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Update of Information Previously Provided to Assist in the Superintendent Search Process

In many instances, the three school districts provided additional information per our request. This additional information has been provided in its entirety as appendices. Cover pages have been provided for each section with instructions as to where the new information should be located in the notebook and all pertinent new information has been summarized and printed in bold italics within each section. The new matrix provided should replace the initial matrix you received on Tuesday.

SCHOOLS SECTION 1 REPLACEMENT

Schools
This section provides a statistical overview of the types of schools in Memphis City Schools, Gwinnett County Schools, the 26 schools under the auspices of the Education Transformation Office (ETO) in Miami-Dade County, and Duval County.

Category

Sub Category

Kriner Cash Memphis City Schools Baseline Year 07-08 Formula/ %/ Number Diff 10-11 Formula/ %/ Number Diff 207 5 95 64 36 22 185 31 164 11 89 16 84 +/17 6 -6 -48 48

Total Schools Charter Schools Schools Non-Charter # Making AYP # not making AYP

190 9 181 117 65

1. The Tennessee Department of Education reported that the number of schools in the Memphis City School District grew from 190 in the baseline year 2007-08 to 207 in 2010-11. The number of charter schools increased from 9 to 22, while the number of non-charter schools increased from 181 to 185. 2. The Tennessee Department of Education reported that the percentage of schools meeting AYP requirements in the Memphis City School District decreased from 64% (117) in the baseline year 2007-08 to 16% (31) in 2010-11. Tennessee received a waiver from AYP requirements in 2012.The Georgia Department of Education reports that the number of Gwinnett County Public Schools grew from 105 in the baseline year 2007-08 to 126 in 2010-11. There was one charter school reported in Gwinnett County Public Schools. 3. Magnet schools in MCS are referred to as optional schools. Only a small number are dedicated; most are schools within schools. The total number of optional schools increased under Dr. Cash’s tenure, from 33 in 2007-08 to 34 in 2011-12.

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Schools -1

Category

Sub Category

Dale Robbins Gwinnett County Public Schools Baseline Year 07-08 Formula/ %/ Number Diff 10-11 Formula/ %/ Number Diff 126 1 99 96 4 1 125 104 22 1 99 83 17 +/21 0 0 -13 13

Total Schools Charter Schools Schools Non-Charter # Making AYP # not making AYP

105 1 104 101 4

1. The Georgia Department of Education reported that the percentage of schools meeting AYP requirements in the Gwinnett County Public School District decreased from 96% (101) in the baseline year 2007-08 to 83% (104) in 2010-11. Georgia received a waiver from AYP requirements in 2012. 2. There was one charter school in 2007-08; they currently have three charter schools in 2012-13.
Nikolai Vitti Miami-Dade County Public Schools - 26 ETOs Baseline Year 09-10 Formula/ %/ Number Diff Total Schools Charter Schools Schools Non-Charter # Making AYP # not making AYP 26 0 26 0 26 0 100 0 100 10-11 Formula/ %/ Number Diff 26 0 26 2 24 0 100 8 92 11-12 Formula/ %/ Number Diff 26 0 26 0 100 +/0 0 0 8 -8

Category

Sub Category

1.

There are no charter schools in the 26 schools assigned to the Education Transformation Office.

2. The Florida Department of Education reports that the percentage of the ETO schools meeting AYP requirements increased from 0% (0) in the baseline year 2009-10 to 8% (2) in 2011-12. Florida received a waiver from AYP requirements in 2012. 3. Dade reports that none of the ETO schools were dedicated magnet or choice schools. Many of the ETO Schools do have magnet programs within their buildings which are open to students outside of their traditional attendance boundary. These magnet programs are heavily marketed to higher-performing students within the feeder pattern.

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Schools -2

Category

Sub Category

Duval County Public Schools 07-08 Formula/ %/ Number Diff 09-10 Formula/ %/ Number Diff 167 3 97 18 82 5 162 14 153 3 97 8 92 10-11 Formula/ %/ Number Diff 171 11 160 20 151 6 94 12 88 11-12 Formula/ %/ Number Diff 176 18 158 10 90

Total Schools Charter Schools Schools Non-Charter # Making AYP # not making AYP

163 4 159 29 134

1.

The number of Duval County Public Schools increased from 163 in 2007-08 to 176 in 2011-12. During this period the number of charter schools grew from 4 (3%) to 18 (10%).

2. The Florida Department of Education reports that the percentage of Duval County Public Schools meeting AYP requirements decreased from 18% (29) in 2007-08 to 12% (20) in 2011-12. Florida received a waiver from AYP requirements in 2012.

