APPENDIX I

MEMPHIS CITY
SCHOOLS

SECTION 10

2007-08 Actual 2011-12 Actual
Goal
1
Status under new State of TN Accountability Model
(Note: Direct comparisons cannot be made due to ESEA State of
TN Flexibility Waiver Request)
Good Standing Needs Improvement - Subgroup
Cohort graduation rate 66.9%
72.6%
(Data Point from 1011)
Event (one-year) dropout rate 17.4%
1.9%
(Data Point from 1011)
Percentage of students scoring proficient in
Reading/Language Arts: Grade 3-8
24.3%
(Data Point from 0910 used in lieu of 0708 due to
rescaling of state assessments)
29.2%
Percentage of students scoring proficient on the
End of Course English I exam
36.3%
(Data Point from 0910 used in lieu of 0708 due to
rescaling of state assessments)
43.2%
Percentage of students scoring proficient on the
End of Course English II exam
35.5%
(Data Point from 0910 used in lieu of 0708 due to
rescaling of state assessments)
37.5%
Percentage of students scoring proficient in Math:
Grade 3-8
18.1%
(Data Point from 0910 used in lieu of 0708 due to
rescaling of state assessments)
27.6%
We believe in and commit to ALL children achieving at high global academic standards .
We believe that school culture and staff have a profound impact on student achievement and commit to hiring and supporting quality teachers, principals,
and staff .
Student Achievement:
Accelerate the academic performance of all students
Measure
Performance Measures
| Page 1 of 8 |
2007-08 Actual 2011-12 Actual Measure
Performance Measures
Goal
1
Percentage of students scoring proficient on the
End of Course Algebra I exam
20.7%
(Data Point from 0910 used in lieu of 0708 due to
rescaling of state assessments)
33.8%
Percentage of students scoring proficient on the
End of Course Algebra II exam
8.2%
(Data Point from 1011 because 1011 was the
initial year for this assessment)
10.2%
Percentage of students scoring proficient in
Science: Grade 3-8
22.9%
(Data Point from 0910 used in lieu of 0708 due to
rescaling of state assessments)
31.6%
Percentage of students scoring proficient on the
End of Course Biology I exam
28.9%
(Data Point from 0910 used in lieu of 0708 due to
rescaling of state assessments)
29.3%
Percentage of students scoring proficient in Social
Studies: Grade 3-8
58.9%
(Data Point from 0910 used in lieu of 0708 due to
rescaling of state assessments)
63.8%
Percentage of students scoring proficient on the
End of Course U.S. History exam
89.6% 87.3%
Percentage of students scoring proficient on the
Grade 5 TCAP Writing Assessment
79% 85%
Percentage of students scoring proficient on the
Grade 8 TCAP Writing Assessment
83% 90%
Percentage of students scoring proficient on the
Grade 11 TCAP Writing Assessment
80% 88%
We believe in and commit to ALL children achieving at high global academic standards .
We believe that school culture and staff have a profound impact on student achievement and commit to hiring and supporting quality teachers, principals,
and staff .
Student Achievement:
Accelerate the academic performance of all students [continued]
| Page 2 of 8 |
2007-08 Actual 2011-12 Actual Measure
Performance Measures
Goal
1
Scores of 8th grade students on the EXPLORE 12.9 13.4
Scores of 10th grade students on the PLAN 14.6 14.7
Number of MCS graduates with ACT scores (Note: in
0809 all grade 11 students began taking the ACT due to TN
regulations)
4,604 6,305
Scores of graduating seniors on the ACT (Note: in
0809 all grade 11 students began taking the ACT due to TN
regulations)
17.5 16.4
District’s ACT College Readiness percentage (Note: in
0809 all grade 11 students began taking the ACT due to TN
regulations)
6% 4%
Number of AP Exams Taken by Students 2,502 3,401
Percentage of students enrolled in AP courses 8.8% 15.1%
Percentage of grade 11 & 12 African-American
students enrolled in AP courses
6.2% 12.2%
Percentage of grade 11 & 12 African-American
students enrolled in dual-credit courses
NA 5.7%
Student Achievement:
Accelerate the academic performance of all students [continued]
We believe in and commit to ALL children achieving at high global academic standards .
