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The End All Diets Nutrition Plan 1.

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Proven Principles for Shedding Excess Bodyfat and Building Lean Muscle
By: Vince Andrich Learn How To; Avoid Starvation Diets, Fads, and Gimmicks Provide Your Body With The Natural Metabolic Benefits of Food Eat More, While Looking and Feeling Your Best Achieve The Visible Benefits You Want
Copyrights 3 Acknowledgements 3 Warnings disclaimers: 3 Chapter 1) Make Yourself; Slow is Steady, Steady IS Fast 4 Chapter 2) Sports Performance & Endurance, Nutrition For The Masses 5 Chapter 3) Ultra Low-Carb/High Protein, The Quick Fix, Needs A Fix 7 Chapter 4) Physique Nutrition; Redirecting The Magical Chemistry Tour 10 Chapter 5) Nutrition and Training Matched; Metabolic Leverage In Your Control 12 Chapter 6) Physique Athlete Nutrition; The Breakdown, To Build Up 14 STEP ONE: Start by Eating 15 Calories per Pound of Body Weight 14 STEP TWO: Divide your Calories over 5-6 Smaller Meals 14 STEP THREE: Eat More Protein than You Need 40% of Your Calories 15 STEP FOUR: Eat 40% of your Calories as Intact, Slow-Digesting Carbohydrate 16 STEP FIVE: Eat 20% of your Calories as Fat ---Mostly Unsaturated Fat 17 Chapter 7) Eating Like A Physique Athlete, Recommended Food Lists 18 Chapter 8) End All Diets Sample Meal Plans 20 A 115-pound woman should begin consuming; 20 A 135-pound woman should begin consuming; 20 A 165-pound man should begin consuming; 21 A 200-pound man should begin consuming; 22

Copyrights Physique Athlete, Protein Leveraging and Protein Economy are registered trademarks of Vince Andrich. 2012 All rights reserved. Acknowledgements I want to thank the many great minds that as luck would have it played key roles in my never-ending search for knowledge in nutrition and exercise. In particular, Dr. Scott Connelly. Ive listened and learned. You have all inspired me more than you know. Warnings disclaimers: Information provided in this guide is solely for informational purposes only. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice. Do not use this information for diagnosing or treating a health problem or disease, or prescribing of any medications or supplements. Please consult your healthcare provider before starting any supplement, diet or exercise program, before taking any medications or receiving treatment, particularly if you are currently under medical care. Make sure you carefully read all product labeling and packaging prior to use. If you have or suspect you may have a health problem, do not embark on any new exercise program, nutrition plan or take any supplements without first consulting and obtaining the approval of your healthcare provider.

Chapter 1) Make Yourself; Slow is Steady, Steady IS Fast The majority of my professional career has been spent in the field of nutrition and performance supplements designed to help athletes gain muscle and lose fat. Ive focused my efforts on creating nutritional plans that not only get results, but more importantly bring forth concepts that can be applied throughout life. Thats because nutrition designed to get you leaner and more muscular must be able to stand up to the element of time, for lasting results. If not, youre only getting a diet, which by definition isnt a plan you can maintain. The slow and steady nutrition plan, IS the FASTEST way to your best body, because its the only one that lasts. Instead of offering short term fixes, Im going to give you principles that can be used year round and even modified slightly to accelerate fat loss or muscle gain. All this without resorting to drastic measures that bounce you into a yo-yo cycle of bulking and cutting that never ends. I believe that to understand what you should eat, you need to know the why behind it. In the next few chapters well do a quick review of the most popular sports nutrition diets. This will allow you to learn why these plans just arent right for the physique athlete, before we get into what you should eat and why. Lets go. Chapter 2) Sports Performance & Endurance, Nutrition For The Masses

For years registered dietitians and related nutritional experts with letters behind their names have lumped dietary guidelines for athletes together, sometimes under the name sports nutrition. The key terms here are; athletes and sports, used in a homogenized form. On its face, these descriptions alone should make any real expert nutritionist cringe. Yet, it seems that their belief is that anyone who does any athletic activity or sport is part of some generic mass of people. Of course they arent. No offense, to any dietitians or nutritional experts reading this. The plan Im referring to has a rightful place with athletes who are focused on, e. g., sports performance or endurance capacity. Not for those of us who just want to build muscle and improve body composition. If you want to debate, let this guide be my personal position. Optimize Energy Storage, And Bodyfat At The Same Time The standard diet for athletes involved in organized sports as well as most any activity with an endurance component, consists of; 60-70% of its calories from carbohydrate, 20-30% from protein and 