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Schools -3

SCHOOLS SECTION 1 REPLACEMENT PAGES

Demographics
The demographics section shows the statistical characteristics of the student population for Memphis City Schools, Gwinnett County Schools, the 26 schools under the auspices of the Education Transformation Office (ETO) in Miami-Dade County, and Duval County. The student population, displayed by number and percent for each district/school group, is disaggregated by ethnicity, limited English proficiency (LEP) status, students with disabilities (SWD) status, economically disadvantaged status, and gender. The total enrollment for the group is also included to lend perspective. These data elements are listed in the tables below for the base-line year (the year before the candidate was in place) and the last school year that data are available and reported by either the school district or the appropriate State Department of Education.
Kriner Cash Memphis City Schools Baseline Year 07-08 Formula/ %/ Number Diff Black Asian Ethnicity Hispanic American Indian White Demographics Multi-Racial LEP SWD Other Categories Econ. Disadv. Female Male Total Enrollment 5,836 16,117 78,036 55,081 56,523 111,604 5.2 15.0 79.6 49.4 50.6 7,082 16,073 89,982 55,811 57,760 113,571 6.2 15.6 84.6 49.1 50.9 1.0 0.6 5.0 -0.3 0.3 1,967 96,118 1,397 5,943 106 8,040 86.1 1.3 5.3 0.1 7.2 10-11 Formula/ %/ Number Diff 94,299 1,646 8,538 171 8,917 83.0 1.4 7.5 0.2 7.9 +/-3.1 0.1 2.2 0.1 0.7

Category

Sub Category

Grouping

1. Memphis City Schools is the largest school system in the state of Tennessee, and the 21st largest school system in the nation. Memphis City Schools report their demographic percentages based on average daily attendance (ADA). For that reason, the percentages that may be calculated from actual numbers will most likely be different from those reported by the school district. 2. While the student population in Memphis City Schools has grown from 2007-08 to 2010-11 by nearly 2,000, the percent of Asians, American Indians, and White students, as well as the gender ratio and students with disabilities have remained essentially unchanged. 3. The Hispanic student population had the most growth from 2007-08 to 2010-11, from 5.3% to 7.5%, and thereby the percent of LEP students increased from 5.2% in 2007-08 to 6.2% in 201011.

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Demographics -1

4. Even though their population decreased by about 3 percentage points from 2007-08 to 2010-11, Black students accounted for more than 86% of the population in Memphis City Schools in school year 2008-09 and 83% in 2010-11.

Category

Sub Category

Grouping

Dale Robbins Gwinnett County Public Schools Baseline Year 07-08 Formula/ %/ Number Diff 10-11 Formula/ %/ Number Diff 46,346 15,981 39,954 0 51,140 6392.56 25,570 17,580 83,103 29 10 25 0 32 4 16 11 52 +/2 0 3 0 -4 0 1 0 11

Black Asian Ethnicity Hispanic American Indian White Demographics Multi-Racial LEP SWD Other Categories Econ. Disadv. Female Male Total Enrollment

41,823 15,490 34,078 0 55,764 6,196 23,235 17,039 63,509

27 10 22 0 36 4 15 11 41

154,901

159,814

4,913

1. Gwinnett County Public Schools, located in the metro Atlanta area, is the largest school system in Georgia and continues to grow. From 2007-08 to 2010-11, the population of Gwinnett County Public Schools has increased by nearly 5,000 students. While still the largest ethic subgroup (32%), the population of White students dropped by 4 percentage points between 2007-08 and 2010-11. 2. Black and Hispanic students seem to have been responsible for the growth in population from 2007-08 to 2010-11. This may account for the slight increase in the LEP population, and the 11 percentage point increase in students who are economically disadvantaged. 3. Gwinnett County Public Schools did not disaggregate their student population by gender for the school years of inquiry, so a determination as to the male/female ratio could not be made.

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Demographics -2

Category

Sub Category

Grouping

Nikolai Vitti Miami-Dade County Public Schools - 26 ETOs Baseline Year 09-10 Formula/ %/ Number Diff 10-11 Formula/ %/ Number Diff 11-12 Formula/ %/ Number Diff 17,176 92 6,274 31 339 169 2,952 3,121 20,695 11,553 12,534 24,087 71 0.4 26 0.1 1 0.7 12 13 86 48 52 +/-1 -0.1 0 0 -1 0.3 0 -2 6 -1 1 -1,423

Black Asian Ethnicity Hispanic American Indian White Demographics Multi-Racial LEP SWD Other Categories Econ. Disadv. Female Male Total Enrollment

18,344 121 6,517 27 404 97 3,092 3,825 20,491 12,390 13,120 25,510

72 0.5 26 0.1 2 0.4 12 15 80 49 51

1. Miami-Dade County Public Schools is the nation’s 4th largest school district. The Education Transformation Office (ETO) oversees the performance of 26 Miami-Dade County Public Schools (sometimes referred to as Turnarounds or the Rising 26) that have been identified as persistently lowest-achieving by the Florida Department of Education. 2. From 2009-10 to 2011-12, the population in the ETO schools has decreased by 1,423 students. There were decreases in numbers for every ethnicity except American Indians. On the other hand, the percent of students who are indicated as economically disadvantaged rose from 80% in 2009-10 to 86% in 2011-12. 3. The ETO schools are predominantly populated by Black students (72% in 2009-10, 71% in 201112), with Hispanic students next in majority (26% in both years). White students accounted for only 2% of the ETO schools’ population in 2009-10 which decreased in 2011-12 to 1%. 4. Miami-Dade reported that 3,121 students with disabilities attended ETO schools which accounted for approximately 13% of all students in ETO. It is not known whether speech, gifted, or hospital/ homebound have been included in this number. It should also be noted that Miami-Dade’s reported number was taken from February FTE where others reported on the Matrix were pulled from October Membership (Survey 2).