We believe that school culture and staff have a profound impact on student achievement and commit to hiring and supporting quality teachers, principals,
and staff .
| Page 3 of 8 |
2007-08 Actual 2011-12 Actual Measure
Performance Measures
Goal
1
Percentage of grade 11 & 12 Hispanic students
enrolled in AP courses
11.4% 21.4%
Percentage of grade 11 & 12 Hispanic students
enrolled in dual-credit courses
NA 3.4%
Number of students graduating from our MCS Prep
Schools
11
(0809 was first year for Prep Academies)
582
(Data Point from 1011)
(Over 2,000 students have graduated from our Prep
Academies since their inception)
Number of students enrolled in Career and
Technology Courses
29,419 34,877
Number of Optional Schools 33 44
Number of High Priority Schools or Target Schools 63
63
(represents a different group of schools based on a
different state accountability model)
Number of Striving Schools Showing Significant
Gains
NA 20 of 25
Number of Schools in Good Standing 117
120
(20 MCS Schools Recognized as Reward Schools)
Number Pre K Classrooms 150 205
Number Pre K Students 2,600 4,120
We believe in and commit to ALL children achieving at high global academic standards .
We believe that school culture and staff have a profound impact on student achievement and commit to hiring and supporting quality teachers, principals,
and staff .
Student Achievement:
Accelerate the academic performance of all students [continued]
| Page 4 of 8 |
2007-08 Actual 2011-12 Actual Measure
Performance Measures
Goal
2
The Comprehensive Annual Financial Report (CAFR)
will be prepared and submitted to the Association
of School Business Officials International (ASBO)
Certificate of Excellence in Financial Reporting
Program
Goal Met Goal Met
District will receive an unqualified fiscal audit for FY
2011
Goal Met Goal Met
Design completion on new construction projects NA 100%
New construction projects completed on time and
under budget
NA 100%
National awards won by Administrative Divisions of
District Operations (Total Divisions = 11)
O 8
Reduction in employee medical costs for accidents
on the job
NA 57% decrease
Number of portable classrooms in use across the
district
296 218
Percentage of defective property titles corrected of
all eligible MCS school properties
NA
94%
(16 of 17 properties)
Total dollars in savings from strategic sourcing NA $13.2 M
We believe in and commit to being a high-performing organization that establishes a culture of continuous improvement, transparency and accountability
at all levels.
Accountability:
Establish a holistic accountability system that evaluates the academic, operational, and fiscal performance of the school district
| Page 5 of 8 |
2007-08 Actual 2011-12 Actual Measure
Performance Measures
Goal
2
District will receive an unqualified fiscal audit of all
Federal Programs for FY 2011
Goal Met Goal Met
On-time bus arrivals at schools
40%
(Data Point from 0910 was baseline year of data
collection)
93%
Goal
3
Engage the community in fall and spring district-
wide Exhibition of Student Work / ThinkShow!
NA 7,512 Jurors
Public presentations, speeches, meetings with
community leaders, and other community
engagements by the Superintendent
< 75 230
Superintendent regional and town hall meetings
with parents, staff, community stakeholders, etc.
NA 8
Percentage of parents reporting attendance at
school-based meetings (e.g., student enrichment
events, open houses, parent-teacher meetings, Title
I Parent Night, PTA meetings)
NA 57.5%
We believe that strong public support is essential for ALL students to excel and commit to developing productive and mutually beneficial family , district,
and community partnerships.
Parent and Community Involvement:
Build and strengthen family and community partnerships to support the academic and character development of all students
We believe in and commit to being a high-performing organization that establishes a culture of continuous improvement, transparency and accountability
at all levels.
Accountability:
Establish a holistic accountability system that evaluates the academic, operational, and fiscal performance of the school district
[continued]
| Page 6 of 8 |
2007-08 Actual 2011-12 Actual Measure
Performance Measures
Goal
4
Participation in the School Breakfast Program 32% 42%
Number of schools participating in the Breakfast in
the Classroom program
None 55
Students served in the School Supper Program None 13,000 +
Number of schools actively participating in the
Student Envoy Project
None 76
Number of Student Envoys, who acting as agents of
change, can help transform their schools
None 1,150
Students receiving Early Periodic Screening,
Diagnosis, and Treatment (EPSDT) via MCS Health
Clinics and school-based visits
22,112 42,297
Total dollars in college scholarships earned by MCS
graduating seniors
$106 M $196 M
Number of schools with Memphis Urban Debate
League teams
None 25
Goal
5
Number of students 17 and under referred to
Juvenile Court
7,727
(Data Point from 0809 was baseline year of data
collection)
4,725
Number of students transported to Juvenile Court
1,484
(Data Point from 0809 was baseline year of data
collection)
559
Incidents involving fights
8,906
(Data Point from 0809 was baseline year of data
collection)
6,306
Number of serious incidents in all schools (reported
by incidents per 1,000 students)
142.4 7.8
We believe that good health is critical to high performance and commit to improving the physical, mental, and emotional well-being of ALL students and
staff.
