States:
Connecticut, Maine, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire
Rhode Island, Vermont
Federal Exhibit
Commonwealth of Puerto Rico
· .. ·.·:)
. ·jl)ecltlc You may additional data aDrl0ft7111oualy
. '·J,yaddreselng .. N.A.
".,··.
. . Mr. JloOPet
· :setter ._· •·
.to4 Ea•t40th Stre;et/- ' -
-New 'fork·16, New York
TN '1·3180
BUSINESS PAVILION
(Lease not yet signed)
This pavilion, with a building area of 60,000 square feet, will have three
separate levels under five interconnected geodesic domes. There will be
curvilinear balconies, ramps and plaza. The series of inter-connected
circular walkways and balconies in this Pavilion have been likened to a
"horizontal Guggenheim", the great and controversial art museum designed
by the late Frank Lloyd Wright.
Exhibit Space and Expense
Sq. Ft. Price for 2 yrs.
2,000 $190,000
8,000 285,000
4,000 380,000
5,000
475,000
For further information contact:
10
Mr. Irwin Kahn, Vice President
Unified Management Consultants
180 Madison Avenue
New York, New York
Tel: OR 9-8140
Quarterly
Payments
$ 47,500
71,250
95,000
118, 750

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; '
. . . . . ·. -. . .
· Joaep-li .: ·s;...- '' President
. , . -JI . I ..
U •. ·.S. liic.
&31 Il'lfth Avenue
NeJr York. 1'1, New York
Tel: MtT '1·6490
'-'l
HALL OF EDUCATION
(Lease signed for 50, 001 sq. ft.)
The HALL OF EDUCATION for the New York World's Fair 1964-1965 will
tell the story of American education-- its past, present and, primarily,
its direction towards the future.
The three-story pavilion (90, 000 square feet) is dedicated to the romance of
learning in all forms and to the applied principles of universal education in
a democratic society. Attention will be given to the major new develop-
ments of the educational process, to the public and private institutions of
learning, to the professional societies and commercial firms in the educa-
tional field, and to the media of communication outside of the regularly
established systems through which knowledge is generated and transmitted
to the public.
Plans call for schedule of conventions, conferences and meetings of the
leading nationwide educational and professional societies, public and private
institutions, school administrators' associations, teachers' organizations
and city planning groups which will assemble at the World's Fair HALL OF
EDUCATION.
The NEA will enlist many of its departments, divisions, committees and
affiliated groups as a working force in the planning and programming of
the HALL OF EDUCATION.
The cost of space rental will be $50 a square foot per year, which will in-
clude exhibit area, land rental, utilities, maintenance, cleaning, safety and
protective services.
Space will be allocated in minimum units of 100 square feet and maximum
units of 1, 000 square feet. Special approval may be granted by the HALL
OF EDUCATION Sponsoring Committee for unusual displays requiring more
than 1, 000 square feet.
For Further Information Contact:
12
Dr. Leonard P. Stavisky
International Fair Consultants Incorporated
Coliseum Tower, Ten Columbus Circle
Suite 1410, New York 19, New York
Tel: J"U 2-1540
The
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•· .. apprt)prlat!t)l"Otes.iobal comnUttees: orgll1.lzecf't6r-the.e ;,:t '·
. } of the sponsor are in orderl ' . . ' .
· • •• 'no .. ·.
· wnlbe permitted as is cue ·tn an scientific projecla •
••. - ·- < ,· ". -, • •:, •• • '. ,. '·: ::•,. • •• -·. ' ••• • c _-, • • . ' . •. • .' ', > /"' . ,;. I • ' . •
····. .'·lrtiJlii&te!lY":foU.oVIlng t!Ut close of.the J'air.·· • •
,. 111 New.Yorlt City planed as .the permanent home 9f the' Amhican:
·vu.s•111il qfHetltb. .wiil th8n Jusftbe two
,_aril to compeJtllate for their 1nvest!rient. · · · · ·
.. . out1inblg prq()Osed program is aVti.Uable, and
. ; t(): ·. . . ·. . . . .· . ' . . .. . . . . . . ,, •··. .
·.-·
...... -.,
The Museum of Health ·
5&0 First ·
Nelf' York 16, New York
,;,=_.-.-··,
Attention: Mr. Edwln A. Salmon, President:. or
Dr. Robert V. Schultz, Vice President
Tel: ·oR 9•0046
13
HOUSE OF GOOD TASTE
(Lease signed for '74, 160 sq. ft.)
There will be '75, 000 square feet directly adjacent to the chief entrance to
the World's Fair. On this site will be erected three outstanding American
homes of differing characteristics in a price range suitable for reproduction
by builders for the general market of home buyers.
Each 9roduct exhibited wUl be displayed in its appropriate position as a
part of the harmonious whole picture of gracious American home living.
A section of the exhibit site wlll be designed to provide special displays,
including cut-aways, etc., of construction materials or of devices incor-
porated in construction such as air-conditioning, plumbing, heating and
others which require such demonstration.
Yearly participation charges range from $5,000 to $30,000 depending on
size and classification.
For Further Information Contact:
Lady Malcolm Douglas Hamilton
House of Good Taste, Inc.
1'1 East 6Srd Street
New York 21, New York
Tel: TE 8-2329
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... otSzDf.th: ... · · > ··
· .. · · · ·· ·
:j ·:rntel"D&ttonal Stlwr Companyf Jol)naon .. earper · .
. ·COliDmmv:. Kroehler :Manutacturlng Company::LUllabJ$. .
· · C. · & Bona; Simmons Company: Syracuse CQ!Dpany, ·.