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Demographics -3

Category

Sub Category

Grouping

Duval County Public Schools 07-08 Formula/ %/ Number Diff 09-10 Formula/ %/ Number Diff 54,712 5,299 9,512 259 49,448 3,363 3,629 16,642 59,017 60,277 62,316 122,593 45 4 8 0.2 40 3 3 14 48 49 51 4 7 0.2 41 4 2.9 14 39 50 50 10-11 Formula/ %/ Number Diff 55,271 5,277 10,026 243 49,200 3,806 3,748 16,528 65,930 60,758 63,237 123,995 45 4 8 12 40 3 3 13.7 53 49 51 11-12 Formula/ %/ Number Diff 55,564 5,422 10,563 243 49,164 4,311 3,839 16,198 65,882 61,463 64,001 125,464 44 4 8 0.2 39 3 3 13 53 49 51

Black Asian Ethnicity Hispanic American Indian White Demographics Multi-Racial LEP SWD Other Categories Econ. Disadv. Female Male Total Enrollment

55,151 4,866 8,360 250 51,033 5,241 3,641 17,843 48,662 61,764 63,011 124,775

44

1. Duval County Public Schools has experienced growth from 2007-08 to 2011-12, even though there were slight fluctuations in the intervening years. 2. Diversity within Duval County has remained relatively stable from 2007-08 to 2011-12. 3. Since 2007-08, the number of students that are indicated as economically disadvantaged has increased in Duval County from 39% in 2007-08 to 53% in 2011-12.

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Demographics -4

COLLEGE ENTRANCE EXAMS SECTION 5 REPLACEMENT PAGES

College Entrance Exams College entrance exams are standardized tests which are used to govern eligibility for admission to postsecondary institutions. The American College Test (ACT), which is administered by ACT, Inc., and the Scholastic Assessment Test (SAT), administered by the College Board, are the most widely used college entrance exams today. The average composite score nationally for ACT is 21.0. The average national SAT scores for reading and mathematics are 508 and 520, respectively. These are the assessments that are addressed in this section.
Kriner Cash Memphis City Schools Baseline Year 07-08 Formula/ %/ Number Diff Avg Reading College Entrance Exams SAT Avg Mathematics Participation ACT Avg Composite Participation 17.3 4604 16.2 -1.1 10-11 Formula/ %/ Number Diff +/-

Category

Sub Category

Grouping

1. The Tennessee Code, a body of policies adopted by the Tennessee State Board of Education has recently (this calendar year) amended the High School Policy to include the analysis and reporting of SAT scores as a part of their Master Plan to track the post-secondary readiness of high school students. SAT was previously considered as not meeting the requirements of the state statute, so those scores were not reported by the state. 2. According to ACT scores reported, students in Memphis City Schools earned an average composite score of 17.3 in 2007-08 which dropped slightly in 2010-11 to 16.2. These scores are lower than the national average in each case. 3. MCS reported that under Dr. Cash’s tenure, all 11th graders were required to take the ACT beginning in 2008-09. Consequently, the number participating increased from 4,604 in 200708 to 6,305 in 2011-12. The ACT average composite score was reported as 16.4 in 2011-12.

College Entrance Exams -1

Category

Sub Category

Grouping

Dale Robbins Gwinnett County Public Schools Baseline Year 07-08 Formula/ %/ Number Diff 10-11 Formula/ %/ Number Diff 501 521 7,490 22.0 3,864 +/-3 -1 1236 -0.2 972

Avg Reading College Entrance Exams SAT Avg Mathematics Participation ACT Avg Composite Participation

504 522 6,254 22.2 2,892

1. According to ‘The Choice Book’, a publication that is tantamount to a student guide, students in Gwinnett County are encouraged to take and retake the ACT and/or SAT beginning in their junior year of high school. The table shows that the number of students who took the SAT increased by 1,236 students from 2007-08 to 2010-11. While the average scores in both reading and mathematics showed very slight decreases from the baseline year to 2010-11, the Gwinnett County scores remained close to the national average in reading and one point higher than the national average in mathematics. 2. Although 972 additional students participated in the ACT administration in 2010-11 compared to the number that participated in 2007-08, the average composite score remained relatively unchanged for that period (22.2 to 22.0). In each case, the score was higher than the national average (21.0).
Nikolai Vitti Miami-Dade County Public Schools - 26 ETOs Baseline Year 09-10 Formula/ %/ Number Diff Avg Reading College Entrance Exams SAT Avg Mathematics Participation ACT Avg Composite Participation 1,189 15.3 2,896 66 1,270 15.9 2,503 72 81 0.6 6 10-11 Formula/ %/ Number Diff 11-12 Formula/ %/ Number Diff +/-

Category

Sub Category

Grouping

1. Even though no SAT scores were reported for the ETO schools between 2009-10 and 2010-11, we do know that the number of students that participated in an administration of the assessment increased by 81 students from 2009-10 to 2010-11. 2. Participation in the ACT among students in the ETO schools increased 6 percentage points from 2009-10 to 2011-12. The average composite score improved slightly from 15.3 in 2009-10 to 15.9 in 2011-12, however still below the national average (21.0). 3. Additional information broken down by the subtest of the ACT is provided in the appendix.