We believe that school safety is essential for a productive teaching and learning environment and commit to providing safe schools.
Healthy Youth Development:
Create a school community that listens to student input and promotes student leadership and healthy youth development
Safety:
Maintain a positive, safe and respectful environment for all students and staff
| Page 7 of 8 |
2007-08 Actual 2011-12 Actual Measure
Performance Measures
Goal
6
Number of teachers receiving dual certification in
ESL instruction
86 179
Number of National Board Certified Teachers 99 196
Percentage of teachers earning a TEM evaluation
score of 3 or higher
NA 85%
Percentage of teachers earning a TEM evaluation
score of 4 or higher
NA 59%
Percentage of teachers hired by mutual consent NA 97%
Number of applicants recruited and approved as
high quality candidates by the Office of Strategic
Teacher Recruitment and Staffing and the Dept of
Human Resources
1,407
(Data Point from 0910 because 0910 was initial
year of operation for the office)
2,025
Ratio of applicants to available positions in Hard to
Staff subjects
NA 7:1
Percentage of total base compensation paid for
teachers performing below expectations
NA 14%
Percentage of "irreplaceable" teachers retained NA 95%
Percentage of teachers evaluated annually < 25% 100%
Percentage of teachers in tested subjects delivering
at least one year of student growth for one year of
instruction
NA 77.4%
Staffing and Diversity:
Create a staff and school community that is sensitive and responsive to the needs of an increasingly diverse population
We believe in and commit to respecting and embracing cultural, social, intellectual, and economic diversity and empowering ALL students and staff to
reach their full potential.
| Page 8 of 8 |
TotaI Number of Respondents: 3,652
SchooI CIimate Parent Survey
Spring 2008 ResuIts
District OveraII
Questions and Percent SeIected
TotaI Number of Respondents: 3,652
SchooI CIimate Parent Survey
Spring 2008 ResuIts
District OveraII
Questions and Percent SeIected
Question AIways
Most
Times
Some-
times Never
1. Do teachers work hard to meet the needs of your child? 62.7 26.3 9.3 1.8
2. Do teachers keep you informed about your child? 61.0 23.0 12.3 3.8
3. Ìs your child safe at this school? 63.8 25.9 7.7 2.6
4. Ìs this school a good place for your child to learn? 70.7 19.2 7.5 2.5
5. Does the school provide a safe environment? 67.7 22.5 7.3 2.5
6. Ìs your child's teacher doing a good job? 66.8 23.2 8.6 1.3
7. Are the teachers fair to your child? 61.5 26.8 9.8 2.0
8. Ìs this school's principal concerned about improving the school? 72.2 16.6 7.5 3.6
9. Ìs this school doing a good job preparing your child for the next level of school or for college? 67.8 21.2 8.3 2.6
10. Ìs the principal doing a good job? 69.7 17.7 8.4 4.2
11. When you visit the school, do people at the school make you feel welcome? 68.2 18.3 10.1 3.4
12. Does the principal care about students? 75.9 13.4 7.2 3.5
13. Does this school's principal set a good example for students? 75.0 14.9 6.5 3.5
14. Do you feel safe when you go to the school? 74.0 17.4 5.9 2.7
15. Do you have concerns about your child's belongings? 27.8 13.9 21.2 37.2
16. Do parents have input in the decision-making process at school? 42.3 30.7 20.1 6.8
17. Ìf there is a problem at school, are you quickly notified? 58.1 25.1 11.6 5.2
18. Do the teachers contact you to say good things about your child? 39.7 22.6 20.7 17.0