10% from fat. This diet emphasizes carbohydrates because the endurance or sports athlete places high demands on energy resources. For the physique athlete this diet should be avoided because: Diets that contain significantly more carbohydrate than protein at each meal, shift energy storage into fat cells, not muscle cells (Devkota 2011). High carb diets cause larger and longer spikes in the hormone insulin, which significantly reduces or stops your body from burning fat. By design, your calorie intake on a high carb diet needs to be extremely high to deliver the protein you need. Lastly, this guide is intended for Physique Athletes that have; family, work, social and even school commitments that limit the amount of time they have to train beyond what is contained herein. Thats the point, you dont have to train more. Unless you have a very physical job, most of the time youre not exercising, and so a high carb athletic diet is impractical at best, and in my view counterproductive. Chapter 3) Ultra Low-Carb/High Protein, The Quick Fix, Needs A Fix Nearly all of the major diet breakthroughs for maximizing body-composition were born from trial and error done by the most hyperobsessed physique enthusiasts on the planet; competitive bodybuilders. The ultra low-carb/high protein diet is likely the most popular of them all, yet misses the mark for long term physique enhancement. There are various marketing faces for ultra low-carb diets, such as the Atkins Diet, South Beach Diet, Protein Power to name but a few. The concept is also the hidden magic inside many calorie reducing diets, as well as the popular Paleo Nutrition Plan. Marketed primarily to sedentary people, the most popular ultra low-carb diets simply emphasize severely restricting carb intake, while you can eat all the fat and protein you want. These are the worst variations for our needs. For purposes of this discussion well assume that a ultra low carbohydrate diet also means one that calls for higher protein intake, which is the form bodybuilders popularized. Lose Some Fat, Gain a Straightjacket The standard bodybuilding ultra low-carb/high protein diet calls for eating 50 to 100grams of carbohydrate per day, while keeping protein levels at about 1-gram or more per pound of bodyweight. Most users are told they can add liberal amounts of fats into the diet to meet energy needs. Some ultra low-carb diets do offer a buffer by telling users to eat carbs in a cyclical manner, e. g. every few days or after training only. The cyclical diets can work, but in my experience they force the user to become very rigid socially, and generally make nutrition more difficult to manage than is actually necessary. And the gains are short term at best. In principle, ultra low-carb/high protein diets have scientific merit. The basic idea is to; 1) limit the amount of glucose your body gets through your diet (all carbs eventually become glucose), which increases the use of bodyfat as fuel and 2) cause fewer spikes of the hormone insulin, which keeps your fat burning switch on. The combination arguably makes you leaner, but there are significant trade offs. For the physique athlete this diet should be avoided because: Physique Athletes do more work than sedentary folkseven typical weight lifters, though less than endurance athletes. Training for Physique Athletes involves a relatively high-intensity, high-volume of work, which requires stored carbohydrate energy (glycogen) in muscle. Training for Physique Athletes is designed to build contractile muscle fibers, and also increase your muscles capacity to store energy--which requires carbs to make your muscles look full and healthy, not flat. Ultra low carb diets are good for people who are insensitive to insulin in muscle, meaning they have severe difficulty (or rather no need) to shuttle glucose into muscle cells Physique training is a much better solution. Ultra low carb diets must be adhered to long term because your fat cells become more sensitive to insulin, which is the bodies way of saying; when you give me carbs, Im going to store every last molecule. My experience as a bodybuilding competitor decades ago created the foundation of the nutritional beliefs in the guide, and are now backed up by science. It has been through a lifetime of dieting that made me realize that the value of any nutrition plan is determined by the ratio of; how difficult it is to maintain, versus the long term cosmetic benefits. For the record, I have personally used ultra low carb/high protein diets, but always came back to a more moderate approach, which well cover next. Chapter 4) Physique Nutrition; Redirecting The Magical Chemistry Tour Food plays a crucial role in the composition of your body. And it isnt simply about energy in, energy out. Its about chemicals. The food you eat truly becomes active after it becomes chemical messengers inside your body. The human body orchestrates these chemicals with elaborate sensors that are nothing short of ingenious. Trouble is, your metabolic sensors are not designed to keep you lean and muscular, otherwise any diet or nutrition plan would work. Instead its programmed to insure that; 1) your brain has fuel, and 2) you stay alive.