IDe. ; aDd Vinyl Plaatlcs.. Inc. . · ·· ··
•l"or ll'u!'tbet Informatlon·Contact:
PhUlp Elton. Vtce Preatdent
PavUlon of American Inc.
301 East 4'lth Street
New York 17, New York
Tel: PL 2·8190
.:1&.
PROJECT '64
(Lease not yet signed)
The building will be given a name and a theme acceptable to the participating
companies. For the present, the building will be known as PROJECT '64.
PROJECT 164 is a cluster of six functionally connected towers (two large,
four small) around a glass-roofed gallery, the entire structure rising five
stories -·eighty feet high.
The large towers contain approximately 7,500 square feet per floor. The
small towers contain approximately 3, 500 square feet per floor. The build-
ing provides 30 modular units, plus the gallery, a total of approximately
150,000 square feet of exhibition space.
PROJECT 164 will have its own public relations and merchandising staff
which will maintain a continuing publicity and press relations program in
all suitable national and international media in order to stimulate and main-
tain public interest in visiting our building at the Fair.
A 24-hoor-a-day service suite will be maintained in the leading New York
hotel, which will be a message center, meeting place and source of hotel-
restaurant-amusement reservations.
A marine ferrying service will operate from the marina at 25th Street and
the East River to the Flushing boat basin, and from there by station wagon
to our building at the Fair, to avoid possible traffic and other transportation
inconveniences.
Price is $125. 00 per square foot for the two years of the Fair.
For Further Information Contact:
16
RichardE. Forrest
PROJECT '64
415 Lexington Avenue
New York 17, New York
Tel: OX 7-9493
- '\-··,
·. •

J"eat1
.·. plant
•real
To.dl
buUd
hlbit
prog

andt
Spec

bUUt
sele
a:ml
Wor
,a-:Cl(. 'l''oo•·:a_ •. -!Jlc• •• _ WU1 present a t1Jn1 · · ·
r.,.,.!,Mio'fii • 80i000 .• quu. feefto boU-.e.food :c,:_;:.':i·; ...
. ·. '
f®:d compallilea have c_• 1)_11
• • .... a: •
a c;oJlltiD.llto'!l.s · ··-JE __ ,.l_r.o haltc:Qii'l •
-· the oj,eratt.s•.' -_. -_
::c•;1b9Jt.tjf:aJ,.:'-X!ilb1tiora to COu_nsel
.IJli:eflit.tllOrii_U ___ and cOilfeqtlonery shop,
• a will be featured tn· the PavU1ot4 . · - · ·
tV .. J1tS,'WiU' lHJ (:OJ1tlnUOUS,· 1Ulder the dlreClt!c>n of Ute : : · .··' . ·. · ·
aa to the·PavtUol\.: -._._-.·
.· ... wheJ:e otan Viaitoi-$. • .U .. ·
• 'b&·. World Of Jood to insure maztm\Uil • tat" exh{bltl to
• bfthe '70,000#.000 persons expected during the 1964":1985 ..
•' ··. - . - :. • -, - ',. •'- .c',-·. :, -,,·

• J"allr.
. .JFj,/ .. exb!bJ.tora Ill World of J'oOcl Pa"riliim are fn •
·· .. or_e4Uf,pment fields·· Space costs ari·JlOO,.per• .•. ·
..

_. .. . . ·. toot lor the entire two years of the . ' .
< ... 1oj,; fu!Unformation on exhibit apace contact•
Mr. Paul Virdone
World of· Food, Inc.
49. West 37th Street
New York. New York
Tel: LW 4·2500'
AGENDA ITEM 4'Q.
MEMORANDUM
REI"ER NOTED

TOr Cc:.aialloaer Robert Hosea, Preaident, New York World's Pair
I'ROMa Quy P. To111ol1 1964·1965 Corporation
DATE1 Karch 8• 1962
8U8JIECTITIAliJPCll'fATICH SECTION, WOI.IJ)'S FADl • SUHMAllY OP SPACE
ALLOCATIONS AND NEGafiATIONS
COIIIY TOr J. Anthony Panuch
TO DATI: BY
llaTUIIN TO PILl:
Tabulated below is the status of leases signed, apace allocations and nesotiationa
to date in the Transportation Section:
Total Area - 2
1
130,000 S.P.
Leases Signed or Participation
Asrenanta S iped
Ford Motor Company
General Motors
Chrysler Corporation
Tranaportation & Travel Pavilion
Sinclair lefinins Co.
U. S • lubber Company
Pive
L!••e• Under Active Neaotiation
Ar 1 tnaton Hat Company
Marine Center
Mobile Homes
Heliport
Total:
Greyhound (Exhibit area included within
operatina and maintenance area)
Space Allocation•
Aerospace (American Rocket Society)
Air Prance
B.O.A.C.
Strol-A·Mat ic
Total:
Total:
Area (S,P,)
304,998
304,920
129,987
112,500
15,152
15,000
30,000
912,557
7,000
130,000
6,000
53,862
85,000
281,862
250,000
10,000
10,000
9,000
279,000
DATI:
e ~ t u t o n e r Robert Moses
Company
Marine Center
Aerospace
(American locket Society)
.. 63760
2 -
March 8, 1962
STATUS OF NEGOTIATIONS
Sg. Ft.
130,000
250,000
Status
A letter has been received from Mr.