College Entrance Exams -2

Category

Sub Category

Grouping

Duval County Public Schools 07-08 Formula/ %/ Number Diff 09-10 Formula/ %/ Number Diff 471 472 55 49 3,969 18.7 3,713 57 61 10-11 Formula/ %/ Number Diff 476 475 4,000 18.7 4,233 60 56 18.7 4,631 67 11-12 Formula/ %/ Number Diff

Avg Reading College Entrance Exams SAT Avg Mathematics Participation ACT Avg Composite Participation

478 478 3,454 19.0 3,041

1. Duval County’s student participation in the SAT has increased over the time periods included in this table. Average reading and mathematics scores have remained slightly below the national averages for each subject area. 2. Participation in the ACT is on the rise among Duval County students, as seen in the table from 2007-08 to 2011-12. There have been steady increases in the numbers each year. Average composite scores have remained essentially constant over the time period, which places Duval County’s ACT scores slightly lower than the national average (21.0).

College Entrance Exams -3

ACCELERATED PROGRAMS SECTION 6 REPLACEMENT PAGES

Accelerated Programs Currently only Advanced Placement (AP) data are included. Additional information for accelerated programs other than AP is pending. Career and Technical Education (CTE), International Baccalaureate (IB) and Advanced International Certificate of Education (AICE) data have been added.
Kriner Cash Memphis City Schools Baseline Year 07-08 Formula/ %/ Number Diff # of Programs CTE Accelerated Programs AP 3+ AP Participation Tests Takers % Students Passed % Exams Passed Tests Taken Test Takers 2,502 8 10-11 Formula/ %/ Number Diff 9 +/-

Category

Sub Category

Grouping

1. AP data for Memphis City Schools have been requested, but not yet received. 2. The Tennessee DOE Report Card for Memphis City Schools lists 8 CTE programs in 2007-08 and 9 in 2010-11. Participation in CTE programs rose from 29,419 in 2007-08 to 34,877 in 2010-11. 3. MCS has reported that the number of AP tests taken for 2007-08 was 2,502 and in 2011-12 it was 3,401. The percent of students enrolled in AP courses in 2007-08 was 8.8 and 15.1 in 2011-12. 4. MCS reports that under Dr. Cash’s tenure, the first and only IB high school was established. The first graduating class is finishing in 2012-13 so no performance data are currently available. 5. MCS doesn’t have the AICE program.
Dale Robbins Gwinnett County Public Schools Baseline Year 07-08 Formula/ %/ Number Diff Accelerated Programs AP 3+ AP Participation % Exams Passed Tests Taken Test Takers 13,329 7,504 63.1 20,914 11,324 10-11 Formula/ %/ Number Diff 56.9 +/-6.2 7,585 3,820

Category

Sub Category

Grouping

1. The percent of exams passed by students in Gwinnett County decreased 6.2 percentage points from 2007-08 to 2010-11. 2. The number of tests taken increased by nearly 7,600. The number of students who took AP exams increased by more than 3,800. DRAFT Accelerated Programs -1

3. Gwinnett does not track IB data at present. 4. The AICE program is not applicable to Gwinnett County Public Schools. 5. Gwinnett reports that there were 28 Tech Ed Program Areas offered in 2008-09 which increased to 32 in 2012-13.
Nikolai Vitti Miami-Dade County Public Schools - 26 ETOs Baseline Year 09-10 Formula/ %/ Number Diff # of Programs CTE Accelerated Programs AP 3+ AP Participation Tests Takers % Students Passed % Exams Passed Tests Taken Test Takers 3,960 2,516 3,548 2,507 258 37 1,714 59 10.3 2,444 10-11 Formula/ %/ Number Diff 11-12 Formula/ %/ Number Diff 46 4,500 68 13.3 4,242 31 3 -1,516 -9 +/-

Category

Sub Category

Grouping

1. The number of AP tests taken in the 26 ETO schools decreased by 412 from 2009-10 to 2010-11. 2. The number of students taking AP exams decreased slightly in 2010-11. 3. Miami-Dade reported that the percent of students passing AP courses in ETO schools increased from 10.4% in 2010-11 to 13.3% in 2011-12. This represents a 2.9 percentage point increase. The percent of students participating in AP courses has decreased; this was done to strategically place students into Dual Enrollment courses. 4. As a result of the strategic placement of students, Miami-Dade goes on to report that 35% of current 11th and 12th graders in ETO Schools (a total of 2,445 students) are either currently enrolled in Dual Enrollment Courses or received credit for Dual Enrollment courses last year. 5. Miami-Dade reports that a total of 46 CTE programs are offered in the 10 ETO senior high schools. Over the past two years, Career Academies have been expanded and aligned to CTE Programs in addition to expanding internships from 150 to 500. 6. Miami-Dade ETO has one school that offers an IB Program. Miami-Dade reports that IB scores increased from 58% to 70% (12 percentage points) from the baseline year through 2011-12. 7. Miami-Dade ETO reports that there are no schools in ETO that offer AICE courses or exams.