The system is actually designed to compensate when nutrition is scarce, which is why you should avoid extreme diets. The goal of the physique athlete is to use training and nutrition to slowly and consistently redirect your bodys most important metabolic choice. That is, where to store the food you eat; muscle or fat. More Muscle, Less Fat; Dont Fight The System I emphasized that our system (biochemistry) is designed to compensate when nutrition is scarce, because by definition all diets try and fool the system with some form of scarcity. Most of the time the scarcity is energy or calories in general, but sometimes it could be any macronutrient, which are proteins, carbohydrates or fats. The system fights scarcity by storing fat, and with numerous ways to make glucose, the preferred energy source for the brain. While it should seem obvious that the brain is critical for survival, most people dont know that the body can make glucose from the fat and protein in our diet, and off our body. In my opinion, this brilliant biochemical trick is the linchpin to any nutrition plan designed to enhance body composition. The key is learning how to leverage our biochemistry and avoid fighting our built in survival mechanisms. Chapter 5) Nutrition and Training Matched; Metabolic Leverage In Your Control Besides training, the main players in your personal biochemistry set are; proteins, carbohydrates and fats (a. k. a. macronutrients). Without getting too technical or longwinded, here is a highlight reel outlining the metabolic implications and leverage that different macronutrients plus training offer the physique athlete. Protein stimulates muscle protein synthesis, which not only turns on your muscle building machinery, it also increases energy expenditure naturally. Reducing carbs in your diet ramps up gluconeogenesis, which is how your body makes new glucose from non-carbohydrate sources. Ramping up gluconeogenesis causes fat and protein to be broken down to make glucose. Added protein to your diet helps protect muscle when gluconeogenesis is ramped up (we want fat, not muscle to be burned here). Physique athlete training is designed to burn and store carbohydrates, which further stimulates gluconeogenesis. Proper physique training redirects the vast majority of the glucose provided by the food you eat to be transported into your skeletal muscle cells (Baron et al., 1988). Generally speaking, as you increase your training volume, the exercised muscles will incur a greater depletion of stored carbohydrate (glycogen), thereby prompting an elevation in overall fat-burning metabolism. If you consume too much carbohydrate, i. e., exceeding your storage capacity in tissues other than fat cells, you will eventually incur a net fat gain. Eating carbohydrate stimulates the oxidation of glucose and its storage as glycogen (Acheson et al., 1982). Eating carbohydrate will instruct your metabolism to burn less fat temporarily, since it has carbohydrates to burn, but it will also cause it to store and oxidize that carbohydrate. Concerning carbohydrate calories, arguably the most important factor determining your ability to lose body fat is the quantity of carbohydrate you eat. Dietary carbohydrate powerfully leverages, or stimulates, its own oxidation, fat does so to a much lesser degree. Contrary to popular belief, eating more fat does not substantially increase fat burning metabolism, causing more of it to be stored (Flatt et al., 1985; Forslund et al., 1999). The list above is not exhaustive, but rather intended to give you better insight into why the physique nutrition plan in the next section is the most sensible choice. Chapter 6) Physique Athlete Nutrition; The Breakdown, To Build Up The nutritional approach described below is specifically designed for physique athletes, so you can achieve 4 things: 1) lose body fat faster, 2) build muscle faster, 3) eat more food and 4) live your life. This is not intended to be a diet, but rather a nutrition plan that wont leave you feeling too restricted or deprived. Youll have the energy