James Briggs and Mr. William Crane,
indicating their willingness to proceed
with the construction of the Marina in
Flushing Bay along the general lines of
the plans developed by Owens Corning
Fiberglas. They also agreed to take an
option on the Marine Center area until
December 31, 1962. Their many dis•
cussions with the Boating Industry have
indicated that the major portions of the
industry will be in a position to ca.ait
themselves in Septe.Wer of this year
provided that sales are satisfactory
during the first nine months of 1962.
My discussions with Outboard Marine, the
"General Motors" of the Boating Industry,
bear out this opinion, The first
meeting to negotiate the formal lease
was held on March 6th. ·
The Executive Committee of the Aserican
Rocket Society at a meeting held on
February 18 decided that it would be an
excellent idea to present the story of
space at the Fair. With the approval of
the directors a letter was sent to Vice
President, Lyndon Johnson, requesting an
opportunity to present the plana, with a
view toward obtaining his support of the
project. This support would not be
finanaial but would rather be in the
form of his approval of the presentation
of such a show to the world at the
World's Pair. We were requested by
Dr. Welsh, Executive Secretary of the
National Aeronautics and Space Council,
which Lyndon Johnson heads, to send a
letter from Mr. Moses inviting the
American Rocket Society to put on such
a show. This was done. The American
Rocket Society is awaiting the outcome
of this meeting before proceeding.
.
Ca.aiseioner Robert Mosea - l -
Cswany
sg. rt,
Caterpillar Tractor Co. 15,000
Mobile IIeDei Hfsn. Assn. 6,000
Goodyear Carveyor 50,000
'rbe Hartz c . , ~ 10,000
Stdllcar 41,360
Little Leaau• Stadiua 100,000
March 8, 1962
Status
A plan for a Caterpillar exhibit,
together with a cost estimate, vas
presented on March lat. The idea
was well received and will be pre-
sented to top management within the
next thirty day a. Mr. Georse Moore,
President of the rirst National City
Bank of New York is a close associate
of Mr. William Blaclde, President of
Caterpillar. Mr. Moore baa been sent
the brochure of the plan with a request
that he discuss it with Mr. Blaekie to
set his support.
The 411endllents to the lease are being
reviewed by tbeir Lesal Staff.
The Walt Disney sroup co.pleted their
econCIIlic study of thil project and Good-
year will advise us of their decision by
April 1st.
Mr. rred Glasa, Executive Vice President,
has not yet aade his decision.
The preliminary enaineertna feasibility
studies of this ride have been virtually
completed and Carltns has requested that
the total coat esti:aatea be refined. A
meeting has been scheduled for March 19th
between Mr. Harry l.ussell of Carlin& and
Mr. Linne 11.
Por the past six months we have been
diacussing with Mr. McGovern, Prelident
of Little League, the possibility of
havi01 a Little Laape Stadiua at the
Pair sponsored by a transportation
exhibitor. We have met several t:lme1
with Mr. Eddie Eaaan to diacuas the
possibility of incorporatins various
other sports challpionship events to
make use of the area wben it i1 not
beins used by Little Leape. Ve have
also discussed with Bill Ad ... and
Lou Ames the pouibility of boldiq
special events in this stadiua. We .haY•
completed our cost estimate aod preeen-
tation material for this total packap.
It will be preaented to both tbe rubber
and oil companies ae an exoellent way
of their being repreaentecl at the Pair.
Mr. Moses has aleo written to AMrican
_ · llobert Moses
- 4 -
Company
Sg. Pt.
Little Leasue Stadium (Cont'd)
Pan American World Airways Indefinite
la1tern Airlines 20,000
llailroad lxhib it Indefinite
I.O.A.C. 10,000
GF'l':nb
March 8, 1962
Status
Motors requesting them to reconsider
their decision on Fair participation
and we expect to present this plan
to them.
A meeting is being arranged with
Mr. Juan Trippe to discuss Pan American'•
participation in the Fair.
We have been advised by Eastern Airlines
that their decision on participation is
being delayed because of the
merger with American Airlines.
The writer attended a meeting called by
Mr. David MAckie. President of the
!astern Railroad Presidents Conference.
The meeting was also attended by Tom
of the Long Island Railroad,
the Vice President of the Railway.
Progress Institute and .representatives
of the lerite Company, General B.ailway
Signal Company and U. S. Switch and
Signal. The railroads had originally
decided to investisate space in the
Transportation and Travel Pavilion
but now that we have managed to project
the suppliers into the picture, they
have begun to consider their own site.
We are working closely with George
Nelson, their designer, and this
quite promising.
B.O.A.C.'s decision to participate will
be based on the status of the British
exhibit at the Fair. We are not
pressing B.O.A.C. for their decision
until this has been detenained.
AGENDA ITEM 6c
MEMORANDUM
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
MR. ROBERT MOSES
CHARLES POLETTI
DATE: March 9, 19 62
eueJIECT: EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE REPORT
The following countries have completed contracts
with the F'air Corporation.:
Participants
CHINA, Republic of
*CHRlS'l!AN ScmNCE
GUINEA
HAITI
HONG KONG
INDIA
INDONESIA
MEXICO
SUDAN
THAILAND
UAR
USSR
Total
Square Footage
24,529
21,520
22,000
10,000
6,000
25,008
40,000
30,001
10,000
12,000
20,000
78,000
299,058
Revenue under contract: $1,665,228
*No charge for space.
A Belgian Village, similar to the Village in Chicago
1
33
and Brussels '58, has been proposed by a man who organized
and managed the Chicago Village and his associate who is the
architect for both villages. '!hey require approximately
130, 000 sq. ft. All of Block 25 and the greater portion of
Block 27 in the International Area is being considered for the
villaqe. An agreement has been drawn up by the Fair Corporation
and k ' ' g sent to the organizers in Brussels.