19. Do the teachers tell you how you can help your child learn? 50.7 21.9 17.0 10.3
20. Do the teachers invite you to visit your child's classrooms during the school day? 49.8 15.9 17.4 16.8
21. Does the school return your phone calls or emails promptly? 51.5 26.4 15.1 7.0
22. Does the school give you information about what your child should be learning in school? 56.2 23.2 12.6 8.0
23. Does the school consider changes based on what parents say? 29.4 29.9 30.1 10.5
24. Does the school schedule activities at times that you can attend? 39.4 33.0 22.6 5.1
25. Does the school treat all parents fairly? 58.3 25.9 12.2 3.6
26. Ìs the principal at your child's school welcoming? 71.6 14.7 8.4 5.3
27. Does your child's school promote good relationships with parents? 62.5 21.9 11.7 4.0
TotaI Number of Respondents: 3,652
SchooI CIimate Parent Survey
Spring 2008 ResuIts (continued)
District OveraII
Questions and Percent SeIected
Question AIways
Most
Times
Some-
times Never
28. Do you attend open houses, parent-teacher conferences, Annual Title Ì Parent Meetings...? 39.5 33.2 22.8 4.6
29. Do you attend student programs or performances? 41.2 33.2 20.7 4.9
30. Do you volunteer for the school? 21.0 19.9 36.4 22.7
31. Do you go on trips with your child's school? 20.1 19.0 30.8 30.1
32. Do you participate in any school based parent organizations? 24.4 18.4 29.6 27.5
33. Are you given the opportunity to participate in school committees? 38.3 21.2 19.1 21.3
34. Do you attend parent workshops? 22.4 18.1 32.3 27.2
35. Do you visit your child's classroom during the school day? 22.9 16.5 44.3 16.3
36. Do you contact your child's teachers about his/her school work? 38.0 25.3 31.1 5.5
37. Do you limit the amount of time your child watches TV, plays video games, or surfs the Ìnternet? 47.5 30.0 19.6 2.9
38. Do you make sure your child does her/his homework? 78.2 16.3 4.6 0.9
39. Do you help your child with homework when she/he needs it? 75.3 14.1 6.6 3.9
40. Does lack of transportation reduce your involvement with the school? 8.2 6.5 15.2 70.1
41. Do family health problems reduce your involvement with the school? 8.0 6.7 19.6 65.8
42. Does taking care of your children or other family members keep you from being involved...? 9.8 9.5 22.9 57.8
43. Do you receive timely information about how to be involved with the school? 44.4 29.9 19.3 6.5
44. Do you feel like it is appreciated when you try to be involved? 56.4 23.2 15.0 5.4
45. Ìs the school interested in parents' ideas and opinions? 46.2 29.3 18.3 6.3
46. Does the school make an effort to get important information from parents? 54.2 25.2 14.7 6.0
47. Does the school make an effort to give important information to parents? 59.6 24.6 12.1 3.7
48. Does your family eat supper together? 43.2 36.3 18.6 1.9
Question
Percent
SeIected
49a. Buy and use educational materials and resources for helping your child achieve at higher levels. 21.2
49b. Help you understand what your child needs to learn and be able to do at his/her grade level. 12.4
49c. Help your child improve his/her achievement by providing assistance or tutoring with homework assignments. 16.9
49d. Provide parent training to make sense of test results such as the TCAP or Gateway to help your child learn. 9.5
49e. Pay for training the principals, teachers, and school staff in ways of communicating and working with parents and
students.