to train properly, maximize your body composition and best of all, live your life. Lets work through it step by step. STEP ONE: Start by Eating 15 Calories per Pound of Body Weight I firmly believe that the ratio of, proteins to carbs to fats, you consume each day is as important, if not more so than calories. But to get a grip on these ratios you need a starting point. This section is that starting point, or baseline, and nothing more. To get you started on the Physique Nutrition Plan, well begin by calculating our energy intake at, 15 Calories (or kcalories) per pound of body weight. Keep in mind, the per pound of body weight description would imply you are feeding metabolically inactive tissue such as your fat. Nevertheless, in my opinion calculating your lean, or non-fat body mass and a calorie level for it is much more work, and really not worth the hassle. In order to acclimated with the breakdown of the food you eat, I suggest going online or getting a calorie-counting guide (e. g., the Nutrition Almanac) that tells you how much energy (calories), protein, fat and carbohydrate are in a serving of as broad a variety of foods as possible. Dont make it rocket science, as it doesnt have to be. Simply watch your mirror closely for the next 2 weeks and adjust your 15 Calories/lb value up or down accordingly. If you are relatively inactive, this may be too much food; for the highly active, it may be too little. STEP TWO: Divide your Calories over 5-6 Smaller Meals Physique athletes are often advised to consume smaller meals (e. g., 5-6) spaced evenly over the course of day. My intention here is not to prevent a fall in your metabolic rate, which is often suggested, but simply to provide a stable supply of muscle-building materials and to keep blood sugar levels from going up or down wildly--which sends off false triggers to eat more than necessary. The small and more frequent approach to eating increases the chances that the calories you eat will be directed toward lean tissue (muscle, connective tissue, bone) and away from fat stores --which, of course, is exactly what you want.

Heres another meal scheduling trick. Physical activity, like training in the gym, turns your muscles into your very own personal energy (calories) sponges. They effectively suck up the food energy you consume, effectively robbing them from your fat cells. You can take advantage of this fact by having slightly larger meals after your weight-training sessions or other periods of physical activity. Eat smaller meals during your less active portions of the day. This may seem insignificant, but over time it can become a big deal when it comes to redirecting energy towards lean muscle rather than as extra body fat. STEP THREE: Eat More Protein than You Need 40% of Your Calories Physique athletes can benefit from.75 to 1 gram of protein per pound of bodyweight per day (Lemon et al., 1997). However, my protein recommendations are even higher, because eating a diet that contains up to 1.35 g per pound/bodyweight/day) yet lower in carbohydrate can allow you to burn more fat both during exercise and at rest (Forslund et al., 1999). This plan is vastly superior to one lower (though still adequate in) protein and higher in carbohydrate for establishing a positive protein balance (Forslund et al., 1999), which is an essential requirement for adding lean muscle to your physique. STEP FOUR: Eat 40% of your Calories as Intact, Slow-Digesting Carbohydrate Okay, so youve calculated your baseline calorie intake using the 15 Calories/lb of body weight rule. 40% of those calories will come from protein. Another 40% of your calories will come from carbohydrate. This will allow you to keep up with the energy demands of your training and keep your your muscles from looking flat. What type of carbs should I eat? It isnt just the amount, but also the type of carbs you eat that can affect the progress of your muscle gain and body composition. My recommendation is to get your carbs come from intact, slow-absorbing sources. The simplest way to do this is