AGENDA ITEM 8
MEMORANDUM
NEW YORK WORLD'S. FAIR 1964 ~ 1965 CORPORATION
TOI ROBERT MOSES DATE! MARCH 8, 1962
PRONI GENERAL POTTER
IUIJECT1 STATES AREA STATUS REPORT
A summary of the status of space allocation in the States Area is
as follows:
Lease Signed:
Puerto Rico
New Jersey
New York State
Four Concession
Areas
29, 522 sq. ft.
87, 519
130, 595
24,000
Space Allocated (intent indicated)
Arkansas 40,000
Delaware 37, 755
F1orida 113,696
Georqia 69, 374
Hawaii 109, 000
Heartlands ( 4) 77, 280
IDinois 55, 540
Kentucky 44, 699
Louisiana 40, 000
Maryland 35,951
Michigan 20, 000
Minnesota 20, 000
New Enqland States(6) 81, 519
Pennsylvania 45, 000
West Virqtnia. 34,409
New York City Existing Building
Intent indicated (space allocation awaiting
selection)
Mississippi
Missouri
Wisconsin
California
Tennessee Total
Total States
Area
Percentage
271, 638 sq. ft.
824, 203 sq. ft.
1,095,839
1,494,000
73%
-,
STATESAREASTATUSREPORT
MARCH. 8, 1962
PAGE TWO
1. California
2. Florida
3. Georgia
4. Hawaii
5. Heartland States
6. Louisiana
7.
Maryland
8.
Michigan
9.
Missouri
Economic Development Agency asking legislature
for budget appropriation to study possibility of
exhibit. Appears hopeful.
Governor Bryant held meeting of 65 industrial
leaders on March 1, 1962 in Tallahassee. It
was agreed to appoint World
1
s Fair coordinator
in Development Commission and to solicit
support from industrial groups. They are talking
a $2, 000, 000 exhibit.
State has appointed architect to design exhibit.
Tentative budget- $1,500,000.
Plan submitted to legislature on February 28,
1962. Expect to issue state general obligation
bonds to cover $3 million budget. Ivel and I
presented and discussed plan with House & Senate
in session.
Group now consists of four states: North Dakota,
South Dakota, Nebraska and Kansas. Theme
Committee is developing concept for exhibit.
Missouri and Minnesota are discussing individual
exhibits.
Governor Davis had appointed official Commission
and they requested that space allocation be increased
from 20, 000 square feet to 40, 000 square feet.
Commission will visit Fairgrounds later in March.
Budget under discussion - $2, 000, 000. Members
of Commission visited Fair in February.
Governor's full commission visited Fairgrounds
on February 15, 1962. Preliminary planning is
under way. The proposed restaurant is now of
lesser importance than in original discussions.
Potter testified before joint meeting of House and
Senate Appropriations Committees. Business .
leaders strongly urge participation.
Missouri is planning to have its own exhibit.
Development Commission has recommended to
Governor Dalton that he appoint World's Fair
Commission.
.. ·· -sTATES AREA STATUS REPORT
MARCH 8, 1962
PAGETBREE
10. New Jersey
11. JS'E:!W York State
12. Okla.homa
13. Texas
Winner of architectural competition was
announced February 15, 1962. Budget for
buildinq is $1 million.
New York State signed lease on February 2,
1962. Architect is expected to be appointed
shortly.
Oldahoma has decided to drop out of the Fair.
We are, however, meeting with Development
groups in early March to reopen subject and
at the least secure participation in the Heartlands.
Legislature did not pass bp.l authorizinq qovernor
to appoint commission due to filibuster by one
Senator after House had passed. New efforts
are being made to assure state's participation.
AGENDA ITEM 9(b 1}
MEMORANDUM
NEW YORK WORLD'S fAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
/
TO:
ROBERT MOSES
DATE: MARCH 6, 1962
,ROt4: STUART CONSTABLE
SUBJECT: WORLD'S FAIR POST CARD LICENSE
Martin Stone has recommended that the World's Fair Post Card
license be given to Dexter Press.
Dexter agrees to pay royalties to the Fair in accordance with the
following schedule:
Size or Type Retail
of Card Price
3-1/2'x 5-1/2" $. 05
card
6" x 9" card . 10
3-1/2" x 9" card . 10
Accordion Folders . 25
Mini-Album &
other specialties . 30
Pric.e to
Concessionaire
$.025
.05
.05
.125
.15
Royalty to Fair
• 008 to 10 million cards
. 0115 to 20 " "
. 0140 to 30 n "
.0150 to 60 " "
. 0155 over 60 " "
. 03
.034
. 05
. 06
and to make a payment of $115,000 against these royalties upon execution
of the agreement.
This is the best proposal received and the staff concurs in
Martin Stone's recommendation.
I ask that the Executive Committee approve execution of this
agreement substantially in accordance with the terms set forth above.
TOI
FROM:
AGENDA ITEM 9 'Ll
MEMORANDUM
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
MR. MOSES
STUART CONSTABLE
T. T. WILEY
DATE: 1:IARCH 8, 1962
/
' ~ i ... - ~
;I 1/.,. .
,l.· I
,. /1/\ ~
\...· ./ v. '--""""' \
We have retained T. T. Wiley, former Traffic Commissioner
of the City of New York as our Traffic Consultant.
He has been employed for one year beginning March 1, 1962
at a fee of $5,000.00 plus reasonable out of pocket expenses not to
exceed $1, 000. 00
Mr. Wiley wUl advise us on internal vehicular and pedestrian
traffic problems and will work closely with the Pinkerton employee
who wlll be in charge of traific within the Fair Grounds.