12.0
49f. Teach your child about drug awareness, school violence, safety issues, gang awareness, and conflict awareness. 14.8
49g. Provide training for teachers and staff on ways of working with special needs students. 8.7
49h. Provide training for teachers and staff on ways of working with non-English speaking students. 4.5
Responses for 3-19: 1=Always 2=Most Times 3=Sometimes 4=Never
Survey Questions
Average of
Responses
3. Was your child safe at this school? 1.6
4. Was your child’s teacher (or teachers) effective? 1.8
5. My child's teacher (or teachers) encouraged my child to do her/his best in school. 1.7
6. Did the school do a good job preparing your child for the next level of school or for college? 1.8
7. When you visited the school, did people at the school make you feel welcome? 1.8
8. Did the principal set a good example for students? 1.7
9. Did the school return your phone calls or emails promptly? 1.9
10. Did the school schedule activities at times when you could attend? 1.9
11. Did the school promote good relationships with parents? 1.8
12. Did you attend open houses, parent-teacher conferences, Annual Title I Parent Meetings, or any other
parent meetings? 1.7
13. Were you given the opportunity to participate in school committees (for example, textbook committee,
School Improvement Plan Committee)? 2.2
14. Did your family eat supper together most nights during the school year? 1.7
15. Did you receive notifications in a language you could understand? 1.2
16. Does the Standards-Based Report to Families (new report card) give you information that you can use to
help your child at home? 2.3
17. Is the Standards-Based Report to Families easy to understand? 2.4
18. Do you understand the ratings (e.g., Not Meeting Standards, Meeting Standards, Exceeding Standards)
for each of the items on the new Standards-Based Report to Families? 2.0
19. Please respond to the following statement: The Standards-Based Report to Families is more reflective of
my child's progress than a traditional letter-grade report card. 2.7
Note that Questions 16-19 are for parents of Pre-K, K, Gr1, Gr2, and Gr3 students only
Responses for 20-21: 1=Strongly Agree 2=Agree 3=Neither Agree nor Disagree 4=Disagree 5=Strongly Disagree
Survey Questions
Average of
Responses
20. My child’s teacher (or teachers) made me feel comfortable in contacting him or her. 1.9
21. My child’s teacher (or teachers) gives students too much homework. 3.5
Memphis City Schools
District 2011-2012
School Climate Survey for Parents
Responses for 22a-22h: Top four areas where the school and district should spend its money in the coming year:
Survey Questions Percentage
of Responses
22a. Buy and use educational materials and resources for helping your child achieve at higher levels. (School) 77.9
22a. Buy and use educational materials and resources for helping your child achieve at higher levels. (District) 73.7
22b. Help you understand what your child needs to learn and be able to do at his/her grade level. (School) 53.1
22b. Help you understand what your child needs to learn and be able to do at his/her grade level. (District) 47.6
22c. Help your child improve his/her achievement by providing assistance or tutoring with homework
assignments. (School) 60.3
22c. Help your child improve his/her achievement by providing assistance or tutoring with homework
assignments. (District) 51.0
22d. Provide parent training to make sense of test results such as the TCAP or Gateway to help your child
learn. (School) 31.8
22d. Provide parent training to make sense of test results such as the TCAP or Gateway to help your child
learn. (District) 33.5
22e. Pay for training the principals, teachers, and school staff in ways of communicating and working with
parents and students. (School) 42.1
22e. Pay for training the principals, teachers, and school staff in ways of communicating and working with
parents and students. (District) 44.9
22f. Teach your child about drug awareness, school violence, safety issues, gang awareness, and conflict
awareness. (School) 32.3
22f. Teach your child about drug awareness, school violence, safety issues, gang awareness, and conflict
awareness. (District) 30.9
22g. Provide training for teachers and staff on ways of working with special needs students. (School) 72.7
22g. Provide training for teachers and staff on ways of working with special needs students. (District) 31.4
22h. Provide training for teachers and staff on ways of working with non-English speaking students. (School) 17.2
22h. Provide training for teachers and staff on ways of working with non-English speaking students. (District) 21.7
Total Respondents = 780
Memphis City Schools
District 2011-2012
School Climate Survey for Parents
Reflections on the Eight Fault Lines: Challenges Met and Foundation Laid
When Dr. Kriner Cash was selected as the 12th superintendent of Memphis City Schools in
June 2008, he quickly went to work on analyzing data to gain an evidence-based perspective
on the 23rd largest district in the country. The data revealed eight "fault lines" in the
district's profile that, left unaddressed, could seriously limit the new administration's
effectiveness in providing a world-class education for all students.
The evidence showed that half of the district's 8,500 entering kindergarten students were
arriving on their first day without the benefit of a high-quality, structured Pre-K experience.
Data showed that these students were significantly behind their counterparts in literacy and
numeracy. With strategic investments and deliberate attention to the district's Pre-K
programming, more than 2/3 of all kindergarten students now have high quality Pre-K
education.
Health problems were all-too-common for the district's children. Of the 60,000 students
who received health screenings, more than one in five failed hearing tests, more than one in
five failed a vision screening, and nearly one third of the students were found to be obese.
Dr. Cash initiated the creation of four region-based health clinics to serve the needs of
students with chronic health issues and in the past year, the clinics expanded their care to
include the families of MCS students.