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Accelerated Programs -2

Category

Sub Category

Grouping

Duval County Public Schools 07-08 Formula/ %/ Number Diff 09-10 Formula/ %/ Number Diff 26 10-11 Formula/ %/ Number Diff 33 11-12 Formula/ %/ Number Diff 36

# of Programs CTE Accelerated Programs AP 3+ AP Participation Tests Takers % Students Passed % Exams Passed Tests Taken Test Takers

13

20,716 12,220

21,042 12,623

21,579 12,305

1. The number of AP exams taken in DCPS grew by 863 tests from 2007-08 to 2010-11. 2. The number of students taking AP exams increased by 85 during the same timeframe. 3. The number of CTE programs in Duval County Public Schools increased from 13 in 2007-08 to 36 in 2011-12.

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Accelerated Programs -3

NON-ACADEMIC SECTION 7 REPLACEMENT PAGES

Non-Academic
Attendance rates are reported differently for each of the districts. Comparisons should only be made between the individual candidate’s baseline year and final year reported.
Kriner Cash Memphis City Schools Baseline Year 07-08 Formula/ %/ Number Diff Non-Academic Attendance Rate Discipline K-8 9-12 Suspensions Avg Daily Attendance 23,495 94.4 89.2 21.1 24,662 10-11 Formula/ %/ Number Diff 94.3 90.4 21.7 +/-0.1 1.2 0.6

Category

Sub Category

Grouping

1. The Tennessee Department of Education reports average daily attendance (ADA) for districts broken down for K-8th grades and 9-12th grades. Average daily attendance for Memphis City Schools K-8th grades remained fairly consistent with only a 0.1 percentage point decrease from 2007-08 to 2010-11. Average daily attendance for 9th-12th grades improved slightly (1.2 percentage points) during the same period. 2. The Tennessee Department of Education reports suspensions for districts. Memphis City Schools had a slight increase in the number of students suspended (0.6 percentage points) from 2007-08 to 2010-11. The numbers reported are a non-duplicated count of K-12 students suspended. 3. According to information received from MCS, they have established a combination alternative school/overage population center in each of the four geographical regions in the district. These students are scheduled on a 4 X 4 block schedule configuration, for the purposes of acceleration, as opposed to the standard 7-period day. The center students have the opportunity to earn 8 credits in a school year. While 2008-09 was the first year students graduated from the centers, in 2011-12, the number of graduates from the centers was 582. It is important to note that these graduates do not count as on-time graduates by the state, but the district reports that this is a worthwhile program for the students inasmuch as they are not dropping out.

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Non-Academic -1

Category

Sub Category

Grouping

Dale Robbins Gwinnett County Public Schools Baseline Year 07-08 Formula/ %/ Number Diff 10-11 Formula/ %/ Number Diff 7.1 +/-0.4 -3.0

Non-Academic

Attendance Rate Discipline

K-8 9-12 Suspensions

abs >15 days 54,049

7.5 abs >15 days 35.1

51,931 32.1

1. The Georgia Department of Education reports students absent greater than 15 days for each district. Attendance information is not broken down by grade. The attendance for Gwinnett County Public Schools improved slightly from 2007-08 to 2010-11. The percent of students absent more than 15 days decreased from 7.5 in 2007-08 to 7.1 in 2010-11. 2. Neither the Georgia Department of Education nor Gwinnett County Public Schools published information on their websites concerning discipline. 3. Gwinnett reported that the percentage of suspensions decreased 3 percentage points from 35.1% in 2007-08 to 32.1% in 2010-11. 4. Gwinnett County has one high school that offers an alternative pathway for graduation. In middle school, they have piloted a program that offers overage 8th graders focused opportunities to be successful and earn Carnegie credit toward high school.
Nikolai Vitti Miami-Dade County Public Schools - 26 ETOs Baseline Year 09-10 Formula/ %/ Number Diff Non-Academic Attendance Rate Discipline K-8 9-12 Suspensions abs > 20 Days 19,812 10-11 Formula/ %/ Number Diff 11-12 Formula/ %/ Number Diff +/1.0 -8,294

Category

Sub Category

Grouping

18.0 abs > 20 Days 14,873

19.0 abs > 20 Days 11,518

1.

The Florida Department of Education reports absences greater than 20 days for districts. Attendance information is not broken down by grade. The students in Miami-Dade’s 26 ETO schools who were absent more than 20 days increased slightly from 18% in 2009-10 to 19% in 2010-11.

2. The disciplinary data for Miami-Dade Public Schools could not be disaggregated to reflect the data for just the 26 ETO schools. The by school suspension data has been requested and will be included in Friday’s update. 3. Data provided by Miami-Dade on all ETO schools indicated the total number of suspensions for 2009-10, 2010-11 and 2011-12 have declined from 19,812 to 11,518.