I attach a copy of our letter retaining Mr. Wiley.
- ~ \ r " ~ A t
SC:qs
Attach.
v
.... ,
NEW YORK WORLD'S F'AIR 19841·198!5 CORPORATION
INTER NATIONAL EX POSITION AT P'LUSH I NO MEADOW PARK
,WIMI ... II, N.Y. TWJIIION&•AIICA Coot£ liZ· W' 4•1tl4 • CAIIL& AooltuaWOitLDsrAIIt"
ltOIIItT MOIEI
ltiiiiiDCNT
Mr. T. T. WUey
149 Broadway
New York 6, N.Y.
Dear Mr. Wiley:
March 6, 1962
BTUAitT CONSTAILI:
--·--
In ·accordance with our m nversation of February 26,
1962, the New York World's Fair 1964-1965 Corporation hereby
retains you as a Traffic Consultant for a period of one year
starting March 1, 1962. Your compensation for this one year
period w1ll be $5, 000. 00 plus reimbursement for reasonable
out of pocket expenses not exceed1nq $1, 000. 00. You will
devote such time to tbese duties as are reasonably required for
the1r proper performance.
It is understood that the Fair Corporation has the option
to extend this aqreement for one year upon the same terms on
March 1, 1963.
Please indicate your acceptance by siqninq below
and returninq a copy to us.

Stuart Constable
Vice President-Operations
ACCEPI'ED AND AGREED TO:
--·8--...
AU.I:!:r-.JDA ITEM
MEMORANDUM
NEW YORK WOR 1964 ·1965 CORPORATION
TO:
ROBERT MOSES
DATE: MARCH 12, 1962
FROM: STUART CONSTABL
•u•JIECT: WORLD'S FAIR SHOPPING BAG
{ESTIMATED REVENUE TO FAIR 00 RPORA TION UNDER $100, 000,)
Martin Stone has recommended that the World's Fair Shopping Bag
be given to Equitable Paper Bag Co., Inc., Long Island City, N.Y.
""' Equitable agrees to pay Fair Corporation 5% royalty on:
.1. All bags distributed within the Fair Grounds;
All new bag business outside the Fair Grounds where
the World's Fair rights are used;
e an advance payment of $15, 000. against these royalties upon
of the agreement.
· is the same financial proposal submitted by Interstate Bac}
c•:9lt;t, Inc. of Walden, New York but Stone favors Equitable because:
It has union affiliations; and
4. Its proximity to the Fair Grounds makes for convenience
of service.
The staii concurs in Martin Stone's recommendation.
We propose to conclude an agreement substantially in accordance
with the terms set forth above and ask your approval.

TO:
AGENLEM 9(£3)
M E ~ A N D U M ~
NEW YORK WORLD·syR 1964-1965 CORPORATieJ ~ /
ROBERT MOSES I DA"" MARCH 12, 1962 jl A A/V
STUART CONSTABL' I v • v FRON:
IU.JECT: WORLD'S FAIR FLIGHT BAG
{EST!MA TED REVENUE TO FAIR CORPORATION UNDER $100, 000. )
Martin Stone has recommended that the World' s Fair Flight Bag
license be given to Bearse Manufacturing Co., Newburgh, New York.
Bearse has agreed to pay to the Fair Corporation an advance pay-
ment of $25, 000. to apply against an equal division of the net profits as a
royalty figure. Since we cannot share in the net profits, a fixed percentage
of the gross receipts will be agreed upon rather than a 50/50 division of
the profit figure once we have settled upon a design and quality of product
so that a cost base is fixed, and when a mark-up to Brass Rail and to re-
tailers outside the Fair is established.
This is the best proposal received and the staff concurs in
Martin Stone's recommendation.
We propose to conclude an agreement substantially in accordance
with the terms set forth above and ask your approval.
SAMUEL 1. IIOSENMAN
IIALPH 1'. COLIN
ROSENMAN COLIN KAYE PETSCHEK X. FREUND
MADISON AVENUE NEW YORK 22
AGENDA ITE:M 10
SYDNEY M.ICAVE OODI"IICV GOLOMAIUC
WALTI" J, PCTSCHII:K
MAX I"IUtUND
AMSIIOSE OOIICOW
SEVMOU" D.LEWIS
LAWIIt:NCIE II.ENO
MUIIIIAV COHEN
ANOAIW J. ICHOEN
Jt:IIOME L.IINOLIEII
ASA 0.
HOWAIU) WCINSTIEIN
STUAIIT .. OSINOWITZ
March 2, 1962
MUAftAV HiLL 8·7800
ARI .. COOl: Ill
ADDIIIIII
"IIOCOICAV NIEWYOIIK"
Hon. Robert Moses
New York World's Fair
1964-1965 Corporation
P.o. Box 1964
Flushing Meadow Park
Flushing 52, New York
Re: Executive Committee
Meeting - March 16, 1962
Dear Commissioner Moses:
In Judge Rosenman's absence I am submitting herewith,
in accordance with your memorandum of January 25th, the
following report on the various exhibits and/or concessions
for which we are responsible.
1.
2.
3.
Believe It Or Not
Mr.Iand has advised me that the two
groups which will sponsor this exhibit
are very close to agreement. The lease
will probably be signed before the end
of this month.
Historical Museum
The exhibitor Is awaiting the return or
Mr. Procopiu from Europe before concluding
the lease. The lease will probably be signed
before the end of this month.