Finding that more than 30,000 students across the district were overage for grade, a fault
line complicating conditions associated with dropout rate, graduation rate, and student
behavior and classroom management, Dr. Cash led the creation of a multi-faceted
intervention including: 1) creation of a Pre-K to third grade continuum where standards-
based reporting -- rather than traditional report card grading -- which allows students and
parents to know more about student progress than ever before; 2) implementation of a no-
retention policy for students in the continuum to address the prior practice of retaining
students in the lower grades; 3) development of an EdPlan -- essentially an IEP for all
students — to keep students on track toward graduation; and 4) creation of four MCS Prep
Academies, one in each of the four regions of the city, to specifically address the academic
needs of overage students in high schools. More than 1,200 students have graduated from
the MCS Prep Academies in their three years of their existence. The MCS graduation rate
for 2011 was 72.6%, one of the highest among urban districts in the country.
Student safety was a problem in the year prior to Dr. Cash's arrival. Two weapons incidents
in the 2007-08 school year made national headlines and created a context that necessitated
intervention and action. Data showed that approximately 2,000 major offenders were
directly causing a substantial number of the behavior incidents observed in the district and
indirectly impacting others. Through programs like SHAPE and GRASSY, the district reduced
the number of serious targeted incidents from more than 140 per 1,000 students to fewer
than 15 in 1,000 in just four years. Region-based Truancy Assessment Centers have made
significant strides in driving down the district’s truancy rate.
With a mobility rate comparable to other urban districts, data showed that one in three
MCS students moved at least once during the school year. For many students, five and six
and more moves was not uncommon. Under Dr. Cash's guidance, the district adopted a
Theory of Action that aligned the teaching and learning centrally, establishing a common
curriculum and pacing framework for a district previously accustomed to a uniquely
implemented reform model for every school. That move set the stage for the coming
implementation of the Common Core State Standards, the national effort for alignment of
curricular relevance and rigor.
After additional analysis, teacher effectiveness was also identified as a fault line for the
district. Data showed that 1 in 5 teachers left MCS in their first year of teaching and 2 of 5
had left the district within their first three years. Meanwhile, the percentage of teachers
with TVAAS results at Level 1 or 2 was approximately 40%.

One of the main indicators of any district’s success is the college readiness rate of its
graduates. For MCS, the college readiness rate as determined by meeting or exceeding ACT
benchmarks on the four subtests (English=18, Math=22, Reading=21, and Science=24) was
revealed as an additional fault line. The college readiness rate for MCS has hovered near
5% for the past four years.

Finally, Dr. Cash's analysis found that the entry and exit of students from the district ---
called In/Out Migration as the fault line --- was destabilizing schools from year to year as the
number of students in the district fluctuated by as much as 5%. The district instituted and
enhanced the offering of Advanced Placement courses in all schools and doubled the
number of Optional Schools. Dr. Cash also oversaw the elimination of tuition charges for the
children of MCS staff who live out of district to encourage teachers and other staff members
to enroll their children in MCS. This practice infused many committed students and families
back into the Memphis City Schools.
Having found eight fault lines through the extensive review of data, Dr. Cash and his
leadership team went to work on solving the challenges identified. And although the work is
not complete, the systematic efforts to address the major challenges the district faced in
2008 laid the foundation for the nationally-recognized strategies and successes that have
followed.
In 2011-2012, the department of Strategic Planning and Volunteer Services:
Screened 4,458 Level II volunteers, who served our schools as classroom assistants,
room parents, field trip chaperones, hall monitors and in other volunteer roles.
Screened 842 Level III volunteers, who served our schools as mentors, tutors, coaches,
overnight field trip chaperones, and extracurricular assistants.
Served 174 students through CONNECT mentoring.
Matched 383 tutors to 720 students through Our Children—Our Future tutoring
program.
Supported approximately 600 businesses, faith-based groups and non-profit
organizations through the Adopt-a-School program.