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Non-Academic -2

4. Miami-Dade reports that specific data on programs for overage students are not maintained by the district. 5. Miami-Dade reports that specialized alternative pathway programs are not offered in ETO schools; however, all ETO high schools have resources in place to specifically target graduation. Some of the resources cited include: • Graduation Coaches at all schools (in addition to standard guidance counselors) • College Summit curriculum infused in Freshman Foundations Courses • College Summit/ACT Preparation Course required for all juniors • College Summit Course for all seniors • Year-Round Interventions and Saturday School for re-takers who have not yet passed the FCAT to prepare students for the FCAT as well as ACT • DATACOM process with ETO high school principals, superintendent, and cabinet to problem-solve around specific obstacles to raising graduation rates

Category

Sub Category

Grouping

Duval County Public Schools 07-08 Formula/ %/ Number Diff 09-10 Formula/ %/ Number Diff 10-11 Formula/ %/ Number Diff 6.0 24 11-12 Formula/ %/ Number Diff

Non-Academic

Attendance Rate Discipline

K-8 9-12 Suspensions

abs > 20 Days 41,258

10.0 abs > 20 Days 28 30,143

7.0 abs > 20 Days 25 29,251

1. Attendance in Duval County Public Schools is also reported according to the number and percent of students absent more than 20 days. The number of students absent more than 20 days decreased from 10% in 2007-08 to 6% in 2010-11. 2. The number of students suspended in Duval County Public Schools has decreased from 28% in 2007-08 to 24% in 2010-11.

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Non-Academic -3

ACADEMICS

SECTION 8

NEW INFORMATION

Academics

Early Learning

1. MCS reports that the number of pre-primary programs have expanded over the years as resources became available. The number of pre-primary classrooms has increased from 150 in 2007-08 to 205 in 2011-12. The number of pre-primary students has increased from 2,600 in 2007-08 to 4,120 in 2011-12. 2. Gwinnett offers Pre-K through private day care and learning centers funded through the Georgia Lottery. As a system, Gwinnett reports that they provide early intervention programs for special needs students only. 3. Miami-Dade provided only 2012-13 data on the early learning programs that were offered at the ETO elementary schools.

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Academics - 1

OTHER

SECTION 9

NEW INFORMATION

Other
School Climate Surveys
School Climate Survey Grouping School Safety District Future Preparation District Welcoming Environment District Kriner Cash Memphis City Schools 07-08 11-12 % % +/Parents 90 1.6 89 87 1.8 1.8

1. Memphis City Schools submitted data collected from the 2007-08 and 2011-12 Parent School Climate Surveys. MCS reports that they administered surveys to parents, students and staff members in 2007-08. A large number of grant surveys were required so the district scaled back on all non-required surveys in subsequent years. 2. The data shown for 2007-08 represent the percent of parents, district-wide, which chose “always” or “most times” for each question. In 2011-12 the data show the average score for each question. 3. The questions used are as follows: a. School Safety – “Is your child safe at this school?” b. Future Preparation – “Is this school doing a good job preparing your child for the next level of school or for college?” c. Welcoming Environment – “When you visit the school, do people at the school make you feel welcome?”

Gwinnett Climate Survey results are released to district leaders and principals, who are responsible for the distribution of the results. Gwinnett reports they survey all staff and students K-12, and all parents. It is a web-based survey however they do not report this information publicly.

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Other - 1

School Climate Survey Grouping School Safety Elementary Middle High Quality Education Elementary Middle High Overall School Grade Elementary Middle High

09-10 % 74 52 67 70 60 64 C+ C C-

Nikolai Vitti Miami-Dade County Public Schools - 26 ETOs 10-11 11-12 09-10 10-11 11-12 09-10 10-11 11-12 +/+/+/% % % % % % % % Parents Students Staff 81 84 10 80 84 89 9 68 73 74 6 64 75 23 69 72 75 6 45 50 52 7 73 82 15 61 73 73 12 45 53 53 8 75 63 69 C C C 81 68 75 BC C11 8 11 80 75 69 BBC+ 86 80 75 B B B90 83 80 B BB10 8 11 76 49 48 BC C81 52 53 BC C 86 59 58 B C C 10 10 10

1. Miami-Dade County Public Schools give the School Climate Survey to parents, staff, and students annually. The data presented in this table indicate the percent of “strongly agree” and “agree” responses for each item or the average overall school grade for the 26 ETO Schools. 2. All indicators shown in the table remained the same or saw an increase in positive responses from 2009-10 to 2011-12. 3. Middle school staff showed the largest increase of 23 percentage points on the item “the school is safe and secure.” 4. The overall school grade of elementary and high schools saw the largest leap as rated by elementary staff and high school parents. 5. The items used are as follows: a. School Safety – “The school is safe and secure.” b. Quality Education – “Students are getting a good education at this school.” c. Overall School Grade – “What overall grade would you give to your child’s school?”

DRAFT

Other - 2

School Climate Survey Grouping School Safety Elementary Middle High Quality Education Elementary Middle High Future Preparation Elementary Middle High Welcoming Environment Elementary Middle High Overall School Grade Elementary Middle High

Duval County Public Schools 07-08 09-10 10-11 11-12 07-08 09-10 10-11 11-12 07-08 09-10 10-11 11-12 % % % % % % % % % % % % Staff Parents Students 91 93 94 92 96 96 97 96 86 85 87 83 77 85 82 82 81 84 86 80 63 65 63 62 67 59 82 85 70 77 72 83 47 59 60 59 92 84 73 89 85 79 91 82 73 83 67 53 94 86 68 90 87 68 91 87 51 85 75 49 93 85 82 90 85 80 93 85 83 82 73 66 93 84 82 90 83 82 91 83 82 83 70 72 92 80 73 89 78 75 94 82 72 89 73 63 92 85 78 90 86 81 94 83 77 89 81 70 92 82 71 91 84 76 95 83 69 91 79 68 92 76 80 90 76 82 95 80 79 89 73 78 89 74 62 87 71 62 85 56 41 76 52 37 89 76 68 87 72 68 84 60 51 73 58 49 88 73 63 87 69 63 85 55 48 77 51 49 87 71 63 85 68 62 82 55 48 72 50 50