Fisherman's Wharf
The lease has been reviewed by the attorney
for the concessionaire. We understand that
the concessionaire is reviewing cost
estimates and arrangements with a restaurant
operator for the actual operation of the
restaurant. ·
Hon. Robert Moses
-2-
4. The Last Frontier
Ve hive been advised by the parties with
whom we were negotiating that they are unable
to raise the funds for financing the project.
A new sponsor will have to be obtained for
this type of project.
5. Bourbon Street
No fUrther progress can be reported at this
time.
6. Las East
No tUr fier progress can be reported at this
time.
7. Tower
Prei1Ininary discussions have been held with
8.
9.
Mr. Augspurger from Buffalo for the construction
of a tower which would incorporate a rocket
ride and an opportunity for the patrons to
obtain a view of the Fair from the top of' the
tower. This would be the 1964-65 replacement
of the parachute jump.
Italian Restaurant
Pre11riiinary negotiations have been co.nducted
with two brothers from Buffalo {Messrs. Milke)
for the construction of an Italian restaurant
in the Lake Area. This would replace the
proposed French restaurant which had been
abandoned by its sponsor.
Magic Show
received an indication of interest
from Mr. Larry White for space to construct
a theater for the presentation of magic shows.
Mr. White is in Europe trying to arrange for
the attractions. If he is successful, he
enter into negotiations with the Fair for the
space.
No authorization other than the authorization heretorore
given is being requested at this time.
Sincerely yours,

HW:f's
AGENDA ITEM ll g_l
MEMORANDUM
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
TO:
Mr. Robert Moses DATE: March 8, 1962
FROM:
Will1am Whipple, J'r.
SUBJECT:
Our electrical charges to exhibitors are based on the assumption
that all distribution to exhibitors would be at 4160 volts leaving the exhibitor to
provide transformer and switchgear to bring it to usable voltage. However, this
would be relatively very expensive for users of small amounts of electricity.
We have now contracted to provide low voltage service for one concessionaire
froJl1 our street lighting circuits and will be required to provide small amounts of
electricity at scattered locations. I would like your authority to incorporate
provisions for such requirements in our electrical planning as they appear, sub-
ject to addinq to the normal charges now specified in our requlat.i.Gns a pro-
portionate share of the transformer expense and any other additional charges that
may be entailed in each instance to provide this extra service. The requlations
should be changed to incorporate such a provision. Any such plan will, of course,
be subject to your approval in the usual way, if substantial expenditures are
involved. However, it would be useful to have a statement of policy to guide us
1n meet1nq these situations as they arise.
Jn accordance with your approval of the above, I have had prepared
appropriate changes to the regulations which have been reedited by the Legal
Division and distributed to Mr. Constable, Mr. Panuch, Governor Poletti,
Mr. Witt and Mr. Tozzoli. Mr. Witt approves, Mr. Constable has no comments
and the others have not replied.
I recommend this amendment be approved.
WW/wh
This Subsection Shall Be Inserted In Part 1
of the Rules and Regulations after Paragraph 15 (c) (2) thereof
(3) LOW VOLTAGE SERVICE TO PARTICIPANTS
In certain instances it may be feasible for the Fair Corporation
to provide to participants low voltage electricity service at less than
4160 volts. For example, the Fair Corporation may be able conveniently
to furnish such service to a participant whose premises are located
adjacent to a low voltage system installed by the Fair Corporation.
Applications for low voltage service are to be made to the Office of
the Chief Engineer of the Fair Corporation. Application should be
made as soon as possible, because service from the Fair Corporation's
low voltage systems can only be provided if the participant's desire for
such service is known sufficiently far in advance of the construction of
such systems so that any necessary provisions for service to a participant
may be incorporated in the Fair Corporation's design of the system.
The Fair Corporation, in its sole discretion, shall determine whether
it is feasible to supply low voltage service to the participant. If such
service is furnished, the participant will be charged as follows:
(A) A Connection Charge computed in the same manner,
at the same rate, payable at the same times, and subject
to the same conditions as specified in the rules and
regulations for the connection charge for electricity at
4160 volts.
(B) A Demand and Energy Charge computed in the same
manner, at the same rate, payable at the same times,
and subject to the same conditions as specified in the
rules and regulations for demand and energy charges
for electricity at 4160 volts.
(C) Meter Installation and Monthly Meter Rental Charges
as specified in the rules and regulations for electricity
at 4160 volts.
(D) The incremental cost, as determined by the Fair
Corporation, of any additional features, construction
and equipment, including design, required to extend the
duct and cable system or to add any other additional
facility for the purpose of providing low voltage service
to participant.(Whenever it is deemed practicable by the
Fair Corporation, the construction of any such extension
shall be performed by participant. )
(E) The proportionate share, as determined by the Fair
Corporation, of the cost of transformers and protective
devices for reducing 4160 volt service to low volt service,
based on the ratio of participant's rated peak load to
entire transformer capacity.
(F) The incremental cost of any other additional capacity
or facility required to provide low voltage service to
participant.
The costs referred to in subdivisions (D), (E) and (F) above shall be
determined by the Office of the Chief Engineer on the basis of contract
costs to the Fair Corporation for the work in question. An additional
eiqht per cent (8%) will be added to such amounts to cover the costs of
engineer..nq and supervision. Participant will pay such charges at the
time payment for the connection charge is due.
..