© 2009 Memphis City Schools
HAS A PARENT/CAREGIVER WHO UNDERSTANDS
DEVELOPMENTAL MILESTONES
BEGINS TO DEVELOP LETTER KNOWLEDGE AND READING SENSITIVITY
PARTICIPATES IN FULL DAY (VS. HALF DAY)
KINDERGARTEN
USES EXPLORATION AND DISCOVERY TO UNDERSTAND SURROUNDINGS
GRADE 9 – ENGAGES IN COMMUNITY & SCHOOL ORGANIZATIONS
- KUDER CONCENTRATION
Cradle to Career:
MCS GAME CHANGERS
CONTENT MASTERY
GRADUATION RATE
COLLEGE & WORKFORCE
READINESS
CITY OF MEMPHIS
GAME CHANGERS
POVERTY
VIOLENCE
ECONOMIC SEGREGATION
MCS REFORM AGENDA
BIRTH TO FOUR YEAR OLD
Pre-K Express
Family Literacy
PRE-K – THIRD GRADE
New Pre-K Classrooms
Pre-K Continuum
Memphis Literacy Corps
K-3 In the Loop
Stanford Math
Destination Reading
Headsprout
FOURTH – FIFTH GRADE
Memphis Literacy Corps
Stanford LA&W and Math
SIXTH – EIGHTH GRADE
MS Social Network
M
2
Algebra Institute
Read 180
NINTH GRADE
Freshman Academies
Read 180
M
2
/Stanford Algebra
TENTH - TWELFTH GRADE
IB Programme
HS Redesign
AP Course Expansion
Dual Enrollment
MCS Prep Academies
Capstone Project
Career & College Expo
THIRTEEN - SIXTEEN
University Corridor
Early College Programs
PM Schools
SYSTEMIC
TEACHER EFFECTIVENESS INITIATIVE (TEI) EXTENDED LEARNING TIME (ELT) URBAN EDUCATION CENTER
RTTT DIGITAL SCIENCE LABS MCS HEALTH CLINICS
CORE CURRICULUM OVERHAUL OPTIONAL SCHOOL EXPANSION THINKSHOW!
MASTER SCHEDULING EXCEL & GRAD PLAN ARTS FEST
E-LEARNING PARENT PLAN PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT
THEORY OF ACTION: ALIGNED CURRICULUM & INSTRUCTION
PARTICIPATES IN HIGH-QUALITY
PRESCHOOL
BIRTH 1yo 2yo 4yo 5yo 3yo
RESPONDS TO PARENT'S/CAREGIVER’S HIGH-QUALITY TALKING,
READING, AND SINGING
GRADES 4 5 1 2 3 6 10 11 7 8 9 12 16 13 14 15 K Pre-K
TRANSITION TO DESIRED CAREER
GRADE 4 – HAS A STRONG ADULT FIGURE ATTACHMENT
OTHER THAN PARENT
HEALTHY
FAMILIES
GRADE 13 – ENGAGES IN COMMUNITY AND CAMPUS
ORGANIZATIONS & DEVELOPS TIME & STRESS
MANAGEMENT SKILLS
CORPORATE
AMERICA
GRADE 5 – DEVELOPS ALGEBRAIC
THINKING & REASONING
GRADE 4 – IS AT READING LEVEL
COLLEGE
= KEY TRANSITION YEARS
19yo
POST SECONDARY EDUCATION/WORLD OF WORK
KRI
PRE-K – 3 CONTINUUM
GRADE 8 – DEVELOPS 4-YEAR GRADUATION PLAN, ESTABLISHES
GOALS, & TAKES EXPLORE TEST
17yo
GRADE 12 – HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION-HAS
SUFFICIENT FINANCIAL AID FOR COLLEGE
GRADE 14 – DECIDE MAJOR AREA OF FOCUS
COLLEGE OR JOB INDUSTRY
GRADE 13 – PARTICIPATES IN FIRST YEAR
SEMINARS (ACADEMIC AND SOCIAL)
GRADE 12 – MASTERS ADVANCED MATH, LANGUAGE,
SCIENCE, & TECHNOLOGY SKILLS
GRADE 8 – MASTERS ALGEBRA I
GRADE 15 – ENROLLS IN JUNIOR YEAR OF
COLLEGE FOCUS ON MAJOR
ACT
COLLEGE
GRADUATION
GRADE 10 – CAREER CONCENTRATION
(PLAN TEST)
ROADMAP OF CRITICAL BENCHMARKS AND
TRANSITION YEARS FOR MCS STUDENTS
Academic
Parent, Family, & Community
Support
EXHIBITS LEARNING-RELATED SKILLS; SELF-REGULATION,
SOCIAL COMPETENCE, SELF-ESTEEM, & MOTIVATION
HAS A STABLE RELATIONSHIP WITH A STRONGLY
INVOLVED PARENT/CAREGIVER
STUDENT
MUST COMMIT TO
10,000 HOURS OF
STUDY FOR 10
YEARS
GRADE 10 – PASSES AT LEAST FIVE 9TH GRADE
COURSES WITH NO FAILING GRADES
GRADE 6 – HAS A CLEAR EXPECTATION OF GOING
TO COLLEGE AND A DESIRED CAREER
Union Summary
Union Name
Contract
Expires Employees Recognized
Approx. No. of
Employees
American Federation of State,
County and Municipal Employees,
AFL-CIO, Local 1733 (AFSCME)
10/31/2013 Custodial lead helper, custodial, custodial stadium workers, and Nutrition Services (cafeteria and Central Nutrition
Center) employees, truck drivers, fork lift operators, mail clerks, warehousemen and warehouse clerks.