1. Duval County Public Schools administers the School Climate Survey annually to a random sample of the parents of K-12 students, a random sample of the students 5-12, and all school staff. 2. The data in this table summarize the number of “agree” and “strongly agree” responses for each item broken down by elementary, middle, and high schools. 3. The majority of the largest increases in percent of positive responses occurred at the high school level. An example of this is the 18 percentage point increase in positive responses from the high school staff on school safety from 2007-08 to 2011-12. 4. The items used are as follows: a. School Safety – “This school provides a safe environment for teaching and learning.” b. Quality Education – “The school is making steady progress toward higher standards for teaching and learning.” c. Future Preparation – “This school is preparing my child for success in the next grade, at college, or in a job.” d. Welcoming Environment – “This school provides a welcoming environment.” e. Overall School Grade – “What overall grade would you give this school?”

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Morale 1. No data are reported from MCS on staff morale. 2. Gwinnett reports that Perception Surveys are administered yearly, and comments and answers are provided anonymously to supervisors to improve district function. These data are not reported or released to the general public. 3. Miami-Dade reports that staff morale is measured at schools through the use of the School Climate Survey, though no data source was provided. They indicate that the following represents the percent of staff who responded that staff morale is high at their school: • Elementary: Staff morale has increased by approximately 7 percentage points from 2010 to 2012 • Middle: Staff morale has increased by approximately 6 percentage points from 2010 to 2012 • Senior: Staff morale has increased by approximately 8 percentage points from 2010 to 2012 Unions 1. MCS reports that unions have had collective bargaining rights in the past under Dr. Cash’s tenure but Tennessee is phasing this out. District administration tries to work cooperatively with all unions in place. The School Board inquires as to union involvement in the decisionmaking process. A listing of unions is provided: MCS Union Summary Union Name Contract Expires Employees Recognized Approx. No. of Employees 1,633

American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, AFL-CIO, Local 1733 (AFSCME) American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, AFL-CIO, Local 1733 (AFSCME-Clerical)

10/31/2013 Custodial lead helper, custodial, custodial stadium workers, and Nutrition Services (cafeteria and Central Nutrition Center) employees, truck drivers, fork lift operators, mail clerks, warehousemen and warehouse clerks. 6/30/2013 Clerical employees. Excluded are academic employees, executive secretaries, employees assigned to the Superintendent’s office, employees assigned to the Division of Fiscal Operations, employees assigned to the Department of Human Resources, employees assigned to the Department of Information Technology, employees assigned to the Department of Labor Relations, and employees DRAFT

565

Other - 4

assigned to the Division of Internal Audits. Craft Employees Association (Craft) 6/30/2013 Board Maintenance Division performing maintenance and construction activities in the areas of brick laying, carpentry, plastering, electricity, glazing, painting, plumbing, roofing, heating and air conditioning, and sheet metal. Professional employees employed by the Board in positions which require a certificate or license issued by the State Department of Education or Health Related Boards for services in public elementary and secondary schools of Tennessee. Behavior Assistants, Bilingual Cultural Mentors, Bilingual Cultural Mentors-ESL, Case Management Specialists, Education Assistants (Regular, Early Childhood, Elementary, and Special Education), Family Specialists, In-School Suspension Assistants, Instructional Assistants, Instructional Computer Technicians, Interpreters for the Deaf, Licensed Practical Nurses, Matrons, and Special Needs Attendants. Assistant Nutrition Services Manager, Facilities Supervising Building Engineer, Relief Nutrition Services Managers, Administrative Plant Engineers (North Area Office and Bond Building), Driver Education Operations Manager, Elementary Assistant Supervising Building Engineer, Elementary Supervising Building Engineer, Junior High Assistant Supervising Building Engineer, Junior High Supervising Building Engineer, Relief Supervising Building Engineer, Nutrition Services Manager, Senior High Assistant Supervising Building Engineer, Senior High Supervising Building Engineer, Stadium Keeper, Vo-Tech Supervising Building Engineer. Truck and tractor drivers, time collectors, maintenance helpers, fork lift operators, tire repair/lubrication person, sod cutter, heavy equipment operator, semi-tractor and trailer DRAFT 150

Memphis Education Association (MEA)

6/30/2013

7,567

Memphis Education Association (MEAESP)

6/30/2013

1,545

Service Employees International Union, Local 205,(SEIU)

6/30/2013

438

United Automobile, 6/30/2013 Aerospace and Agricultural Implement Workers of

56

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America and Local 3036,(UAW)

drivers, small engine mechanic, mechanics (A, B, certified I and II), auto mechanic helpers, and crewpersons.