AGENDA ITEM ll
MEMORANDUM
NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
TO: Mr. Robert Moses DATE:
March 8, 1982
FROM: William Whipple, Jr. £
SUBJECT, • Jt
Herewith for your approval is proposed report to the Committee
on the agenda item:
Construction- World's Fair Contracts
Cable and Substations - The contractor, Eastern States Electric, has
started installing 27,000 volt cable. Cutting length orders for 92,000. feet of cable
has been placed, about 20% of the system. Until now, this contractor has been
delayed because the conduit which precedes him was behind schedule; now however
progress is satisfactory. We still hope to have electric service to exhibitors
available starUng 1 July. Telephone service will be available sooner.
Security Building - 31 bids were received. The lowest bid, from
Electronic and Missile Facilities, was $222,000, as compared with the architect's
estimate of $310, 000. The contract has been awarded by the President to the low
bidder, in accordance with authorization from the Executive Committee. Abstract
of bids is attached. Work will start within two weeks.
Planning and design continues generally on schedule. Preliminary plans
of the Press Building have been modified to better reflect actual requirements, and
final planning is under way. Preliminary plans of five other administrative buildings
and utilities plans for the Lake Area have been submitted and are under review.
Plans for the electrical low tension system, including street lighting, and for the
Customs Building have been somewhat delayed. Other plans are making normal
progress.
Exhibitors' construction will soon start on a large scale. Both Ford
and General Motors express an intention to start work in April. Six of our
exhibitors have submitted preliminary plans for formal review, and one (Ford) has
submitted fina.l plans without prior submission at preliminary level. Informal
discussions of design problems have taken place with 25 exhibitors, including
Soviet Russia. The Soviet delegation has announced that construction will start in
October. The number of exhibitors which have now announced construction starting
times is 21, of which 9 will be before the end of June. The list is attached.
A potential bottleneck in the supply of long piles has been avoided by a
supply contract, signed by the President with the Niedermeyer-Martin Company.
Under this contract up to 20, 000 long plies will be available for purchase by our
..
Page No. 2
March 8, 1962·
exhibitors, at a guaranteed low price. Purchase of piles by exhibitors will be
optional. A pUe yard will be maintained on the Fair site, to assure flexibility
in supply, and 6, 000 long piles will be stockpiled in advance for the Spring rush
of 1963.
WW/wh
Att.
l>ATES ONffERE !{NOWNl OF CONS'l'RUCTION STARTS
FOR EXHIBITORS
A m e r i ~ Telephone & Teleqraph 5/62
Better Livinq Pavilion 6/62
Chrysler Corporation 6/62
Coca-Cola Company 10/62
E. I. duPont de Nemours & Co. 9/62
Eastman Kodak Company 9/62
Electric Power. & Liqht Exhibit 5/62
Ford Motor Company 4/62
Gas, Incorporated 6/62
General Electric Company 5/62
General Motors Corporation 4/62
Hall of Education 11/62
International Business Machines 8/62
PavWon of American Interiors 7/62
PeP.,si-Cola Company 7/62
~ & M Schaefer. Brewinq Company 8/62
Transportation and Travel Pavilion 10/62
Travelers Insurance Exhibit 9/62
World of Food 9/62
Project
1
64 9/62
SoViet Russia 10/62
WW/wh
3/8/62
TABUI.;ATION OF BIDS
SECURITY BUILDING
NEW YORX WORLD'S FAIR
1964-1966 CORPORATION
Bids opened at / tJ,
1
tJ tJ
A.M. c:
:Jt;:M: on ___ ....... 6_, __..2_..o.......,...._..l962
Witnessed By:
Bids Received from:
CONTRACTOR
Ames Contracting Company, Inc.
Auserehl & Son Contracting Corp.
Bonwit Construction Company, Inc.
Comet Construction Corp.
De Foe Construction Corp.
Leon D. De Matteis & Sons, Inc.
John H. Eisele Company, Inc.
Alfred Eisenstein, P. E.
Electronic & Missile Facilities, Inc.
Fellow-Brown Contracting Co .• Inc.
Grammercy Contractors, Inc.
S. T: Grand, Inc.
AMOUNT
$ 282.317.
>
$. ____ _
$
$ 2 23 9CJ()
J
$ "-"9 z /6.0
'
$ 2?? .:;(:J(J
$ ____ _
$ 2.J6, Sao
$ 222 0(}<2
>
$ ____ _
$ 2SI, 98Z
$ 2?3 'J,j .. ()
CONTRACTOR
Harris-Crocker Construction Co., Jnc.
George Hoffman & Sons, Inc.
James King & Sons, Jnc.
Kuhn, Smith & Harris, Inc.
Lendor Structures. Inc.
Mantione Contracting Corp.
Mardan Construction Corp.
The Metrig Corporation
T, Moriarty & Son, Inc.
Neckman Contracting Corp.
Norit Construction Corp.
Oldfield Construction Co., Jnc.
M. Parisi & Son, ,Inc.
Parks-Seidman, Inc.
Roberts Nash Construction Corp.
Peter Reiss Construction Co., Inc.
Rubin Construction Corp.
Ryan Contracting Corp.
DanielL. Rice Construction Co.
Sloan & Greenberg, Inc.
Sofarell Bros. Building Co., Inc.
J. R. Stevenson Corporation
- 2-
AMOUNT
$ 218 000
$ JtJ.j-: 6 t)(j
>
$ 7oo
I
$ 297. tJOO
;
$. ____ _
$ ____ _
$ Z 8 '} 2.tJO
'I
$ Z8.f.l,OO
'
$
l.2.'-
)
7£2
$ 222'_. 'l.IL.
$ 2'/7 IJOO
$.c..,
$ ____ _
$ V'
$ 24"1. 0()
;
$ 3tJ9, 1-'ff
$ £79 720
$ 29? ,31?