1,633
American Federation of State,
County and Municipal Employees,
AFL-CIO, Local 1733
(AFSCME-Clerical)
6/30/2013 Clerical employees. Excluded are academic employees, executive secretaries, employees assigned to the
Superintendent’s office, employees assigned to the Division of Fiscal Operations, employees assigned to the Department
of Human Resources, employees assigned to the Department of Information Technology, employees assigned to the
Department of Labor Relations, and employees assigned to the Division of Internal Audits.
565
Craft Employees Association
(Craft)
6/30/2013 Board Maintenance Division performing maintenance and construction activities in the areas of brick laying, carpentry,
plastering, electricity, glazing, painting, plumbing, roofing, heating and air conditioning, and sheet metal.
150
Memphis Education Association
(MEA)
6/30/2013 Professional employees employed by the Board in positions which require a certificate or license issued by the State
Department of Education or Health Related Boards for services in public elementary and secondary schools of
Tennessee.
7,567
Memphis Education Association
(MEA-ESP)
6/30/2013 Behavior Assistants, Bilingual Cultural Mentors, Bilingual Cultural Mentors-ESL, Case Management Specialists,
Education Assistants (Regular, Early Childhood, Elementary, and Special Education), Family Specialists, In-School
Suspension Assistants, Instructional Assistants, Instructional Computer Technicians, Interpreters for the Deaf, Licensed
Practical Nurses, Matrons, and Special Needs Attendants.
1,545
Service Employees International
Union, Local 205,(SEIU)
6/30/2013 Assistant Nutrition Services Manager, Facilities Supervising Building Engineer, Relief Nutrition Services Managers,
Administrative Plant Engineers (North Area Office and Bond Building), Driver Education Operations Manager,
Elementary Assistant Supervising Building Engineer, Elementary Supervising Building Engineer, Junior High Assistant
Supervising Building Engineer, Junior High Supervising Building Engineer, Relief Supervising Building Engineer,
Nutrition Services Manager, Senior High Assistant Supervising Building Engineer, Senior High Supervising Building
Engineer, Stadium Keeper, Vo-Tech Supervising Building Engineer.
438
United Automobile, Aerospace and
Agricultural Implement Workers of
America and Local 3036,(UAW)
6/30/2013 Truck and tractor drivers, time collectors, maintenance helpers, fork lift operators, tire repair/lubrication person, sod
cutter, heavy equipment operator, semi-tractor and trailer drivers, small engine mechanic, mechanics (A, B, certified I
and II), auto mechanic helpers, and crewpersons.
56
Helpful On-line Resources
Memphis City Schools Web Site
http://www.mcsk12.net/
Curriculum and Instruction
http://www.mcsk12.net/aoti/ci/index.asp
Alternative Schools and Overage for Grade Population
http://www.mcsk12.net/prep/
http://www.mcsk12.net/alt/aboutmcs_alternative_schools.asp
Innovative Schools Zone
http://www.mcsk12.net/izone/
Early Learning and PreK
http://www.mcsk12.net/p3c/index.asp
Parent and Community
http://www.mcsk12.net/pace/index.asp
Professional Development
http://www.mcsk12.net/aoti/pd/index.asp
Optional Schools and Advanced Placement
http://www.mcsk12.net/optional_schools/index.asp
http://www.mcsk12.net/ap/index.asp
http://www.mcsk12.net/de/
State of Tennessee Education Web Site
http://www.tn.gov/education/
Memphis Education Association (Teachers’ Union)
http://www.gomea.com/showpage.asp?id=MEA&page=index
State of Tennessee Survey Results
http://telltennessee.org/index

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