2. Gwinnett County and the state of Georgia do not have any unions. 3. Miami-Dade County Public Schools reports that they have several unions/associations that represent their employees. Below is a list of the unions/associations and the employees they represent: Union/Association United Teachers of Dade (UTD) American Federation State County Municipal Employees (AFSCME) DCSAA – Dade County School Administrators Association DCSMEC – Dade County Schools Maintenance Employee Committee FOP- Fraternal Order of Police MEP – Managerial Exempt Personnel DASA- Dade Association of School Administrators Type Employees Represented Teachers, Associate Educators, Substitute Teachers, Clerical Personnel, Security Monitors, AV Personnel, Computer Technicians, Cafeteria Personnel, Facilities Personnel, Custodians, Maintenance Personnel, Bus Drivers Budget Directors, Budget Analysts, Network Analysts, Non-Certificated District Administrative Positions District Maintenance Workers School Resource Officers School and District Administrators

Union Union

Association Association Association Association

It is reported that the Education Transformation Office (ETO) is actively involved with all unions to ensure employee contracts are followed. Through collaborative efforts with UTD, there have been three Memorandums of Understanding (MOU’s) completed as an addendum to the contract. These memorandums consisted of language addressing: • • • • • • • • • Common Planning Incentive Pay Performance Pay Extended School Day Lesson Plan Templates Parent Conference Evenings Assessments Differentiated Instruction Active Coaching DRAFT Other - 6

• •

Data Driven Instruction Instructional Review Process

Additionally, they report that members of UTD (both district and school site union representatives) take part in the Instructional Review (IR) process including the opening presentations, classroom walk-throughs, and final debriefs. This is done as a partnership to ensure shared ownership of the school improvement process. Strategic Plans 1. MCS does maintain a district Strategic Plan and the link is available in the appendix. 2. The 2007-2008 Strategic Plan for Gwinnett is no longer available online. The link for the 2010-2020 Plan is provided in the appendix. 3. Miami-Dade reports that the Education Transformation Office uses a detailed Strategic Plan to drive and align the resources used at all schools. These resources are tied to School Improvement Grant (SIG) Goals and the overall goal of increasing student achievement. While they did provide a graphic representation of a plan for increasing student achievement, this flowchart indicated only how schools are serviced through the various stakeholders and district resources. They did not supply actual numerical targets or quantified results. Teacher Retention 1. MCS defines “irreplaceables” as those teachers who need to be retained. While some data tracking for teacher retention is available currently, the data from 2007-08 were not tracked as they are currently. MCS reports that the percentage of irreplaceable teachers retained was 95% in 2011-12. 2. Gwinnett reports that for 2007-08, certified retention was 90.5%, and for 2011-12 retention increased to 92.1%. 3. Miami-Dade County Public Schools do not keep data on teacher retention rates. There is no current district or regional data available in this area. Community Engagement 1. For 2011-12, MCS screened 4,458 Level II volunteers, 842 Level III volunteers, and matched 383 tutors to 720 students through the Our Children-Our Future program. This data point was not tracked in 2007-08. Memphis does not track volunteer hours. 2. No data were provided for Gwinnett County. 3. Miami-Dade reports that one of the highlights of the Education Transformation Office is Community Outreach. This outreach includes community members, businesses, universities, mentorship programs and other external resources and stakeholders that partner with schools. Included in this is a strong mentor program as well as a focus on the school volunteer program. DRAFT Other - 7

Mentor Programs 1. No data were provided for MCS. 2. Gwinnett did not track the number of mentors in 2007-08; in 2008-09 they reported 26. In 2011-12 the number of mentors increased to 186. Gwinnett reports that the number of volunteer hours (1,150) per year is only available for 2011-12. These are district program numbers only and do not include local school programs. 3. Each of the 26 Miami-Dade ETO schools has a variety of mentor programs including: • Positive Behavior Support (PBS) coaches at all secondary schools • Teach for America (TFA) • Communities in Schools (coordinates federal and local social service agencies with district resources for at-risk parents and students) • City Year (daily and on-site AmeriCorp volunteers who mentor and tutor students and reach out to parents) • Talent Development (provides data on Early Warning Indicators and problem-solves with administration and teachers to improve student achievement, attendance, and behavior) • Diplomas Now (partnership between City Year, Talent Development, and Communities in Schools) • Big Brothers/Big Sisters (providing mentorship opportunities to students aligned to career academies) • Women of Tomorrow (provides mentors for African-American girls in senior high schools) • Embrace Girls (provides mentors for African-American girls in elementary schools, including enrichment, cultural and etiquette experiences) • Non-Violence Project (provides students with strategies to avoid conflict and violence when solving problems) • Take Stock in Children (provides students with scholarships for maintaining higher performance throughout schooling) Dade goes on to report that while the exact number of mentors during each year is not monitored by the district, the above mentioned services are strong throughout ETO Schools and their presence has been integral in increasing student achievement. Non-Profits 1. No data were provided for MCS. 2. No data were provided for Gwinnett County. 3. The Education Transformation Office (ETO) in Miami-Dade reports that they work with a wide variety of partners and stakeholders. The main venue for this partnership is the ETO Task Force which is a group of community leaders who meet monthly to discuss educational issues and concerns or recommendations brought forth by the community. This Task Force is made up of a variety of community members who represent various stakeholder groups. ETO has also been strategic in working with the community to bring grants into the schools to supplement funds and offer additional programs. DRAFT Other - 8