by consuming only natural, whole (unrefined, unprocessed) foods --the foods that are generally found in the perimeter of the grocery store. I call these foods inconvenient foods. Carbohydrates and the Glycemic Index (GI) A lot has been written about the Glycemic Index (GI) of carbohydrates, heres a quick review. We use the GI to rate the tendency of carbohydrate-containing foods to raise your blood glucose (and thereby, insulin) levels following their consumption. Our metabolic equipment likely has the capacity to use low-GI, biologically intact (unprocessed) carbohydrate-containing foods much better when it comes to achieving the physique benefits we want. In fact, studies performed in the 1930s (Cuthbertson and Munro, 1939), showed that sustained nutrient delivery, such as would be expected to occur by eating smaller, more frequent meals consisting of unprocessed nutrients is superior for enhancing lean tissue and minimizing body fat. Higher-GI Foods, and The Runaway Appetite When it comes to appetite regulation, sustained delivery of energy appears to be best. Higher-GI foods, because of their effects on blood sugar and the accompanying insulin secretion, can cause your blood glucose to fall to a lower level than that which occurred prior to their consumption. Your brain interprets this as a threat to your glucose supply and reacts by stimulating appetite. This can make you extremely hungry, even though you are actually well fed. This is sometimes called, reactive hypoglycemia, which results in rebound eating. This explains why a regular soda and a bagel kicks in a runaway appetite. This is the nasty side effect of what is commonly known as the sugar roller-coaster. In effect, your system is trying to match the high level of insulin in your bloodstream, which got spiked rapidly with the fast acting sugars, but are cleared out before the insulin levels come down. STEP FIVE: Eat 20% of your Calories as Fat ---Mostly Unsaturated Fat The physique nutrition plan allows you to eat 20% of your calories from fat. However, like carbs, I believe the type of fat you eat matters. While the debate over which fats are more or less healthy, seems to never end, the jury is out on trans fats. That is, they are not recommended. Note, I am not a nutritional biochemist, but my personal experience suggests that you certainly cannot eat all the fat you want, and expect to look your best. This is true even eating a zero carb diet. You may lose scale weight, but you will not maximize your body composition. Even the evolutionary/ancestral diet experts like those who prescribe the popular Paleo plans, dont actually agree on which fats are best. With respect to body composition, the consensus however does point to eating less saturated fat, and more unsaturated fats. Generally speaking, animal fats are richer in saturated fats. The harder a fat is at room temperature (e. g., cooled bacon drippings vs. vegetable oil), the more saturated it tends to be. Plant fats tend to be richer in unsaturated fats, though cold-water fish are also good sources. Processed fats (e. g., vegetable oils, lard) should be avoided as much as possible. Chapter 7) Eating Like A Physique Athlete, Recommended Food Lists Lean Protein Sources High-quality, lean protein sources include chicken or turkey breasts, broiled or steamed fish, lean cuts of beef, non-fat and 2% fat cottage cheese, hard-boiled eggs, and water-packed tuna. Carbohydrates To spread your meals out properly, most every meal should contain at least some carbohydrate. Focus on eating low- to moderate-glycemic index carbohydrate. You can find Glycemic Index tables all over the Internet. Physique nutrition means eating more foods that in their whole, unprocessed state. Your training will allow you to eat starchy carbs which include (though are not limited to); brown rice, yams, steel-cut rolled oats, and baked potatoes. Don't drive yourself crazy trying to make each meal perfect. Just think whole, unprocessed --as close to nature as you can get. Fibrous Carbs These are the low-GI, biologically very intact carbs. To ensure good health and to alleviate any wild blood sugar swings, ample amounts of