,
$
>
$ 39/. O<J()
$ 2?.f;?8tJ
$ 2/f-' (){)()
CONTRACTOR
T@.orm.ina Contracting Corp.
Thatcher Construction Co. • Inc.
L. A, Wenger Contracting Co. , Inc.
Ziplmerman Builders. Inc.
AMOUNT
$ d : . ~ 3 7 C'CJ
7
$. ____ _
$ ;.: 2 ,. &p(J
>
$ 2 71.992
>
.-· .... ANDitiW8 a CU.IIIIC
N ~ Y. WORLD'S FAIR 1964-1965 CORPORATION
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE MEETING
MARCH 16, 1962
Park Department Construction Contracts
AGENDA ITEM 12
1l Basic Roads & Utilities
Progress to date 58%
$3,098,295
2) Electrical & Communication Conduits
Proqress to date 46%
3) Tide Gate & Dam
Progress to date 10%
4) eens Botanical Gardens
Progress to date 1
5) Tree Planting - 1st Phase
Proqress to date 10%
6) Roosevelt Avenue Parking Field
Proqress to date 7%
7) mT - LIRR Overpass
Lawrence Street Overpass
a) Contract plans have been referred to Budget
Director at Board of Estimate meeting on
Nov. 21.
b) Approval expected at Board of Estimate
meeting on March 22
8) Tree Planting - 2nd Phase
Contractor to begin work on March 12
9) Park Pools - 1st Phase
Plans being prepared by Clarke & Rapuano
*Total estimated cost of IRT- LIRR Overpass and building
beneath structure amounts to $2,750,000.
736,090
144,940
296,889
111,635
396,440
2, 000, 000*
250,000
138,039
240,000
ANDRIIW8. CLARK
SCHEDULE OF
PARK DEPARTMENT CONSTRUCTION AT THE WORLD'S FAIR
• OF PERMANENT VALUE TO FLUSHING MEADOW PARK
1961 PRQGRAM
Contract
Basic Roads & Utilities (Q-99-161)
Electric & Communication Conduits (Q-99-361)
Rehabilitation of Tide Gate (Q-99-261)
Moving Botanical Gardens (Q-300-161)
Roosevelt Avenue Parking Field (Q-99-561)
Tree Plantinq, 1st Phase (Q-99-461)
Tree Plantinq, 2nd Phase (Q-99-761)
m.T - L. L R. R. Overpass and
Lawrence Street Overpass (Q-99-861)
2% Park Department Costs
TOTAL
City Funds
$ 3, 098, 296 * (B)
736, 090 * (B)
144,940 (B)
296,889 (B)
396,440 (B)
111,636 (B)
138,039 (B)
2,260,000
$ 7,172, 328
143.672
$ 7,316,000
* Contract includes additional work paid for by New York World's Fair
1964-1965 Corp.
(B) Bid Price
February 13, 1962
ANDII&We • CLAIIK
SCHEDULE OF
PARK DEPARTMENT CONSTRUCTION AT THE. WORLD'S FAIR
OF PERMANENT VALUE TO FLusHING MEADOW PARK
I
1962 PROGRAM
Contract
Roads & Utilities
Electric & Communication Conduits
Electrical Cables & Transformers
Lagoon Perimeter
Clearing Water in Lake
Theme.;, Foundations & Pool
Sculpture
Pools & Fountains
Bench Units
Dl'l'·LIRR Overpass Building
Bridge to Parld.nq Field
Park Lighting, lst Phase
Improvement of Stream & Lake Banks
Botanical Gardens Administration Building
2% Park Department Costs
Total
Citx Funds
$ 1, 966, 000 •
34,000.
918,000
170,000
116,000
600,000
90,000.
1, 642,000 *
360,000
650,000.
100,000
1, 025,.000
800,000
150,000
$ 8, 610,000
174,000
$ a, 684, ooo
* Contract includes additional work paid for by New York World's Fair
1964-1966 Corp.
February 13, 1962
ANDR&Wa • C:UitiC
SCHEDULE OF
PARK DEPARTMENT CONSTRUCTION AT THE WORLD'S FAIR
OF PERMANENT VALUE TO FLysmNG MEADOW PARK
1963 PROGRAM
Contract
Paving of Park Roads
Permanent Landscaping
Park Liqhtinq, 2nd Phase
Theme - Fountains
Bridqe to Parldnq Field
Flushinq Bay Improvement
Botanical Gardens - Arboretum
Entrances
Drinldnq Fountains
Laqoon Seats & Assembly Area
Fence Leased Area
General Grading of Site
2% Park Department Costs
Total
$
$
$
City Funds
703,000 *
696,273 *
2,200, 000 *
260,000
100,000
1,400,000
189, 727
100,000 *
76,000
260,000
206,000
1, 776,000 *
7,843, 000
167,000
8,000,000
* Contract includes additional work pa.id for by New York World's Fair
1964-1965 Corp.
February 13, 1962
... •, ..
w. CAPIL.& A"'D"&ws
t:"NII:eT .J. C:L.APIK
DONALD W. SMITH
ANDREWS S. CLARK
CONSUL.TINO E:NGINEERS
30!5 ltAST ll3•P STA!!T
N!W YORK II
TEo40'"1tTOH 8 • 1800
AfiU caa• a11
February 21, 1962
Miss Ernestine ~ i g
New York World's Fair 1964-1985 Corporation
Box 1964
Flushing 52, New York
Dear Miss Ha.ig:
'This should go on your next meeting of the Executive
Committee calendar as my part of the deal.
dially,