fibrous carbs should be eaten at each meal. The only exception is that if the starchy carb (like steel cut oats) contains ample fiber or if you are in a hurry use a fiber supplement such as Metamucil. My favorite approach to getting more fibrous, vegetable carbs in my diet has always been a bit of a cheat. Truth is, it works. I opt for blends of frozen vegetables from the local supermarket and microwave them. There are several good varieties that can found virtually in any good grocery store. Many of them have ethnic styles such as fiesta blend (Mexican) as well as Italian, Japanese and Oriental. It sure beats the heck out of shopping, dicing and slicing produce. Chapter 8) End All Diets Sample Meal Plans A 115-pound woman should begin consuming; 1,380 calories per day (40%-40%-20%) 552 calories of protein, 552 calories of carbs and 276 calories of fat 5- Meals That contain roughly; 28g Protein 28g Carbs 6g Fat Meal One 1x Serving of Physique 2.0 or 6 scrambled egg whites, 1 cup steel cut oats Meal Two 4 ounces chicken breast, 3/4 cup brown rice, 1/2 cup broccoli Meal Three 3/4 cup low fat cottage cheese (2%) w/1 medium apple Meal Four 4 ounces water packed tuna, 1-slice whole grain bread (w/low fat spread) Meal Five 1 x Serving of Physique 2.0 or 3/4 cup low fat cottage cheese (2%) w/1 medium apple A 135-pound woman should begin consuming; 1,620 calories per day (40%-40%-20%) 648 calories of protein, 648 calories of carbs and 324 calories of fat 5- Meals That contain roughly; 33g Protein 33g Carbs 7g Fat Meal One 1 x serving of Physique 2.0 or 3 scrambled egg whites, w/3 ounces chicken or turkey breast, 1.5-slices whole grain bread (w/low fat spread) Meal Two 5 ounces chicken breast, 1 cup brown rice, 2/3 cup broccoli, small salad w/low fat dressing Meal Three 1 cup low fat cottage cheese (2%) w/1 large peach Meal Four 5 ounces water packed tuna, 1.5-slices whole grain bread (w/low fat spread) Meal Five 1x-1.5x serving of Physique 2.0 or 1 cup low fat cottage cheese (2%) w/1 medium apple A 165-pound man should begin consuming; 2,475 calories per day (40%-40%-20%) 990 calories of protein, 990 calories of carbs and 495 calories of fat 6- Meals That contain roughly; 41g Protein 41g Carbs 9g Fat Meal One 1.5x serving of Physique 2.0 or 4 scrambled egg whites (one yolk), w/4 ounces chicken or turkey breast, 2-slices whole grain bread (w/low fat spread) Meal Two 7 ounces chicken breast, 1 & 1/3 cup brown rice, 1 cup broccoli Meal Three 1x serving of Physique 2.0 or 1 &1/3 cup low fat cottage cheese (2%) 1-slice whole grain bread (w/low fat spread), 1 large peach Meal Four 7 ounces water packed tuna, 2-slices whole grain bread (w/low fat spread)

Meal Five 6 ounces broiled flank steak, 1- medium yam, small salad w/low fat dressing Meal Six 1.5x serving of Physique 2.0 or 1 &1/3 cup low fat cottage cheese (2%) w/ 1 &1/3 cup diced fruit A 200-pound man should begin consuming; 3,000 calories per day (40%-40%-20%) 1200 calories of protein, 1200 calories of carbs and 600 calories of fat 6- Meals plus 1 snack that contain roughly; 43g Protein 43g Carbs 9.5g Fat Meal One 1.5x servings of Physique 2.0 or 5 scrambled egg whites (one yolk), w/4 ounces chicken or turkey breast, 2-slices whole grain bread (w/low fat spread), 1/3 cup berries Meal Two 7 ounces chicken breast, 1 & 1/3 cup brown rice, 1 cup broccoli Meal Three 1 &1/3 cup low fat cottage cheese (2%) 1-slice whole grain bread (w/low fat spread), 1 large peach Meal Four 1.5x servings of Physique 2.0 or 7 ounces water packed tuna, 2-slices whole grain bread (w/low fat spread) Meal Five 6 ounces broiled flank steak, 1- medium yam, small salad w/low fat dressing Meal Six 1 &1/3 cup low fat cottage cheese (2%) w/ 1 &1/3 cup diced fruit Snack (taken 2-hours before breakfast or before bed) 1.5x serving of Physique 2.0 and 1 tablespoon almond, cashew or peanut butter or Protein Shake, 1/2 medium cantaloupe and 1 tablespoon almond, cashew or peanut butter (unsweetened)